Starfinder Core Rulebook

****½ (based on 23 ratings)
Starfinder Core Rulebook

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Shoot for the Stars

Blast off into a galaxy of adventure with the Starfinder Roleplaying Game! Step into your powered armor and grab your magic-infused laser rifle as you investigate the mysteries of a weird universe with your bold starship crew. Will you delve for lost artifacts in the ruins of alien temples? Strap on rune-enhanced armor and a laser rifle to battle undead empires in fleets of bone ships, or defend colonists from a swarm of ravenous monsters? Maybe you'll hack into the mainframe of a god-run corporation, or search the stars for clues to the secret history of the universe or brand new planets to explore. Whether you're making first contact with new cultures on uncharted worlds or fighting to survive in the neon-lit back alleys of Absalom Station, you and your team will need all your wits, combat skill, and magic to make it through. But most of all, you'll need each other.

This massive 528-page hardcover rulebook is the essential centerpiece of the Starfinder Roleplaying Game, with rules for character creation, magic, gear, and more—everything you need to play Starfinder as either a player or Game Master! The next great adventure in science-fantasy roleplaying takes off here, and the Starfinder Core Rulebook is your ticket to a lifetime of adventure amid the stars!

Inside this book, you'll find:

  • All of the rules you need to play or run a game of Starfinder.
  • Seven character classes, from the elite soldier and stealthy operative to the physics-hacking technomancer and mind-bending mystic.
  • Character races both new and classic, from androids, insectile shirrens, ratlike ysoki, and reptilian vesk to the dwarves and elves of the distant future.
  • An in-depth exploration of the Starfinder setting, including its planets, gods, factions, and threats.
  • Hundreds of weapons, spells, technological gadgets, magic items, and other options to outfit any character.
  • Complete rules for starships, including customization and starship combat.
  • Rules and tips on using Pathfinder RPG content with Starfinder.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-956-1

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****½ (based on 23 ratings)

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I've been playing for half a year now; here are my thoughts.

*****

First off, a review of a core rulebook is pretty similar to a review of a game system, so this is basically that. The short version? I really, really enjoy Starfinder, and I think the Core Rulebook does an excellent job of explaining and showcasing the system.

Alright, the long version:

Character Creation: In comparison to Pathfinder, building characters is less fiddly while maintaining a large array of meaningful customization options. One new addition is Themes (analogous to Pathfinder's traits) which have a small amount of mechanical impact but do a very good job of hooking your character into the world around them.

Races: Starfinder ships with six new alien races as well as all the core Pathfinder races. Most of them largely fall into the category of Star Trek aliens (ya know, humans with masks on), but they have some fairly interesting racial abilities to differentiate them.

Classes: Starfinder has seven classes. Some are familiar (soldiers are basically space-fighters), some are deceptively different (technomancers look like wizards, but they're really not), and some are completely new (solarians are... solarians). Overall, the power curve is pretty tight and each class is interesting, highly customizable, and worth playing.

Feats, Skills, and Spells: Feats are, overall, less important than in Pathfinder (as a corollary, feat taxes have been eliminated; the feat trees are quite short). Skills are arguably more important (especially in starship combat), and the skill list has been condensed in a way that makes skills more accessible. The biggest change to the magic system is probably the addition of undercasting (i.e., some spells can be cast at multiple spell levels), which is absolutely essential, considering that both spellcasting classes in Starfinder are spontaneous.

Tactical Rules: It feels like Pathfinder. There are a host of small to medium changes (iterative attacks have been replaced with scaling weapon damage, for example), but if you like Pathfinder combat, you'll like Starfinder combat (unless, of course, you hate change - Starfinder is a new system, not a setting on top of an old system).

Other Things: Starship combat! I think it's pretty neat and makes a good addition to the game. There's also an expansive chapter on setting, which includes deities, planets, groups, etc. - it's usful to both players & GMs. There's a chapter on game mastering, which is nice. Finally, the art is fantastic through and through.


*****


Ehhh?


While I like some aspects of this game. The over all experience fell flat. The main problem is equipment. The leveled set was so lockstep that it made all of my players disappointed. You could not have a signature weapon or such. It was grind for the next level of gear and toss out the old. No one like it.

The classes were Okay and the concepts were pretty cool. But I can say if this is the basis for pathfinder 2nd ed were not likely going to put out any more money.

One big problem you have is this drive to constantly simplify and stream line. Thing get lost when you smooth out the details to much. Good things get lost. This is not a hobby that tend to attracted people who can handle a few rules, And the simplification feels like our intelligence is being questioned and only the lowest common denominator is being served. I don't know why I am writing this though. Publishers never listen.

Any way the critical flaw is still in the money and equipment.


Great system, great book!

*****

The book is beautiful, thick, filled with good mechanics and a lot of background.

The game is very nice, streamlined.

Go Starfinder!

I am very happy to have discovered the game, and this book is enough to run a lot of adventures.


An RPG Resource Review

*****

Chapter 1: Overview sets the scene of sweeping science fantasy before launching into the customary explanation of what role-playing is all about. It then lays out what is to be found in the rest of this vast rulebook, which contains everything both players and game masters need to play the game. There's an overview of the various forms play can take and an example of an actual game in progress. Fundamentally it's a bit of a space opera, in which the party explores and interacts with the wonders of the galaxy.

Now, down to business with Chapter 2: Character Creation. If you are used to Pathfinder or similar games this is familiar territory: come up with a concept, pick a race and class, then sort out abilities and skills and other miscellaneous numbers. Following chapters go through all the options in detail so that you can read up about your choices. There are actually two chapters on race, one presents the 'new' starfaring races - the aliens if you will - and the other the 'legacy' races from more traditional fantasy. It makes it all rather interesting to see how the fantasy races we're used to almost become 'normal' compared to alien races! Humans are there, of course, but you can also play an android or one of several new races of aliens - reptilian, insectiod, telepathic and more... one race even has four arms (as well as two legs)!

The classes also have a chapter to themselves. There are seven base ones: envoy, mechanic, mystic, operative, solarian, soldier, and technomancer. Most of those are pretty obvious, but a solarian is a very disciplined warrior granted special powers by the cosmos itself, while technomancers are spell-casters attuned to technology and able to use it to create remarkable effects. Interestingly, there doesn't seem to be any class that involves space travel itself - even the mechanic is more of a tinkerer and creator of artefacts rather than the classic 'starship engineer' - although there is a mechanic build suggested that does take that role. However, there's a new concept, that of 'Theme' and that does include an ace pilot as one option, with it including starship operation in generally, not just the piloting of them. Choosing a theme also brings mechanical advantages as well as helping you hone your overall character concept to what you want... and this is where, should you wish it, characters of a religious bent can express themselves by means of the priest theme. Characters who don't fit into any of the themes offered are deemed 'themeless' - and have their own mechanical advantages to go with it, so they don't lose out. Each class has several suggested builds, with combinations of class and theme working together to present a distinctive character (and can be used as a basis for a character if you are in a hurry). You can further tailor your character by the addition of feats, abilities that are not based on their race, class or skills - these too have a chapter to themselves and, as with skills, each is presented with clear examples of how to use them.

Once characters are sorted, they need to be equipped, and Chapter 7: Equipment sets out to provide all you could desire for your new character. It opens with a discussion about money and the form it takes, which is a little confusing with references to Pact Worlds and the Church of Abadar which haven't been introduced yet! Currency itself is reasonably straightforward, with a digital currency called the Credit being the standard although some worlds still use coins - and you can get physical Credits if you prefer. Most folk use the credstick, which can be loaded with money from a bank account or another credstick, and spent as you wish... the advantages including anonymity when you spend and that a thief only gets what was on the credstick stolen, not access to all your wealth (or your identity). It also discusses how much can be carried and plenty of technical details about weapons and armour before getting on to the actual lists of what is available. Technologically-advanced weapons include cryo, plasma and laser ones as well as more traditional projectile weapons (slug-throwers). An important distinction is between weapons that are technological in nature (and so can be targeted by attacks that affect technology) and those which are not, termed 'analogue' by most people. Being a fantasy game, you can also add magic via a 'weapon fusion' to create various additional effects. For those who prefer to improve themselves, a wide range of cybernetic enhancements are also available.

There's an extensive section on computers, which includes programs, anti-hacking measures and more. Next, technological items presents an array of other technological items, followed by a section full of magic items. The next lot are interesting: hybrid items which combine technology and magic. The Digital Harrow Deck sounds rather fun! Throughout, there's plenty of information (and necessary game mechanics) about how to use the items described, and the consequent effects.

Chapter 8: Tactical Rules looks at combat in great detail, exploring all the options available and explaining how to use them, including movement and the use of special abilities, as well as how and when to apply bonuses and penalties. As ever, it sounds more complicated than it really is once you get to grips with it. Familiarisation is the key, fight a few practice combats until you are comfortable with what a given character can do, then you will be able to play him confidently 'for real' without having to look everything up! There are extensive definitions of effects and conditions, then we move on to deal with vehicle tactical rules - referring here to planetside vehicles, space combat comes later - including chases.

Next, Chapter 9: Starships deals with every aspect of space travel. The way in which interstellar travel developed is described, again confusing because the basic concepts of the universe haven't been covered yet although there are a few references to pages further on in the book. There are notes on navigation, building starships (with everything you need to know to construct your own) and a gallery of starships to marvel at. Naturally starship weapons and combat are also covered, and there is plenty to get to grips with here. Here, individual crew members play their separate parts and it can all get pretty complicated. There's an example of starship combat which does help however.

Then Chapter 10: Magic and Spells explores this subject, mainly from the game mechanical aspect of how spells work in the game. The various parts of a spell's description are explained, and then there is a very extensive spell collection, with lists for mystics and technomancers. Many will be familiar to Pathfinder spellcasters, save for those that specifically affect technology or other things appropriate to the science-fantasy setting.

That concludes the player portion of the book, as we move on to Chapter 11: Game Mastering. This discusses the technical aspects of putting together adventures and campaigns for your players and comes over rather mechanical. It does, however, give you the tools to create balanced encounters. The discussion then moves on to other aspects of running a game from maintaining flow and pacing, to taking control, dealing with player-character death and difficult players and even bringing a campaign to a tidy end. It then looks at the environments to be found in the game and how they can be utilised to create interesting adventures, these ranging from astronomical objects to different atmospheres and terrain types planetside along with the effects of weather and varying gravities. Settlements, structures, traps, and various afflictions follow. Some of the traps are ingenious, melding magic and technology in ways that can be difficult to avoid without making use of both to neutralise them. How about a magical computer virus...?

Next is Chapter 11: Setting. Now we find out what all those references to Pact Worlds and the like are about! The core concept of the game is exploration, and it's assumed that the party starts in the Pact Worlds, a densely-populated system of planets, even if they don't stay there for long. This is when it gets weird: history is broken. Wherever you go, nobody has records or memories that are more than a few centuries old. There's a big gap, then stuff from ancient times. Even the deities have this gap in their knowledge. It is as if a wave of amnesia swept across the universe, indeed the first records post-Gap (as it's called) tell of people who lost a chunk of their own personal memory, never mind physical records. It is as if everyone clean forgot. Nobody knows what caused the Gap, the most that can be said is that it was several millennia long. Somewhere during this time the core world of the system, Golarion (familiar to all Pathfinder players as their homeworld) vanished. Where, or how, nobody knows. All that remains is a massive space station, Absalom Station, that sits where Golarion once orbited. It's said that it wasn't destroyed but is somewhere, complete with the descendants of those living on it at the time, but even the gods have no idea where. It was just after the Gap that the secret of Drift, which makes interstellar travel possible, was given to those who could understand the transmissions.

We are now in the year 317 AG (after the Gap)... but I am left wondering as to the need for this. Why the mystery? In particular, why a mystery without any solution? Players are curious creatures: present them with a mystery and they will want to solve it, a missing planet just begs to be found. Either there's some massive plot arc that will eventually be revealed, or we're left to our own devices and can, if we wish, come up with our own ideas about what's going on... but we need to know, 'cos if we create our own rationale it's unlikely to be the same as the creators of the game had in mind.

The chapter goes on to describe the various entities that make up the Pact Worlds, with a quite detailed gazetteer of the various worlds, most of which are both habitable (sometimes barely) and inhabited. OK, there's a couple of gas giants, but their moons are inhabited and at least one has blimp-like lifeforms drifting through the gas. Although there are sentient beings everywhere, there's still plenty for the curious to explore, exciting encounters for them to enjoy. Beyond, there are intersellar wonders to explore and several are detailed here to get you started. Rich and strange are the wonders of the great beyond. We also learn of different planes, and of the factions and organisations that are to be found. These include the Starfinder Society, the driving force behind the shared campaign ('organised play') set up for Starfinder. There is also information on faith and religion, which still pays a large part in many people's lives, and a listing of deities - the Pact Worlds alone revere some twenty of them as core deities and there are plenty more out there.

Finally, Chapter 13: Pathfinder Legacy which addresses the mechanics of converting Pathfinder characters, monsters and other material for use in Starfinder. This is also where you find the traditional fantasy races described in Starfinder terms, so if you want to be a science-fantasy dwarf or elf here is what you need to know. (Gnomes, half-elves, half-orcs and halflings are also included.)

So here it is, possibly the best science-fantasy game I've read. I've often wondered what lies in the future of my favourite fantasy worlds... here that question is (almost) answered, although to be honest I'd not have chosen to have Golarion vanish or there be a big Gap in history. There again, I like history... perhaps the authors just didn't want to write the necessary millennia of history to bridge the gap! That aside, it's a great game and I'm looking forwards to revelling in this universe for a good few years to come.


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KingOfAnything wrote:

Oh, it's popular for sure. But, it is a frustrating spell that (when it works) makes combat a slog. I'm very glad it's not included.

I'm not sure where you got the idea that Starfinder was marketed as Pathfinder 2.0. All the interviews I read made pains to point out that it was a brand new game system that shared a setting with Pathfinder.

If you've got links to some of those interviews, I'd like to see them. If it turns out my perception was wrong, I'd like to go back and edit my review to correct that mistake.

As for the slog, I can't say I ever experienced that. Maybe it's because most of my GMs enforced some variant of the 30-Second Turn.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Card Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber

Even with 30-Second Turns, if no one can reach the enemy, the combat drags on and on.

Liberty's Edge

I don't think you can cast a 6th level spell with a 1 level slot.


TriOmegaZero wrote:
Even with 30-Second Turns, if no one can reach the enemy, the combat drags on and on.

That sounds more like an appropriate use problem than a problem with the spell. A confined area is a poor area for a black tentacles placement.


Paladinosaur wrote:
I don't think you can cast a 6th level spell with a 1 level slot.

Some of the spells, like fly, have varying effects based on which spell slot you cast them with. In the original pathfinder, the effects of the fly spell are based on caster level.

Grand Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Card Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber

Nevertheless, it is a reason many groups do not love it. Kind of how I hate confusion effects.


TriOmegaZero wrote:
Nevertheless, it is a reason many groups do not love it. Kind of how I hate confusion effects.

Fair enough.


Pathfinder Companion, Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
GDNS24 wrote:
Paladinosaur wrote:
I don't think you can cast a 6th level spell with a 1 level slot.
Some of the spells, like fly, have varying effects based on which spell slot you cast them with. In the original pathfinder, the effects of the fly spell are based on caster level.

It's actually the undercasting mechanic from Occult Adventures, found here. They just made it a core premise instead of something they came up with later. I'm not sure why being able to use a fly spell to cast levitate or feather fall with a lower level spell slot is a downgrade, though...it seems like an upgrade to me.

Paizo Employee Customer Service Manager

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Removed posts. Refrain from back and forth bickering.


Luthorne wrote:
GDNS24 wrote:
Paladinosaur wrote:
I don't think you can cast a 6th level spell with a 1 level slot.
Some of the spells, like fly, have varying effects based on which spell slot you cast them with. In the original pathfinder, the effects of the fly spell are based on caster level.
It's actually the undercasting mechanic from Occult Adventures, found here. They just made it a core premise instead of something they came up with later. I'm not sure why being able to use a fly spell to cast levitate or feather fall with a lower level spell slot is a downgrade, though...it seems like an upgrade to me.

In Pathfinder, and many other systems, spellcasting follows a mixed power/skill mechanic. As you level up, you gain more power (more spell slots, power points, whatever) and the spells you can already cast are cast with greater skill (i.e., fireball does more damage as you level up, fly has a longer duration, etc).

An undercasting core mechanic, as implemented in Starfinder, completely strips out the skill half of the equation, and the only thing you are left with is power. You never actually gain any skill, per se; you just gain power (additional spell choices) and a different kind of power (more spell slots). It removes a lot of the growth, and the changing gameplay thereby, that made casters great.

I kind of like the option of using one spell selection to create a multitude of effects, but that doesn't make the core flaws more palatable to me.

The system would be more acceptable to me if it replaced spell slots with power points, ala Ultimate Psionics; it would have the same effect, but with a flexibility that at least partially compensates for the loss of skill. It would also be better in keeping with the fluff descriptions of magic use as less regimented, more encompassing.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Card Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber

Spell slots are power points, just fixed so that you can't spend all your points on your highest spell.

Silver Crusade

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Please don't use the word "fluff". Lore, background, setting is all fine, but "fluff" is borderline derogatory.


TriOmegaZero wrote:
Spell slots are power points, just fixed so that you can't spend all your points on your highest spell.

In a system where most of the spells increase in effectiveness without having to spend higher level spell slots to get it, that works out. In a system where most spells are either locked into one level of effectiveness (explosive blast) or have completely different effects based on which slot you use (fly), it's not so good.


Gorbacz wrote:

Please don't use the word "fluff". Lore, background, setting is all fine, but "fluff" is borderline derogatory.

Is that some unique community thing with Paizo?

I don't mean to be rude, but I've been using fluff and crunch for years; you're the first to ever express the viewpoint to me.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Dunno if it's unique, but the devs have stated on several occasions that the term "fluff" is perceived as belittling and disdainful.

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
GDNS24 wrote:
TriOmegaZero wrote:
Spell slots are power points, just fixed so that you can't spend all your points on your highest spell.
In a system where most of the spells increase in effectiveness without having to spend higher level spell slots to get it, that works out. In a system where most spells are either locked into one level of effectiveness (explosive blast) or have completely different effects based on which slot you use (fly), it's not so good.

Magic hacks are where some of that scaling by level can be realized. Debug Spell increases your average damage and improves at 11th and 17th.


KingOfAnything wrote:
Magic hacks are where some of that scaling by level can be realized. Debug Spell increases your average damage and improves at 11th and 17th.

Honestly, most of those seem kind of bad to me; not enough to compensate for what was dropped. A couple of them caught my interest, though (heal grenades, anyone?)

Gorbacz wrote:
Dunno if it's unique, but the devs have stated on several occasions that the term "fluff" is perceived as belittling and disdainful.

Must be a Paizo thing. Regardless, I'll use “Lore” later.

Grand Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Card Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber
GDNS24 wrote:
Must be a Paizo thing. Regardless, I'll use “Lore” later.

Much appreciated mate.


The book appears to be sold out pretty much everywhere. Any idea when it may be in stock?

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

The reprint should start to reach retail within the next three weeks or so.

Scarab Sages

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Can we please get a pocket edition soon? While I have the Hardcover and PDF, I would really like a pocket-sized one for my downtime at work.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Vic Wertz wrote:
The reprint should start to reach retail within the next three weeks or so.

The 2nd printing has arrived in german stores on friday 15th of december.

I bought one for a friend.

Upon having it in hand, i could see immedeately, that the binding was perfect.

In retrospect, i only bought the faulty 1st printing, because i wanted to play the game and all three copies i inspected were of the same bad quality.

I will be buying another copy when either the Pocket Edition or a 3rd printing (with the new starship combat skill DCs) comes out.

Do you expect that to happen in 2018?

Thank you for your great communications skills, "Envoy" Mr. Wertz. ;-)

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber
maldar wrote:
Can we please get a pocket edition soon? While I have the Hardcover and PDF, I would really like a pocket-sized one for my downtime at work.

Oh yes, pretty please!

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

2 people marked this as a favorite.

We don't generally provide advance notice before releasing a reprint that incorporates new errata, as doing so could cause prospective buyers to delay their purchase until we start selling the new version, which would then cause stores to take longer to sell through the previous printing, meaning it could actually delay the release of the reprint.

But since we've only just started shipping the second printing, that should be a pretty good clue that it'll be a while before we need to contemplate a third printing.

There are no current plans for a pocket edition. (Note that the shortest gap between a hardcover release and a pocket edition to date is about two and a half years.)


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Companion, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Roleplaying Guild, Tales Subscriber; Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber

I like the pocket editions, and will probably buy them all, in spite of the fact that I find them hard to read even with my reading glasses on. :-(


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

You can also put me down for two or three pocket editions if or when they become available.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Vic Wertz wrote:
There are no current plans for a pocket edition. (Note that the shortest gap between a hardcover release and a pocket edition to date is about two and a half years.)

I think that with how popular Starfinder appears to be, you could make that say... 6 months? Just from the few posts after mine, we can see people interested in them. I know I want one for myself and they would make great prizes when I hold drawings at my store.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Vic Wertz wrote:

We don't generally provide advance notice before releasing a reprint that incorporates new errata, as doing so could cause prospective buyers to delay their purchase until we start selling the new version, which would then cause stores to take longer to sell through the previous printing, meaning it could actually delay the release of the reprint.

But since we've only just started shipping the second printing, that should be a pretty good clue that it'll be a while before we need to contemplate a third printing.

There are no current plans for a pocket edition. (Note that the shortest gap between a hardcover release and a pocket edition to date is about two and a half years.)

Thank you for as always well thought out answer. :-)

As Starfinder seems to sell much quicker than Pathfinder, which is in part because the print run was lower than the demand, it will be interesting to see how fast the 2nd printing sells, even if it's too early to calculate that now.

That being said, the concept of a Pocket Edition is still relatively new and if i remember correctly the 1st print runs of both the Pathfinder CRB and Bestiary sold out very fast.
I think the PE has a higher utility appeal than the hardcover, not only because it is usually half the price, but also because it is handy for transport (and some people even find it cute).

I can easily see myself buying 4 Pocket Editions of the Starfinder Core Rulebook to distribute to the players, even with it being having the same content as the 1st printing, but i will not buy a 2nd printing hardcover for myself before my three 1st. printing ones fall apart and even then i'll probably wait for the 3rd. printing or PE.

In short, while a hardcover and PE certainly have some overlap appeal, it is not 100% the same.
I find the decision to first publish the HC financially logical, even though i could see a Pocket Edition following 6-12 months later.

I also know a lot of people who wouldn't spend the money for a hardcover ($40-$60), but would and have immedeately snagged up the PEs (for $20-$30), even multiple copies.
It seems like an apples & oranges thing.

Just some observations i made.

Have a great x-mas holiday, Vic & all others! :-)


Hey Paizo, why is it that when referring to PCs in this books every descriptor is she, her or hers except the "difficult players" section, where every descriptor is he, him or his? why didn't you just keep the same descriptor throughout the book?


4 people marked this as a favorite.
kirk riley wrote:
Hey Paizo, why is it that when referring to PCs in this books every descriptor is she, her or hers except the "difficult players" section, where every descriptor is he, him or his?

You may want to count more carefully. I'm finding male pronouns alternating with female all through the character creation chapter.


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Legends Subscriber; Pathfinder Tales Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Generally, when talking about class features, Paizo's style is to use the pronoun appropriate that class's iconic character.


Is there any chance we can get a corebook lite, or a player's guide? I have the core book, but it would be handy if I, or my players, could get their hands on some smaller, streamlined versions that are just a compilation of classes, races, themes, feats and augmentations all in one?

I'm looking for a cost effective and space saving way to help my players be able to build characters and do level ups.

President, SmiteWorks

The Fantasy Grounds version is available for $9.99 off if you already own the PDF here at Paizo.com and synced your account.

Starfinder Ruleset and Core Rules for Fantasy Grounds

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