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Pathfinder Society Scenario #2-22: Eyes of the Ten—Part IV: Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained (PFRPG) PDF

****( ) (based on 5 ratings)

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A Pathfinder Society Scenario designed for 12th level characters (Tier 12).

In the secret upper levels of the Pathfinder Society’s headquarters, you must survive the deadly defenses laid in place by the masked Decemvirate and save one of their number from an assassin’s blade.

Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained is the fourth and final scenario in the Tier 12 Eyes of the Ten campaign arc and is the sequel to Pathfinder Society Scenario #2-05: Eyes of the Ten—Part III: Red Revolution.

Written by Tim Hitchcock

This scenario is designed for play in Pathfinder Society Organized Play, but can easily be adapted for use with any world. This scenario is compliant with the Open Game License (OGL) and is suitable for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game.

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Product Reviews (5)

Average product rating:

****( ) (based on 5 ratings)

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Great Plot

****( )

I love the plot of this scenario and certain elements. One encounter in particular is challenging to run with any sense of realism, and the way we ran it was to have one PC with the GM at a time, recapping turns. Time consuming, but we got through it. Generally the encounters in this scenario fall flat compared to the earlier scenario, but as I posted in the reviews of previous ones, its hard to compete with the raw flow of gold into PCs.

I had a good time playing it, and the final encounter is memorable, even if it could use a little tuning in terms of difficulty.


The end of a fantastic voyage

*****

Eyes of the Ten is easily the best series that Paizo has put out for PFS. This is the conclusion of that adventure, and I love how it ties up everything. The combat is well-executed, the plot has a lot of fascinating twists and turns and, most importantly, a lot of the nonsensical elements of the PFS rules get explained.

Examples:
Ever wonder why evil PCs get removed from the campaign? How your faction leaders knew exactly where you were going to be sent and what is there? What exactly it is that Osprey does? All of these and more are answered.

All in all, don't miss it. It's the perfect capstone to a PFS adventuring career.


Decent, but disappointing...

**( )( )( )

Eyes of the Ten part 4 is a well written scenario with plenty of "think outside of the box" moments, but I just don't see it as nearly as exciting or grand as part 3.

Spoiler:
I mean, after you've been in an airship battle on Mars, where do you go from there?
The fights are memorable, but I feel that this would have been better served as Part 3 than the final point.

The chronicle sheet wasn't much better. It ultimately left me disappointed and upset.

Spoiler:
You recieve TONS of gold and PA...for a character that will no longer be being played. Unless you managed to compleate a large amount of compleately ambiguitous objectives, NOTHING on this sheet will come up again, as none of it other than the ultra-special boon carries over. While this boon IS pretty unique, I would have liked to see something, anything, carry over to a new sheet to mark that I have made it through retirement.

My suggestion? Keep the Ultra-special boon, but give the players something to remember their experiences by. A simple boon that carries over to a designated character, such as a single Wayfinder.

In the end, a good senerio worth playing, but a poor choice for the final one.


All Good Things Must Come To An End

****( )

This scenario was the perfect capstone to the retirement arc. The Decemvirate sure does hole themselves up in a well-guarded and creepy place. In fact, what the crap are they doing with that item with stored...you know what, nevermind. I'm not going to ask.

The first encounter of this scenario was probably my favorite and most memorable of the whole series, next to the first encounter of the first scenario. I can see how it would be an absolute nightmare for a GM, but ours had a very creative way of keeping the PCs from knowing to much information before they needed to.

I must agree that the end encounter could use more fleshing out in back story. In fact, looking at the actual character level, why the crap is the BBEG so concerned with his mission? Not only that, but the damsel in distress is pretty lame when considering her powers and abilities to do everything else she did (for a suggestion on how to shore this up, just hop on over to the discussion section).

The bad guys are pretty memorable, and the entire complex of Skyreach is just as ridiculous as you imagine it to be. Thank you Tim for putting a fitting end to the arc.

PS. I look forward to any special scenarios / modules to play after this, especially with what my PC has gained. He'll be happy to take a break after all that has happened in his experiences (especially the gauntlet that this arc was), but I think he has a few more good adventures in him. :)


Fitting end for a retirement arc in PFS

****( )

I just recently played through a marathon weekend of all four parts of the Eyes of the Ten series with our level 12 characters. This was a fitting end to the entire four part arc. There were plenty of scary traps, items, and flavor in Sky Reach that made me think as a player “Yep, this is where the Decemvirate must live.” The first encounter seemed like it was very very difficult for the DM to run and is something that he should prepare extensively for. In fact, I’m not positive if it’s even possible for the DM to fully prepare this first encounter properly without having played it or DMed it prior. However properly executed it will be a memorable encounter for the PCs.

The only other complaint I have is that the end encounter didn’t seem quite… epic enough. It wasn’t an extraordinarily easy encounter, but it didn’t seem nearly as difficult or as “deadly” as the first encounter of the entire arc. However the final encounter was a fitting end to the arc, and something that I didn’t see coming as a player. My only gripe would be that we as players don’t learn enough of the BBEGs motivations. I feel as though we stopped the BBEG, but we don’t really know how he got to the point where he is in the story (and this is after taking him alive and interrogating him).





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