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The Chronicles of Future Earth (BRP)

***** (based on 1 rating)

Our Price: $18.95

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It is the end of the Fifth Cycliad, the unimaginably far future of planet Earth. A world grown strange with time, where the stars are but a distant memory, and demons, sorcery and ancient technologies hold humankind in thrall.

The Venerable Autocracy of Sakara, oldest and greatest of the Springtide Civilizations, is decaying from within. In its vast and crumbling cities strange races eke out lives unchanged for millennia, while ancient enemies gnaw at the edges of the world, ready to wreak a terrible revenge.

In these dark days a cry goes out for heroes, to stand against the dying of the light and save the world from the sins of its past. Sorcerer, priest, warrior or prince, everyone knows the end of an age is at hand.

Will you answer the call?

Welcome to The Chronicles of Future Earth.

The Chronicles of Future Earth is volume one of the new techno-fantasy setting for Chaosium's Basic Roleplaying, and contains: an introduction to Urth, the world of the unimaginably far future, focussing on the vast and ancient city of Korudav; new races, cultures, and occupations; new magic, artifacts, and religions; rules for demons and divine powers; a bestiary of the Urth's more deadly denizens; and "The Worm Within", an introductory scenario showcasing this unique and adventure-filled world.

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Product Reviews (1)

Average product rating:

***** (based on 1 rating)

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Chronicles of Future Earth

*****

I wrote a longer review which should be appearing soon on rpg.net. Here's most of it without the chapter by chapter breakdown at end:

Buy it today, play it tonight. This wondrous world of lost tech and psionics paired with swords and sorcery is a campaign ready to start in one book.

In the far future, Earth in known as Urth. Ancient and little understood tech and mind-bending psionics are used alongside sorcery and divine magic. Chaos incursions threaten the land, banditry is on the rise, and the ugly specter of a possible second civil war looms large. The book zooms in on the city of Korudav, part of the Venerable Autocracy of Sakara, a great empire run by a divinely appointed Avatar.

I’m completely new to Basic Roleplaying (BRP). Even though I enjoy the stories of HP Lovecraft I’ve never played Call of Cthulthu (CoC). While I was searching for fantasy options to compare to Pathfinder, I found the Chronicles of Future Earth and I was immediately sold not only on the setting itself but also on the BRP rules it utilizes.

If you’re looking at this setting and ruleset from a D20 background read on. If you’re looking at it from a BRP, RuneQuest, or CoC background skip to The Book’s Layout to go right into details of the book.

If You Play Pathfinder or D&D
Basic Roleplaying is available as a free quick-start version in PDF form: <a href=" http://catalog.chaosium.com/product_info.php?products_id=3700">BRP Quick-Start Rules</a>.

This world has much in common with Eberron with a splash of Dark Sun and Gamma World. While BRP doesn’t have classes, the professions of psion, thief, war priest, and glorious paladin will be familiar to D20 players. BRP broadens the field of fantasy archetypes to over forty including assassins, beggars, nobles, and even lawyers.

There are two big differences between D20 and BRP. The first is that the majority of BRP characters will remain vulnerable to a really well placed sword strike or spell for their entire adventuring career. Combat is much less abstract than in D20 and players will see each slash, parry, dodge, and riposte and respond each moment to desperate moment.

The second is that the player of a BRP character has much more control over the abilities of his character. Whatever skills the character uses in the actual game are the skills that might improve. Whatever the player has the character focus on also becomes the focus of character improvement.

I ordered this book directly from Chaosium because no store in my area carries it. Chaosium shipped it the same day and included two nice bookmarks and two postcards relating to Cthulthu free with my order. It was sturdily wrapped in cardboard and sealed with tape and the book was shrink-wrapped. It arrived with no creases, bends, or other damage.

The Book’s Layout
The book is 112 pages in black and white with a two page double-sided black and white map folded in half. One side of the map is the city of Korudav and the other the Venerable Autocracy of Sakara and surrounding lands. My copy was shrink-wrapped and the map didn’t have to be removed from glue or from a perforation.

One of the pages is an ad. Three include a title page and dedications. Two are repeated tables of gear. Four are reprints of the included map. One page has a quarter page of text and the rest white space. And two are a well detailed combination of table of contents and index. The table of contents is found in the back with the index which makes it harder to find, but saves on space.

That still leaves 99.25 pages of actual world information. The book was originally scheduled to be 96 pages so the page count seems fair even with the repeated gear and maps.

The cover art completely captures the setting: a trader leads a “trunkless” elephant-like reptile (the beast of burden in the setting) into a large city that I assume is Korudav. Another well done piece similar to the cover is on page 4.

Chapter numbers run down the edge of the page. Whichever chapter you’re in has the number darkened. Background art is also behind the names of chapters.

The majority of the art is decent to great. I particularly like the picture of the Virikki (a humanoid race) looking out over a city on page 10. The maps for the adventure are well rendered, have a square overlay, are easy to read, and are nicely detailed. City streets as well as building interiors are depicted.

Chapter by Chapter
The Chronicles of Future Earth does not contain dozens of kingdoms described in one or two pages alongside centuries of world history. Instead, this first book in a proposed series focuses on one city and the closest surrounding areas of possible adventure.

I consider this a great strength of the book. If you bought this book in a game store on a Saturday afternoon you could read it over and play the adventure in the back that night. Everything (except the core BRP rules) needed to create characters, ground them in the setting, and kick off a brand new science-fantasy BRP campaign are there including excellent maps and an interesting adventure.



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