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cmastah's page

Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Cards, Companion, Maps, Modules, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 768 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


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To my knowledge, I heard he writes in a single year:

Two 1,000 page books
Three novels
Several novellas

This guy is the definition of prolific author.


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Admittedly while reading the first novel (takes place after the first short story), I can't help but notice that he's actually quite cunning. He may not be the bravest man (and by bravery I mean the guys who actually charge at W40K monstrosities), but he REALLY knows how to use his brain, he is one heck of a master manipulator AND he has almost an innate knowledge of human psychology. I haven't gotten too far but DAMN does this guy really know how to think himself outside a box, this novel could NOT have been done in any other way than 1st person either. Some of the editorial notes and notes by 'historians' also tell us that it's possible that he only ever PAINTED himself in such a negative light.

From some of the sections in the novel, I don't know if I'd say he's a master swordsman but he clearly knows how to handle himself.


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Lord Snow wrote:

Because if you are going to say that being motivated by men related objectives is means being defined by men, the following logical conclusions follow:

1) If men are motivated by men related objectives, they are defined by the men in their lives (so a son wanting to impress his father is not his own person, he is defined by men)

2) Any man motivated by women related objectives is defined by the women in his life (So a man trying to rescue his wife is defined by women)

You willing to accept those conclusions?

It may be shallow to say so, but yes, I actually do :P


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Lord Snow wrote:

cmastah, now I'm pretty sure you're kidding.

** spoiler omitted **...

In the case of Arya, I will grant that she is a plucky underdog, but she's not yet in a position where she can stop other people from deciding her fate.

Spoiler:

Sansa only RECENTLY, when she defended littlefinger took control of the situation rather than BE controlled (whereas prior, she was everyone's scratching post).

Brienne IS a strong character, but highly underused.

Daenerys...yeah, she is a strong character, I forgot about her because I just don't like her >.>' (I haven't read her mind in the books, but she's being awfully cruel right now (yes, slavers are bad, but she's acting as cruel as they were), so I don't understand how she FEELS about the matter).

Asha Greyjoy...admittedly I'm beginning to think I can't look past Catelyn, Sansa and Arya and that's probably because I just finished reading the first book whereas I finished watching the latest GoT ages ago.

Sand vipers....umm....who?

From the TV show, Shae feels more like she thinks she has strength, but she's really unhappily just following Tyrion's desires (not the sexual ones) until she gets upset with him and betrays him, and then she just lowers herself to become Tywin's...umm...not going to say it.

Ygritte...If she'd killed Jon, I'd be on board right now.

Melisandre...Ok, that one's tough AND scary and she's got someone as psychotically unstable as Stannis wrapped around her little finger.

Admittedly I'm probably judging my female characters by the first book.


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If I'm correct, legacy of fire is still 3.5e, which means that yes, you are most likely overpowered (not a solution, that's true, but just thought I'd give you a heads up).


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Been reading some ciaphas cain stories (did not get a hold of the first novel, but I did get two short stories), and DAMN is it amusing.

There's a hilarious scene where he 'charges' the enemy (he's actually running for cover and swinging his chainsword in a mad frenzy) and his howls of terror are being mistaken for battle cries by the rest of the infantry.

Heheh, there's a funny scene where someone tells him that he's the 'greatest man I've ever met' and Ciaphas thinks to himself 'and you're a terrible judge of character'.

Given the world of warhammer(craft :P), these novels are really funny because while everyone else takes themselves seriously, Ciaphas feels like he's ripped straight out of a reality check. The stuff he fights? Tyranids and other horrors? He's realistically frightened whereas the other marines are exactly as you'd expect from an action/serious novel.

It's been a while since I've read 1st person, but the writer is truly talented.


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ShadowcatX wrote:
If you want to see strong female characters who aren't defined by their relationships with men, check out A Game of Thrones if you haven't already.

You're kidding, right?

I've so far watched all GoT episodes BUT I did read the first book (and boy, does GRRM get anal when he describes Catelyn's journey to the Eyrie. If she was thrown through the moon door, I'd actually expect five pages of details of everything she sees on the way down).

Let's see:

Sansa: Joffrey, oh Joffrey, the wonderful (male) knights of legend, my prince Joffrey, the heroic Joffrey, some more awesome (male) knights of legend, oh Joffrey....and the male knights/not-knights who I really hate or fear.

Catelyn: *sobs* My husband! (cue traveling for miles for her husband) My sons! (cue traveling for miles for her sons) My husband again!

Cersei: My fat oaf husband hath made me miserable...however I still have the lights of my life...Joffrey and Jaimie (both male)

Arya? Sure, she's not defined by the men in her life, but sorry to say she is not a strong character. She spends the last half of the first novel running from danger and in the first half, she's clearly not a strong person who admittedly is trying to find strength.

Then again, if by females of GoT you meant Septa Mordane and Ol' Nan, then yes, these characters are not defined by the men in their lives.

@Scythia,

You want a strong female character not defined by the men in her life? How about one from anime? Look up 'Olivier Mira' from fullmetal alchemist, coolest female character EVER (in fact, the only negative thing about her character is that no other female characters will ever measure up)!

"What would you like to see in a fantasy novel?"

Humanity from the main character. I'd like a main character who doesn't just kill away his problems, perhaps even shows mercy to a 'lesser race' like goblins and such (there was a scene in a Drizzt novel where he saw a goblin being drowned by a drow and he wanted to help, but it would have blown his cover (which I felt was ironic, given that any other day of the week he would've gladly have been killing goblins left and right)).


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Blayde MacRonan wrote:
Winter Anime Guide 2014

*sigh*

It's about a school kid....

skip

A high school...

skip

This kid in this high school...

skip

This high school...

SKIP!


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My interpretation:

Spoiler:
The guy is torn between his anime idol world and his girlfriend but he ultimately chose the idol world. The girl is being hurt by trying to live up to this expectation and because she can't, he's pushing her away (and it's obviously harming her). His obsession with idols is dragging him deeper into his idol world and it's slowly eating him away. He tries to fight it for her sake and to save himself, but he'd have to sacrifice so much of what was once so important to him that it feels like it's tearing him apart. He tries to stay strong (when he grows his legs back and fights again) but the sexualization of these idols has become a weapon that is overwhelming.


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Well, how about an ARABIC anime? Something designed by a guy who apparently loves the stuff and wanted to make his own (there's also no fanservice):

http://www.barakabits.com/2014/11/meet-man-making-middle-easts-first-ever-a nime

But why robots? Oh dear God, why is it always robots?


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Oh, sorry :P

Just checked the link and saw that you're all swamped :P


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Hi, I ordered two of the Sihedron medallions but the order is still pending, is the item currently out of stock?


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Thanks :)


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Hi, I haven't gotten into any sessions in over a year and am finding myself overloaded with minis.

Could you guys please cancel my pathfinder miniatures subscription?


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Thymus Vulgaris wrote:


*Because how else is a cleric of Lamashtu going to get the help of a cleric of Iomedae or Sarenrae ;)

Tell them he/she needs their help to take down a rovagug-ian/daemon-worshipping cult, heck, that's a diplomacy check with a +5 bonus o.O (I would so jump on that bandwagon, those guys are the greater evil +5)


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@deadmanwalking, to add some possible numbers: Aid another, +2, vision of madness, +4, now we're down to +14 shy ;)


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DrDeth wrote:


And, THAT's the whole point of FANTASY Role-playing games.

Well now that's not entirely fair, what about athletes who want to roleplay athletic characters? Or actual geniuses wanting to do the same? Or real half-dragon kobold psions multi-classed into paladins who want to do so as well?

Then again, fantasy role-playing games have many points, there's the point on the end of a spear, the one on a rapier, the several points on a morningstar....


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Don't let the Int 9, sentience and ability to speak deter you from going 'bad dog, that is a bad dog!' or even in a cuddly voice going 'who's a good doggy? Who's a good doggy?' and even giving it doggy snacks.

I forgot, you're trying to make it more homicidal, right?


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Gilfalas wrote:


The entire point of the bluff skill is that it is there to bypass the NPC's common sense.

If all you have to do is tell someone 'don't believe X' to void the bluff skill then the entire skill would be irrelevant as any suspicion on the bluff targets part would be mistrust, which a successful use of the bluff skill BYPASSES. It is the entire point of the skill.

That said, a previous warning from a trusted source may be grounds for a circumstance bonus to the bluff targets sense motive value but automatic voiding of any use of the skill seems a bit over the top.

After all the target may know the person is a consummate liar but the successful skill use still would change their mind. That is the whole point of the skill.

Agreed, there's even a modifier for if the lie is impossible (-20). NPC B is being told the PC is a liar, which is at WORST (and even then, it's not necessarily to the point that NPC B thinks what the guy says is out of the realm of possibility) making it at the 'lie is impossible' stage. NPC A tells B, don't believe the PC when/if you meet him, PC shows up and says the captain sent him over to retrieve some documents. True, NPC A DID say that the PC would lie and while this sounds very fishy, it's not entirely crazy, heck, perhaps NPC A was vague about what NOT to believe and THIS isn't what NPC A was referring to. With a high enough bluff check, the PC can have NPC B doubting NPC A's reliability on the matter.


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Lord Snow wrote:


What can I say? some people are impossible. I know some very fast readers but nothing as extreme as this... still, I wonder if this lady would be able to answer easy trivia questions about books she read, say, a week before. Find it hard to believe she'd be able to give good answers.

There certainly are extreme cases, I doubt if you named the first hundred or even thousand books she'd read that she'd remember them.

@Geraint, I'll challenge that: I say it's not possible because the Chinese kept a detailed record of their history, their works alone would've most likely taken a lifespan to read :)

I've actually begun reading another book: wolf brother, though given that I started several days ago and am still on chapter 8, I'd say my reading is taking a massive backseat.


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kikidmonkey wrote:

The trick, in this case, is to start telling the truth, knowing that he'll automatically believe you are lying.

"Nah, that's cool, I'm just here to distract you from my friends breaking in from the back door."

"No you're not"

*loud hammering, drilling and a backing truck noises*


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There's a modifier to the bluff check for if the target wants to believe you (+5), just reverse it (-5) and there you go.


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Lord Snow wrote:
cmastah wrote:


Heheh, I'm actually reminded of a woman I read about who claims she read 25,000 books in her life, that's just amazing :P
And impossible. First and foremost because of the time it would have taken her (let's be very generous and assume she was, say, 107 when she said that? so she had about 100 years to read? that's 250 books per year). Secondly because I find it hard to believe she started counting right away.

Or she could be 91 and read lots per month ;)


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Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
Yeah, if y'all'd been reading Sutter Cane you wouldn't be lamenting you don't read as much as you used to...

I hear his writing really brings the stories to life.

I've actually found a small amount of time during work to do some reading....of manga >.>'

Heheh, I'm actually reminded of a woman I read about who claims she read 25,000 books in her life, that's just amazing :P


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Ravingdork wrote:
Anyone got any more ideas/reasons on why she would remain a paraplegic?

Insanity? :P

Here's a thought: The spirit of her sacrificed familiar is messing around with her body's ability to make use of regenerative spells? Perhaps that familiar can make a comeback as a villain later on.

How about every time a healer came to town (she appears to have tried the healers while she was still in town), they sent them away and brought someone in masquerading (via spells/disguise) as the healer? Perhaps they did this because they despised her or found her condition humorous.

Perhaps the imp familiar she got is making deals with the people who are trying to help her so that she'll just become a lich instead (of course he wouldn't tell the healers his plans)? He could easily trick them into thinking that she's evil and if fixed, will become a more murderous foe.


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Coriat wrote:

I uploaded a couple pictures.

One still in use (not very detailed)
Closeup of an abandoned one; due to dilapidation you can see some of the construction from the "inside"

Perhaps the second in particular may be of some use. I would also recommend looking into some of the American Southwest archaeology for this sort of thing, since it is an example of much more recent (and (sometimes) more well-preserved) Stone Age construction than most, and you already mentioned Native American construction as a topic of interest. Albeit much of that is in materials other than wood as well.

The Pacific Northwest offers recentish Stone Age timber construction examples it seems. Also a potential area to focus research. Less region-specific, with a lot of links to sub-pages.

Thanks, I wasn't precisely sure how some of these houses were and the stuff that was mentioned on the wiki is really amazing, thanks. The long house link was great but the plank house is exactly what I'm looking for. I didn't really want to end up making use of tribal huts because it didn't fit the culture I was aiming for, they have a hunter-gatherer society and primarily rely on stone tools because of their lack of access to metal.

Quote:
You might try reading 'Wolf Brother' and it's sequels by Michelle Paver, which are set 6000 years ago and look up her web site for her sources. Because it's very clear that she did extensive research for them.

Wow, I went to the lady's website and I have to say, she really deserves a prize for all that in-depth research. I managed to get my hands on the first three books, I certainly can't wait to read them. I don't intend on dwelling too long on the culture/life of the tribe because the character himself won't be staying there for too long but more than that, one of the tribesmen's children will go with him, this should certainly help out massively on the subject, thanks.

Quote:
Notice, however, that I said that consistency was required in RELEVANT issues. If you don't take up time explaining about the stone age tools, you can probably get by without the planks sticking out. Particularly for people the protagonist only meets briefly. But, make the tools important, and a waterfall of consequences follows from that. Find a way to make the hero connect with the nomads that doesn't involve focusing on the tools, and you're probably good to go. That said, I would say it's a disconnect in itself that nomads build houses of wood. It's odd to me, and would thus need a decent explanation.

Thanks, I'll try and keep the focus away from some of these details because honestly, the section is meant to reflect the care and love the traveller has for the tribe more than anything else. Admittedly the stone age tribe's life is of far less importance than the members and I don't want to get bogged down in details that won't be brought up again in the story.


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Coriat wrote:


For a long time now I've been of the opinion that suspense is often used to cover up bad writing in much the same way that spices in the Renaissance were used to cover up bad food.

I don't need any suspense about what note is coming next to enjoy this. For me, it's not now about being surprised, it's about hearing the notes done well. A good book is similar.

I've found myself to have no patience at all anymore for books where the only reason to keep reading is to find out how they end.

I personally have always been a believer in the 'it's the journey, not the destination' kind of thinking, it's why I enjoyed the hobbit so much (I really couldn't care less what the end goal was...heck, I think I either forgot the goal or didn't understand it by the time I got to the middle of the book).

One of the things that can carry a book far with me is well developed characters (the hobbit is one of the few exceptions, I just really liked the fairy tale aspect of it), if I can really like the characters and feel there's some depth and humanity to them, I can usually stomach a mediocre book (one example of excellent character design (though I only read the first book and the story itself is also entertaining) would be the codex alera book 1). I like 'human' characters (not necessarily as in racially speaking though), characters whose actions are sometimes not ideal but only because they're just so human, actions that are only flawed BECAUSE they're just so human, or they did the right thing because it's a justice that affects them personally. Books where they don't show us 'what's under the hood' make it hard for me to follow along, where I see characters sometimes react in extreme ways without telling us how the character feels towards what made him react in such a way.

Also? Less ideals and principles and more human-ness. I'm going to fail to connect with a character who starts spouting 'liberty, truth and justice' real quick. Reading about characters who act quickly because a family member is in danger or because they're trying to help suffering people whose pain hurts them emotionally (and that hurts them because they connect/are-connected with those people, not simply because -suffering people!-).


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He flies? Feint and then throw a net.


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Thanks guys, I tried to find some stuff to read/watch but I had some difficulty. Seems you can't google 'how did people first build their homes' and get a full answer. I found explanations of what those homes were, just not how they were built. I remember watching a documentary ages ago that featured a group of documentarians who wanted to build a rudimentary water mill from scratch (the whole deal, not a small replica). It's actually amazing how much fun some of these documentaries are or how interesting the info is. I DID find a documentary on how to build a wooden home from scratch but....as you can guess, they had proper tools for the job >.>'

Ultimately the purpose of the section was for the main character to work alongside the tribesfolk, to let the reader know that the character pulls his own weight (the tribesfolk are building him a home since he plans on staying with them for a while) in addition to contributing to the tribe. I mentioned use of steel tools because I really had no idea how people first cut trees down with stone implements (I'm actually surprised they work...then again I wasn't aware there were more types of stone than flint and 'stone' :P). The primary goal behind this section isn't to show the details and technicalities of how the tribe live but to instead build up the main character in addition to showing the tribe and him becoming close but the problem was I didn't want to end up bringing something up like one of the tribesfolk having a steel axe and the reader wondering where he got it from. They eat communally but my intention was off tables for example, whereas tribes back then most likely just ate sitting on the ground....and again, didn't want readers wondering how they made their tables :P


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I remember reading a novel about characters who got to the shadow plane, they found a place that had ancient ruins (which were no longer around in the PMP). WHO they found were the previous inhabitants who had died there as wraiths, although they ignored the group (who also wisely didn't do anything distracting to attract their attention) and just continued in some reverence of something there. The group then found some powerful beast they were unable to kill (a powerful shadow spider thing?) and had to flee instead (this was one of the Erevis Cale books). If you WANT to design something like shadowy creatures that mimic/reflect their counterparts on the PMP, the book I linked has a 'darkened' template for creatures that stay in the shadow plane and become warped by it (becoming something that better belongs there).


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You can use the pathfinder wiki I believe to find out about those guys and their domains.


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bob_the_monster wrote:
He was playing a disguised half-Fiend that just enjoyed battle more than anything else. I agree that a DM allowing a character like that to begin with is slightly suspect, but we also have a (non-evil) Drow Noble Samurai... so. A few other party members want me to use resurrection on him, but I am basically refusing to do so :P

IF you choose to do so, have your character go into another room temporarily and give the DM a secret list of all the protective spells you cast on yourself, cause when he ressurects, he's going to most likely let loose.


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Your cleric being low intelligence plays no part here, your character chose to commit an action that was totally legitmate. If you as a player DID have that knowledge though, it couldn't hurt to let the barbarian's player know about the possible consequences of your character not knowing.


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RainyDayNinja wrote:
Expletive wrote:
Can they? Is it a rare vestigial ability like it is in humans? If it isn't possible through conscious effort, what about reflexive? If you were to jump out and shout 'Boo' at an elf would their ears move in surprise? If it is possible with conscious effort, could an Elven bard use Perform (Percussion) with chimes/bells/etc. attached to their ears?
I'm not sure which is scarier: the idea that this is a key component to some power-gamer build, or that this is a key component to your elaborate character backstory.

The kingdom of Elfinheim was once ruled by a benevolent and highly misunderstood family called the Romanovs, at a time of political upheavals and during one particularly nasty rebellion, most of the royal family were killed off. The rule came down to the sole heiress who was smart enough to have many body doubles of herself positioned around the country. The family were renowned for their unique genetic makeup that allowed them to wiggle their ears. The sole heiress Earastasia at some point saw a singing minstrel from afar, hearing his beautiful song, she chose to go near him within the royal gardens that was outlined by a steel fence. The people who passed around the gardens paid no heed, for even though they hated the royal family, they had no way of knowing that this was the true Earastasia. The young Queen neared the singing minstrel until she lay herself upon a chair beside him. Upon him turning to look upon her, the young and innocent Earastasia who didn't understand her desires blushed and unknowingly and instinctively wiggled her ears. The onlookers saw her ears move and immediately burst into a murderous frenzy, screaming for her death. The poor and bewildered girl, in a fright, ran off, escorted by guards who immediately came to her rescue. She has fled the country and had to learn to protect herself. The innocent flower bloomed into a thorny rose whose first contact with love took her forever from her home and position. Her ears wiggle no longer for love but for sadness.


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You're forgetting the bard archetype that lets them play by ear or even ultimate combat's answer to UM's magical duel: Ear duels.

There's even a whole culture around ear dancing and even the courting rituals of the elves of Cheliax involves complicated dance moves where you only move your ears.

Some elves have even accepted that they're freaks (Dwarves FTW) and just go ahead and show their ear's versatility by clapping them together.


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It's got an impressive number of creatures:

Book of beasts: monsters of the shadow plane


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RainyDayNinja wrote:
Regarding the steel tools, I think the more appropriate question is: Why is it important that they have homes made of lumber? What narrative purpose is served by giving them tools above their technology level?

The truth is that originally when I came up with the idea for the story, I'd pictured the tribe living in well built homes with rooms (I don't know much about housing in the past, nor whether groups like native Americans merely had Teepees/wigwams and such or bigger/better structures). The tools I assumed would've been absolutely necessary cause I didn't know whether you could get proper wood from trees with simple stone implements.

@Charles Scholz, Thanks man, I actually tried looking around on the web but had no idea what to type exactly to find out the details of what I'm looking for. This ought to help me out quite a bit (the segment featuring the tribe is only the beginning but one of the most important parts).

EDIT:
1. Actually they're not nomadic, they've been living in a hidden valley for centuries, I just wasn't sure what type of buildings (and tools) you'd expect from a very primitive culture.

2. Thanks, I actually wasn't sure whether stone axes would be strong enough for the task or if they'd just crack immediately.

3. I actually had no idea what molds were made from, I never would've thought clay would work :P

4. He's actually trying to avoid contaminating their culture and would rather see how they manage without outside influence.

5. True enough, I guess I was worried my lack of knowledge on certain issues would become a problem (for example, ever read a fantasy novel that features war? I lack any real tactical knowledge but I've always wondered if someone (or most people for that matter :P) who knows a bit better would catch the issues immediately)


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D'ziriak

There's also a pdf being sold on paizo (3pp) that has a whole bunch of creatures you'd encounter in the plane of shadows.


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I've never played it but knowing FGG, I'd say pump up your saves and perception (so possibly a paladin). Some of their creatures from their tome of horrors are nightmarish against will saves and fortitude saves. Expect traps, reflex will help with that, if you can get improved evasion (I think it raises from successful reflex save halves damage to successful reflex save negates all damage) then perfect, perception will also help to see the traps (darkvision will probably also take you far).


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I wanted to ask, when you read a novel and you come across something that doesn't sit right with you, like how a government is handling itself or laws in the land, or how certain officials somehow have more time on their hands than their jobs would indicate, or how peace between two nations can be easily achieved whilst not making mention of things like how trade would be impacted or how in real life it's more complicated than that and such, do you let it be an issue or just go with it? For example when reading about an isolated tribe, do you ask yourself how they have use of steel tools when the author makes them out to be more like stone age folk? What about asking how their homes are wooden shacks/cabins/cottages when they wouldn't actually have the tools to make such?

I've been thinking about writing a novel but there are some things I intended that I know are impossibilities when you actually sit to think about it. What's more, some of these may be brought up such as one character actually helping to build one of those houses when, again, you think about it and realize those necessary tools shouldn't even be there. The folks live more like barbarians/native indian tribes and have no access to outside cultures, nor do they have any sort of mines yet their housing is wooden, made of planks (even though I'd probably just mention wooden homes/cottages without ever bringing up the word 'planks'). They don't even keep livestock or farm, they just hunt and live off the land (their tribe is small and never grows that high due to a genetic condition that specifically knows to keep their numbers down). They don't have any complicated structures, no mills, no specialized tools, just axes to cut trees down with and perhaps a few other steel tools that they'd require (THIS is something that will be brought up since the main character will be living with them for a while and helping in these issues such as building a home).

Even if I added relatively complicated structures, they'd never see use in the story but worse than that, I end up starting to raise the tech level above what I intended. Is it even possible to make properly built wooden homes (with rooms and such) with stone age tools? More importantly, is there any point to asking myself complicated questions or will the reader not care?


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Numerian wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_reading

I'm not quite sure speed reading is for me though but thanks for the heads up.

@Geraint, I'll try and find the first of his kingkiller trilogy, I'm actually surprised to find out he's quite famous for a guy who apparently only published three novels (he's working on planescape's spiritual successor?!)...plus he's got a beard and beards are cool :D

For a while about a few months back I was picking up a few novels and getting through them before I stopped and...well here I am. I got through about 5-7 and then I stopped indefinitely. I won't deny though that it does inspire one to want to write his own novel (although it looks like getting published back then was a lot easier than it is today).


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Kimera757 wrote:

A wizard in elemental form? Sounds like the wizard wanted to be in that form. They should consider ending the spell. If the wizard was in fire elemental form, she could literally cook the baby before it takes its first breath. (What is the Concentration DC to cast Protection From Fire while giving birth? If the Drizzt books are any guide, the Concentration DC of giving birth is pretty significant; one matron actually weaponized the pain by inflicting it on another matron.)

Undead form? If it's willing, presumably the baby is undead until the duration ends. If it's unwilling, I'm thinking the baby is permanently (un)dead.

Gaseous form? Assuming willing, presumably you get a coherent gas cloud that can't move (it's not like the baby has any idea what's going on). Again, these are contrived scenarios. Any responsible wizard would try to give birth in her natural form in a healthy environment.

Heheh, I remember reading that book, it was an odd idea (I heard that WotC(TSR?) usually had a thing about their spells having to be accurate to the rulebooks (which is why originally the panther was supposed to be neither male nor female), which has me wondering if they were fine with this or if he managed to 'get away with it' :P), alternatively she probably has a really low concentration bonus and just rolled really well ;)

Any 'RESPONSIBLE' wizard would give birth in natural form, I've actually had caster characters that were so far removed from 'responsible' they would've tried giving birth in the form of a swarm :P

Another thought, would a mind-controlled character give birth to a mind-controlled baby? If so, that would be great for keeping your child from being a nuisance, provided they come born with the common language (they don't need to actually speak it, several creatures that can't speak have a language for just such a thing) :P


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What does a shape shifted or transformed person give birth to? A human baby? Fine, a shape shifted druid who looks like a bear MIGHT give birth to a human but what does a wizard in elemental form give birth to? What about undead form? Gaseous form?


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ArmouredMonk13 wrote:

Umm, I think that they can move their ears if they try, but I have to ask one question.

WHY?

If they cast enlarge person on their ears specifically, I hear they can fly. One fellow made the mistake of casting enlarge person and bull's strength on his ears and that's how the first Vargouille was born.


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I occasionally get a few minutes of free time to read during work, it's how I managed to get through the first codex alera novel. I drive to work and while using your phone is illegal, I'm going to take a guess the law probably frowns on reading while driving too :P. My time is further divided because I've stuck myself on some exercise courses that take a further two hours off my free time (when you step off the treadmill, sometimes you just can't focus clearly enough to read).

A guy I know who finally graduated college (went abroad and then took further courses to put more impressive stuff on his CV(resume?)) still reads a lot, I even found out about Paul S Kemp and RA Salvatore from him (although his current reading list leaves much to be desired....*cough* twilight *cough*). The rest of my buddies read LotR and the Silmarillion, possibly other stuff but I know they at least read those (which surprised me to be honest, I never thought they were the reading type).

I'll try giving reading before bed a shot though. I'm not married but the guys I work with who are, tell me that once you're married, your kids and your wife become massive responsibilities that eat away your freedom (I don't doubt that they love their kids but it sounds like their work has become their new (and only?) excitement).

I'd seriously hate to think that my life could pass me by and I'd miss reading the Silmarillion (I heard it has great story-telling).


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Ravingdork wrote:

Huh? A +5 enhancement bonus has a market price of 50,000gp--25,000gp if you make it yourself.

Hence, using wish in this fashion is largely a waste.

Alternatively, in a pinch, you could cast wish and make a foe's oversized weapon one size category larger and now he can't use it :P


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Anyone here find that you do the same? It used to be that in my youth, there was pretty much nothing else to do and reading was a great way to get into some pretty awesome story-telling. At first I read stuff like goosebumps, fear street and animorphs stuff when I was really young, then I branched into Christopher Pike's more adult/young teen (based on what cultural view you have of what's adult and what's young teen :P) horror novels. I read some sci-fi novels as well but truth be told, I can hardly remember them (save for obernewytn(sp?), deathworld 3 and one of the doom novels). I got into fantasy novels after reading the hobbit, there was something fairy tale-ish about the story and I think that's what drew me into it. I started reading other fantasy novels but it was hard to find a good one, some of them just felt so....dull.

The thing is, back then, cheap and quick entertainment was just not that entertaining. I had a sega master system (along with an atari, some keyboard that you could insert cartridge games into and some other low tech stuff) even past the PS1 era and late into the PS2 era, I also had an EXTREMELY difficult time getting access to shows and movies so I ended up watching very little media. Today on the other hand, I've got several consoles (not getting the current gen stuff, I've got more unfinished/unplayed games for the old one than I care to admit) and I can easily get access to watch whatever media I want, it's gotten to the point that I get home from work and the first thing I do is pop the PS3 on and start gaming, when I'm done, switch to PC view and pop a DVD in the drive.

I feel like I'm sacrificing good story telling for quick and easily achieved shots of entertainment. It used to be that if I started reading a book (and back then, I really did like most of the Christopher Pike horror stuff), I'd be so entertained I could finish the book in a day or two and my mind would be swimming with the awesome of what I just read for weeks, today it can take me up to a fortnight to finish a thick book like one of the codex alera novels and I hardly take to the book in my free time. I watch stuff like movies and TV shows and I can't help but just switch my brain off automatically (you ever read a review where the author just points out how stupid some of the characters are? Or how the 'subtle' plot was actually quite simple and easy to figure out? It makes you realize just how much you switch your brain off and just accept the garbage you're being fed), video games rarely (if ever) have good storylines, usually probably because a good story comes with a build up of what's going on around you and unless you're willing to read a novel's worth in text (like in planescape...actually apparently from a quote I read somewhere, it's more like THREE novel's worth) they give you a basic rundown: You're part devil, your dad was a devil, today's bad guy was a devil that was involved somehow with your dad, now fight (devil may cry)! Even metal gear solid, as entertaining as it was, the story was pretty simple, the depth came from playing all the games and seeing the sum of its parts rather than individually (and then...you were still stuck with one good story from several games put together).

It used to be that I read about a character who was having doubts, fears and concern that impacted her views and sometimes no dialogue to show it, games have no choice but force it into dialogue and into the face of the character, no view on what's under the hood. I play a video game and at best it's like 'yaaaaay' and then when I turn it off I don't give what just happened in the game a second thought. For me, true art lies in the written word and the places it can take you, from the minds of the characters to the landscapes of the many worlds, everything else just falls flat. I remember reading about characters who DO the research to find out what's happening behind the scenes, today, it's a montage or 'I found a book/googled it'. When I picked up a few novels, I just began to see what I've spent the last decade missing out on for quick shots of empty entertainment, where you meet someone and in the span of three days or less (a couple of hours in a movie's world time at worst...at worst and most prevalent), they're suddenly everything you ever wanted in your life.

And for that, I lament that I don't read as much as I used to.


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How about 'Made in China' and 'Assembled in Taiwan'?


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If you're a level 1 cleric, you have a caster level of 1, level 2 cleric, caster level 2, so on and so forth. There may be a metamagic feat that can also increase it to its maximum.

EDIT: For example, for cure light wounds (CLW), at level 1, it's 1d8+1, at level 2, it's 1d8+2. Same for the rest.


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Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
cmastah wrote:
comrade anklebiter wrote:
Woah.
Can't access the link at work :/
Maddy on 60 Minutes opining that furthering American goals in Iraq was worth a half million dead kids.

Wow....that's.....wow.... -.-'

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