Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Adivion Adrissant

agnelcow's page

Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber. 166 posts. 2 reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


RSS

1 to 50 of 166 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | next > last >>

Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
137ben wrote:
137ben wrote:
I keep seeing references to "deific (or celestial?) obedience". Apparently a feat that is more complicated than a normal feat. Could someone please explain what that is?
Anyone?

There's a 1-page section at the start of each the core 20 deity articles explaining the boons that can be gained from the feat. Taking the feat allows you to gain mechanical benefits for performing tasks in the god's honor, starting with a modest boost to a skill or two and growing in power as you gain levels. Each deity offers three different groups of boons: one for evangelists, one for sentinels, and one for exalted; a character can choose any of the three paths for their character, but members of the corresponding prestige classes are locked into the appropriate choice. Being a member of those prestige classes allows you to gain the benefits of the boons more rapidly (as fast as level 8, 11, and 14), but makes all of your class features dependent upon performing your god's Obedience.

EDIT: Or, y'know, what TOZ said.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Ustalavic Duelist:

Lose heavy armor and your level 1 bonus feat for a scaling dodge bonus that only applies in light/no armor while wielding a single melee weapon in one hand.

Weapon Training only works on light blades, but the damage bonus is higher if you meet the above requirements.

Int bonus to damage on Vital Strikes with dueling weapons, and deal max damage on Vital Strike crits.

You get to use your dueling weapon with certain combat maneuvers, allowing you to add in their enhancement bonuses.

Dueling weapons deal ability damage of your choice on crits.

I actually really like the archetype, and not just because Ustalav is my favorite nation.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Major_Blackhart wrote:
What are the odds we get some gorumite archtype?

Rangers worshiping Gorum can choose from a religiously-themed list of bonus feats in place of their usual style feats, which is pretty nifty.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
David knott 242 wrote:

That's interesting -- a couple of pages back Lord Gadigan made mention of an Evangelist choosing "one of five deity associated classes" -- and the mention of "aligned class" as opposed to simply "class" suggests that there is some limitation of the class that can be chosen. So what is the real story here?

The deity section of the prerequisites for the class lists 5 classes for each of the core 20 deities who are most likely to become Evangelists. However, there are no mechanical restrictions on which classes worshiping which deities may take the class, so presumably the "aligned class" section does not restrict this. Which is nice, considering bards (who have access to the Dawnflower Dervish archetype) aren't listed as an option for Sarenites.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Nate Z wrote:

The blog says something about Radovan. I demand spoilers!

...pretty please?

Spoiler:
It just lists Radovan as a CG rogue 5/monk 2 in the Combatants section. Whomp whomp.

Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Mechalibur wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

Spoiler:
Not only immune, but allies in 10ft who are forced to reroll get to roll their reroll die twice and take the higher result. And if they are forced to roll twice and take the lower result, they instead roll three times and take the second-lowest. Death to Pugwampis!

Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Matrix Dragon wrote:
I'm kind of curious about what an Iroran Paladin is like, especially considering that I thought there already was a prestige class for that. If this archetype does the paladin/monk thing without having to multiclass, that will be pretty cool :D

It does indeed do the paladin/monk thing with no multiclass, although it's not compatible with the Champion of Irori PrC.

Spoiler:
You trade Smite Evil for "Personal Challenge" that can be used against any alignment but gives less bonus damage, lose Detect Evil for Ki detection, swap channeling for a Ki Pool, become immune to forced rerolls, change the Good Aura to Law, get IUS as a bonus feat, and scale your unarmed damage as a monk half your level. Oh, and you get your Cha bonus to AC so long as you're in light or no armor, up to a max of your paladin level. I like the archetype overall, since it offers a good alternative for Iroran characters who don't have 6 good stats.

Haven't had an extensive look at the Antipaladin archetypes yet, but the Seal-Breaker seeks to bring back the Whispering Tyrant and can spend Smites to bind murderous souls to dead bodies while the Rough Rampager's auras prevents healing and force wounds to stay open.

EDIT: The Calistrian Hunter loses Weapon Training to cause bleed damage when hitting enemies that hit them in the last round, imposing penalties on the offender while gaining temp HP as they savor the damage. Creepy!


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Just got my shipping email! SO EXCITED TO DOWNLOAD THIS AHHHHHHHHHH


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Adjule wrote:
One thing that always bothered me about Golarion's deities is the large lack of non-Demon Lords/Archdevils (or really, non-evil deities) with the Animal Domain. Out of the 38 beings that provide the Animal domain

I think this is at least partly due to the fact that Curchanus, Desna's mentor and god of beasts, was murdered by Lamashtu so that she could gain authority over animals in his place. So in the setting, Evil actively slayed Good in order to lay claim to the domain; giving it to various good-aligned demigods minimizes the importance of that act (which turned Lamashtu into a full deity) and calls into question why she didn't just target some random animal-loving do-gooder instead.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

*drools*

The art alone looks to be worth the price of admission for this book, but seeing that table... it does something to me in a way that collated data usually doesn't.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

The Pathfinder Wiki is pretty well-maintained, and has a ton of information about the setting. The Meet the Iconics series is great for backstory on the characters you're most likely familiar with from the card game. The Inner Sea World Guide gives a good overview of each of the nations in the Inner Sea region of Golarion, as well as brief descriptions of deities and organizations (and the PDF is only $10!).

That should be enough to get started, at least. Welcome to Golarion!


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Mark Moreland wrote:
How about 3 blogs over 3 weeks?

You drive a hard bargain, but I'll take it!


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Great! Thanks Erik (and Steve and chavamana) for the quick replies!


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

If multiple items are being released in the same subscription line this month, will the items automatically be grouped as a single shipment or will they be authorized and shipped separately?


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Admittedly, I'll be sad to see an end to revisions of Kirthfinder. It's truly a thing of beauty. Whenever the latest version is due out, I'd like a copy.

Spoiler:
agnelcow [at] gmail [dot] com


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

The Crusader's Oath begins with "I do so swear under the Light, by the Sword and Scales of Truth and all the fires of heaven, to undertake this holy Crusade."; most of the things being sworn by are capitalized in the oath which, combined with the fact that it is a "holy crusade", suggests that they are not just physical things, but divine concepts. Fittingly, Iomedae is a goddess of the sun (light), war (the fires of heaven), and honor/justice (scales of truth), whose favored weapon is the longsword (sword) and whose church has historically called and closed the various crusades.

Further, the Low Templar Prestige Class (where I grabbed the oath from) follows the text of the oath with "in too many cases, these words are hollow falsehoods, for many of those who take up the sword to crusade in Iomedae’s name do so for their own glory", which implies that the oath is directly related to crusading in Iomedae's name. The class's Path of Darkness/Light ability also mention that the character "must eventually decide how closely he wishes to hew to his oaths to Iomedae"; the only oath mentioned in the class is the Crusader's Oath, again implying that it is an oath to her divine cause.

Finally, the ISWG section on Mendev mentions that all crusaders fight under the banner of Iomedae and whatever regional/knightly order they are a member of. Taken together, I believe this is fairly strong evidence that the Crusader's Oath is an oath to Iomedae, even if it is given to secular authorities or by those who worship other deities.

I definitely agree that being in the goddess's presence should constitute a mythic trial by itself, and James Jacobs mentions it as one on page 5 of Herald of the Ivory Labyrinth even though the adventure's text doesn't say "this encounter counts as a mythic trial" in the story award section, as it does for other mythic trials.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

NOTE: This entire post, including the stuff in not spoiler tags, likely contains varying levels of spoilers.

There's a lot of missing context here, and a lot of very strong terminology being used, but that is how some people have felt about the encounter. I disagree with the assessment, but certainly sympathize with it. Iomedae does transport the PCs to her celestial realm with no warning, though I wouldn't exactly call that a "kidnapping". It's important to note that the questions aren't just questions: they're affirmations of the beliefs and attitudes underlying the Crusade to which the characters have sworn themselves. A "wrong answer" means that everyone in the party has said something that is contrary to the motivations and demeanor that the goddess seeks in mortal representatives of her divinely-ordained war— representatives whom she wishes to send to another plane of existence in overt action against a deific power. If their actions betray Iomedae's cause, she may be seen as breaking the mandate of divine non-interference by having the PCs seek to do more than merely recover her herald; knowing that the PCs will behave in a way that she approves of means that they can be trusted to avoid implicating her in the breaking of one of the multiverse's biggest no-no's.

Here's my post on the encounter from an earlier thread, which goes into my thoughts on the implications of the "kidnapping" as an act of a LG deity. Note that my question is "How do we understand these actions as LG, knowing that Iomedae is of that alignment?" rather than "Is Iomedae Evil because of these actions?"; my first assumption is that her alignment is not in question, and that we should aim to comprehend rather than condemn.

Agnelcow's Iomedaen Apologia:
My take, honestly, is that the whole "sonic damage for being wrong" thing is related to the mandates preventing divine interference.

Look at it this way: if gods can just abduct anyone in the world and harm them for not responding as they want, then they whole "don't directly interfere on Golarion" thing seems moot. So what might be an exception to appearing in the presence of mortals? Obviously, you would want it to be limited to those who follow the deity to prevent inter-faith conflicts. But the PCs aren't necessarily Iomedaen. So how do we reconcile?

Well, we know that (traditionally, at least) Mendevian Crusaders are required to swear an oath to Iomedae and fight under her banner; see the Low Templar prestige class for how that may not always be a firm oath. But we nonetheless have a formal oath to serve a goddess's interests in the mortal realm, in a crusade against Abyssal forces appropriating chunks of the Material Plane. As the PCs gain prominence in the crusade, eventually overshadowing the power and influence of Queen Galfrey herself and taking the fight back to the Abyss to undermine the opposition's war efforts, it seems reasonable that the goddess whom they claim to represent in their actions should be allowed to give them a test of faith in order to represent her on a scale beyond the limited military scope of a terrestrial conflict.

Of course, a test of faith where one meets a deity should not be straightforward and strictly positive event (although overcoming the ordeal should prove satisfactory to members of the faith); there must be danger for marked failings in the mortal's faith. The punishment for conflicting ideals within the party or between mortal and deity isn't just Iomedae lashing out in anger or frustration (although she is disappointed, I believe) but a metaphysical retruibution of the multiverse against the PCs for having failed to uphold their sworn faith or cause— notably, a faith or cause to a deity who emphasizes the sanctity of such things. While clearly a painful experience, it's not merely a slap on the wrist intended to reprimand but a necessary part of the rites of Trial By Ordeal which tests the faith to the cause and, notably, is one of the few ways that a deity may physically manifest before her followers (another reason why deities show favor with things like the presence of birds: it's subtle, can have a mundane explanation, and doesn't require putting their faithful at risk should they fail).

As for the abduction with no warning? Communicating divine intentions to mortals is generally handled by the herald, who is missing, or by the church (ie, giving someone higher up on the chain of command a vision instead and having them pass it along), which could allow enemies who infiltrated the faith to root out the deity's intentions and relay them to evil powers; better to call them to your side with no warning so that your graciousness cannot be used as a tool against the crusade's only hope for success. Besides, making it sudden and unheralded fits with the idea that you'll be testing the PCs' faith: to explain what would happen beforehand would allow them to mentally/psychologically/physically prepare themselves, which skews the field in their favor, something which won't happen when they're doing the deity's work in the real world.

So yes, the damage and "abduction" are not very nice, but it's part of the process— not merely Iomedae's, but the entire Multiverse's— when testing the fitness of mortal faithful who wish to serve the divine on a multiplanar scale, especially when their actions may call the attention of rival deities. Iomedae resorts to this kind of trial because it is simple to arrange, given the PCs' level of power and prominence in a crusade undertaken in her name, without violating divine mandate and she believes that they will be able to overcome it (though not necessarily unharmed). Being damaged by the angelic choir is a consequence of being imperfectly faithful to the cause, and is a standard part of this kind of deific meeting. The PCs aren't just four people answering questions; they're four sworn servants of a divinely sanctioned cause trying to properly elucidate the duties enshrined in their oath in order to placate the multiversal enforcers of divine non-interference, so that the deity to whom they are sworn may be permitted to give them aid and direction in a nigh-impossible task.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Bonuses of the same type (enhancement, in this case) do not stack; even if the creature would qualify to receive the increase in ability scores twice, only the highest bonus would stick. Since the bonus from both sources is tied at +4, it would receive only that +4 to Str and Con.

Note that this also means that casting Bear's Endurance or Bull's Strength on the summoned monster is pointless, as those spells provide enhancement bonuses as well.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
trawets71 wrote:
I'm playing a Tiefling with the Child of the Crusades trait currently. This trait doesn't say you grew up in Mendev just that your parents were crusaders. Due to tieflings starting ages (64-108, 4594 AR-4650 AR) you'll have been born somewhere around the 1st (4622-4630 AR) and 2nd (4638-4645 AR)Crusades.

Just wanted to point out that James Jacobs has said that Tieflings and Aasimar should age as humans in Golarion, as the plot of certain adventures hinges on that being that case; his hope is that the ARG will receive errata to put it in-line with setting products that predate it, rather than have the stories be rewritten to accommodate the information in that book. The setting-specific Blood of Fiends, for instance, states that Tieflings age as humans.

That said, whatever you and your GM feel is appropriate for your story should determine what aging conventions are used.

/threadjack


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Personally, Inner Sea Gods is the book I've been most excited about since starting Pathfinder. Sure, Gods and Magic exists, but that only gives each of the core 20 two pages; the core 20 are covered in various articles in the APs, but those would cost over $300 to acquire; and the "Faiths of" series, while great for seeing how to RP a religious character, doesn't offer much in the way of specific deific teachings, church history, holidays, or saints.

Can't speak to other products coming out, but this is one I'll be picking up in hardcover as soon as it's out.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
This is a question for those of you who are victims of severe clinical depression, like me. I have a lot of things that I'm interested in, but when it comes to actually doing them, I just can't muster up the emotional strength to even start. And when I do manage to do so, I don't stick with it. How do you get around this problem?

Aside from highly randomized bouts of stick-to-itiveness, the only thing that can get my motivation up for more than short periods is medication. Therapy is helpful as well, of course, but that's mostly to keep me focused on the progress made while taking meds so that I don't neglect them and encourage building up strong social ties so that there's people who can tell when something's not right and try to intervene.

And Andrew R, please seek help, even its just some informal counseling. "Handling it" isn't enough long-term because even if you can get through the worst day you've had, you might not be able to get through the worst day you're capable of. Just become something is working so far doesn't mean it's correct; a cow thinks it's well cared for every day until it's slaughtered, each day making it more certain of its happy state even as its death draws closer. The last time I thought I was handling it was just before spiraling into months of isolation that culminated in a failed suicide attempt. I got lucky. Please don't rely on getting lucky.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

The CRB doesn't list Witch spells, because the Witch was not in the CRB. The Witch class section of the APG (not the Spell chapter) lists all the spells from the CRB and APG that the Witch can choose from. These won't be noted as Witch spells in the CRB since the class didn't exist when it was designed and isn't part of the game's core assumption, but they are still valid choices for the class. This means that you will need both books or an online resource such as the PRD or PFSRD to cross-reference your character's options.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
The diet, in any event, works quite well, but it's not easy. I've been on it for just over a year and have lost about 165 pounds so far—I'm actually pretty close to being at my target weight, so in theory, I'll get to eat pancakes in a month or so.

That's fantastic progress! Congratulations on sticking to the diet for so long, and best of luck on getting through the last bit ahead!

And a question, so as to not divert from the thread's purpose:

Without revealing any spoilers, which volume of Iron Gods are you most looking forward to having released (whether to just be done with it, or to see fans' reactions)?


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

You can get suuuuper pedantic about it and say that the damage comes from touching the stone, not having it touch you (ie, the difference between picking it up and squished against your skin).

Or you can say "Look, that's clearly not the intention of the item; if you want to use it offensively, use the one free insta-kill that the item gives you instead of trying to squeeze out some rules cheese."


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Hi James!

Just wanted to say: Holy crap, Kaer Maga is amazing! The city, the culture, the adventure hooks, everything. I particularly enjoyed that, despite being a CN city, the main deities are law-lovers Abadar and Asmodeus for their emphasis on binding contracts.

Any chance that we'll see more Kaer Maga goodness in the future?


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

I think that

Carrion Crown Spoilers:
Luvick Siervage, the head of the underground vampiric society in Caliphas
is a more likely candidate for leader of the anti-demonic forces than Malyas. After all, he's the one who
Rule of Fear Spoilers:
united vampires against the Whispering Tyrant after realizing that his plan to undead-ify all of Golarion would leave them without a fresh blood supply. And since then, he's managed to maneuver politically for nearly a thousand years to remain Top Dog in Ustalav.
He's not the most powerful (ie, highly-leveled) vampire in the country, but that's because anyone who isn't part of his extensive network of favors, servitude, and politics has to be pretty high-level to be able to escape his influence and not be killed.

Malyas is too devout to the Whispering Way to be able to lead a coalition of humans and vampires, but

Spoiler:
Luvick
has the tendrils of influence, the credibility, and the pragmatism to reach out to the living population and be able to broker an... arrangement to their mutual benefit; a yearly tribute could be instituted to commemorate the bond between their kind and the alliance that fought to drive out Demons, a pittance in comparison to the uncontested bloodshed that would have happened without them.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

I'm inclined to agree with Zahmahkibo on this one: Discordant Voice only cares if you are maintaining a performance and gives a bonus based on that rather than counting how many performances are maintained and rewarding each; that is, maintaining more performances doesn't cause DV to go "Oh my, how impressive, please add sonic damage twice, you inventive scoundrel!" but to continue going "Yes, you are performing, here's the 1d6 damage I promised".

I would be open to arguments from a player that DV was written with the core assumption of "one bard, one performance" in mind and that it should be able to scale with characters that break that core assumption, but that is a matter of houseruling and I'd be wary to implement it given the relative strength of Sonic damage.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Wow, already under 250 copies of City of Locusts? I'm honestly kind of impressed. Hope this bodes well for future mythic APs and modules!

Oh, and the "non-mint" Great Beyond books are currently priced $5 over the regular copies; not sure if that is in error or not.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Vivianne Laflamme wrote:
Either way, that quote provides no evidence that this is not a scenario of kidnapping and torture.

Bad GMing or no, neither does it provide evidence that the feelings of pride and hope are anything but the genuine sentiments of the PCs. In the absence of evidence for either assertion, I would hesitate to assume that the actions of a Lawful Good deity were written to be anything but Lawful and Good in nature; if that means we must consider ends and structures outside of the PCs and the setting/events at hand, then we should do that before making the actions out as the empty cruelty of a pigheaded goddess.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Chuckg wrote:
There is nothing Good about lashing out with deadly force (anything that beats you into negative hp is a potentially deadly attack literally by definition) simply because you were dissed. There is nothing Lawful about requiring your followers to obey rules and self-restraints that you then exempt yourself from.

There is nothing in the text to imply that anyone is "beaten" into negative HP; yes, they are stabilized at -1 HP, but that could be a purely divine and harmless effect that doesn't affect the well-being of the person targeted. This is left unspecified, and reading anything further into it is pure speculation.

I wonder if you are familiar the work of Jonathan Haidt? Haidt is a psychologist who studies morality, and his basic thesis is that different people (especially when grouped by political leanings) have different "pillars" or "spectrums" through which they analyze the morality of an action: Care/Harm, Fairness/Cheating, Liberty/Oppression, Loyalty/Betrayal, Authority/Subversion, and Sanctity/Degradation.

If you look through the thread, I think you'll find that many posters on the "it's torture" side of things are emphasizing the Harm and Oppression aspects of the actions Iomedae takes: the PCs are whisked away without any say in the matter, and then can have hurtful things befall them. I think that those on the other side of the discussion are wrong to try to downplay the Harm and Oppression aspects, and would be better served in trying to show the righteousness of Iomedae's actions through the remaining four lenses.

Loyalty, Authority, and Sanctity are all diminished when PCs defy the goddess whose oath they swore and whom they represent in the heavenly realm to which takes them. They break their oaths, defy their superior, and degrade the twice-holy land they stand in (once for its celestial nature, once for its religious structure). In this light, the Harm that befalls them could be considered Fair as it is punishment for breaking three types of morality that Iomedae supports; if the PCs do not realize that this is a likely outcome, then that is their fault for not fully understanding the meaning of their oaths or the expectations of the goddess.

Lochar wrote:
Which isn't LG to me, but LN at best.

That is most likely a fault in my arguments, and I apologize for that; I am a fairly-solid LN individual, and expressing lawful sentiments in a manner consistent with goodliness is far harder for me than making a general argument for lawful attitudes. I hope you don't hold that against others taking similar positions, and allow them a fair shake at making the case without the burden of my imperfect assertions.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Chuckg wrote:
Openly mocking Iomedae gets you hit with being struck forever mute, against a DC 40 Will save. Only a deity's will can remove this condition. Iomedae will remove this at the end of the conversation... if she feels like it.

Again, I'd argue that being punished for mocking Iomedae isn't just a matter of her not liking pithy remarks; I think a lot of people are focusing on the Good/Evil axis to attempt to evaluate the actions when they should be looking at Law/Chaos.

The PCs are sworn agents of her crusade on Golarion, and the most powerful ones at that; their actions aren't just their personal choices, but the acts of leaders of thousands of mortals who are fighting a planar war against the forces of Chaos and Evil. The PCs should realize (and if they do not realize by the 5th installment, now would be a good time) that their deeds are reflections on the crusades as a whole and, in that way, reflections on Iomedae's church. Now you might argue that it's not fair that the PCs must represent the crusade, or that they must be held to their oaths, or that there is no real harm since no mortal ears will hear the remarks they make against a goddess, but I would contend that this is a Chaotic (though not evil) viewpoint: not inherently incorrect, but firmly against the beliefs of the goddess in whose presence they stand.

Their derision amounts at best to poorly-considered snark in the face of a very momentous and inspiring occasion, and at worst to blasphemy and insubordination to the deific power to whose cause they are sworn. It doesn't matter if Iomedae is the only one who hears them, because (according to Iomedae) composure and consideration of the whole crusade are things that must be taken into account at all times.

It's not a matter of "she doesn't like what they say", but of "they are showing themselves to be unfit vessels for the divine mandate they claim in leading the crusades". The PCs have power and authority, and Iomedae is enforcing the duties that come with that. The PCs are sworn to the cause, and perhaps they thought that could be an empty promise; but Iomedae doesn't abide those who make empty promises to gain power, and she will expect those who serve her to act with her wisdom. And if they will not bite their tongues when their superior calls to them, then they will be made to listen.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Orthos wrote:
Unless, you know, that's actually how they feel about what's happening. Because a lot of people do.

I've no problem with people saying that they feel the actions are torture or kidnapping, or arguing for why that may be the case, but there is a difference between "I think this, and here is why" and "this is what it is, and you cannot disagree". For the most part, people have been fairly articulate about their stances and done well in making clear that they are stating their positions rather than unassailable facts; but I think that blanket characterizations of the actions, positive or negative, without support or argument can make open discussion a bit more difficult, as those with nuanced or differing views are cut out of the conversation for being wrong-headed, evil people.

Not that this has happened to a large degree, mind you, but it is something to think about when making assertions in the thread. Even if one side is totally factually correct, a magnanimous and open-minded approach to opposing positions could help inspire some interesting discussion.

Reasonable people can, do, and will disagree; acting as though they are unreasonable merely for disagreeing deprives you both of meaningful conversation and introspection.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

My take would be "no", based on James Jacobs's answers, but that doesn't mean that Asmodeus isn't trying to make the most of the situation. Certainly, he benefits from the persistent presence of the Worldwound distracting from his schemes in Cheliax. He may thus view Baphomet's escape as something of a blessing in disguise: an unplanned and undesired setback in deific politics, but an exploitable opportunity in mortal machinations.

Of course, Big A would tell everyone he planned it all along, and his worshipers would sing his praises for it. But though he gains power from the lie, it is still an unsettling revelation to the Prince of Darkness that he may be bested by a demigod.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
magnuskn wrote:
So, why would Iomedae act this way when in a completely peaceful encounter with the PC's, where the only person with any power potential (her) is using force on friendly people whom she abducted?

My take, honestly, is that the whole "sonic damage for being wrong" thing is related to the mandates preventing divine interference.

Look at it this way: if gods can just abduct anyone in the world and harm them for not responding as they want, then they whole "don't directly interfere on Golarion" thing seems moot. So what might be an exception to appearing in the presence of mortals? Obviously, you would want it to be limited to those who follow the deity to prevent inter-faith conflicts. But the PCs aren't necessarily Iomedaen. So how do we reconcile?

Well, we know that (traditionally, at least) Mendevian Crusaders are required to swear an oath to Iomedae and fight under her banner; see the Low Templar prestige class for how that may not always be a firm oath. But we nonetheless have a formal oath to serve a goddess's interests in the mortal realm, in a crusade against Abyssal forces appropriating chunks of the Material Plane. As the PCs gain prominence in the crusade, eventually overshadowing the power and influence of Queen Galfrey herself and taking the fight back to the Abyss to undermine the opposition's war efforts, it seems reasonable that the goddess whom they claim to represent in their actions should be allowed to give them a test of faith in order to represent her on a scale beyond the limited military scope of a terrestrial conflict.

Of course, a test of faith where one meets a deity should not be straightforward and strictly positive event (although overcoming the ordeal should prove satisfactory to members of the faith); there must be danger for marked failings in the mortal's faith. The punishment for conflicting ideals within the party or between mortal and deity isn't just Iomedae lashing out in anger or frustration (although she is disappointed, I believe) but a metaphysical retruibution of the multiverse against the PCs for having failed to uphold their sworn faith or cause— notably, a faith or cause to a deity who emphasizes the sanctity of such things. While clearly a painful experience, it's not merely a slap on the wrist intended to reprimand but a necessary part of the rites of Trial By Ordeal which tests the faith to the cause and, notably, is one of the few ways that a deity may physically manifest before her followers (another reason why deities show favor with things like the presence of birds: it's subtle, can have a mundane explanation, and doesn't require putting their faithful at risk should they fail).

As for the abduction with no warning? Communicating divine intentions to mortals is generally handled by the herald, who is missing, or by the church (ie, giving someone higher up on the chain of command a vision instead and having them pass it along), which could allow enemies who infiltrated the faith to root out the deity's intentions and relay them to evil powers; better to call them to your side with no warning so that your graciousness cannot be used as a tool against the crusade's only hope for success. Besides, making it sudden and unheralded fits with the idea that you'll be testing the PCs' faith: to explain what would happen beforehand would allow them to mentally/psychologically/physically prepare themselves, which skews the field in their favor, something which won't happen when they're doing the deity's work in the real world.

So yes, the damage and "abduction" are not very nice, but it's part of the process— not merely Iomedae's, but the entire Multiverse's— when testing the fitness of mortal faithful who wish to serve the divine on a multiplanar scale, especially when their actions may call the attention of rival deities. Iomedae resorts to this kind of trial because it is simple to arrange, given the PCs' level of power and prominence in a crusade undertaken in her name, without violating divine mandate and she believes that they will be able to overcome it (though not necessarily unharmed). Being damaged by the angelic choir is a consequence of being imperfectly faithful to the cause, and is a standard part of this kind of deific meeting. The PCs aren't just four people answering questions; they're four sworn servants of a divinely sanctioned cause trying to properly elucidate the duties enshrined in their oath in order to placate the multiversal enforcers of divine non-interference, so that the deity to whom they are sworn may be permitted to give them aid and direction in a nigh-impossible task.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Bobmufin52 wrote:
So I was just wondering if anyone had any sort of advice as to how to make it at least possible for the cohort to stay alive in the later adventures, or if I need to worry about it at all in the first place.

If you want to mitigate the lack of Mythic Tiers on the cohort, I suggest having the cohort take Mythic Companion as one of their feats and having the PC take Mythic Companion as one of their Path Abilities. WOW, those shouldn't have the same name.

That should protect them from "hurt non-mythic" type abilities and give them the option of surging to get through a good attack or save when needed without having to shoe-horn in why they might be as legendary as the PCs.

Mythic Companion Feat:
Despite your non-mythic nature, you're a vital part of the greater mythic world.

Prerequisite: You must be non-mythic.

Benefit: You're considered a mythic creature for the purposes of determining how mythic spells and effects affect you. If you ever become mythic, you gain a +1 bonus on all saves against mythic spells and effects.

Mythic Companion Path Ability:
Select one animal companion, cohort, eidolon, familiar, or bonded mount. That creature can use the surge ability a number of times per day equal to your tier. Its surge ability uses the same bonus die type as you do when you use your surge ability.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
Mark Hoover wrote:
So not every major city has a university then?

I'd say not, no; there's just not enough people with the time and wealth to devote a large part of their lives to study to justify wide-spread higher education. Ustalav, for instance, has three main places of higher learning: Lepidstadt University, Tatterdemalion, and The Quarterfaux Archives. That said, the cities in Golarion are fairly cosmopolitan, so it wouldn't be out of the question to place at least a small school in major locations (especially capitols) for characters to have attended.

EDIT: And thanks, Orfamay, for the lesson in the more-classical University structures!


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Lepidstadt is indeed in Ustalav. There is a rough analogue to Frankenstein (and his monster) as well, in the person of

Spoiler:
Alpon Caromarc, former Count of the Vieland
, if you're interested in that as a plot point; see Rule of Fear or Trial of the Beast for more information.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Lepidstadt University in Ustalav is one of the most respected schools in the Avistan. They put a big emphasis on the "mortal sciences": medicine, mathematics, hard science; all that fun stuff that let mundane folks accomplish great things that can rival even the miracles of magic. Also, they have a reputation for training fine duelists, and dueling fraternities such as Malkenclaw and Gateguard are well-regarded.

EDIT: Typically, a University is a collection of Colleges, which each encompass a broadly-conceived type of learning and overseen by a separate functionary (ie, the Dean of the College of Arts and Science). Colleges are further broken up into "schools" of specific disciplines or approaches.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

My players enjoyed it, but I had intentionally misled them as to what would be happening to keep everything a surprise. I played up the "10 day-long festival that focuses on respite from crusading" thing for Armasse, and said there would be a series of competitions/events to participate in (along the lines of We Be Goblins) in order to win prestige and have difficult but non-lethal encounters boosting party experience. The players signed up for gladiatorial combat, jousting, feats of daring, religious services, and displays of relevant crusading knowledge ahead of time so that I would "know what to prep", which helped build excitement.

Then, after equipment checks, I did the "you awake in darkness" thing which led to a nice amount of party confusion. Flashbacks to the attack were accompanied with a slideshow of demonic destruction and dramatic music. That was enough for our Bard to become paranoid about all the giant vermin they saw being heralds of Deskari's evil presence, and Aravashnial's conspiratorial tendencies egged him on.

All in all, they were big fans of the opening sequence, even if (or partially because) it's not what they were expecting.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Huzzah! Now to spend an hour trying to download the materials!


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Class: Bard. Always take credit for hits that would've missed without you!

Monster: Lich. Love undead, love spellcasters, love not dying.

Deity: Abadar. TAXFEST! There is a holiday called TAXFEST! Pharasma is a close second though.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

I always mentally say it as "Oh drowed", as in "Alas, we have been beset by Drizzt clones!"


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Spacer text makes sense

When you write text about space

No one likes haiku

Abadar
Can
Get
Axis
Very
Expensive
Teapots
Liberally
Bidding
At
Auctions


10 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

My answer for that has always been "it doesn't", which seems contradictory to the rules so I should explain. What follows is all based on my own wild speculation and homebrew cosmological answers.

Positive Energy is, in a weird abstract way, life force. All living things have it, and adding more to one can help repair "broken" vital functions, which is more or less how healing works. Over time, your reserves of it naturally dwindle until there is no spark of life inside you.

Negative Energy is not merely the absence of Positive Energy, but its functional opposite; imagine that there is not only darkness, but rather a sort of anti-light that obliterates it to create darkness— that's how the two interact. Similarly, when Negative Energy interacts with living things it doesn't just "darken" part of your life force but actively obliterates a portion of it.

Now, this isn't an absolute truth; there are planes of existence and alternate realities where Positive Energy brings harm and Negative Energy heals. But that's pretty much an academic point, because if we lived in one of those realities we would refer to them by the opposite moniker, and not actually answer the question. "Positive" and "Negative" are shorthands for describing the effect on living things on the Prime Material Plane. The "undoing" of PE by NE is merely the first half of its own form of creation, which are cannot see as we are destroyed by the process; the distinction of "Entropic NE" versus "Creative PE" is based purely on our position in the process's cycle, and PE does quite the same to NE in universes where the dominance is reversed.

Animating dead is more than just infusing a corpse with Negative Energy because, at least in our version of existence, Negative Energy can't grant vitality; that's Positive Energy's job (again, in other realities, the roles of these two energies might be reversed, as the "anti-light" of NE could presumably illuminate in other universes). Instead, animating dead flesh uses the onyx in the spell as a focus that opens a sort of connection to the Negative Energy Plane that is focused through the corpse. Ambient PE is pulled through this connection into the NEPlane, where it is negated and destroyed. It is the Positive Energy flowing through the corpse that powers Undead, not the Negative Energy itself, as the process is sort of a gross mockery of the natural attrition of life force in living creatures. Animation only persists because the PE being drawn through the corpse is obliterated as it contacts the metaphysical connection to the NEPLane, causing a constant flow of life force through the dead tissue in attempt to create equilibrium.

As the undead is damaged, its connection to the NEPlane weakens until it closes and cannot draw any PE into itself to maintain animation. NE "heals" the undead because it strengthens the connection and allows more PE to be drawn through it, prolonging its unlife. PE harms the undead by altering the balance of NE and PE "pressures" around the portal to the NEPlane and causing the tide briefly flow the other way, drawing NE from its plane to be obliterated in ours. Equilibrium is restored quickly thereafter, but the connection is already weakened by the sudden reversal of energy flow.

TL;DR: Positive Energy actually animates the corpses, but doing so requires a connection to the Negative Energy Plane that forces Positive Energy to flow through tissue that normally does not contain it.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Here.

I want to go to there.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Wait a minute.

Brandon is implying patience is the key to learning more about the Order. He also said that I "hit the nail on the head". BUT he didn't say that the nail was the term "Palatines"! The nail could be my earlier theory about the Order playing a part in Mummy's Mask!

Let's look closer. Patience means waiting. We have to wait for adventure path volumes. Nails are used in coffins. Coffin, sarcophagus. Sarcophagi are found in Osirion, and are often decorated with images of the deceased inside. Masks are worn decorative images. Dead people in sarcophagi are mummies. Mask, mummy. Mummy's mask. EOotPE in Mummy's Mask confirmed! KHU BA HETEPH, NIB IMNET HEM MAA

Now where'd I put that tinfoil hat?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Very interested in full names! A few of my players just got inducted, and I want to overwhelm them with vernacular opulence.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

Well, one title that is given within the organization is Most Worthy Angelic Prince, which is (oddly) the first station in the organization; I'd imagine that things only get more ridiculous from there. I've taken to calling members "Palatines" in general, but I don't know of any other common name.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber
archmagi1 wrote:

Minor Carrion Crown spoilers below:

Spoiler:
A moment that sticks out in my mind was when the Splatterman sends nightmares to one of the PCs. The modus operandi of this former serial killer (now a way over CR'd ghost who is nerfed with dumb tactics) was he spelled out the name of someone over the course of a bit and they gruesomely died at the end. One my player's PC, Abraham, woke in the night to the shudders on the window slamming, looked out the window to see the haunted prison just outside of town, and hearing faint whispers from it. He then turned around and saw his name being scrawled into the wall in blood. His eyes started bleeding, he felt like he was dying. As the spectre started writing the M at the end, his buddies woke him up at morning. That character was sufficiently disturbed and nearly refused to sleep for the rest of the time they were at Ravengro.

I did roughly the same, but went a little further.

Spoiler:
One of my players was a Cleric of Desna and had the Good Dreams trait, so she got prophetic visions at night. First night in Ravengro, she had a pleasant dream that she was walking in a park with a kind-looking old man who asked her name (which was "Siphone"). He then proceeded to give an etymological discourse on the origins of that name and how it morphed over time. Then, of course, his head lit on fire, his flesh melted, the park they were in turned into a horrific hellscape, and he screamed that she would die now that he knew her name. Blood ran down her face and arms in the dream as the man ripped at her flesh. Awaking with a start, she found that she was in her room and that her wall was covered in blood that spelled, in broad and messy letters, "I know your name, Siphon-". Her left hand was bloody and cut, and in her right she held a blood-spattered piece of glass. The window in the room (on the first floor) was broken and opened, and she heard screaming from outside. The villagers had just found the statue defaced with blood from the town dog, its entrails spilling out from a clean, straight cut along its belly.

It really built up the self-doubt and paranoia that horror games need, and set up fairly quickly just how bad things were going to get.

If you haven't heard the Horror In RPGs seminar from this year's Paizocon, give it a listen. It has a lot of great tips for running effective horror games. And check out Dread as well; even if you don't use the system, there's a lot of good examples of creepy questions and advice for building tension.


Pathfinder Campaign Setting Subscriber

I do about the same as Dudemeister, summarizing the AP outline and sharing the Player's Guide, but sometimes I feel the need to spice up the language and throw in some spoilers. This is my most recent pitch, for Wrath of the Righteous.

Spoiler:
Wrath of the Righteous is a Pathfinder adventure path that's all about bringing the pain to demons in the most Lawful Good way possible. There's smiting, alliances, traitors, cults, armies, balors, crusades... Everything that you could ever want from a "let's invade the Abyss" adventure. Oh, and did I mention that you eventually invade The Abyss? Because you do. For murder reasons. Your job is to kill demonic demi-gods, save the world, and be capital-G Good.

Sometimes campaigns make you compromise your morals for expediency or political reality (cough, Carrion Crown, cough). Enough of that nonsense. Rise above, do Good, go mythic, and tear down some badguys. Someone's got to, right?

The adventure goes from levels 1-20— yes, 20 levels— and ten full mythic tiers. "Mythic tiers? Is that like epic levels?" Yeah, if you could start taking epic levels at level one and gained the ability to fling blood off your sword to blind people! Hell, the first adventure alone gets you to level six and has you (I kid you not) face down SIX CR 6 enemies at once. And win. Why? Because the gods like your beautiful faces, that's why.

Would anyone be interested in kicking demon butts, either as a Friday thing or a recurring weekend event?

1 to 50 of 166 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | next > last >>

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.