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Zovarue

Zeugma's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 1,192 posts (1,360 including aliases). 3 reviews. 1 list. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 5 aliases.


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Joe Dirt.

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I've gotta agree KC, "Rescuers Down Under" is actually way better than the first "Rescuers," too.

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1 person marked this as a favorite.
Set wrote:
Cole Deschain wrote:
The Lost Boys. "One thing about living in Santa Carla I never could stomach; all the damn vampires."

Woo! Vampire movies! I can watch The Lost Boys or Vamp or Near Dark on endless repeat.

For comedies, it's Clue, Oscar, A Fish Called Wanda, Soapdish, etc.

There's also pulpy stuff (some campy, some almost serious), like The Shadow, The Rocketeer, The Phantom, Flash Gordon or Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow.

Have you seen Without a Clue? Michael Caine as Sherlock Holmes and Ben Kingsley as Dr. Watson. Hilarious!

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Tremors 5: Bloodlines

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Tremors 4: The Legend Begins

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Tremors 3: Back to Perfection

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Tremors II: Afterschocks

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1 person marked this as a favorite.

Tremors.

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Twistlok wrote:

Shawn of the Dead

Hot Fuzz
The Worlds End

My dad and I laughed like maniacs at Simon Pegg in "A Fantastic Fear of Everything." No brain cells required.

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1 person marked this as a favorite.

I finished Paris in the 20th Century. It had a suitably French, downer ending, with the protagonist dying in a winter cemetary. I can see why it didn't get published in Verne's lifetime.

Now I'm reading another Winter themed book: The Left Hand of Darkness. It's a reread. The last time I read it in high school, so I have totally forgotten the ending, although certain scenes remain in my head. e.g. Genly Ai walking through a forest of red trees, the landships driving over the snow. Le Guin is very good at worldbuilding in her description - just in her own, subtle way. However, on the second reading, I've discovered places where the connections between this book and her other "Hainish" books rubs a bit thin - that is, it stretches probability farther than it needs to go in order to make a tenuous in-text connection. Unless she's trying to make a point about the nature of the novel or point out its construction as a creation of her authorship, which would be very post-modern (despite Cervantes having done it), and I don't think she's trying to do that. It could be stealth marketing...But that kind of thing doesn't affect me. Hmm....Maybe I should go check out Rocannon's World...

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Readerbreeder wrote:
Currently reading The Very Best of Tad Williams a short fiction collection by, of course, Tad Williams. I'm enjoying it; it's nice to see that Mr. Williams does not excel only at epic-length epic fiction.

I might try that since I like Williams' writing style but his doorstop novels are just too long to keep my interest.

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1 person marked this as a favorite.

I was expecting the tedious misogyny in Paris in the 20th Century, because I skimmed through before reading, but it is inadvertently funny when a character says, "There have been no true women since our grandmothers' time..." and he's supposed to be a guy in his 30s. Hold on there, Jules, you're getting way ahead of yourself. The GMILF won't be a "thing" until at least the 1970s*!

*e.g. "Harold and Maude" et al.

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ClingClong wrote:

"Foucault's Pendulum" by Umberto Eco

I'm a bout a third in and still can't quite suss out the main plot. But a few paragraphs blew my mind. So I keep reading.

A lot of the book is like that. If you can push past the Knights Templars chapters the ending is just amazing. It's my favorite Umberto Eco novel.

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Mantel is taking too long on the last Cromwell book, dangit! I blame television.

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1 person marked this as a favorite.

I've put Rite of Passage on pause for now after not getting very far in it. I've turned to Jules Verne's Paris in the 20th Century. I'm really enjoying it, and it reads quickly despite my needing to page through the endnotes when he name-drops now-obscure 19th c. industrialists.

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I'm getting strong deja vu from Rite of Passage although I'd swear I've never read it before. I must have read a summary somewhere, possibly in some sci-fi essay/critcism I've read.

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2 people marked this as a favorite.

Yay! Counterspell! When I played a wizard that never worked, though.

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I finished The Unwilling Warlord, by Lawrence Watt-Evans. The protagonist was quite a passive fellow, and I feel like Watt-Evans wanted to go somewhere interesting with his relationship to the more-active villain but didn't quite get there. It was a light, quick read.

I also re-read Shirley Jackson's We Have Always Lived in the Castle, in honor of her 100th birthday this year. I highly recommend it if you haven't read it, along with The Haunting of Hill House.

Spoiler:
There's a new movie of WHALitC coming sometime next year - although I must admit the actress playing Merricat doesn't look at all like how I envisioned her. I don't know how they're going to keep it from being funny instead of creepy because Jackson's 1st person unreliable narrative doesn't seem like it would easily translate to film. Stanley Kubrick managed it with Nabokov's Lolita, to some success - while deviating a bit from the book ['scuse the pun], but Nabokov was never aiming for a Gothic vein and Kubrick was directing Peter Sellers.

Next I'll probably be reading Alexei Panshin's Rite of Passage, but maybe not since there are a good 2 dozen books on my nightstand waiting patiently for me to read them.

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1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'm rereading We Have Always Lived in the Castle, by Shirley Jackson. (This year marks the 100th anniversary of her birth).

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Why is he talking about NAFTA and including Japan?! And he did not address the question of taxes; NAFTA isn't about taxes, it's about eliminating or reducing tariffs.

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Diego Valdez wrote:

Hello Zeugma,

Thank you for letting me know. The order was being a bit stubborn about applying your store credit so I had to move the items to a new order. I was able to apply all of the store credit and everything should be ok now. You will be receiving an email confirmation for the new order.

Thank you!

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Dear Customer Service,
I received an e-mail that there was no payment method for this order, however, I was applying my store credit to the order as per what it says on my account: "You have a store credit balance of $29.85 that you may apply toward future purchases." I wanted to apply the complete store credit, but it looks like it only applied $4.34 to my purchase, and has requested a payment method for the rest. IF you apply the whole credit, I don't think I'll have any remaining balance for the order that would necessitate an additional payment method (i.e. credit or debit). Please let me know if this is so.
Sincerely,
Zeugma

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¡Mas Manu Chao!

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2 people marked this as a favorite.

Manu Chao's "Desaparecido"

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Thanks Comrade, another book for my TBR Jenga pile! Most interested in what Bahktin has to say about the Quijote.

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1 person marked this as a favorite.
Thomas Seitz wrote:
I read Cevantes. Does that help?

It always helps to be able to laugh at life's tragedies and absurdities and society's conceits.

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I read Kant and Hegel in my Philosophy survey course as an undergrad, so it's not just doctoral students who are capable of reading him. You don't have to be a doctoral student to grasp the idea of "thesis-antithesis-synthesis." Hegel may be worth while, even if he isn't read generally for political economy.

I commend Mike Rowe for what he's written, even though I worry that what he advocates is predicated on an education attainment that we've placed such barriers to for so many (and is perhaps a bridge too far for some).

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Michael Whelan did the Pern covers. I never got into Pern. For human figures, Sweet's tend to seem more dynamic to me, as if they are about to spring into motion, or are painted in motion. Whelan's figures tend to seem more static, as if they aren't about to move. There are exceptions, of course.

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Rolling my Cha modifier

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Irontruth wrote:

The skulking and pacing didn't help him and could have avoided so easily. It just makes it clear that he doesn't like to prep/practice, cause that would be admitting he doesn't know how to do the thing already.

When not answering a question, Hillary did the smart thing. Sit down and occasionally write something down on her pad of paper.

Someone really needed to tell Donald to do the same thing. When it's not your turn, sit down and jot something on the paper. Even if it's just stick figure drawings, it doesn't matter. It'll make you look calm, composed and smart. Instead, the pacing and glaring made him look awkward and agitated.

At one point, when the CNN camera was tracking him, his pacing made it look like he was turning his back on the audience. That is something that could so easily have been avoided.

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Name one thing you like about your opponent.

My Dad (to the tv): his hair!

Me: Dad, no one likes his hair.

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At least Scalia didn't interrupt his own answers in a line of questioning.

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The Unwilling Warlord, by Lawrence Watt-Evans. I picked it up from a Little Free Library kiosk for the awesome technicolor 1989 cover illustration.

The illustrator also did the Wheel of Time covers: Darrel K. Sweet

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3 people marked this as a favorite.

The level of dedication you all put into your games is amazing and it shows! I'm incredibly jealous! Keep up the good work; this is just inspiring.

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Brings new meaning to "frog song." I like that Bara's song only affects Malek. ; )

Link

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Just thought I'd link in case anyone is planning on using Iara as a monster in their campaign/game: The "Rejected Princesses" website did Iara!

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stormcrow27 wrote:
For an awesome example of dwarven women with beards who then shave them and some great stories, check out the Rat Queens comic by Image. Dwarven women start shaving their beards as a protest against traditional male dwarven standards of beauty and it eventually becomes a hipster tradition like man-buns are now. The dwarven smiths also use their younger daughters to model armor they have finished forging, and a bunch of other stuff. It's a great post-modern take on traditional dwarves.

Rat Queens is awesome!

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1 person marked this as a favorite.

V's familiar is certainly a highlight of the comic; and probably a pleasant surprise to Rich how much he could mine the character for sarcastic quips as well as act as an audience surrogate.

I also like how Rich set up the frames/gutters for the giant-killing sequence. Belkar's never been my favorite character but he lends himself nicely to action sequences!

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Ruins of Azlant sounds exciting! It also looks like there will be some nautical elements. :)

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4 people marked this as a favorite.

For my next three picks: why not a city under the distant shore, such as those mentioned in "Oceans of Golarion" from Raiders of the Fever Sea?

5) The cecaelias city of Sihuw.

6) Alohmba, built on the shell of Belimehu the Blind Mother.

7) The Tian Xia nation of Xidao (probably a bit more accessible than the first two for air-breathers).

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1) Somewhere in Casmaron; possibly Kaladay. I'd love to find out what a city with a large Sweettalkers population would look like (or sound like).

2) Another monster city. Dhucharg was a surprise highlight of the Distant Shores book for me. It had so many seeds for adventure!

3) Mzali! I know there's already some information on this city, but it'd be nice to see it expanded with a nice map and additional locations, and cultural details.

4) Somewhere in Arcadia; possibly a city in Razatlan.

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</lurk mode>

<.<

>.>

...

no new comic

<lurk mode>

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I'm thinking about making the dress worn by Mayor Wanakeena from the Segada entry in the "Distant Shores" campaign setting sourcebook. I'm not sure how to do her hairdoo, though.

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Hola from LA!* I can't let San Francisco** have the only Cal pin on the map!

*El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reina de los Angeles del Rio Porciuncula.

**And Berkeley too. Can't forget the actual Cal.

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Amelia Earhart? Srsly? Did he object to her support for ERA or the fact she married a divorced man? Or the fact she flew airplanes? Or the unpardonable fact that she was a woman?

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Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

...when I get back from yelling at the school board committee member in Manchester who didn't want free books about Nelson Mandela and Frederick Douglass because it was pushing a political agenda of "multiculturalism,"...

SMH. Of course, at one of the libraries where I work there is half a shelf in the kid's section on Mandela, and MLK gets a shelf and a half (along with about a foot of Coretta). Which is good! Don't get me wrong, I'd never begrudge their shelf space (keep in mind, a kids' book is usually less than 1-2 in. wide so that's a lot of books!). But it'd be nice to see more stuff on Shirley Chisholm, A Philip Randolph, etc. At this point, MLK is up there with Washington and Lincoln as "people we learn a few facts about in school" and I don't see how kids can really see themselves in positions of leadership if we don't present them with a wide variety of leaders to emulate.

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2 people marked this as a favorite.

Good luck, Liz! Please come lurk (or post) on the message boards here from time to time!

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That is one beautiful, awesome, pulpy cover!

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This thread is helping me grok what George Orwell is going on about in "Homage to Catalonia" (the book I'm reading now).

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1 person marked this as a favorite.

"Outside Spain few people grasped that there was a revolution; inside Spain nobody doubted it."
-- George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia

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