Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Zovarue

Zeugma's page

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 1,226 posts (1,398 including aliases). 4 reviews. 1 list. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 6 aliases.


RSS

1 to 50 of 1,226 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Keillor's Liberty was ok; mildly amusing but not laugh-out-loud funny.
Now I'm re-reading Lords and Ladies by Terry Pratchett. I'd re-read Witches Abroad last week and it seems I'm working my way forward chronologically. I still haven't read The Shepherd's Crown yet.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'm reading Liberty, by Garrison Keillor, for a book club. I did not pick this book. Although I've occasionally enjoyed his "A Prairie Home Companion" radio show, a whole novel of Lake Wobegon is a bit too much.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

According to the map, my current closest neighbor is TriOmegaZero in Phoenix (about 373 miles, according to Google). My second-closest neighbor is Tinfoil Yamakah in San Francisco (about 382 miles according to Google).

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Okay. Thanks.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I think you have some very cool ideas, Axial! You may need to do a lot of work to add in the Molthune stuff, though.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'd vote for Legacy of Fire.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

@Readerbreeder: have you read Orwell's Homage to Catalonia? The way he describes being shot in the neck, and later his participation in the street fighting in Barcelona, is crazily "understated British."

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

This king was standing in the middle of a crowd of shouting miners.

--Terry Pratchett, Witches Abroad

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Also, I didn't see where I could apply my remaining store credit to the order. Is that something I can't do when I sidecar an order or was I just not looking in the right place on the webpage? If it's possible, can you apply the store credit to the order?

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Dear Customer Service,
I think the item I added to my sidecar has been reduced in price. It was previously 12.99 and now the website says 7.99. Is this correct? I saw on the message-boards that there may be a glitch in pricing and was wondering if it was an error because the new price wasn't reflected when I placed my order.
Thanks,
Zeugma

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Thank you for all of your reviews Lord Snow.

thoughts:
PoV is so tricky!I too find the "irrelevant character PoV" very annoying; it feels like the author hasn't worked hard to find a way to provide the information or plot point through an important character. Loren D Estleman wrote a magnificent essay on the topic of PoV in the how-to book Writing Mysteries, edited by Sue Grafton. Third-person objective PoV - where we are entirely outside of the characters and never know their inner thoughts, as you've described, foregoes one of the great pleasures of reading novels: knowing what someone is thinking without being actually psychic. Third-person objective is like reading a movie script. Estleman says there's only a handful of full-length novels that do this well, most notably The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett. By not knowing what Sam Spade is thinking, it helps build suspense because the reader doesn't know what he is going to do next, or what clues he may have picked up about the Maltese Falcon.
Anyway, that's my 2 cp. Happy reading in 2017!

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Ooh! The Onyx Citadel! I'm looking forward to this!

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I noticed that this volume and the next one in the series are both scheduled to release in March now. Are we getting 2 volumes of this AP in March, or will the other releases be pushed back?

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

My library got an exhibitor license for this movie, so we'll be showing it next month!

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I finished A Slight Trick of the Mind. It was alright, but I still like the movie better. "Mr. Holmes" has a happier ending.

Books read so far for 2016: 47

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Yet Roger's initial query regarding the Japanese honeybees was never addressed (the boy being far too polite to press it).

- A Slight Trick of the Mind, by Mitch Cullin

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'd like to keep with Lord Snow's "reading year in review" theme, but I haven't taken as detailed notes as he has (and I don't have a Goodreads account).
Books read so far: 46
My top 5 books of 2016:

Spoiler:
In no particular order:
1. Cry the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton. The story of a South African priest, a landowner, and their respective sons. The only book this year that made me cry. I really haven't cried at a book since I read In Cold Blood years and years ago. One of the best works of realistic fiction I've read.
2. A is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie, by Kathryn Harkup. This Edgar Award finalist made organic chemistry interesting and understandable to me (a C-student in High School science); it helped that I'm a huge Agatha Christie fan, but anyone interested in forensics and medicine could find value in this book.
3. Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking, by Susan Cain. Cain's book explores how our "extrovert ideal" harms people who are more introverted. As someone who grew up on the shy side, I could definitely relate.
4. The Grand Tour: The European Adventures of a Continental Drifter, by Tim Moore. The hilarious adventures of Tim Moore as he tries to retrace the steps of one of the world's first European tourists, 17th century "explorer" Thomas Coryate.
5. The Fourth Bear, by Jasper Fforde. A "nursery crime" book that feels just as madcap and bearly restrained as the last Fforde plot, but with more of a message about being true to oneself, and a (serial)killer ending to die for!

Bottom 5 books of 2016:

Spoiler:

1. through 3. "The Darwath Trilogy" by Barbara Hambly. The themes didn't coalesce into something greater than their parts for me, and the paper villains and ethnic stereotypes just turned me off. Good fight scenes, though.
4. The Body in the Wardrobe, by Katherine Page. A light cosy mystery that I could have enjoyed had it been fair play. It wasn't. Any mystery that invokes the supernatural for an explanation and doesn't lay out that it's going to be a ghost story on page 1 is setting itself up to be discredited. At least "the butler did it" is a plausible explanation!
5. Sayonara Slam, by Naomi Hirahara. I liked this mystery from Edgar Award-winner Hirahara; the detective, Mas Arai, is like a more-curmudgeonly Inspector Columbo, and I enjoyed the background and details of the crime as much as her last book. But I figured out who the killer was by the middle of the book, so it didn't hold my interest.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I think Aouda has a bigger role in the stage play. However, that could be my own misperception since Mark Brown's English translation I saw has a cast of 5 playing multiple roles, so the actress who has Aouda's role also has other lines for other characters. I'm not sure about the Verne version of the play, as I only saw this English translation.

P.S. It was great! If you get the chance, go see it!

P.P.S. When I read the book, I shipped Aouda and Passepartout, not her and Fogg. Passepartout is just a more relatable character.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Kajehase wrote:


From memory:
I know Michael Strogoff would make one heck of a war/road movie set in Siberia. There's a showdown with savage coloured people.
Off On a Comet is a fun bit of fluff about a French officer who is sent off into space when an asteroid rips the Gibraltar sound off Earth.
The Begum's Fortune is a spy story/Verne's revenge on the Germans for being ruined by the Franco-Prussian War.
Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon is a travelogue along the Amazon river. At one point caymans attack.
Tribulations of a Chinaman in China is the "I've arranged for my own murder, changed my mind, but can't cancel the contract, oh crap." Features two unflappable British insurance agents as comic relief.
The Steam House is a bunch of Brits travelling through India in a steam-driven elephant. There's a showdown with savage coloured people.
Mathias Sandorf is the Count of Monte Cristo in Hungary. There's a showdown with savage coloured people.
Robur the Conqueror is about a man who's invented a lighter-than-air ship. Sort of a less satisfying 20'000 Leagues Under the Sea
The Purchase of the North Pole features the heros from From the Earth to the Moon and From the Moon to the Earth as they try to remove the tilt of the Earth's axis (a bad idea).

Wow! You've sure read a lot of Verne!

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The Lighthouse at the End of the World is about pirates attacking an isolated lighthouse at the tip of Argentina. It's on my list of books I want to read. It was also made into a movie starring Kirk Douglas and Yul Brynner.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

@Aaron Bitman: Thanks for pointing out that it was the character, not the author, who is expressing misogyny. It was a brief post and I didn't make that distinction - but it is an important one to make. Verne tends to create opinionated characters (e.g. the impulsive Ned Land in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, or the single-minded Detective Fix in Around the World in 80 Days).

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I still have the flu. Thanks, Cosmo.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Does no one play bards anymore? Why would a bard be sub-optimal for this campaign (vs. just sub-optimal generally)?

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

This order is supposed to be part of my Adventure Path subscription, but it is not showing up on the My Subscriptions page. Is Pending Orders not counted as part of the Subscription?

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

So far in A Slight Trick of the Mind Sherlock is doing a bit more detecting than he does in the movie, but it looks like it isn't adding up to much. I'm not sure how I feel about it yet. It was a quiet little movie and so far seems to be a quiet little book.

Cullins' Holmes is Holmesian enough, without becoming a pastiche. However, Cullins' describing Holmes with a beard just doesn't work for me, since Ian McKellen doesn't wear one in the movie. Nor did Basil Rathbone, who, IMO, is the "best" Sherlock Holmes... Jeremy Brett is a close second.

Read-alike: The Final Solution, by Michael Chabon

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I blame Cosmo for giving me a cold on the last day of work before my vacation.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Aberzombie wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:
Did you finish Stranger Things?

Oh yeah! Great f@&%ing show! It reminded me a lot of my youth, insofar as the references, cars, visuals, bike riding all over, etc. Not so much regarding the psychic chicks, people-eating nightmare monsters, or bizarre shadow realms. It also reminded me a lot of some Stephen King stuff - can't help but wonder if the creators are fans of his.

Winona Ryder's performance was really great. I also liked the sheriff dude. Last time I saw that actor, he was in The Equalizer with Denzel Washington, also playing a cop, but a crooked one. Of the kids, the one with the missing teeth was my favorite. Matthew Modine was creepy as f&&%.

Wait whut? Matthew Modine AND Winona Ryder are in this? Shoot, now I'll have to see it.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Women scare robber out of store by whipping sex toys at his face

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

2 Questions:
1) What is the creature on the mock-up cover? She(?) looks like a faun?
2) When will you announce the last volume of this adventure path? Does it have a title yet?

The Exchange

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I LOVE the purple dragon on the cover!

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The minotaur reminds me of this scene: Can I go home?

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
SmiloDan wrote:
Zeugma wrote:

I finished The Left Hand of Darkness. Some things I thought I remembered were not in the book, specifically ** spoiler omitted ** Still an enjoyable story, with a good message about humanity overcoming differences at the end.

I'm not sure what I want to read next. I'm starting a new job soon and I know I will do more work-related reading so I'm not sure I want to start a big epic novel or anything. I have the "Mr. Holmes" novella on hold at the library, so maybe that will tide me over till the new job starts (just before Xmas!).

Do you consider Jules Verne steampunk, and if so, do you like steampunk?

If you answered "Yes" to some of that, and want some quick fun reads, I suggest Soulless by Gail Carriger (a steampunk comedy of manners with vampires and werewolves, but polite vampires and werewolves, and a kickass heroine, but not an Underworld-type of kickass heroine, even though she also deals with vampires and werewolves...) and Retribution Falls by Chris Wooding (basically a steampunk version of Firefly, but with a distinct lack of vampires and werewolves. Some kickass heroines. ).

I should try Gail Carriger. Some of her books are shelved YA in the public library I work at, and I actually don't read enough YA. I don't think of Verne as being particularly steampunk, but I have read some William Gibson, so perhaps I lean cyberpunk? But I do like historical fiction & sci-fi. I think it would have to be very cleverly done for the historical and the sci-fi to mix just right, to where I'm not constantly questioning the history, or the etiquette, or the language, or the tech. I just don't want to get burned by something that is unfunny and painful to watch and ahistorical, like the Will Smith movie "Wild Wild West."

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The "Mr. Holmes" book arrived: A Slight Trick of the Mind, by Mitch Cullins. So far it is tracking pretty closely to the movie, but I read that it will diverge from the film in interesting ways, so I'm hoping to be surprised. I can't judge yet, but it has a high standard to live up to, since I loved Ian McKellen and Laura Linney in the movie.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I finished The Left Hand of Darkness. Some things I thought I remembered were not in the book, specifically

Spoiler:
I thought Estraven shared kemmer with Ai, but it was not so! ...so, not as much alien sex as I'd thought there was, in other words.
Still an enjoyable story, with a good message about humanity overcoming differences at the end.
I'm not sure what I want to read next. I'm starting a new job soon and I know I will do more work-related reading so I'm not sure I want to start a big epic novel or anything. I have the "Mr. Holmes" novella on hold at the library, so maybe that will tide me over till the new job starts (just before Xmas!).

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Joe Dirt.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I've gotta agree KC, "Rescuers Down Under" is actually way better than the first "Rescuers," too.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Set wrote:
Cole Deschain wrote:
The Lost Boys. "One thing about living in Santa Carla I never could stomach; all the damn vampires."

Woo! Vampire movies! I can watch The Lost Boys or Vamp or Near Dark on endless repeat.

For comedies, it's Clue, Oscar, A Fish Called Wanda, Soapdish, etc.

There's also pulpy stuff (some campy, some almost serious), like The Shadow, The Rocketeer, The Phantom, Flash Gordon or Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow.

Have you seen Without a Clue? Michael Caine as Sherlock Holmes and Ben Kingsley as Dr. Watson. Hilarious!

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Tremors 5: Bloodlines

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Tremors 4: The Legend Begins

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Tremors 3: Back to Perfection

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Tremors II: Afterschocks

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Tremors.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Twistlok wrote:

Shawn of the Dead

Hot Fuzz
The Worlds End

My dad and I laughed like maniacs at Simon Pegg in "A Fantastic Fear of Everything." No brain cells required.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I finished Paris in the 20th Century. It had a suitably French, downer ending, with the protagonist dying in a winter cemetary. I can see why it didn't get published in Verne's lifetime.

Now I'm reading another Winter themed book: The Left Hand of Darkness. It's a reread. The last time I read it in high school, so I have totally forgotten the ending, although certain scenes remain in my head. e.g. Genly Ai walking through a forest of red trees, the landships driving over the snow. Le Guin is very good at worldbuilding in her description - just in her own, subtle way. However, on the second reading, I've discovered places where the connections between this book and her other "Hainish" books rubs a bit thin - that is, it stretches probability farther than it needs to go in order to make a tenuous in-text connection. Unless she's trying to make a point about the nature of the novel or point out its construction as a creation of her authorship, which would be very post-modern (despite Cervantes having done it), and I don't think she's trying to do that. It could be stealth marketing...But that kind of thing doesn't affect me. Hmm....Maybe I should go check out Rocannon's World...

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Readerbreeder wrote:
Currently reading The Very Best of Tad Williams a short fiction collection by, of course, Tad Williams. I'm enjoying it; it's nice to see that Mr. Williams does not excel only at epic-length epic fiction.

I might try that since I like Williams' writing style but his doorstop novels are just too long to keep my interest.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I was expecting the tedious misogyny in Paris in the 20th Century, because I skimmed through before reading, but it is inadvertently funny when a character says, "There have been no true women since our grandmothers' time..." and he's supposed to be a guy in his 30s. Hold on there, Jules, you're getting way ahead of yourself. The GMILF won't be a "thing" until at least the 1970s*!

*e.g. "Harold and Maude" et al.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
ClingClong wrote:

"Foucault's Pendulum" by Umberto Eco

I'm a bout a third in and still can't quite suss out the main plot. But a few paragraphs blew my mind. So I keep reading.

A lot of the book is like that. If you can push past the Knights Templars chapters the ending is just amazing. It's my favorite Umberto Eco novel.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Mantel is taking too long on the last Cromwell book, dangit! I blame television.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I've put Rite of Passage on pause for now after not getting very far in it. I've turned to Jules Verne's Paris in the 20th Century. I'm really enjoying it, and it reads quickly despite my needing to page through the endnotes when he name-drops now-obscure 19th c. industrialists.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'm getting strong deja vu from Rite of Passage although I'd swear I've never read it before. I must have read a summary somewhere, possibly in some sci-fi essay/critcism I've read.

1 to 50 of 1,226 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

©2002–2016 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.