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Zovarue

Zeugma's page

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 1,253 posts (1,426 including aliases). 4 reviews. 1 list. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 6 aliases.


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<sarcasm>Thanks, 137ben!</sarcasm> Now I feel super old!

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That puts things in perspective for anyone playing a dwarf or elf character. I can see the Nirmathi human characters getting peeved each time the elf forgets and tells them she wants to "free Molthune from the goblinoid menace!"

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Classic half-elf bard with a few levels of sorcerer for extra firepower.

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Come on, Giant! Let's get back to Roy's giant-bashing!

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Thank you so much, Diego! That really cleared things up for me. And my package arrived today!

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Charles Scholz wrote:

Newfound snail named after D&D goddess

That's so cool! I always wonder about these novel taxonomies - I mean, how do they know it isn't already a relative or subspecies of another type of snail? That said, I have no problem with the names.

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I quit The Fifth Servant. It's very well written, and the period details (16th century Prague) are excellent, but the plot is just too noir for me at the moment. I don't do well with even imaginary torture and I skimmed ahead and saw some of the Inquisition scenes coming up and decided I didn't need this in my life right now. I'll try to pick it up again when I'm in a better mood.

I've started reading Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain, by Antonio Damasio. I suspect the science is a bit out of date but I'm enjoying it so far. It's kind of a slow read for me since I haven't taken a biology course since my first year of college, but it meshes with some of the articles I read about how Pixar developed the movie "Inside Out", about the emotional building-blocks of personality.

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Dear Paizo,
My order has still not arrived, even though my payment was charged on Feb. 8. The order said it would probably take between 4 to 8 days to arrive. Is it too soon to worry? I was wondering if the snow up in your part of the country put a delay on shipments, or if I should start worrying about mailbox-thieves.

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I'm debating whether to start The Fifth Servant or just read Lumberjanes comics until my book club book come in.

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I finished The Lighthouse at the End of the World, by Jules Verne. Lots of pirates, some derring-do, and loving descriptions of ships (lots and lots of this!). I'd recommend it to people who enjoy Patrick O'Brien and other age-of-sail type books. It isn't a very "sci-fi" Jules Verne here but in a realistic vein.

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Philo Pharynx wrote:


A Scanner Darkly is a Phillip K Dick mindbender, if you're into that. It fills the Rule of Keanu by definition. (Movies where Keanu's character knows less about what's going on than somebody else tend to be better) I had my own Whoa! moment, when it showed the freeway off ramp I take every day.

You live in LA, too? I loved that movie! I didn't know the Rule of Keanu but it makes sense. I saw that movie when I was getting into a funk post-college. It was kind of a highlight for me because I went to the theater alone to avoid my sister's birthday party and her super-annoying happy friends, and it's just enough weird+downer that it made me feel better.

Movies: Record of Lodoss War (but does it count because it is more of mini-series than a 2-hour type movie?)

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Fourshadow wrote:

Anyone remember one of his first works? "A Man For All Seasons" is a favorite movie of mine. 1966 Best Picture about the schism between Sir Thomas More and his friend Henry VIII. John Hurt plays a pivotal role as Richard Rich.

Everyone should see this movie at least once. Seriously.

I love that movie! Hurt was great in that role! Have you read Wolf Hall, by Hilary Mantel? Leo McKern played Cromwell in the 1966 AMFAS as a bulldog defender of Henry VIII and that was my impression of Cromwell until I read her novel; it's from Cromwell's POV so we get a totally different, less favorable impression of Thomas More.

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Here's a link to the Frontiers of Imagination series! link

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Also, of probable interest to the readers of this thread, the academic publisher of the manuscript Lighthouse also published Francis Stevens' The Nightmare and other short stories! And a bunch of Edgar Rice Burroughs, A. Merritt, and Clark Ashton Smith reprints! It's the Bison Frontiers of Imagination Series by University of Nebraska Press.

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I'm getting around to reading Verne's The Lighthouse at the end of the world. It's good so far, with lots of facts and speculation about the future of lighthouses in Tierra del Fuego. But I got the manuscript translation, the one that's not edited by Michel Verne, so there are some consistency errors. I wish I could get a good English translation of the Michel version but it ain't available for free from my local library and I'm too lazy and impecunious to try elsewhere.

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The 1900 Christmas issue of Munsey's Magazine that I found in a workroom at school. I had to eventually get rid of it because it developed mold. There were color plates for the front and back covers! And they certainly don't do etched plates for magazine illustrations nowadays, do they? No, they just photoshop stock images! [sheds a tear]

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I finished Jepp, who defied the stars, by Katherine Marsh. I really enjoyed it - the ending was heartwarming. The level of historical detail was right for a YA audience with a teenaged protagonist, and there were some really intense themes as I expected, given the 16th century setting and characters. My one big disappointment is that Marsh changed some historical dates so that Jepp is presented at both the court of the Infanta of Spain and at Uraniborg to Tycho Brahe. I feel Marsh could have got around this problem by choosing a different court for Jepp - but that would likely have created other problems as both the queen's and astronomer's courts are crucial to the plot, and not merely a backdrop to the action.

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Tarondor wrote:

In the last six weeks:

Babylon's Ashes by James S.A. Corey
The Cold Dish by Craig Johnson
Death Without Company by Craig Johnson
We Are Legion, We are Bob by Dennis E. Taylor
Kindness Goes Unpunished by Craig Johnson
The Flame Bearer by Bernard Cornwell
Devil in the White City by Erik Larsen
Another Man's Moccasins by Craig Johnson
William Tecumseh Sherman by James Lee McDonough
The Plantagenets by Dan Jones (which I'm reading for the second time)

The Plantagenets sounds interesting. Is it historical fiction or a history book?

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This thread always makes me smile.

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I Ain't Gonna Give Nobody None of My Jellyroll

and

He May Be Your Dog But He's Wearing My Collar

Why don't songs have clever lyrics and innuendo like they used to, I want to know?

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I finished my bookclub book, The Light Between Oceans. I was unexpectedly moved by the final two chapters, even though Stedman calculates events to maximize the pathos.

Spoiler:
A child returns to the estranged family that raised her only a few weeks AFTER the mother has died of cancer. Yeah, it's that kind of story.

I thought I'd start on the Verne, but I'm kind of tired of lighthouses at this point so I'm reading Jepp, Who Defied the Stars instead. It's a YA historical-fiction novel from the perspective of the court dwarf who was imprisoned at Uraniborg by Tycho Brahe. So far so good, but knowing a little bit about the actual history, I think I can see where the plot is going to go and I'm only on Chapter 2.

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Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:

Books-wise, I lost my bag on Thursday and was bereft of my reading material all weekend, so I started reading Charles A. Beard's An Economic Interpretation of the United States Constitution. Didn't get very far before I realized I left it at the church where I attended the "What Is Sanctuary?" meeting to organize rapid response teams to ICE raids (sorry, more politics) and had to walk through a mass performed in Khmer to recover it, got halfway through A Play of Knaves and finally got to the murder mystery.

Enjoying it thus far.

Because you liked A Play of Knaves: You may also like...the Brother Cadfael mysteries. I started off watching the tv show and then was surprised by how much richer and atmospheric the novels are. A morbid taste for bones is the first novel by Ellis Peters but I read Brother Cadfael's Penance (the last in the series) first.

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Gark the Goblin wrote:
Sorry, my meaning was, "Why are the people of the Tribe of the Sacred Serpent listed as Garundi? Were they meant to be that way, or were they meant to be Mwangi?"

I think it must have been a mistake when they put Garundi instead of Mwangi on page 35. The tribespeople only speak Polyglot and they are a long way away from northern Garund; culturally, I'd expect them to be more Mwangi than Garundi.

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Gark the Goblin wrote:
Is the Tribe of the Sacred Serpent intended to be Garundi and not Mwangi? They speak Polyglot but not Osiriani.

Visa versa:

Mwangi = Polyglot.
Garundi = Osiriani.
I think of the Garundi as more "North African" and Mwangi as more "Subsaharan African," going with the geographical analog of Garund continent = Africa analog.

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TOZ wrote:
Zeugma wrote:
I love how Roy's speech is just so contradicted in the last panel.
Roy's speech isn't contradicted, it's a juxtaposition highlighting the contrast between the two teams.

Well put, and more accurate than my statement when just looking at OotS as the main 6 characters of the webcomic (plus Blackwing). But I was thinking of the fight in the larger sense of the "team" being those on the airship vs. the enemy frost giants; in that sense, I think my statement can also stand.

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I love how Roy's speech is just so contradicted in the last panel.

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Inspired by @Judy Bauer, I also checked out The Lighthouse at the End of the World from my local library. Unfortunately it has to wait until I finish a different lighthouse-themed book for my book club, but Im looking forward to it more than I'm enjoying reading the current book.

for those interested:
It is called The Light Between Oceans, by M.L. Stedman. Apparently it was made into a movie. It's okay, but the characters' choices annoy me and the middle part is quite slow. I hope it picks up again.

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Keillor's Liberty was ok; mildly amusing but not laugh-out-loud funny.
Now I'm re-reading Lords and Ladies by Terry Pratchett. I'd re-read Witches Abroad last week and it seems I'm working my way forward chronologically. I still haven't read The Shepherd's Crown yet.

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I'm reading Liberty, by Garrison Keillor, for a book club. I did not pick this book. Although I've occasionally enjoyed his "A Prairie Home Companion" radio show, a whole novel of Lake Wobegon is a bit too much.

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According to the map, my current closest neighbor is TriOmegaZero in Phoenix (about 373 miles, according to Google). My second-closest neighbor is Tinfoil Yamakah in San Francisco (about 382 miles according to Google).

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Okay. Thanks.

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I think you have some very cool ideas, Axial! You may need to do a lot of work to add in the Molthune stuff, though.

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I'd vote for Legacy of Fire.

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@Readerbreeder: have you read Orwell's Homage to Catalonia? The way he describes being shot in the neck, and later his participation in the street fighting in Barcelona, is crazily "understated British."

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This king was standing in the middle of a crowd of shouting miners.

--Terry Pratchett, Witches Abroad

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Also, I didn't see where I could apply my remaining store credit to the order. Is that something I can't do when I sidecar an order or was I just not looking in the right place on the webpage? If it's possible, can you apply the store credit to the order?

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Dear Customer Service,
I think the item I added to my sidecar has been reduced in price. It was previously 12.99 and now the website says 7.99. Is this correct? I saw on the message-boards that there may be a glitch in pricing and was wondering if it was an error because the new price wasn't reflected when I placed my order.
Thanks,
Zeugma

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Thank you for all of your reviews Lord Snow.

thoughts:
PoV is so tricky!I too find the "irrelevant character PoV" very annoying; it feels like the author hasn't worked hard to find a way to provide the information or plot point through an important character. Loren D Estleman wrote a magnificent essay on the topic of PoV in the how-to book Writing Mysteries, edited by Sue Grafton. Third-person objective PoV - where we are entirely outside of the characters and never know their inner thoughts, as you've described, foregoes one of the great pleasures of reading novels: knowing what someone is thinking without being actually psychic. Third-person objective is like reading a movie script. Estleman says there's only a handful of full-length novels that do this well, most notably The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett. By not knowing what Sam Spade is thinking, it helps build suspense because the reader doesn't know what he is going to do next, or what clues he may have picked up about the Maltese Falcon.
Anyway, that's my 2 cp. Happy reading in 2017!

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Ooh! The Onyx Citadel! I'm looking forward to this!

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I noticed that this volume and the next one in the series are both scheduled to release in March now. Are we getting 2 volumes of this AP in March, or will the other releases be pushed back?

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My library got an exhibitor license for this movie, so we'll be showing it next month!

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I finished A Slight Trick of the Mind. It was alright, but I still like the movie better. "Mr. Holmes" has a happier ending.

Books read so far for 2016: 47

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Yet Roger's initial query regarding the Japanese honeybees was never addressed (the boy being far too polite to press it).

- A Slight Trick of the Mind, by Mitch Cullin

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I'd like to keep with Lord Snow's "reading year in review" theme, but I haven't taken as detailed notes as he has (and I don't have a Goodreads account).
Books read so far: 46
My top 5 books of 2016:

Spoiler:
In no particular order:
1. Cry the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton. The story of a South African priest, a landowner, and their respective sons. The only book this year that made me cry. I really haven't cried at a book since I read In Cold Blood years and years ago. One of the best works of realistic fiction I've read.
2. A is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie, by Kathryn Harkup. This Edgar Award finalist made organic chemistry interesting and understandable to me (a C-student in High School science); it helped that I'm a huge Agatha Christie fan, but anyone interested in forensics and medicine could find value in this book.
3. Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking, by Susan Cain. Cain's book explores how our "extrovert ideal" harms people who are more introverted. As someone who grew up on the shy side, I could definitely relate.
4. The Grand Tour: The European Adventures of a Continental Drifter, by Tim Moore. The hilarious adventures of Tim Moore as he tries to retrace the steps of one of the world's first European tourists, 17th century "explorer" Thomas Coryate.
5. The Fourth Bear, by Jasper Fforde. A "nursery crime" book that feels just as madcap and bearly restrained as the last Fforde plot, but with more of a message about being true to oneself, and a (serial)killer ending to die for!

Bottom 5 books of 2016:

Spoiler:

1. through 3. "The Darwath Trilogy" by Barbara Hambly. The themes didn't coalesce into something greater than their parts for me, and the paper villains and ethnic stereotypes just turned me off. Good fight scenes, though.
4. The Body in the Wardrobe, by Katherine Page. A light cosy mystery that I could have enjoyed had it been fair play. It wasn't. Any mystery that invokes the supernatural for an explanation and doesn't lay out that it's going to be a ghost story on page 1 is setting itself up to be discredited. At least "the butler did it" is a plausible explanation!
5. Sayonara Slam, by Naomi Hirahara. I liked this mystery from Edgar Award-winner Hirahara; the detective, Mas Arai, is like a more-curmudgeonly Inspector Columbo, and I enjoyed the background and details of the crime as much as her last book. But I figured out who the killer was by the middle of the book, so it didn't hold my interest.

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I think Aouda has a bigger role in the stage play. However, that could be my own misperception since Mark Brown's English translation I saw has a cast of 5 playing multiple roles, so the actress who has Aouda's role also has other lines for other characters. I'm not sure about the Verne version of the play, as I only saw this English translation.

P.S. It was great! If you get the chance, go see it!

P.P.S. When I read the book, I shipped Aouda and Passepartout, not her and Fogg. Passepartout is just a more relatable character.

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Kajehase wrote:


From memory:
I know Michael Strogoff would make one heck of a war/road movie set in Siberia. There's a showdown with savage coloured people.
Off On a Comet is a fun bit of fluff about a French officer who is sent off into space when an asteroid rips the Gibraltar sound off Earth.
The Begum's Fortune is a spy story/Verne's revenge on the Germans for being ruined by the Franco-Prussian War.
Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon is a travelogue along the Amazon river. At one point caymans attack.
Tribulations of a Chinaman in China is the "I've arranged for my own murder, changed my mind, but can't cancel the contract, oh crap." Features two unflappable British insurance agents as comic relief.
The Steam House is a bunch of Brits travelling through India in a steam-driven elephant. There's a showdown with savage coloured people.
Mathias Sandorf is the Count of Monte Cristo in Hungary. There's a showdown with savage coloured people.
Robur the Conqueror is about a man who's invented a lighter-than-air ship. Sort of a less satisfying 20'000 Leagues Under the Sea
The Purchase of the North Pole features the heros from From the Earth to the Moon and From the Moon to the Earth as they try to remove the tilt of the Earth's axis (a bad idea).

Wow! You've sure read a lot of Verne!

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The Lighthouse at the End of the World is about pirates attacking an isolated lighthouse at the tip of Argentina. It's on my list of books I want to read. It was also made into a movie starring Kirk Douglas and Yul Brynner.

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@Aaron Bitman: Thanks for pointing out that it was the character, not the author, who is expressing misogyny. It was a brief post and I didn't make that distinction - but it is an important one to make. Verne tends to create opinionated characters (e.g. the impulsive Ned Land in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, or the single-minded Detective Fix in Around the World in 80 Days).

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I still have the flu. Thanks, Cosmo.

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Does no one play bards anymore? Why would a bard be sub-optimal for this campaign (vs. just sub-optimal generally)?

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