Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Zovarue

Zeugma's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 922 posts (1,085 including aliases). 1 review. No lists. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 4 aliases.


RSS

1 to 50 of 922 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Qadira

Necromancer wrote:
Zeugma wrote:
2. Please don't stop with just reading Kafka! You do yourself a disservice if you fail to read the Kafka criticism of the last 50 years! A lot of what has been written is contradictory, but each critic has added to my understanding, and what with Kafka's last papers finally being prepared for the public after protracted custody disputes, now is a good time to revisit it.
It's interesting to watch how criticism changes over the years. My prefered method is to find the earliest analysis available and then read them (the interesting ones) chronologically.

The only difficulty with that approach is that if you start with Brod and (in English) Edwin Muir, you are getting in the former a very specific agenda, and in the latter a very incomplete view since, at that point, most of Kafka's oeuvre hadn't been posthumously published yet. Not that you can't do it, just that some of the conclusions that are drawn are off the mark if Kafka's works are taken as a whole.

Qadira

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Jean-Paul Sartre, Intrnet Troll wrote:
Zeugma wrote:
But once you read the truly brilliant, such as by Albert Camus,
[Curses in French]

Wouldn't your girlfriend Simone de Beauvior care to troll this thread, instead of you?

Qadira

2 people marked this as a favorite.

I agree with the Neil Gaiman article, although his evidence is much weaker, being drawn from Pratchett's life, than the evidence in Pratchett's books.

How can anyone read Pratchett's Night Watch and not think he has a lot of darkness in his soul? Yes, he is sending up torturers and secret police, but...he's sending up torturers and secret police!

I recently re-read his Monstrous Regiment. The part where Tonker says, "Yes, they were very good at seeming," about the Poor Girls Working House is just like a punch to the gut.

Anyone who calls Pratchett a "jolly old elf" is clearly not thinking about Terry Pratchett's elves.

Qadira

At second thought, I'm pretty sure that the Kafka criticism I read specifically about "The Trial" and the symbolic/literal aspects of K's guilt was by Walter Benjamin, and is not part of the Gray anthology. However, it should still be widely available.

Qadira

Necromancer wrote:
JurgenV wrote:
Necromancer wrote:

To help get us back on track:

Kafkatrapping

This is why I'm concerned for game culture, because this is common in other media industries and growing in society at large. Please read.

Yep that is exactly it.

Makes me think of the youtube guy called the amazing athiest that starts one vid whipping himself chanting"why am i white, why am i male, why can't i stop oppressing others?"

After reading it, I've decided to do two things:

1 - Reread The Trial (Der Prozess) and any other Kafka work I can get my hands on.

2 - Stop using the SJW pejorative and start calling people Kafkatrappers. More accuracy and less anger.

1. Congratulations! I'm a huge fan of Kafka. My favorite of his is "A Hunger Artist," and my second favorite is "Amerika." My third favorite is "A Country Doctor" for the longer short stories, pre-Aphorisms, but it is currently in a tie with "In the Penal Colony." "The Castle" and "The Trial" are better written than "Amerika" but I like his earlier epic better precisely because it is incomplete (or more incomplete than "The Castle") and because it is a wonderful European POV of what America means to an urbanized Prague Jew of the 1920s, and can be read as a criticism of both Americanism and urbanization while also seeing these forces as inexorable.

2. Please don't stop with just reading Kafka! You do yourself a disservice if you fail to read the Kafka criticism of the last 50 years! A lot of what has been written is contradictory, but each critic has added to my understanding, and what with Kafka's last papers finally being prepared for the public after protracted custody disputes, now is a good time to revisit it.

3. Kafkatrapper is not actually more accurate (see my previous post above). BUT if you want to argue it is, and do a different reading of "The Trial" than I have, be my guest. But once you read the truly brilliant criticism, such as by Albert Camus, people who throw around such a facile term as "Kafkaesque" will make you resentful when you read its overbroad and generalized misapplication. At least, it makes me resentful.

<shakes head, mumbles> people don't know what they're saying

Qadira

Necromancer wrote:

To help get us back on track:

Kafkatrapping

This is why I'm concerned for game culture, because this is common in other media industries and growing in society at large. Please read.

2 points:

1. Claims of "concern for [fill in the blank] culture" make me think of the claims made against heavy metal in the '80s, and all the moral panics preceding it, including D&D. It just reads as ironic.

2. The invocation of Kafka left me very disappointed in the article as written. I was hoping for Kafka criticism. This is not it. I've read The Trial and I've read a lot of Kafka criticism. This was a shallow use of a story with many more dimensions to it that those he pointed out. An alternate reading (arrived at by several authors in the Ronald Gray anthology Franz Kafa: A Collection of Critical Essays): Kafka's K was guilty. There is no escape from guilt. The fact it can be invoked to make us do/think/feel things is not some flaw but the sum of its function, which Kafka was brilliant at describing. Does it make you feel bad? Then it is doing its job. Some external referent isn't necessary. The author seems to think this is bad for society. He is wrong. Kafka would tell him it is society, and, more than that, it is K.

Qadira

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I had a bad experience at a convention with a smelly, large, very hairy man playing cross-gender at my table and doing it VERY badly, in the vaudevillian "man dresses up in coconuts and wig...makes pouty face...so-called hilarity ensues" way. He went through all the stereotypes about how "women" act: slutty, cares only about the gold/lootz, afraid to be a front-line fighter, dumb, etc.

The racial equivalent would be a white man wearing black-face to a convention to portray a "black" character and saying, "Where da white women at?" and "I sho' love watermelon, yessir" right in front of a group of black players.

As a cisgender woman that guy made me VERY uncomfortable. I suspect he would make cross-gender women uncomfortable too. Hell, I think he'd have made Norman Bates uncomfortable!

If you, dear reader, are going to play cross-gender, I recommend you do not do that. Divest of your stereotypes. Or, if you must use them, mediate them with positive qualities and develop a well-rounded character before you sit down at the table. If my first ever gaming experience had been with that man at the table, I would have walked away and never looked back, and later on, if I had kids, I'd be very reluctant to let any of my children play role-playing games for fear of them becoming like him.

Qadira

Caineach wrote:
thejeff wrote:

The discussion's moved on (and exploded) while I was away, but I'll add a couple of points back towards the start.

When I said the "reality of the day" I wasn't talking about when you (or I) were nerds in school, whenever that was, but back to the earliest roots of computer gaming. Back to that ad for the arcade game with the model in the transparent dress and back beyond that to the first hackers writing games on the old time share machines.
Women weren't involved back then to any noticeable degree, not because women just didn't happen to be interested in computer games, but because there was tremendous social pressure against women in any kind of hard science, including computers. This was back in the very early days of second wave feminism. I would hope that even those who deny sexism today will admit it existed back then.

For your response to the second point: it doesn't really matter whether I think it's a correct reaction or not. It's going to happen. Women are coming into gaming culture and gaming culture is going to change. You can fight back, but it can't be stopped, short of changes in the status of women in the outside world.

This isn't true. Like comics, women were actively involved at the beginning and then left. Look at 70s art and advertising instead of 80s. It was the 80s where gender stereotypes started being used. I suspect it was a large part of the cultural shift that encompassed a lot of other things too.

This is true of photography and filmmaking too, back in the 1880s-90s. When I studied film history in school, the reason given for the fall-off in female-produced content was a) "professionalization" and b) money (although those 2 points aren't really separate). Once Wall Street saw that [movies/comics/videogames] was making serious money instead of being just a fringe interest, they folded it into Madison Avenue's existing business model for selling stuff (i.e. Lowest Common Denominator selling) and co-opted it, making it harder for competing groups (e.g. women, minorities) to profit in an area that the Establishment suddenly wanted to compete in; when the Big Money shoved aside the Little Money, we saw a lot fewer women and minorities get the jobs and a lot less content directed at such low-dollar groups.

Qadira

Simon Legrande wrote:
What if "Women are just naturally less interested in hard science" is actually true? Have there been studies by anyone to prove that women are just as interested in hard sciences as men are?

They've done studies of sex-segregated vs. mixed-sex classrooms that have shown that among student achievers in mixed-sex classes, the girls get lower grades in STEM classes than the girls in single-sex STEM classes. In other words, girls show greater aptitude and interest in STEM when in a society of females than they do in mixed company. Now whether or not the girls are more or less "interested" in science as a class than boys as a class really hasn't been compared (at least not in the studies I've read). Compulsory schooling means that kids have to take classes no matter what their interest level. However, better grades does imply that the girls are academically engaged with STEM subjects. The conclusion is that environment makes a big difference in interest/achievement. SO NO, women are not "naturally" less interested in STEM; social/environmental factors influence interest levels. There is nothing "natural" about it.

Female achievement in STEM workforce (in terms of jobs and measurements of achievement) is a whole different kettle of fish which I won't get into here. Schools provide sort-of-ideal controls for social experiment because of standardized curricula and natural division by age group and ability. Workforce studies are a lot more difficult to carry out and draw conclusions from. I'd assume video-game studies are even more complicated to control, although if the focus-group R&D money of several game companies was pooled and went to such an experiment it might provide fascinating results.

Qadira

I also finished L.E. Modesitt, Jr.'s The Soprano Sorceress. It wasn't as dull as it was made out to be, but it was not as interesting or exciting as it ought to have been, judging by the title/cover. It's one of those books that just didn't live up to its potential but wasn't frustrating/boring enough for me to not finish reading it.

Things that specifically got on my nerves:

Spoiler:
Modesitt, Jr. has some late-'90s views of feminism that make Anna, the protagonist, a bit of a Mary Sue, in that other characters/obstacles are sometimes set up as straw-men so a feminist Aesop can be delivered (dang, I TV Trope too much!). It's not something that bothers me so much as I feel it doesn't do justice to a topic that deserves a more nuanced portrayal, even in fantasy novels. I could say, "At least it isn't misogynistic drivel," but as a reader I still hoped for a higher standard than "After School Special."

The large cast didn't help round out the world as much as it ought to have. The villains were an ensemble; the BBEG didn't get enough face-time or active moments in the story (except for very early on), which made the plot feel less urgent and disconnected. I don't like it when villains just cackle evilly and scry on people most of the time and then the Mary Sue comes in and wipes them out before we get a chance to really know them.

Finally, one of the characters, Daffyd, who dies in the end with no real payoff, is one of the few Modesitt actually spent a lot of time building up with an interesting background and motivations. I thought his relationship with Anna was actually worth exploring more than it was and I was frustrated that his death didn't lend anything to the story.

I may read the next book in the series, but more likely I won't.

Qadira

I'm reading Iain Pears' An Instance of the Fingerpost. It's slow going. I can't read it before/after I eat because it's about Oxford vivisectionists in the 1660s. Each time I try to describe to my sister what's happening now in the story, she gives me this look that says WTF? Why did you tell me that?

Qadira

thejeff wrote:
Dave Gross wrote:

While I love the first five Amber novels, the first Zelazny I like to recommend is Lord of Light.

It's my favorite, but it's a little denser than the Amber books. A little more experimental and harder to grasp.

Lure them in with the easy stuff. :)

I read Lord of Light first and I didn't find it experimental or hard to grasp at all. But I read/watch a lot of sci-fi, so maybe I'm used to the sort of world-building where not everything gets explained and tied up in a pretty bow at the end.

Qadira

edit: I meant Edgar Rice Burroughs. Dang, I get those two confused way too often! But Robert E. Howard also uses the "stolen from Earth" trope too. It's too darn convenient to have the protagonist be the reader's stand-in.

Qadira

I picked up The Soprano Sorceress by L.E. Modesitt Jr. from the .50c pile at the library sale. It isn't bad, but it ain't good either.
Things I like so far: fairly realistic portrayal of professional singers and their personalities that are shaped by their singing. Dang it, I KNOW these people! (except if they had magic...it would scare the ship out of me)
Things I don't like: having to take the "stolen-from-earth" genre for what it is and the disconnect between the "naturalistic" fiction of the protagonist's "Earth" in contrast to the fantasy world. Even with Robert E. Howard (John Carter) or Mark Twain (Connecticut Yankee) I've yet to see it done in a way that doesn't make me work really hard to suspend my disbelief. Excepted for Francis Stevens' The Heads of Cerberus who makes it work because it is just too gonzo, like a trippy episode of "Sliders."
Pet Peeve: It's "I couldn't care less." COULDN'T! grumbles about writers and lazy editors.

Qadira

I really can't speak to top-tier spell/domain lists because I've never played a cleric beyond 13th level. But putting aside mechanics, I built my cleric characters to fit the campaign and story, so that sometimes, Iomedae fits the bill, while at another time, I went with Asmodeus.

Qadira

@RainyDayNinja:

I just read Neal Shusterman's Unwind. It was published fairly recently (2007). I liked it and it was a quick read. It is young-adult sci-fi, but it is definitely "hard" sci-fi, because most of the things that happen in the novel are things that could potentially happen in the future (e.g. extending the range of transplantable organs to include parts of the brain).

Qadira

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Finally got my "Sass and Sorcery"! It fills in some of the narrative gaps I had from having missed issues

comics:
- especially about the Merchant's Guild.

Qadira

Finally read some more Samuel R. Delany. I forgot how much that man can make his characters monologue! Sheesh!

Qadira

@DM Wellard. Don't forget to mention that he was also a great director of large-scale, important movies. I don't know that in future we'll see movies with the scope and size of "Gandhi," "Cry Freedom" or "A Bridge Too Far" - or if we do, all the 'extras' will be digital creations and the scenes will all be performed in front of a green screen. The kind of directing Attenborough did may one day be a lost art.

Qadira

Has discovered "The Four Just Men" by Edgar Wallace. It's a locked-room mystery, which is one of my favorite kinds. Apparently there is also a feature film and a TV series.

Qadira

Ross Byers wrote:

Finished Redshirts. It was good, but was a little slow to start. I almost bailed before it got good. Ending was a bit meta.

Not sure what's next. Might wait for Reign of Stars.

I felt the same way about Redshirts. The jacket copy made it out to be a non-stop hilarity-fest from start to finish, which got my expectations way too high for what was actually delivered.

Qadira

"The standpoint that exists outside positive and natural law is one that has nothing to do with the orientation toward an end that characterizes these two kinds of law."

--The Cambridge Introduction to Walter Benjamin, David S. Ferris.

Qadira

I saw some games of "Exquisite Corpse" at the Surrealists exhibit at LACMA. They were pretty freaky. So I think that a multi-author horror story could work, but only if the writers are of equal caliber.

Qadira

If you think it could be in a post-1988 issue, the Los Angeles Public Library may be able to help you...maybe. They've got a ProQuest account for Analog that dates back to 1988, but not before.

Qadira

My local library has an Analog subscription, but it is limited to recent issues.

Qadira

If you can find a Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature at your local library, or you can access an Ebscohost or Proquest database through your college or university (assuming your class is through such an institution and their subscription includes a genre serials index - a big if), they just may have Analog included.
This search approach may work best if, in reading through the 1980s information, you can also bring to mind other articles or stories that may have appeared in the same issue, since I know judging by titles and authors for the story you want is almost a craps shoot, since there has been so much that sounds similar in terms of authors/titles that has been published.

Qadira

Analog's forum page seems to be down for repair, but a first step could be trying to contact the magazine through their website. Some of the retailers they list on the website might also have information about the contents of their back issues. This would be most helpful if hearing the title of the story or reading it jogs your memory.

Analog's information page

This might be a good first step in your search.

Qadira

Uncle Taco, your spoiler just made me want to read the Perdido book. Specifically

Spoiler:
the anthro-insect-lover part.
It just scratches this itch I've been having ever since reading Butler's "Bloodchild"...or maybe since I first read Kafka.

I've just finished re-reading Megan Whalen Turner's The Thief. I just discovered there's a bunch of sequels and I needed to refresh my memory about what happened in the first book before reading those. 1997 was a looooong time ago!

Qadira

I finished the Nalo Hopkinson book, "Report from Planet Midnight." The transcription of her speech at the international sci-fi convention was the best part of the collection; it digs into race issues in fantasy/sci-fi. The two fiction stories were good, but the one about Caliban and Ariel I liked better than her time-travel story (since I <3 Shakespeare & seeing people mess with Shakespeare*). The author interview was alright, but some of the interviewer/editor's questions were weird: e.g. "What kind of car do you drive?" - wtf kind of question IS that? As if a car or its possession say something specific about a person and her work! Answer: Hopkinson doesn't have a car and doesn't drive in LA; very similar to Ray Bradbury, in that he also wrote sci-fi in LA and didn't drive.

*except for "Shakespeare in Love." I can't stand that movie!

Qadira

Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Didactic materialism?

Dialectical materialism. Autocorrect is not my friend.

Qadira

Finished the collection of Walter Benjamin. I liked the "theses on the philosophy history" the best of the essays, perhaps because it was either a) most clearly written, or b) most clearly translated. The didactic-materialist basis for his theses was over-done, but he brings up a critique of it himself (perhaps it was overdone FOR the purpose of deconstructing it, but we'll never really know), in the form of his critique of historical progress - he just doesn't take it that further step that maybe Derrida and the post-modernists take it (I read Derrida so long ago I can't remember).

Now I'm onto a collection of Nalo Hopkinson essays/short fiction that is part of a "controversial SF authors" series. Her writing doesn't FEEL controversial to me, but maybe I haven't examined it in the kaleidoscope of its implications for the genre...maybe.

Qadira

Treppa wrote:
Be sure not to die before you read Ancillary Justice.

I saw it won a Nebula award recently. I will mentally put it on my "to read" list.

My "sci-fi project" (i.e. to read more sci-fi) has been underway a while, but sadly neglected recently...unless the Lady Trent novel I read counts more as soft sci-fi than fantasy. It's hard to say because the protagonist is a natural-scientist in the 18th-19th century sense, but the dragons aren't of the komodo variety; it sort of walks that fine line between genres since scientific explanations are given for SOME things in the novel, but by no means all of them. I suppose the same charges can be leveled against the Pern novels, though I haven't read any of those.

I'm wending my way through Walter Benjamin's Illuminations (translated by Harry Zohn). The foreword by Hannah Arendt is too darn long at over 50 pages, and presupposes a prior familiarity with Benjamin I certainly don't have. But once past the intro the collection has some interesting essays, including his essays on Kafka. I'm looking forward to those after I finish "The Task of the Translator."

Qadira

I liked the episodes I saw so far of season 3. I feel like they've got the show on an even keel now, with 3 baddies instead of one BBEG, but it remains to be seen how things develop, if in the end this season will also feel rushed.

Qadira

Eli Wallach acted with Uta Hagen. He was a textbook of the Stanislavski method (well...as interpreted in America). He was also a natural. I wrote a whole paper on him for my acting class. RIP.

Qadira

Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:

About time for a Literary Musical Interlude, methinks:

Swinburne Stomp

Where do you FIND these artists? Is it a gift from Cthulhu or do you seek them out? You need some kind of "mad-composer" avatar for when you post these things.

Qadira

I just ordered Walter Benjamin's Illuminations from my local public library, after re-reading his "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction." I was inspired by the "if the author is dead, why is the literature teacher alive?" thread.

Qadira

Gore Vidal wrote:
Readerbreeder wrote:
Gore Vidal wrote:
I remember an essay by Gore Vidal (hence my Gore Vidal face) where he mentioned that there were very few academic discussions of Oscar Wilde, because what would be the point?
Well, from what I understand, Wilde was pretty full of himself to begin with, so he really didn't need any encouragement.
Mostly, it was because what would you do, write a book explaining the jokes? (In retrospect, he may have said there weren't many discussions of his comedies, I don't recall.)

Few academic discussions of Wilde? On what planet? Maybe, if you can't find it under Literary Criticism, try Queer Studies. I doubt there's anything he wrote on, short of a bar napkin, that hasn't been studied by some academics. I'm sure you'll find PLENTY there...and they will also have stuff about Gore Vidal, too (e.g. his The City and the Pillar).

Qadira

Hasn't this whole discussion already been addressed by Aristotle in his Poetics? ...
Lord Snow, a thought I just had in reply to your post: if Aristotle categorizes poetics (which, if he were alive, would likely include the novel as a form of "epic") as a form of imitation, then there's not some necessarily fundamental difference between studying literature and, say, cultural anthropology, because it is all a question of looking at how we, as homo sapiens, imitate our surroundings and each other...
How is studying one person's story different from one psychologist writing a case study about a single analysand, for example? [is analysand a word? the person being analyzed]
There is more of a continuum between the study of literature and other fields than differences, perhaps. Plato would disagree with me, but if we look at modern scientific methods, the rise of empiricism, etc., how is that less imitative and artificial than the way we study literature? It's more standardized, and objective for a given amount of "object," but look at something "directly tied to the study of nature" like Linnaeus' taxonomy, and that's about as man-made and artificial as you can get. Once we start classifying things in science we're no better nor worse than Plato and his "ideal forms."

Qadira

It also depends on what kind of analysis you're doing. If you aren't keeping strictly to literary criticism but branch out into that mix of cultural-studies/criticism, lets say, like Walter Benjamin, then the thesis that started this thread isn't far off but you DO get to ask questions that are closer to "Could the Hulk beat up Superman, and why?" and get away with it in academia.

Qadira

Readerbreeder wrote:


This highlights an issue I have with academic fiction - let me see if I can explicate it properly. If you look around, you will probably find that the academic study for Dickens is a little thin. The reason for this, at least with the professors I spoke with, is that he was a little too popular to merit scholarly attention, his ability to capture and explicate the human condition of his time notwithstanding. The same "stink" adheres to almost any writer who has the audacity to use their talent to try and make a living off of it (e.g. writing popular fiction). In the end, the only people who can write and try to be "great" (i.e. for academic plaudits) are those who can afford to, because they don't have to care if their work sells or not, with the exception of the academic community.

Who can afford to not care if their work appeals to anyone but the academic community? Those who are independently wealthy (or at least well off enough that do what the rest of us do without having to worry about the proceeds of their writing), or those being sponsored to do so (academics). So whose viewpoint gets into academic discussion? The wealthy. Those who have to "work" for a living (e.g. Dickens, Tolkein, King) are shut out, regardless of what they might have to say.

I'd say a big exception to this dichotomy of writers are "the good die young" school, or those who intend for their work to "die young." E.g. Emily Dickinson, Franz Kafka, Keats, et al. These aren't WEALTHY people I've just mentioned (though Keats probably wasn't too bad off), but they didn't make a living off their writing, and probably never would have. Some of them never wanted their works to be read widely at all.

Also, some popular writers are also covered extensively in academia: e.g. Ernest Hemingway, Toni Morrison (but they won Nobel prizes, so maybe the people in Stockholm know better than the academics after all).

Qadira

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
My own experiences in the academy (well, state university) were pretty boring. No postmodernists, no idiot professors, nobody who wanted to junk Shakespeare, nobody who wanted to replace the canon with feminist slave narratives by transgendered people with mobility impediments. Although, come to think of it, I never was assigned any Dickens. But I did have one guy make us read The Canterbury Tales and The Time Machine in the same class, so that's gotta be worth something.

I wouldn't mind having Canterbury Tales and The Time Machine in the same class at all. My undergrad didn't spend enough time on Chaucer, IMO. But what I couldn't stand was having Frankenstein and Wordsworth in the same Eng Lit class. There is only so much elaborate description of nature that one mind can endure. If I never read about a Swiss alp or an English hilltop again, it'll be too soon.

Qadira

Not to mention Newgate Prison makes its appearance in "Moll Flanders" probably in no small part due to Daniel Defoe's continuing fears about his debts. It's possible Defoe wouldn't have become a novelist if he hadn't gone broke.

Qadira

But isn't "only trying to make a buck" associating the author's intentions with his/her writing?

If we do a materialist reading of "the novel" then every single novel in the Western canon, at a fundamental level, is firstly about the price of cotton-based vs. pulp-based paper and the savings on inputs to be gained by newer designs of printing machines and typefaces.

Qadira

Orfamay Quest wrote:


Most of the literature study that you are familiar with probably is "reactive" in that sense, but that's partly because of the nature of academic status and prestige. It's much more fun to read works closely and analyze them for content than it is merely to catalogue them. The effect is that most scholars would prefer not to engage in the grunt-work of, for example, preparing a scholarly edition.

[golf clap] This jives with my XP as both an English major and LIS student. I can say that there is nothing more satisfying than a good, annotated, scholarly edition of Robinson Crusoe with a great big index at the back, for undergraduate reading (or just pleasure reading!) but that I chose not to go into English for grad school because it did not seem focused on providing that kind of work.

I would say the one exception is the Shakespeare industry; never seems to be a dearth of professors working on their umpteenth scholarly edition of "Richard III."

[has flashback to the off-topic Richard III thread and considers quitting the internet]

Qadira

I got some of the older issues of "Rat Queens" last week. I was LOLing by the second panel! I'm not a regular comics reader, but I really dig this comic. Quite a bit more blood splatter than I'm used to (I'm more familiar with the super-hero type comic, where there's not so much blood/guts, e.g. kid-friendly Superman) but the banter and the hi-jinks of the Rat Queens makes up for that. I'm not sure which character I like the best yet, they're all so darn cool.

Qadira

I just now heard about this comic. I really want to read it. It looks fun.

Qadira

Still reading the Francis Stevens collection. I laughed at the egregious racism and blatant sexism in "The Labyrinth." The sexism isn't SO bad compared to other works I've seen from the period (1910s-20s), but there are a lot of assumptions that we don't make anymore, and one particular gender assumption is the key to the plot, so I found the story less engaging than I might have otherwise.

e.g. that a single-woman is automatically assumed to have loose morals if she is alone with a man who is also single. #doublestandard.

I shouldn't have been surprised at the racism since Stevens was an influence on Lovecraft, but several of her racist statements still took me aback. I'd include an example of the racism here but I really don't want to feed THAT particular internet troll. I'll just say that Stevens took the "Yellow Peril" seriously in 1918 and leave it at that.

Qadira

Marc, there is already a Community thread on the messageboards. I'm not complaining about your information. It's great and I'm glad you are spreading the news about Community but wouldn't the info fit better there?

Qadira

I enjoyed tonight's D&D Part II episode. The best part of it was the dean and I laughed out loud a lot. I'd totally love to play D&D (or Pathfinder) with dean Pelton! Jim Rash is such a great ham!

Qadira

@doc the grey:
I got an autographed copy of "A Natural History of Dragons"! I hadn't heard of Marie Brennan before, but she was by far one of the best panelists who spoke at the book fair I attended, so I bought her book figuring someone so well-spoken is bound to be a good writer. It was a delight! I still haven't bought "Tropic of Serpents" but my b-day is approaching so I think I will treat myself to it.

Right now I'm still reading Francis Stevens, this time a short story collection. I recommend "The Nightmare" for its very Gygaxian features. Lost islands full of carnivorous giant plants and strange fungi? Yes, please!

1 to 50 of 922 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.