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Zovarue

Zeugma's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 983 posts (1,147 including aliases). 1 review. 1 list. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 4 aliases.


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The Exchange

I'm reading The Voyage of the Basilisk: A Memoir by Lady Trent, by Marie Brennan. It's the third book in the series. So far it has been a fun read, full of nautical adventure, and I like Tod Lockwood's illustrations, but I don't like the blue ink the publisher chose to use. I think it's supposed to make it look "old-timey" but it just makes it harder for me to read and does Lockwood's illustrations a disservice IMO.

The Exchange

I picked up issue 10 during Free Comic Book Day today. I was planning on waiting for the collected volume but my will power is weak.

I liked how the issue and the plot arc resolved. Especially because

Spoiler:
Dee, my favorite character, was the absolute most bad@ss, bravest character ever! When she put that mask on, it was amazing!

The Exchange

Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Black History and the Class Struggle No. 7: Glory: Black Soldiers Fight for Freedom

I went back and re-watched Glory after reading Fire on the Beach: Recovering the Lost Story of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Lifesavers by David Wright and David Zoby.

Link: Goodreads page.

I really liked this book, and it taught me about what happened to a lot of black Civil War soldiers during Reconstruction (not a generally happy time, by any stretch). I also think it would make a great movie or miniseries.

The Exchange

When is the next part of "The Gem" coming out?

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Update: I got Ken Liu to sign my copy of The Grace of Kings after the sci-fi/fantasy panel at LA Times Festival of Books. This is one hefty book! Over 600 pages! But I'm really looking forward to it, especially after hearing Mr. Liu speak.

The Exchange

Treppa wrote:
Atonement was OK. Now on to Gibson's Neuromancer, courtesy of that damned communist/socialist institution, the Public Library. Digging Neuromancer so far, with its cyberpunk, Blade-Runneresque feel.

I love the opening sentence: "The sky above the port was the color of television, tuned to a dead channel."

True story: I first tried reading Neuromancer as a freshman in high school and just could not get into it. I wasn't mature enough for it yet/not big into sci-fi in HS. But then I read it a few years out of college and really enjoyed it. There are some very memorable moments and very little of it is jarring to read in the 21st century (unlike, say Pohl's Gateway). I recall only a few outdated conceptions about the future of computing from the '80s.

The Exchange

3 people marked this as a favorite.

<brags> I'm going to the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books this weekend! I get to see John Scalzi interviewed by Wil Wheaton! And I'm going to get Ken Liu to autograph The Grace of Kings for me! <crosses fingers></brag>

The Exchange

Hi Set! I thought that Galt was our "Fantasy France" equivalent, and that Andoran was sort of like a "Fantasy England" where Oliver Cromwell's side won the English Civil War (at least, the costumes they wear in the artwork seems to suggest this).

The Exchange

Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

Finished Malcolm, still working on Sherlock and Walt. Also finished

Black History and the Class Struggle No. 5: Finish the Civil War!

I clicked the link (which, more often than not, I really shouldn't). I noticed the sidebar table of contents lists: "Cop Terror Stalks Black America." Dated 1988. Boy, the times they are a changin'!

In Book news: I reread Jeff Smith's Bone: Out from Boneville, the first book in the series, for work! It wasn't quite how I remembered it from the '90s, but that's as it should be.

The Exchange

I like the little details Gary Kloster includes, such as the description of the crate: "its wood so raw it still bled sap." I am looking forward to reading the book.

The Exchange

I finished reading Devil in a Blue Dress, an Easy Rawlins Mystery, by Walter Mosley. I liked its fast pace, and I really appreciated the "down these mean streets" themes that are lamp-shaded by Rawlins' pal by Mouse, but some of the supporting characters were pretty cliché, and despite her speeches I felt like the femme fatale was an underdeveloped character.

I might try another Rawlins mystery to see if Mosley changes it up and reminds me less of "Chinatown." I liked his Socrates Fortlow books, but those weren't the same genre.

The Exchange

mittean wrote:
What's in the box? wrote:
Growing up I really liked The Last Unicorn and am surprised at how many people have- not only never seen it but- never heard of it.

We love that film. BTW...look for a potential re-touring of the film around the US sometime soon. New music, and they're bringing back the actors for a reprisal of their roles. Very cool. :)

What's in the box? wrote:


there is an animated movie called: Flight of Dragons that I really enjoyed but can NOT find ANYWHERE!

I can't find it anywhere. I always remember the chinese dragon...so cool looking.

Don't forget the awesome title song by Don McLean! Flight of Dragons!

The Exchange

Wicht wrote:

Some more good remakes:

The Parent Trap (1961). The original novel had already been adapted to film three times between 1949 and 1961.

The Maltese Falcon (1941).

The Truth about Charlie (2002). (I like the remake anyway. I don't think its universally popular.)

The Italian Job (2003).

The Man who Knew too Much (1956).

The Ten Commandments (1956).

I've got to disagree with you about "The Man Who Knew Too Much." I admire Alfred Hitchcock's 1934 version more; at that point in his career he was really innovating in his approach to directing and editing, and the script is zippier (75 min. vs. 120 min run-time). The sound track was crap, but the pacing was great. Also, I hate the Doris Day/Jimmy Stewart pairing. They have no chemistry. My 2 cp.

The Exchange

I've been reading middle grade fiction for work lately (I currently work in library youth services, but I usually read nonfiction until my current project came up). Here's a brief list:

spoiler for length:

Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis
-- Pre-Civil War African-Canadian boy deal with slavery in the U.S. Good, serious subject matter (slavery) but the protagonist's voice can be a bit grating since Curtis wrote him in a semi-dialect style.
Savvy by Ingrid Law
-- Preteen girl develops supernatural powers; I wanted to like it more than I did. The plot takes its time getting where it's going (but certainly not as much as Don Quixote did!)
Echo: a novel by Pam Munoz Ryan
-- Kids find a magical harmonica that unites them across time and space. The plot twists were obvious but might not be to the age range the book is aimed at. The magical-realism elements were very well integrated.

The Exchange

@Itchy: I think it can be read before Firesoul, otherwise Paizo probably wouldn't have published it on the website until after the book came out.

This story makes me want to get Firesoul when it comes out next month.

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

In my opinion, The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly is the best of the Sergio Leon spaghetti western trio. The others lean more heavily on , while intensifying the violence of, standard western tropes -- but TGTB&TU expands outwards and builds this whole fantasy west in an almost archetypal pastoral that is like no other western.

The "Ecstasy of Gold" theme, "The Good's" theme (Dadadadada...Wa-waaa-wa), and the standoff scene are right up there with the Odessa Steps scene in Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin as a defining moment of cinema.

I also agree that Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade is better than the other two films that precede it. The 4th Indiana Jones film...<shudder!>

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Currently reading: The Maltese Falcon, by Dashiell Hammett.
There is some "rounding out" of the loose threads I saw in the movie, but otherwise I feel the movie captures the essence of the novel. The only real difference is the Hays Code, because Spade does more with the ladies in the book than Bogey ever does in the film. Hammett doesn't pad his story, but I can see his process at work -- the procedural aspects that make the reader question who-dun-it, which is a thing there is less time to do as a film-viewer. I think that really is a tribute to John Houston's work.

Because I saw the movie first, all the characters sound like their counterparts, even on dialogue that wasn't in the film. Joel Cairo looks more dashing in the book, but it is hard to beat Peter Lorre for his good looks, innit?

The Exchange

Rest in Peace, Mike. Your work was some of my favorite from Paizo's early days.

The Exchange

Congratulations, Monica! I'm looking forward to reading this one!

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Feros wrote:
3!

Don't you mean 3.1415?

The Exchange

I got Issue 9. Paizo website munched my long post so I'll put the highlights of my thoughts here:
1. The mental manipulation of the abyssal monsters/scene-jumping in the plot confused me. Seeing stuff happening "in media res" is exciting, but it plays havoc with my sense of "WTF is going on."
2. I don't think Violet's explanation to Orc Dave (while filling me in on the gist of what's going on) satisfied my need for a more visual exposition.
3. That probably means I'm slow...or something.
4. Sejic's art is IMO neither better nor worse than Upchurch's, just different. I think he's worse at drawing Dee's hair, but better at drawing Betty. YMMV.
5. Both artists have been bad at drawing the characters' noses consistently. What is up with comic artists and noses? You'd think it would be easy since they are right in the middle of the face! At least with the orcs, they don't have to worry about that.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I love what happens to Nobby in Feet of Clay. That book has to be in my Top 10 list, if I ever get around to writing one.

The Exchange

I finally finished Don Quixote. I liked it, and in some ways Comrade Anklebiter is correct -- Cervantes does dig at the bourgeois in the story. But Don Q & Sancho are besties 4ever, and neither would ever betray the other, at least not in any major way.

um...:

Sancho preys on Don Q's madness a bit, and gets some $$$ out of him in the end, but still admires the guy.

The Exchange

I am still reading Don Quixote. Only 4 chapters left!

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Welcome, Linda! I'm looking forward to seeing your work!

The Exchange

Congratulations! I know I'm going to love reading all of your final submissions!

The Exchange

Taliesin Hoyle wrote:


Kafka - The trial. Metamorphosis and other stories.

Have you read his "Amerika"? I really loved it and, although incomplete (or is it?), it is perhaps my favorite or second favorite of his longer works; "The Castle" is also a masterpiece!

But my first favorite Kafka work is "A Hunger Artist." I've read three different translations and no matter how they change a phrase here or there, I feel the intention of the story comes through very clearly. Perhaps Walter Benjamin is right and a work becomes more itself in translation...Even so, Kafka is the only reason I wish I could read German.

The Exchange

ericthecleric wrote:
Don Quixote, by Cervantes, is surprisingly readable for a book that's 400 years old. Although it's a LONG read.

I'm reading it right now! I've laughed out loud a number of times, and my copy comes with Gustave Dore engravings so yeah...I feel spoiled.

The Exchange

kikai13 wrote:
Anything by Italo Calvino, Umberto Eco, or Jorge Luis Borges. Invisible Cities by Calvino is amazing.

Get outta my mind!

The Exchange

Thanks for keeping the contest going! I love being able to see all the talent RPG Superstar produces/brings out, and it wouldn't be possible without all of your dedicated effort.

The Exchange

It's hard to believe he's gone. I grew up with TNG, but I loved OS reruns, especially Spock's banter with McCoy and Kirk. It wouldn't have been Star Trek without Spock to balance out Kirk's emotional displays. I remember practicing the Shekinah sign in the mirror so many times until I could get the "Vulcan Salute" just right. I even read Nimoy's book, "I am not Spock," which I bought at a library sale. I wrote a short essay about it and Nimoy's relationship to the Stanislavsky Method for my acting class in college.

The Exchange

Oceanshieldwolf, the contestants weren't allowed to use their own monsters, only other contestants'. I voted for the same two entries you voted for. I just wasn't thrilled by the geomaw, and was disappointed so many contestants used it.

The Exchange

I'm actually disappointed so many contestants used the geomaw. It wasn't one of my favorites from the monster round, to be honest. However, it was well-designed, and certainly better than anything I could have come up with given the parameters of the contest!

The Exchange

Hi all. I finally got around to reading the Braga comic. [my life has been too busy to hunt all over town for one comic] I really liked it, especially Tess Fowler's take on orcs. Very tribal-punk. I hope she gets to do more guest artistry on the series, or at least that her orcs are the style going forward. I think we need another Braga issue, too.

Spoiler:
I'm looking forward to what Round 2 with her brother is going to be like!

The Exchange

Congratulations, top 8! And to the top 16: I wish I could have voted for ALL of your monsters. They were all way beyond cool.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Getting in touch with my inner LG Cavalier

Spoiler:
and Broadway geek
. link

The Exchange

Also, in the spirit of the thread: I am now reading a dual-language edition of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra's Don Quijote/Don Quixote. It's been great because I don't need to use a bilingual dictionary for the words I don't know. Also, I discovered that there really is no equivalent to "hallar" in English. There are other words that are more equivalent to English, but not that one. It's a very useful word. Cervantes uses it a lot.

The Exchange

Tinkergoth wrote:
Having just finished The Black Prism, I have to say I really enjoyed it.

This sounds really cool! I had an idea for a story about color-based magic, but it ended up taking a very different direction. The Black Prism is going onto my "to read" list.

The Exchange

Yeah, I want to continue to the end of the story arc too. But I didn't see where Stepjic re-designed the characters. Do you have a link?

The Exchange

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Since the monsters don't get much direct sun exposure, they need darkness-enabled features. I'd like to see something involving spores, or those bioluminescent bacteria, like angler-fish have. Something different than your standard "it has darkvision" response. Not everything should be able to see in the dark. I also like the monsters that have tremor-sense, echolocation, or other work-arounds for the darkness condition. It just feels more organic to me. So I hope we get some monsters with those alternative qualities.

The Exchange

Please disregard my previous post as I see this issue is being discussed over in the LGBT Gamer thread.

The Exchange

The whole Roc Upchurch arrest is making me feel uneasy about the series going forward. Will Wiebe having a new illustrator change the content? Is it temporary or will Upchurch return to illustrating it at some point down the road? It also makes me super sad that a series that is so positive/entertaining about women kicking @ss has a corollary in real-life violence that is as far as one can get from "entertaining."

I was wondering what other readers on here thought about the issue, or if y'all don't want to touch it with a 10 ft. pole.

The Exchange

That AP cover is super intense!

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Did anyone get the Braga special issue? I couldn't find it at my local comics shops, and I went to two different stores!

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Maggot Brain

The Exchange

I'm really looking forward to all the maps! Those un-keyed maps were a favorite feature when I used to read "Dungeon" magazine. Good luck, you top 32ers!

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Samnell, I don't know if you are still reading Civil War stuff, but I thought of you while reading this news item about abolitionist Elijah P. Lovejoy: Lovejoy's will found.

Oh, and I'm reading stuff. Serpent's Skull AP, to be exact. I liked the fiction by Robin Laws. It has a "Magnificent Seven" vibe, though the plot is very different from that movie.

The Exchange

Aaron, I think you came up with a great ending to the campaign! Find the treasure, defend it, then ride off into the sunset... who could ask for anything more?

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

I just downloaded the Wayfinder. I'm really enjoying reading through it. This has to be the best fanzine ever, in terms of adherence to theme/style! Keep up the good work!

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I love the sound of "volcano-themed class options"!

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