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Zovarue

Zeugma's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 1,154 posts (1,322 including aliases). 3 reviews. 1 list. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 6 aliases.


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The Exchange

Ruins of Azlant sounds exciting! It also looks like there will be some nautical elements. :)

The Exchange

4 people marked this as a favorite.

For my next three picks: why not a city under the distant shore, such as those mentioned in "Oceans of Golarion" from Raiders of the Fever Sea?

5) The cecaelias city of Sihuw.

6) Alohmba, built on the shell of Belimehu the Blind Mother.

7) The Tian Xia nation of Xidao (probably a bit more accessible than the first two for air-breathers).

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

1) Somewhere in Casmaron; possibly Kaladay. I'd love to find out what a city with a large Sweettalkers population would look like (or sound like).

2) Another monster city. Dhucharg was a surprise highlight of the Distant Shores book for me. It had so many seeds for adventure!

3) Mzali! I know there's already some information on this city, but it'd be nice to see it expanded with a nice map and additional locations, and cultural details.

4) Somewhere in Arcadia; possibly a city in Razatlan.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

</lurk mode>

<.<

>.>

...

no new comic

<lurk mode>

The Exchange

I'm thinking about making the dress worn by Mayor Wanakeena from the Segada entry in the "Distant Shores" campaign setting sourcebook. I'm not sure how to do her hairdoo, though.

The Exchange

Hola from LA!* I can't let San Francisco** have the only Cal pin on the map!

*El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reina de los Angeles del Rio Porciuncula.

**And Berkeley too. Can't forget the actual Cal.

The Exchange

Amelia Earhart? Srsly? Did he object to her support for ERA or the fact she married a divorced man? Or the fact she flew airplanes? Or the unpardonable fact that she was a woman?

The Exchange

Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

...when I get back from yelling at the school board committee member in Manchester who didn't want free books about Nelson Mandela and Frederick Douglass because it was pushing a political agenda of "multiculturalism,"...

SMH. Of course, at one of the libraries where I work there is half a shelf in the kid's section on Mandela, and MLK gets a shelf and a half (along with about a foot of Coretta). Which is good! Don't get me wrong, I'd never begrudge their shelf space (keep in mind, a kids' book is usually less than 1-2 in. wide so that's a lot of books!). But it'd be nice to see more stuff on Shirley Chisholm, A Philip Randolph, etc. At this point, MLK is up there with Washington and Lincoln as "people we learn a few facts about in school" and I don't see how kids can really see themselves in positions of leadership if we don't present them with a wide variety of leaders to emulate.

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Good luck, Liz! Please come lurk (or post) on the message boards here from time to time!

The Exchange

That is one beautiful, awesome, pulpy cover!

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

This thread is helping me grok what George Orwell is going on about in "Homage to Catalonia" (the book I'm reading now).

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

"Outside Spain few people grasped that there was a revolution; inside Spain nobody doubted it."
-- George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia

The Exchange

I'm reading Jasper Fforde's Chronicles of Kazam series. I just finished The Last Dragonslayer. It's a fun orphan-becomes-the-Chosen-One story and full of Ffordesque jabs at modern life. Yet it's not quite as good as other juvenile comedy-fantasy series I've read, such as Pratchett's "Tiffany Aching" sub-series of "Discworld" and Rowling's "Harry Potter." I'll probably read the rest of them since they're easy to read and I wanted some new talking-dragon comedy after rereading Kenneth Grahame's The Reluctant Dragon.

The Exchange

Oh my gosh! Second issue for this AP already posted! (with mockup cover, but still...) This AP looks like a good Gygax-style kick-in-the-door dungeon+forest+hidden-soon-to-be-revealed-weirdness crawl. I've never run an AP but this is the sort of AP I'd run.

The Exchange

Sissyl wrote:
I liked Chiang's The story of your life, even though second person. Then again, it is written as a letter to someone, so it works.

I read that story! It was pretty good.

The Exchange

Nervosa. I love their thrash!

The Exchange

Now reading Woman with a Blue Pencil, by Gordon McAlpine. It's a post-modern mystery. Imagine Naomi Hirahara meets Dashiell Hammett at a party hosted by Jorge Luis Borges. Or for those readers who only get movie references: "The Purple Rose of Cairo" meets "The Maltese Falcon."

The Exchange

Gladior wrote:
Very excited about this one--perhaps as a follow on after starting PCs play through Ire of the Storm. This could make for a nice little mini-campaign with some homebrewed filler to get the PCs up to 5th level.

I had the same idea! But maybe the 5th level starting encounters would need to be modified a bit to work with 6th level characters (or let it be a bit of a cakewalk for them?)

The Exchange

Found the link to the description: Macmillan description of "Shy Knives".
Is there a reason Paizo didn't put this information on the product info page above?

The Exchange

I like pretty cover art as much as the next person, but it annoys me that there is no product description/synopsis. Are people so darn impatient that you must put up whatever you have on the schedule without even a hint of what the book will be about? Surely in development there was something you could include -- does the story even have a protagonist? Who is it? What does "shy knives" mean? If you have that info, why not put it here or link to it?
The cover is evocative, but it really doesn't give many hints of who the the story will be about, just a possible hint it will involve Iobaria and at least one centaur. Not really enough for me to want to buy the book on that basis.

The Exchange

Reading book 4 of Marie Brennan's Lady Trent series: In the Labyrinth of Drakes.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

So what did everyone get this year? I picked up a bunch of kid-friendly freebies I can pass on to my sister for her classroom (I highly recommend the "Mouse Guard" comic that came in a compilation with "Lumberjanes". It has Gorgeous Art!) and I bought some Rat Queen issues.

Here's a link to the Free Comic Book Day website Link

The Exchange

I'm such a lit geek, I've read the annotated Treasure Island. It was awesome. The only thing I liked slightly less than most of Stevenson's works was The Black Arrow. My favorite Stevenson story is "Markheim," which is a little gem of a morality play, and really displays his deft hand at characterization.

The Exchange

Set wrote:
Set wrote:
Just re-read Bridge of Birds, by Barry Hughart, and it was as fun the second time as it was the first. Fun stuff set in an over the top 'mythic China.'

Turns out he has two sequels, The Story of the Stone (which I had to buy twice, since 'bunko' apparently means 'written in Kanji,' which I did not know...) and Eight Skilled Gentlemen.

Neither was as good as his first outing, IMO.

I kind of feel like I did with Neal Stephenson, whose Snow Crash was life-changingly hilarious, and whose later books have been meh.

I dunno. The Story of the Stone has

Spoiler:
the most hilarious and shocking encounter with a demon in Hell I've ever read.
However, SotS is the book I read first out of the trilogy (I didn't know they had a reading order), so I didn't read Bridge of Birds with the same set of expectations of it being better, which skews my perspective on the series.

I do agree with you about Eight Skilled Gentlemen. I liked the conclusion with the dragon-boat race, but it has a lot of plot problems. Even if you pay close attention it can be impossible to tell what is going on.

The Exchange

What am I reading now, you ask?

Daughters of the Samurai: a journey from east to west and back, by Janice P. Nimura.

It's about five young daughters of disgraced Meiji-era samurai who were deputized to spend 10 years being educated in the United States of America, in order to acquire Western ways and introduce them to Japan. I'm enjoying it so far!

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

I really love the cover art for this one! It has a "sword-and-planet" style pulp vibe!

The Exchange

Marco Massoudi wrote:

None of the 6 Second Darkness issues are sold out. On acount of the last info 1000+ remain of each (a shame, as parts 3-5 are great, the intro and end could use some work).

Legacy of Fire #4 is SOLD OUT.
#5 & #6 are under 250 copies each.
#1 & #2 are under 1000 copies each.

If #5 (THE CITY OF BRASS) and #6 (great article on Rovagugs spawn if i remember correctly) sell out, we COULD get a hardcover in a few years.

So do yourself a favour and buy them, as the articles, Pathfinder Tales and a lot of the art WON'T BE REPRINTED in a hardcover!

I really enjoyed the Pathfinder Tale in the Legacy of Fire AP. The half-elf "water druid" was awesome!

The Exchange

6 people marked this as a favorite.

Can I FINALLY get that Grey Maidens T-shirt they ran out of before I could order? Pretty pretty pretty please????

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

This sounds great! The 32 page modules were "just right" for the limited time my group had to play, so this might fill that one-shot niche while also offering more for folks who want to run a longer game. It also sounds like the turn-around time for the final product will be quicker with 3 authors working on their parts at once.

It'd be cool if going forward the modules mix it up between offering "anthologies" for short sessions/one-shots and "mini-campaigns" for those who want something longer with a unified theme or arc.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I like this! Two back-stories for one mixed up personality! Quinn is an awesome character too, so it's great he could be brought into the story.

"What will the Red Raven do next? Find out next time on [cue the echo-chamber] The Adventures of the Reeeeddd Raaavveeennnn!"

The Exchange

My recent reads are an interlude of non-fiction:

The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past, by John Lewis Gaddis.
It is more of a defense of history-as-discipline than a deep exploration of methodology, so I was mildly disappointed. I was hoping for more interviews and anecdotes and less deprecation of the social sciences (Gaddis is particularly hard on Sociology for some reason).

The Turk: The Life and Times of the Famous Eighteenth-Century Chess-Playing Machine, by Tom Standage.
This one was fun. It made me think about reading some clockpunk, if that's still a thing.

Now I'm reading Cry, The Beloved Country, by Alan Paton. It's good, but at times I have trouble distinguishing the speakers due to Paton's style of setting off dialog by em-dash.

The Exchange

the Queen's Raven wrote:
Why does everyone keep bringing up Batman? Zorro, is who Batman was based on. Red Raven and Galt, Zorro and California.

It warms the cockles of my heart to have my lovely home-state compared to Galt. Does that make Governor Brown our Citizen Goss, and our State Senate the Cabinet of Skulls? Thank Desna it's an election year!

Also, it looks like the Red Raven has gained quite a bit of weight since we last saw him, in addition to his wardrobe upgrade.

The Exchange

I read Alexei Panshin's Masque World again yesterday. I laughed. I also noted one of Panshin's dedications is to Chip Delaney. That gave me a bit of context (or resonance?) for one of the organizations in MW that I hadn't noticed before. A change in perspective, if you will.

The Exchange

I finished Barabara Hambly's Darwath trilogy. I'm SO glad I'm done. I won't be revisiting this series. I liked the fight scenes, the aliens, and her use of the two viewpoint characters, but really nothing else about the books. I wanted the villains to win as redemption for their being written as such flat, stupid stereotypes with cardboard swords. The themes in the book don't feel "of a piece" and each separate idea on its own that she introduced didn't quite mesh with the other ideas.

The Exchange

Lord Snow wrote:

Blazed through the second half of "Interesting Times" by Terry Pratchett in what was otherwise a slow and lazy day.

I'm going to be doing around the clock shifts for an entire week soon, and I am saving the last Wheel of Time book as a read for that, so for now I'm back to The Long Way To The Small Angry Planet.

** spoiler omitted **

Re: spoiler. Dangit, Snow! You made me get teary-eyed.

Spoiler:
I still haven't read The Shepherd's Crown because Granny Weatherwax dies!
The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Fleetwood Mac's The Green Manalishi. Priest does a more-rock cover, but the original is more psychedelic.

The Exchange

Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:

My recommendations to get you out of your established comfort zone: Some of them have books I particularly recommend, but you can't go wrong with any of them.

Harlan Ellison If you really want some insight in the gutters of "Star Trek", I recommend his book "City on the Edge of Forever".
Kurt Vonnegut "Sirens of Titan", "Slaughterhouse 5" "Player Piano"
Phillip K. Dick "The Man in the High Castle"
Michael Moorcock,
Ursula K LeGuin, one of the few Masters of both Fantasy and Science Fiction. "The Dispossessed" "The Earthsea Trilogy"
Samuel R. Delaney "Empire Star", Canticle for Leibowitz

Walter M. Miller wrote "A Canticle for Leibowitz," not Delaney. Delaney wrote "Dhalgren" which is a book that really intimidates me (and most books don't intimidate me).

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'd like to see what happens to mini-Durkon (is it Durkon's soul? I'm not clear on that); he has to find a way to break Durkula from within, somehow.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Gark the Goblin wrote:

I . . . may have it the worst.** spoiler omitted **And every single player is an adult.

When yours figure out that they can change their characters' minis and drag new images onto the map, a whole new level of distraction will arise.

This made me snort-laugh.

The Exchange

Aw heck, might as well give it another go.

book: 1d1001 ⇒ 791

The Invisible Man, by H G Wells. Hmm...Or I could watch the movie!

The Exchange

Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
False start on Some Summer Lands as I realized I should probably read some of the books I got for Christmas. Mr. Comrade and the Nigerian Princess got me a book by Octavia Butler

Thanks for the heads up about the Clockshop and Huntington celebrations. I remember reading something about it on the Huntington's website but I'd forgotten about it.

When I went to school in Santa Monica my sister would point out this house she said Octavia Butler used to stay at. One of those small Santa Monica stucco bungalows they've probably torn down by now.

The Exchange

@SmiloDan:

How did you like The Girl with Ghost Eyes?

The Exchange

Celestial Healer wrote:

Burroughs, along with the other Beats, is one of my dad's obsessions.

I've finished A is for Arsenic, and I've started the last book in the Darwath trilogy. So far it's not so bad, but there's more of a Shaver-like bent to the story once the protagonists start confronting the monstrous "Dark" (a collective monster kind of like a cloaker with ESP and magic).

The Exchange

"[Describing chiral compounds by analogy] Hands have identical components (fingers, thumb, palms and so on) but they are arranged slightly differently on each hand, forming mirror images that cannot be superimposed onto each other (hence the labeling in chiral compounds: l- for laveo, 'left' in Latin, and d- for dextro, 'right.'"

--A is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie by Kathryn Harkup.

The Exchange

I finished book two in the Darwath trilogy. Man, was it a slog! It felt like a big book with a skinny book inside it waiting to get out... and it was only about 300 pages! But I'm still probably going to read the last book, "The Armies of Daylight" because I do want to find out what happens to the protagonists. This trilogy isn't really a recommend from me, but YMMV. Be prepared for cardboard villains if you do read it.

I'm now reading A is for Arsenic: the poisons of Agatha Christie by chemist Kathryn Harkup. I'm already at H in the alphabet-titled chapters: H is for Hemlock. If you are a Christie fan and/or a chemistry fan, pick this book up! It goes into all the details about the drugs Christie uses in her novels, the real-life cases that inspired her (and that she inspired!) and how the drugs function to disrupt the body's systems.

In the wings: The Devil's Rooming House: the true story of America's Deadliest Female Serial Killer. I picked this one up at the library and just KNOW I'm going to enjoy it! This is the true case that inspired the classic play/movie Arsenic and Old Lace.

The Exchange

Which is better by you? Spooky Tooth or Judas Priest? I like Rob's fire on the lyrics, but you've got to hand it to Mike Harrison for bringing the soul & being the original artist.

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Blackwing is my favorite character in OOTS!

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.

So, I'd heard of "Dreamer Deceiver" but I'd never heard it before. Holy moly! Now I know why they call Rob "the metal god"!

The Exchange

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Black Sabbath's Paranoid

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1 person marked this as a favorite.

Archivist.

I'm currently a librarian, but I used to be an archivist and some of what I do is not all that much different.

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