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Yakman's page

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber. 174 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


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If Russia seizes more of Ukraine, Moscow is going to feel it. The West was willing to put up with ceding Crimea, but they aren't going to allow Moscow to gobble up its neighbors willy nilly.

Funny how the dictatorship criticizes the democracy for not being democratic 'enough'.


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Do Canadians get free dental coverage too?


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Gallo wrote:
GeraintElberion wrote:
and the last invasion of the UK, although terrible for the victim, was the vikings.
Actually it was the Norman invasion of 1066.

Actually, it was Henry VII and his Flemish mercenaries... and that was a quite successful invasion.


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Whoever wins the WWE Title is important on the world stage.


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Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Yakman wrote:
Detroit's larger trends were exacerbated by horrible mismanagement, a general failure to contain crime or educate kids, and an inability to create anything resembling an attractive place to start a business.

Not for lack of trying, though. Coleman Young, IIRC, was one of a long line of liberal Democrats voted in by a riled up, in this case, black electorate, who then turned around and served the interests of the plutocracy.

From the wiki page: "Although Young had emerged from the far left element in Detroit, he moved to the right as mayor. He called an ideological truce and won the support of Detroit's economic elite.[18] The new mayor was energetic in the construction of the Joe Louis Arena, and upgrading the city's mediocre mass transit system. Highly controversial was his assistance to General Motors to build its new 'Poletown' plant at the site of the former Dodge Main plant, which involved evicting many long-time residents. Rich argues that he pulled money out of the neighborhood to rehabilitate the downtown business district, because 'there were no other options.'"

Anyone wanna place bets on DiBlasio?

What "plutocrats" benefitted from Detroit's collapse, other than suburban realtors and home builders? Sorry, but no.


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Detroit's larger trends were exacerbated by horrible mismanagement, a general failure to contain crime or educate kids, and an inability to create anything resembling an attractive place to start a business.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kwame_Kilpatrick

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1967_Detroit_riot

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devil%27s_Night

and, arguably

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coleman_Young

who captained the sinking ship.


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Irontruth wrote:
Yakman wrote:
Personally, I agree that the pensions should be paid for most workers. But there are going to be some extravagant pensions which should not be paid. Again, that's the role of the authorities to determine.

That isn't how it'll go, the poorest are going to be some of the hardest hit. Looking through the statistics on Detroit pensions, they're already some of the smallest of any major city in the country. Sharp cuts to people on the edge of poverty is only going to exacerbate all problems that are increased by poverty for the city.

Adding to the poor is going to increase the cost of city services while decreasing revenue, meaning that the reliance on borrowing isn't fixed. It's a short term gain that only amplifies the problem as time goes on.

Like I said, bad situation all around.

Hopefully, no other major american city ever elects such horrible representatives to lead them consistently for fifty years ever again.


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Not in a number of states like California, where retirees make more from their pension than they did when they were working.


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I agree with you on most points. However, just telling BofA to shove it and not pay $1.4B in credit swaps is going to have massively negative consequences for Detroit's ability to borrow from BofA or anybody really, in the future. Hopefully Detroit and EVERY OTHER STUPID CITY COUNCIL EVER learned its lesson to never ever buy into some investment bankers' slick method of racking up fees on the backs of the taxpayers. See Harrisburg PA for a marvelous example of this kind of stupidity.

Just like the pensioners negotiated for their benefits, so too did the city's financiers. Detroit offered potential employees pensions, and they offered potential creditors interest payments. Both lenders and pensioners have legitimate claims on the city's resources. It's up to the Emergency Manager and the bankruptcy judge to decide who gets what.

Personally, I agree that the pensions should be paid for most workers. But there are going to be some extravagant pensions which should not be paid. Again, that's the role of the authorities to determine.


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There's really no benefit in getting angry over things like this. You can't do anything about it, and honestly, whatever. Keep your head down, do a good job, and you'll probably get recognized.

If you hate your job, find another one. That's about all you can do.


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Well, it looks like the search is done.


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DEA?


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What is there to wonder about? It was COMPLICATED and PEOPLE STARTED SHOOTING and I WOULDN'T WANT TO BE THERE.

That wraps the Balkans in the 1990s up in a nice little bow for me.


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When a city stops making bond payments, it stops being able to borrow money. This is a very bad thing.

The bondholders have taken losses on Detroit's bonds already. They might have to take more. But the city has obligations to pay them, just like it has obligations to pay the pensioners. I don't know how they are tiered, but it seems to me like the pensions are going to have to take a cut.

It's a bad situation. Everyone is going to have to feel some of the pain. But ultimately, looking forward, it's better for the city that Detroit is able to borrow money than it is to paying people who used to work for it (and don't any more).


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Irontruth wrote:
Yakman wrote:
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Snyder to Detroit’s Retirees: Survive on One-Third Less

Honestly, should they expect what they were promised when the city was twice as large and financially healthy?

Things have changed. It sucks, but they STILL HAVE A PENSION and some benefits. Most people don't. They MIGHT have a 401k with a bit of money in it, but for most Americans, Social Security is going to have to be the primary breadwinner after retirement.

Detroit's pension is costly, but it's not the biggest thing dragging the city down. The cities police department accounts for 32% of the budget and fire is 15%. Retiree health care is 12% and pensions are 6%.

Cutting the pensions initially helps the budget, but now your retirees are going to have less money to spend and the sales tax is important for Detroit, so you're going to see less revenue.

People on fixed income tend to spend most of their income. Reducing their income means reducing consumer spending. That's a downward spiral for the cities budget.

As bad as it would be, razing neighborhoods and consolidating homes would be more effective. It would require building new homes for people to move to, but it would make city services cheaper, such as police and fire. Making service areas smaller and denser would save the city money. No one's going to do that though.

Detroit's pensioners don't all live in the city.

The police and fire department do all their work in the city. Big difference. When you have a city plagued by fires from abandoned buildings and with a horrifying crime rate, I would think that investments in public safety are pretty important. Apparently, so do Detroit's leaders.


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Scribbling Rambler wrote:
Yakman wrote:
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Snyder to Detroit’s Retirees: Survive on One-Third Less
Honestly, should they expect what they were promised when the city was twice as large and financially healthy?
Not just promised, but guaranteed in a legally binding contract.

One of my clients was a lawyer, and he decided not to pay his bill (he was going out of business).

I told him that he signed a contract saying that he would pay said bill. He responded "Every contract has the implicit understanding of breach."

Things aren't great in Detroit, but EVERYONE is taking haircuts here, including the much maligned bondholders.


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Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Snyder to Detroit’s Retirees: Survive on One-Third Less

Honestly, should they expect what they were promised when the city was twice as large and financially healthy?

Things have changed. It sucks, but they STILL HAVE A PENSION and some benefits. Most people don't. They MIGHT have a 401k with a bit of money in it, but for most Americans, Social Security is going to have to be the primary breadwinner after retirement.


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yellowdingo wrote:
The possibility it was shot down to prevent a secret cargo from reaching china is the alteration on the theme. So we have a tie in with the theft of nasa secrets by an Iranian engineer working with nasa. While most of the documents were discovered in a storage facility in the USA accidentaly, more were shipped on to Iran. This ties in with the Iranians on the plane under stolen passports. They are shipping the documents to a Chinese buyer. The USA shoots down the plane to prevent the documents from going to China.

umm... really?


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yellowdingo wrote:
Vlad Koroboff wrote:
thejeff wrote:

A "formal request" to join a country while that country's troops are patrolling your streets is suspect at best.

Where's the resistance?

Because,you see,in Chechnya there was resistance,and it was not even independent.
Let's say referendum fails.What then?They will gun down parliament?
The ONLY thing on the russia's side here is that whole situation looks like will of Crimea's people.
Otherwise,that's an invasion,and NO-ONE back home will support invasion of Ukraine.
Pro russian government have a two question referendum.

and you can't answer "No"


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I'm calling MILLENNIUM on the whole affair.


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yellowdingo wrote:
This will escalate into Russia providing nukes to Arab states...mark my words.

nope.


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I enjoy my job. The one thing that stinks is I spend two weeks there, and then only have one week to spend at home (work on drilling rigs). If it was two weeks on / two weeks off, I would have no complaints.

Now, my last job... that was awful. But that's also why there was the following conversation:

MANAGER: Hey, Yakman, we're going to need you to work in Texas for a month. So you are going to have to start driving.

YAKMAN: No, I don't.

Best decision I've made in years.


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But... but... Obama! Black Helicopters! Tesla death rays! The Bilderberg Group!


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But where's Drover going to live?


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Mad Dollarz?

Yes, Russia's long history of bringing peace and prosperity to its newly conquered periphery is truly well-documented.

Oh wait....


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reading about the terms of the referendum... nice stacked deck there.


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silly.


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thejeff wrote:
Yakman wrote:

In any case, I have to applaud Putin for the stones he had to do what he did. It looks like he'll get away with it too. Obama won't stand up to him without European support, and the Europeans won't do anything.

He took what he did in Georgia, and on a much grander scale. My question is: does he do the same in eastern Ukraine? Does he move on Belarus when Lukashenko dies? Will anyone care?

We just love the strong men don't we? All sorts of talk about how Putin has "stones" and Obama is wimp.

As if this is just a big dick waving contest with no subtlety. Or consequences.

Obama "won't stand up to him" because he hasn't sent troops in or threatened to nuke Moscow. (Of course, when he does send troops or threatens to, he's a warmonger.)

This hasn't played out yet. Diplomacy and economic pressure isn't as emotionally satisfying to the chicken hawks as war is, but it can work and Obama's actually pretty good at, even if it doesn't play well to the bleachers. Russia's already taken a serious economic hit from this and the fallout hasn't ended yet. Its economy is far more linked to the rest of the world than it was back in the Soviet days. That means there's a whole lot more leverage.

There's more leverage on both ends. The Europeans are more concerned about access to Russian gas than they are about Ukraine's sovereignty. It's easy to sanction Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Zimbabwe... it's harder to sanction a country that has billions in foreign investment waiting to be seized, and which supplies your heating oil.

I don't think Obama's a wimp: he's a politician. there's nothing that compels him to act aggressively in Ukraine's defense and as such, he looks at where he needs Russian support (Iran, Syria, North Korea) and makes decisions about his options. He can cancel the G8, and force Russia out, he can levy economic sanctions against individuals complicit in the invasion, but beyond that?

Obama's decision not to act as the Imperial President regarding Syria's chemical weapons was not only the smart decision, but something that is probably going to underline his philosophy and approach here - Congress has to support action (whether, military, economic, or political). As it stands, the US Congress is in horrible disarray, with little taste for passing legislation, much less legislation that might have consequences.


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James,

Why do you make me give your company so much of my money with so much high quality product?

Thanks,

Yakman


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In any case, I have to applaud Putin for the stones he had to do what he did. It looks like he'll get away with it too. Obama won't stand up to him without European support, and the Europeans won't do anything.

He took what he did in Georgia, and on a much grander scale. My question is: does he do the same in eastern Ukraine? Does he move on Belarus when Lukashenko dies? Will anyone care?


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Razimir might just be a god - but a petty one, whose corporeal body has continued to age and weaken?

Also, another good reason why the supernal/infernal should not be giving clear advice or answers


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Golarion is old, very, very, very old.

Who knows what untold horrors and glories birthed the human race on that world?

My own guess is that humans were uplifted by the aboleths in the relatively near-past (the Azlanti were the "true humans" with all others being less perfect experiments scattered across the globe), but who is going to make them talk?


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Brandon Hodge wrote:

Being the freelancer with the most contributions of Azlanti-related material for Pathfinder, I've planted depictions and clues to the fashion and architecture of ancient Azlant in From Shore to Sea, Lost Cities of Golarion,, and, most recently, The Dead Heart of Xin. For the high apex Azlanti period of which Xin was outcast, I usually go for a Skesis-inspired (Dark Crystal) vibe with layers and layers of overlapping robes and strange coral-like structures, with an obvious bit of idealized lost Atlantis driving the whole strangeness. Go alien...Melinibonean, even.

Of course, I expanded on these themes for the non-IP companion volume of FStS: Open Design's "Sunken Empires."

Which is pretty sweet btw.

To reiterate a point above, Azlant was around for a long time and covered a huge area. There are going to be different styles and fashions coming from there.

That being said, Thasillon's style and fashion is clearly High Tyrannical.


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Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Bellona wrote:
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:

Not to burst your bubble but an immobile rod is, you know, immobile. As the planet rotates around the sun wouldn't it move away from the completely stationary space station?

By the same line of reasoning, wouldn't the planet eventually rotate away from an immobile rod on its surface?

I'd suggest that so long as the immobile rod is in a location which can reasonably be called an orbit of the planet, then one can apply the same reasoning that allows spellcasters to teleport onto moving ships.

Good point. Upon consideration it does have a weight limit. I take that to mean that it can't break orbit even when activated.

Magi-physics are hard.

Only if you violate the first law of Magi-Physics: You can make them do what you want.


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The Silver Mount didn't crash. It knows what it is doing...


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That's what's great about how Golarion is laid out.

Each nation is largely self-contained, so if you don't like Numeria, you don't have to go there, and the influence of the robot-spaceship-high technology doesn't pervade the setting.

On the other hand, it was written such that there aren't tons of jarring, nonsense borders. The dark would-be deiocracy of Razmiran isn't next to Viking Land, it's next to the politically divided River Kingdoms, where it makes sense. Socially advanced Galt is next to advanced Taldor, not smackdab in the center of the magical tyrannies of Garund.

Now, there are problems with this modular geographical layout, but in general, it works well for actually playing the game.


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Personally, I find it incredibly disappointing how Congressional Republicans keep talking about Benghazi like it is one person's fault - either Obama or Hillary.

The reality is that decisions were made based on rather serious constraints - Libya forbade the use of private military contractors, so either Libyans or US Marines had to be used... for cost purposes and because of increased budget constraints, a minimal Libyan security presence was in place at the consulate... Ambassador Stevens wanted to be accessible and able to move around the country, and 11 years from 9/11 thought that the anniversary wouldn't be a cause for undue alarm....

They keep fishing in an empty pond... as a Republican, this just makes me sad and frustrated.


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This past week, I discovered at the local Marriott, Port City Brewing Company's Monumental IPA, which is truly fantastic.

Best part: the Marriott is across the street from my apartment.

Washington DC is the best.

http://www.portcitybrewing.com/beer/monumental-ipa/


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Kahn Zordlon wrote:
Irontruth wrote:


Do you think that if a union bargained for a higher wage that would be unfair to the company?
Do you think collective bargaining would result in lower wages and benefits?
On average, union workers receive higher pay and more benefits than their non-union equivalent (even after deducting union membership fees).
Kirth wrote:


If I understand his argument, he thinks he's way better than his co-workers, and that this will be recognized and rewarded by a benevolent management -- whereas if there were collective bargaining, all the other people who aren't as awesome as he is would just be dragging him down.
That's it in a nutshell. Actually I think I'm sort of a schmuck at work sometimes, but I'll rise and fall on my own merit. I do think it's unfair for the company, since I don't believe they can fire those who try and unionize. I think collective bargining would result in lower wages and benifits, as the profit companies are paying for higher wages and benifits are coming out of profits for the company.

Collective Bargaining usually means higher wages and benefits - or it wouldn't be as demonized by the equity holders.

As far as "unfair for the company" that's silly. They can fire you, take away all your benefits, and leave you on the street just because someone is having a bad day... if you live in a Right to Work state. Is that fair to you? "The Company" is an idea. It doesn't exist. On the other hand, you actually do...


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Sissyl wrote:
What is becoming possible is genetically tailoring viruses to target specific groups, or even individuals. Of course, that requires massive amounts of DNA samples to work with... where would the states get that?

That's all super theoretical at this point.


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FallofCamelot wrote:
More thread necromancy?

Yuppers.

Although, people still want Numeria.


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Two Words: Massive Explosion

PCs running in Slow-Motion towards the camera as a fireball races after them.


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James Jacobs wrote:
Yakman wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Yup; Classic Monsters Revisited is the best place to go to at this point for more Golarion goodness on lizardfolk.

You need to stop posting and making me spend so much money on your products.

SHAME

It's the circle of life, man.

I post more product info. You spend more money on product. Said money fills Paizo's vaults. Money from vaults pays my salary. I'm still here to post more product info.

One of these days...


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Steve Geddes wrote:

Cheliax isn't any further than osirion if the mountains are high enough and filled with enough dangerous monsters. Similarly it would depend on the politics of the various nations. After all, holland is technically further away from South Africa than Egypt, yet the Afrikaners attend Dutch orthodox churches.

I'm not trying to persuade you as such - "feel" isn't something one can really argue about. Nonetheless, if you mentally squint a bit, things like this might resolve themselves for you.

Someone has to stock those massive slave markets in Katapesh...

Plus, I love the imagery of undead Gebbite Slavers driving the living to flesh entrepots on the coast.


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James Jacobs wrote:
Yup; Classic Monsters Revisited is the best place to go to at this point for more Golarion goodness on lizardfolk.

You need to stop posting and making me spend so much money on your products.

SHAME


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Steve Geddes wrote:
Yakman wrote:
John Kretzer wrote:

The comment 'All the trade is in the Inner Sea' is just false.

1) There is a ton of sea trade that never even goes near the Inner Sea.

2) The Shackles sits on the sea trade route that goes down to Southern Garund.

1) Where from? How can there be colonies on the far side of Azlant? Storms, psycho elves, ancient evil... ain't going to be me getting on that boat...

Nidal is an awful place. Nobody is going to trade there. Northern Cheliax is poor and sparsely populated compared to southern Cheliax. Varisia is... well... fun for stabbing. There ain't much trade outside of the Inner Sea.

2) The Inner Sea World Guide makes it quite clear that the Eye of Abendego is a massive navigation hazard. Ships don't go near or around it. Moreover, the paucity of information on Southern Garund (and more particularly, South Western Garund) implies that little trade from that region goes to the Inner Sea. There's a giant near-abandoned colony down there, whose entire reason for being in the game is that Cheliax forgot about it 100 years ago...

so... what trade?

I had a similar view to you at first. Based on some of the Garund based modules/APs I think the justification for a steady stream of trade is based around a whole "Northern, imperialistic countries exploiting the resources of underdeveloped Africa" thing. Whilst I find that implausible, it's nonetheless an in-game reason.

I get the exploitation of Garund, but the most logical place to do that from is... Garund. Eastern and Northern Garund, places like Nex and Osirion are probably knee deep in slaving and oppressing distant peoples in Mwangi and elsewhere.

On the other hand, Cheliax? SOOO far away. It makes no sense.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
Yakman wrote:
Who is going to pay for these things?
As it stands, nobody, so the city just gets more and more isolated and more and more into decline. Even the $$$ gas companies have just set up offices outside the city -- the side where the airport and WV gas fields are -- and don't bother to acknowledge that the city exists.

As someone in the gas industry, I believe a large part of that is b/c Pittsburgh's airport is on the west side of the city and far from the downtown. I don't make those real estate decisions, but if I were Shell or Baker Hughes and needed to get people into offices from the airport or wherever, I would be taking the commute from the airport into account.


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I think "the Dreaming" suggestion is a good one.

I would look for inspiration from THE MAXX comics from back in the day for Sarusan.

Some of the ideas from Eberron's Xen'drik might be helpful... a continent where time and space are fluid, particularly for outsiders.


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_Cobalt_ wrote:
Yakman wrote:

3- FR style Gods are not interesting or cool... again, I think Eberron's model is much better and should have been emulated.

I kind of agree with this. However, there would be those who would say just the opposite.

It seems to be a big split on the D&D community. I recall going to the FR Forums on WotC, and seeing endless pages talking about the deities and their various feuds, etc.. Some people really like that model, but it's not my thing.


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John Kretzer wrote:

The comment 'All the trade is in the Inner Sea' is just false.

1) There is a ton of sea trade that never even goes near the Inner Sea.

2) The Shackles sits on the sea trade route that goes down to Southern Garund.

1) Where from? How can there be colonies on the far side of Azlant? Storms, psycho elves, ancient evil... ain't going to be me getting on that boat...

Nidal is an awful place. Nobody is going to trade there. Northern Cheliax is poor and sparsely populated compared to southern Cheliax. Varisia is... well... fun for stabbing. There ain't much trade outside of the Inner Sea.

2) The Inner Sea World Guide makes it quite clear that the Eye of Abendego is a massive navigation hazard. Ships don't go near or around it. Moreover, the paucity of information on Southern Garund (and more particularly, South Western Garund) implies that little trade from that region goes to the Inner Sea. There's a giant near-abandoned colony down there, whose entire reason for being in the game is that Cheliax forgot about it 100 years ago...

so... what trade?

Quote:
Actually I think their reaction makes complete sense considering their history...I am surprised that other fantasy setting have not explored the idea of the gods are just not worth it.

we'll have to agree to disagree, but from my perspective, the benefits of clerical magic far outweigh the dangers of meddling priests.

Quote:
So you have seen the complete map of Golarion where there is a whole continent blocking that route? I think you should look at that map again. It is on Page 204 of the Inner World Guide.

Yes, there is a whole continent... which is warm and settled, and much nicer to drive a caravan across than a perilous ice road north of the arctic circle, which is also much, much longer.

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