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Yakman's page

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber. 235 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


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i love russian dashcam videos on youtube!


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at some point, people have to go home. that point hasn't been reached yet.


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an ID needed at all for a carpet cleaner? this is a problem far worse than racism.


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new favorite brewery is port city out of alexandria virginia.

i could not imagine liking a white beer. but they made one that is enjoyable. their pale ale is also amazing.


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shut up and take my money.


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Forty2 wrote:

As far as the Palentine Eye is concerned. I like it, but I have discovered another good candidate... a follower of the Whispering Way. There have been... quite a few undead in the campaign so far, having an undead-loving foil might be a good move.

Maybe Ren stumbled into can altercation between the two groups and was thrown off the cliff to ensure his silence? Perhaps he ran across a defector from the Order? Would any of that even make sense?

Totally. The Whispering Way wants to bring undeath to everything... and whose got more undeath than Osiron?

I can easily see a Whispering Way cultist becoming fascinated with the Osiriani traditions and culture and abandoning the Avistani prediliction for lichdom and vampireism in favor of the mummification rituals of Orsiron.


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Yeah, I bought tickets on Aeroflot to fly over that part of the world the day before the plane was shot down... great...


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I love foggy mornings in the mountains of Appalachia


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GeraintElberion wrote:
Aw dang, I was waiting for this to come out so that I could buy it and completely missed the 'pre-order gets free pdf' bit of the blurb.

me too...


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Vlad Koroboff wrote:
thejeff wrote:


Much like all the talk about how Russia had no interest in looking beyond Crimea?

Well,rebels already had referendum,and formally requested to join RF.

No recognition,no nothing.Because El Presidente,like any good Cylon,has a plan.
Also,what's so bad about expansion,especially if people are OK with it?

people are NOT ok with it, the referendums were NOT legitimate, etc.

For someone who is decrying how Kiev is run by neo-nazis, it's strange how you can't see that it is Moscow who is running another Anschluss.


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oh silliness.

companies pay what they have to pay to attract and keep the talent they need to attract. sometimes they make stupid decisions, but mostly, they try hard to get it right.

besides, wages are only one piece of the puzzle.


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ORDER THEM TO USE GAS AND CLUBS.

Just think about that. Legitimate governments don't have to issue orders for this violence against their own people.

People, who by the way, were right. Yanukovich was a thief, and he shouldn't have been in power.


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How is "the lesser evil" having thugs murder civilian protesters?

Please.


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wha?

the lesser evil was NOT to massacre the protesters in Kiev. That's just evil period.

Yanukovich, larcenous coward that he is, did the right thing and ran away when his situation was no longer tenable.

He is a thief, not a mass murderer, and if he had ordered his security forces to murder those people, then he would have been overthrown even earlier, and probably not have had a chance to escape to Russia and enjoy his stolen fortunes stashed in secret bank accounts.


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Artanthos wrote:
Arnwolf wrote:
Yes, the poor are ignorant and should work hard, make money, buy property, then vote. It is far better than poor people voting themselves breads and circuses from the state coffer, which eventually destroys all democracies.

Feudalism was a perfectly functional system for centuries.

it was perfectly functional for:

1-fending off vikings/magyars/Kings
2-keeping poor people poor and marginalized
3-keeping rich people rich w/o them having to work hard or change anything

other than that... not so great.


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Vlad Koroboff wrote:
Yakman wrote:


The people manning the barricades were THE GOOD GUYS. The people who've taken over are corrupt, yeah, but they aren't nazis. That's a ridiculous assertion.

Can we call any right-wing extremist nazi?

no. you can't.

additionally, the whole "right-wing extremist" thing is just... silly. it's a ploy that moscow is using to tarnish the new gov't in ukraine and turn people against it. it's transparent and ridiculous.


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JohnLocke wrote:

This is one of the most depressing things I've ever read. Seriously, how does anyone - even the most ardent patriot - view the U.S. as anything other than an agent of violence and despair around the world?

I'm not naive - I fully support a nation doing what it has to in order to defend it's legitimate interests. But America's desperation to assert and maintain it's dominance - subjugating so many for the benefit of so few - simply infuriates me. It's that arrogance, that disregard for right and truth and simple fairness that really does it.

But I still feel angry with myself when I take pleasure from events - such as yesterday's massive gas deal between Russia and China - that circumvent America's will sometimes. I've internalized such a belief that we - "the west" - are the good guys that I consciously have to remind myself of the facts to convince myself otherwise.

the author made a lot of good points... then he called the Ukrainian revolution a "putsch" and lost me.

The people manning the barricades were THE GOOD GUYS. The people who've taken over are corrupt, yeah, but they aren't nazis. That's a ridiculous assertion.


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bugleyman wrote:
Arnwolf wrote:
It was a short term fix that put people to work. There were still economic problems caused by regulation. But the worst of the depression on the poor was over.
So...to recap, the government's deficit spending ended the Great Depression. Got it.

nope. the post-war expansion ended the great depression.

people like to talk about the depression ending with ww2, but when food and clothing is rationed, i find it hard to call that prosperity.

add in the post-war recession, and one could argue that the great depression really, truly, didn't end until 1947.


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DM Barcas wrote:
I worked a case last year where I dealt with a number of electricians. The journeyman electricians I dealt with were trained in trade school but made excellent money. Those who did trade school, became master electricians, and went back to formal school made absurd amounts of money. (They made $300/hour for consultation work on the case.)

i work on drilling rigs.

most of the hands don't have a college degree. almost all of them earn at least $80k, with the majority earning well over $100k. work your way up to being a directional driller or a company man, and that number gets much larger really fast.

there's a market for skilled tradesmen. plumbers in affluent neighborhoods make good money, as do electricians, etc. college degrees are nice, but no guarantee that you'll be relevant 10-15 years from now... people will always need toilets and electric power.


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Freehold DM wrote:
Arnwolf wrote:
The biggest problem we have is nonproperty owners voting. Biggest mistake we ever made. I don't care if they are black, jew, muslim, martian, and/or gay.
The time period where that was true to the level you insinuate has long passed.

still the case in virginia.


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Alex Smith 908 wrote:
Arnwolf wrote:
Yes, the poor are ignorant and should work hard, make money, buy property, then vote. It is far better than poor people voting themselves breads and circuses from the state coffer, which eventually destroys all democracies.
You do realize that Rome was at its height when free bread and mass entertainment existed right, and that Rome wasn't a democracy? The only democracy to truly collapse was Athens and there only people who owned land could vote. All other democracies that have fallen were destroyed in violent military coups. Most of those were caused by military personnel and veterans becoming disenfranchised with society or being mistreated. Name one democracy that allowed non-land owners to vote that has collapsed.

the weimar republic comes to mind.


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Krensky wrote:

10k a year is very low, even for a state school.

Penn State main campus is over 20k for a freshman year with room, board, fees, and books, more if you're not a Pennsylvania resident.

it depends on the state, and the school.

i'm originally from Virginia, so i'm basing my info on what the rates are there, although they've gone up quite a bit recently, and might have exceeded my figure.

i know that in texas that the big, impressive state schools charge more than the smaller ones also. i would assume that penn state does the same.


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Nicos wrote:
I always wnated to ask if every college is so expensive in the us, there is no public college or soemthing?

As far as I am aware, there is only one free accredited school in the United States, aside from teh military academies, which is Cooper Union in New York City.

Of course, only 400 students go there, and they are all brilliant, so...

Public colleges are run by the states, and are affordable, with loans generally, but beyond the reach of many people (for all expenses, $10k a year is probably a good yardstick).

Private schools are typically expensive, with the most expensive approaching $60k / year.

There are plenty of programs to make schools more affordable, but many of them are focused on loans, which means that lots of kids get out of school with loan payments that they struggle to pay.


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I think's there's a legitimate concern that minimum wages can act as an anchor for hourly salaries to gravitate to though.


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people don't have to pay a ton for a four year degree.

go to community college for two years (it's cheap!) get your associate's degree. then, transfer to a state school for your last two years.

presto, you just saved HALF of your costs, and got the best part of the college experience.

also, and here's something to think about: major in something that will get you a job. Sciences, math, engineering, medicine. the stuff people are hiring for. yeah, the economy sucks in general, but there are plenty of sectors and regions there there is growth. put yourself THERE and you'll probably do better than most kids, who don't ever think about what life is going to be like after they graduate.


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Businesses are owned by people, no? Any tax on them is effectively a tax on the business owner, who is further taxed on his direct income from the business.

Why not just cut out the corporate taxation part (which is rife with corruption and ridiculousness) and tax the actual proceeds of the business - the capital gains to the shareholder?


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
Yakman wrote:
Delaware has simple incorporation laws. It allows for a quick, relatively painless means of incorporating a company. This allows for a low start up cost for businesses. This in turn, allows for more competition.

It also allows for more corporate shenanigans, like ripping people off and reforming under a new name, or forming a corporation to buy a company and then split the companies debt off , sell the profitable part, raid the pension fund to pay for your companies "consulting fees"

Quote:


Because everyone who is anyone is a Delaware corporation, they all fall under the same regulatory schema

Or lack thereof.

Quote:
Does it siphon off tax revenue from other states? Yes.

It doesn't just re direct tax revenue. It drops it. And that means that you have to pay more in taxes to make up for that shortfall, because the government doesn't spend less just because the corporations are taxed less.

And no. That money doesn't trickle down.

Quote:
But does it benefit the economy as a whole? Yes.

There's more to the economy than wallstreet.

Quote:
Before the Delaware Corporation companies used to have to PETITION THE STATE LEGISLATURE FOR INCORPORATION. It was insane. This is a good thing.
getting incorporated was SUPPOSED to be hard. They're incredibly abusable

when it is easy to set up and yes, easy to fold up, a business, economies become more competitive. reducing the cost of entry (and exit) allows for new competitors, greater innovation, etc.

besides, corporate taxation is a bad idea in the first place. it's double taxation, and emininently abusable. tax incomes, not businesses.


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did they ever find this thing?


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
Yakman wrote:
It also ensures that companies have a single place to go to resolve disputes

In their favor

Quote:
one set of courts,

That they bought and paid for

Quote:

The "Delaware Corporation" started out as a fancy way to lure away companies from New Jersey, but it has done wonders for the US economy as a whole.

But is absolutely horrible towards actual americans that DON"T fit in a PO box.

No.

Delaware has simple incorporation laws. It allows for a quick, relatively painless means of incorporating a company. This allows for a low start up cost for businesses. This in turn, allows for more competition. Because everyone who is anyone is a Delaware corporation, they all fall under the same regulatory schema in this regards, meaning that the cost of hiring corporate law specialists decreases, since all the specialists are specialists in this field.

Does it siphon off tax revenue from other states? Yes.

But does it benefit the economy as a whole? Yes.

Before the Delaware Corporation companies used to have to PETITION THE STATE LEGISLATURE FOR INCORPORATION. It was insane. This is a good thing.


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eh, haven't been too enthused with some of the more recent offerings, but the Numeria book is going to be in my downloads file the day it goes on sale.


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Samasboy1 wrote:

Well, since they could interbreed with other human ethnicities, it would make sense that they could breed with each other...

Of course, given the high magic nature of their culture, I don't think frequent use of things like Clone would be out of order.

Ah, but they are interbreeding with other humans to create... other humans.

Perhaps to have the "Pure Azlanti" abilities, something else was involved, not just a bit of the old boot knocking.


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
Yakman wrote:
The people of Delaware have built themselves a nice little legal/financial hub and accompanying industry as a result of the "Delaware Corporation".

The LEGISLATURE of Delaware has built themselves a nice financial hub. HUGE difference.

Quote:
I dunno if they'd be upset that their state is taking away tax revenue from other states in exchange for the thousands of jobs their little loophole has created in American corporate law.
They're there because the tax revenue is minimal. Its a race to the bottom to see which state will charge them the least, and its cheaper to chip in together and buy one state legislature than for all of them to pay more in taxes.

It also ensures that companies have a single place to go to resolve disputes, one set of courts, etc.

The "Delaware Corporation" started out as a fancy way to lure away companies from New Jersey, but it has done wonders for the US economy as a whole.


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Fergie wrote:
Yakman wrote:
I don't like minimum wage laws. I think they distort the market.

The market is already distorted. There is no such thing as a "free market". Never has been, and probably never will be. There will always be VERY good reasons to reign in "pure capitalism" such as morality, democracy and security. Once you realize that there can't be a "free market" you realize that everything government does picks economic winners and losers.

Belief in a "free market" is dangerous because it is a fantasy.

Of course the market is distorted.

That doesn't mean that we should just go hog wild and artificially distort it all we can.


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Do we even know if Azlanti reproduced naturally?

These guys were an aboleth experiment. Nothing should be assumed about them.


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
Yakman wrote:
The lawmakers of Iowa probably understand Iowa better than the lawmakers of the entire country understand Iowa.

By this logic, the people of Delaware must really love giving corporations lots of rights.

You're also assuming that the lawmakers give a flying fumble about the lives of iowans, and the ones most impacted by a minimum age increase. They don't.

The people of Delaware have built themselves a nice little legal/financial hub and accompanying industry as a result of the "Delaware Corporation".

I dunno if they'd be upset that their state is taking away tax revenue from other states in exchange for the thousands of jobs their little loophole has created in American corporate law.


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thejeff wrote:
Yakman wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Yakman wrote:
This is why states have democratic governments - if people don't like that, they can elect people to change the law.

Which is why the country has a democratic government. If people don't like it, they can elect people to change the law: either to repeal the national minimum wage or to raise it.

The logic is the same.

You could also make the same argument you do on the state level: People slinging burgers in upstate New York don't have the same expenses as people doing the same in New York City, therefore having the states make minimum wage laws is ridiculous. Counties or towns should do it.

To which I would make the same reply.

Yes. Of course. Totally rational.

We live in a democracy, and we are allowed to have opinions, and can, in numbers have those opinions made law.

I don't like minimum wage laws in general, but I'm okay with states doing it, as it is slightly less absurd than the federal gov't doing the same.

Now we come to it. The basic problem is that you don't like minimum wage laws. Therefore it's better to fight them one state at a time than on the federal level.

And it's easier to argue "It's a state issue" than to argue against the concept, so ...

That's generally the way all the "State's rights" issues go. Of course when you can win on the federal level, "state's rights" go out the window. Witness Scalia on medical marijuana.

not at all.

I don't like minimum wage laws. I think they distort the market.

BUT I'm okay with them on a state level. They aren't great, and I believe there's some research that says they might actually depress wages, (don't quote me on that), but whatever. Not a major issue.

I don't think the federal gov't should set them. Fine with plenty of other workplace things the feds do, like OSHA and what-not, but I don't like the feds setting wages, anymore than I like the feds setting prices on anything.


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Mike Franke wrote:

On the positive side, although unification will cost a lot of money Korea could look forward to 100 percent employment for a couple of decades. Nothing like re-building an entire country from the ground up to get an economy booming. Look at Germany. Pretty painful at first but the German economy came out even stronger....

Which is probably another reason why China would never let it happen.

East Germans had these things called "skills."

North Koreans on the other hand... the costs are going to be INSANE.


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Irontruth wrote:

No, that is a factor of why it exists, not the complete story.

See above in my much wordier post. There were active political divisions in the country that your explanation doesn't account for. Which means that relying on your explanation alone will lead you to false conclusions about the country and why it behaves the way it does.

The difference between what you are saying and what I am saying is simple...

You: X is the cause of the problem.
Me: X is a major cause of the problem, but Y and Z are also factors that help explain many things.

If you think I'm wrong, feel free to explain why Y and Z are not problems. Because I agree with you, X is a cause. That isn't the difference between our statements. You have to show that Y and Z are non-factors.

Please feel free to show that Korean history has nothing to do with the current state of Korean affairs.

The Korean people did not have any say in the aftermath of WW2. Everything that happened, from the division of the country, to who was put in charge, to what those people were allowed to do, was imposed on them by the Great Powers.

Korea's current political division is solely, entirely, the result of the end-game politics of the Second World War.


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thejeff wrote:

Raising the minimum wage is usually popular, but if it's not getting talked about and there aren't votes for it and against it, it's not a political issue and there's no political pressure. Bringing it up on the national level gets it in the news and ratchets up the political pressure for it. Which, as I said, helps the local minimum wage efforts as well.

Now if they let up on it after this election so that it's forgotten about before there's a chance to take any action, then maybe it was just a cynical ploy.

OTOH, I'm not too fond of the idea of dismissing anything that can't be accomplished immediately as cynical ploys. There's been a lot of good progressive legislation over the years that took many tries over many years to get passed. It's an important part of politics.

Now, if the Senate had taken 50 different votes over the last 2 years about raising the minimum wage with no hope of it happening, then I'd be willing to accept "cynical ploy".

The american legislator would never engage in such irrational and cynical behavior!!! [OUTRAGE] :-o


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
Yakman wrote:
My point was that having a National payfloor doesn't make sense. States can and do, have higher payfloors, but the federal gov't shouldn't be making blanket decisions for pay across the entire country.
There is no reason why the state government is inherently any more sensible than the federal one.

The lawmakers of Iowa probably understand Iowa better than the lawmakers of the entire country understand Iowa.

Clearly that's not something that can be proven, but it's generally the rationale for the federalist system.


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thejeff wrote:
Yakman wrote:
This is why states have democratic governments - if people don't like that, they can elect people to change the law.

Which is why the country has a democratic government. If people don't like it, they can elect people to change the law: either to repeal the national minimum wage or to raise it.

The logic is the same.

You could also make the same argument you do on the state level: People slinging burgers in upstate New York don't have the same expenses as people doing the same in New York City, therefore having the states make minimum wage laws is ridiculous. Counties or towns should do it.

To which I would make the same reply.

Yes. Of course. Totally rational.

We live in a democracy, and we are allowed to have opinions, and can, in numbers have those opinions made law.

I don't like minimum wage laws in general, but I'm okay with states doing it, as it is slightly less absurd than the federal gov't doing the same.


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meatrace wrote:
Yakman wrote:
This is why states have democratic governments - if people don't like that, they can elect people to change the law.
You're describing the way we want it to be, not the way it is.

So... the people who make the laws are not elected by popular vote?


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This is why states have democratic governments - if people don't like that, they can elect people to change the law.


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Irontruth wrote:

But that's talking about the war, not the mere existence of DPRK.

Two separate things are not the same thing.

The DPRK exists b/c the USA and the USSR drew a line approximately halfway across the Korean peninsula in 1945. That's the beginning of it. It continues to exist b/c it has been propped up / actively defended by the USSR and the PRC since then. That's the present state of it.


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I'd like to think that the rest of the world views him as a successful, somewhat mysterious, and more than a bit bonkers, River King.


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Samasboy1 wrote:
Samasboy1 wrote:


There is a spell, Half Blood Extraction, that turns half [b[orcas[/b] into full orcas.

Stupid auto correct.

Err.....Orcs.

I don't know about 9th level.....Half Blood Extraction is only 5th. But 7th, maybe higher.

Of course, as you say, it might require gaining knowledge from an Aboleth, and certainly would be a prized secret no matter what.

I think the half-orca is a much more interesting character race than the half-orc


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Archpaladin Zousha wrote:

The thing you have to remember is that Rahadoum's position is less about "Man is great!" and more "The followers of the gods are bastards!"

The Oath Wars were apparently VERY destructive, and the reason the Laws of Man were embraced is because the followers of the guy that came up with them brought order and peace where they were in charge. In their minds, if you have priests curing diseases, the priests can use that as leverage against you, and once they do that, they'll start using as cannon fodder in their conflicts with each other.

It's the same reason the citizens of Cheliax put up with the domineering hand of House Thrune and the Asmodeus worship. It's better than the chaos of war. In fact, that seems to be a looming specter over much of Golarion, a very strong desire to avoid more large scale wars around the Inner Sea. The Mendevian Crusades are kind of an exception, as EVERYBODY knows demons are bad news.

And it's important to note that priests capable of curing disease are rare (which is why Curse of the Crimson Throne's second act is even possible). Since few priests get to that high of a level, Rahadoum likely doesn't feel a need to open the floodgates just for a single priest who can cure maybe a hundred or so people in a day. During a plague that's not going to accomplish much.

Long story short, in a world where divine power can cure disease, it's important to know that that ability alone isn't all that holds a nation together over generations. Pestilence is only one factor that affects it, and it's a factor that hasn't necessarily been hard on Rahadoum anyway compared to what they perceive as the much more dangerous threat of civil war.

House Thrune has been in charge for a brief period of time. Rahadoum has been anti-clerical/anti-theist for thousands of years - every change in government/culture, etc. has maintained a strict line on the issue. I don't think that's a valid comparison.


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Personally, I don't like how Rahadoum is presented.

In a world where divine power can cure disease, a nation that denied such power for generations is inconceivable.

I would argue for restructuring Rahadoum as a nation that is built on principles of humanism... which was made manifest in the divine being ARODEN. Oh yeah, there was a God of Man who was a person himself... and given Rahadoum's geographical location, it's reasonable that Aroden came to Rahadoum when he first arrived in Garund after leaving Azlant.

Let's say that Rahadoum venerated Aroden as a role-model and paragon of humanity who emerged upwards to divinity rather than descended from the heavens. They rejected all other faiths, and in fact rejected all other gods, or even the concept of gods. The Law of Man was the Church of Aroden in Rahadoum. In Rahadoum Man is the Measure of all things, and the perfected man was Aroden.

The Church proper was probably more like a Unitarian Universalist service than a more traditional religious gathering. Considering the advanced levels of education in Rahadoum, I can imagine itenerant lecturers and philosophers giving speeches about history, science, letters, etc., rather than leading prayers.

Now Aroden is dead. Rahadoum can be the present-day Atheist, anti-clerical, anti-divine state that it is, but now has a method for it continuing to exist for centuries. The Faithful of Aroden reject the overtures of the other, lesser gods, and hold their ancient compact with the Last Azlanti.


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Which Ireland?

Ice Age Ireland?

Celtic Ireland?

Viking Ireland?

Norman Ireland?

English occupied Ireland?

Modern Ireland?

Contemporary Ireland?

Dinosaur Ireland?


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thejeff wrote:
Yakman wrote:
Orfamay Quest wrote:
Yakman wrote:
Good for the GOP. States can, and do, have their own minimum wage laws. They should pass such things, not the federal government. It's a huge over-reach by the feds in the first place.

Tried and found wanting. The interstate commerce clause covers this.

But please don't let facts and reason interfere with your beliefs. They'll throw you out of the Republican club if you do.

oh, they CAN do it. It doesn't mean that they SHOULD.

People slinging burgers in Alabama are less valuable than people doing the same work in, say, Washington DC, or Washington. Having the same payfloor for people working thousands of miles apart in vastly different local economies is ridiculous.

Which is why states can set a higher minimum wage as they wish. The feds set a floor. If states (or counties, cities and towns) think they need a higher one they can set their own.

My point was that having a National payfloor doesn't make sense. States can and do, have higher payfloors, but the federal gov't shouldn't be making blanket decisions for pay across the entire country.

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