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Wayne Reynolds

Wayne Reynolds's page

Contributor. Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 76 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


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Triphoppenskip wrote:
Have you ever illustrated Reiko without her mask? Or does one not see her without her mask and live to tell the tale?

When I designed Reiko for Ultimate Combat I was asked to provide a portrait sketch of her without her mask and hood on. I guess it's never been released?

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Vhayjen wrote:

I have to say Imrijka has always looked the best to me as far as all Iconics are concerned. Now, Quinn is especially cool; but in the end, Imrijka still wins as my favorite piece of art.

Great job on her, Wayne!

So my question is . . . how do I go about asking her out on a date? You know, dinner and a movie. Maybe bring her to meet the parents and such like family and friends.

I suppose you would have to give your blessing on such a matter, correct?

Just refer to me as Curious in Charlotte . . . :)

Dear Curious in Charlotte,

I'm very pleased that you like my artwork of Imrijika.

I was assured by a good friend of mine that best way impress a lady was by dressing as a hedgehog and hanging around leafy borders and shrubbery.
I must admit that this hasn't worked for me yet and I may have chosen the wrong animal to emulate when it comes to initiating any kind of social interaction when someone approaches due to a tendency to curl up into a tight ball until they lose interest and go away.
Now I think of it, my good friend is actually a hedgehog.
However, I am confident that should this strategy ever meet with success, then she's a keeper.

Let me know how it turns out.

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Askren wrote:

Don't really have much in the way of questions. I've always wanted to find Wayne at a convention and bother him in person about just how much his art has been a really big influence on my own illustration for years now, but this'll do I guess.

So, thanks Wayne.

My question would probably be whether you still paint traditionally or have moved completely digital. If the former, I have no idea how you work so fast.

Also where can I get poster-sized versions of your covers?

Thanks for your interest in my artwork.

All of my artwork is created using traditional methods - Acrylic on 3mm artboard. I don't use any digital technology to touch -up or enhance the image. I'm just more comfortable using paint & brush.

I'm contractually unable to make prints of my artwork over a certain size. However, I think Paizo occasionally release promotional poster sized versions of the core book covers.

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Set wrote:
tuypo1 wrote:

that is an odd request indeed

im guessing they wanted to make them seem androgynous or something

I'll admit that I can't really tell boy crows from girl crows, so unless you go the 'let's give girl dragonborn huge jumblies!' route, it's kind of a toss up.

The clothing choices on the Tengu-in-question led me to think male.

'Beaky' as a wizard or sorcerer is an interesting tweak. I probably based my cleric assumption at least partially on tengu statistics (bonus to Wisdom), 'cause I'm a dirty powergamer. :)

New question!

Seoni and Ezren have sorta-similar staves, and when you draw them, they are distinctive (his looks more cobra-head-ish, hers more like a dreamcatcher), but other artists seem to draw them so similarly I sometimes have to go look at the originals to see if they 'got them wrong.' Was the staff-similarity something in the original art order, or did they just sort of both randomly end up with staves that curved at the end like that?

:)

Form and clothing are ways an artist can denote gender on non-mammalian zoomorphic creatures.
Your observation that "Beaky" the Tengu (Yep, that's his name now)is male due to his clothing is an accurate conclusion.
I'd have probably given a female Tengu more jewellery and a kimono rather than a hakama. I'd make her form more slender than the male counterpart too.
I like the idea that Tengu use paint to make distinguishing marks a fascinating concept also. It would be a fun visual to play around with.

I love creating creature and culture building art. I'd relish the opportunity to work on some of the Golorion - specific races.

Ezren's stave is a kinda dragon - headed handled walking stick. (Rather like a question mark "?") It's shape is coincidental to Seoni's natural - shaped staff, which has a top shaped a bit like the letter "G".

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RhinoKneel wrote:

Is there more "action" artwork containing some of the iconics in the upcoming Wrath of the Righteous PACG adventure path? My friend makes custom character sheets for my group and he likes putting art on the deck spot.

Transparent .pngs of characters seems to be a fairly hit-or-miss find as well.

I can say that I've done a piece of artwork for the Wrath of the Righteous PACG. But I can't really divulge any other information regarding future Pathfinder artwork until they've been officially previewed by Paizo.

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Ms. Pleiades wrote:

Hello Mr. Reynolds, your work always helps give a little spur in visualizing Golarion.

What's your favorite non-core race to illustrate? Including bestiary monsters.

Thanks very much.

So many good races to choose from!
I enjoy illustrating anything in the Pathfinder setting.
I had a lot of fun painting the cover to the Monster Codex with all the different creatures on it.
I think I can narrow it down to Ogres or Mites. :)

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Romaq wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Seoni's attire is, in my mind, more typical of a Varisian outfit than Thassilonian. That said, Varisian history is intermingled with Thassilon, so I'm also sure there's echoes of that in her outfit as well.

When Darsadi (Half-elf Varisian Sorc) wants to dress fancy, it is more like Seoni's attire and having reference to things like Mongolia/ East Asian attire is VERY useful for me as references. Darsadi has no problem being "cheese-cakey". If you've got it, flaunt it. I love the tagline for a sorcerer, "Work is for ugly people."

When Darsadi goes to the field, she wears something much more like the Iconic hunter Adowyn: dress for function, and she has her hair up to not get caught on anything or used against her in a grapple. And Darsadi loves hats!

I must say if Seoni were dressed to look more like Adowyn, I couldn't tell she's a Sorceress. Regardless of how practical or "realistic" I would personally consider Seoni's attire, I KNOW for a fact you can lay out each Iconic: Wizard, Sorcerer, Summoner, Monk, Fighter... each and every one WAR has done to date. Ask someone who never heard of Pathfinder what "this" image is, and I'm pretty sure they'll guess it. And if they are interested at all in playing Fantasy Tabletop RPG, they'll know what they want to play off a WAR pregen image before they even know what the class & stats are.

One look at Seoni... just one... and I knew, "Ok, that's mine. Let's roll!"

Thank you, WAR! The only regret I have in buying my 2015 PaizoCon tickets is that I know you won't be there as the Guest of Honor. But I look forward to the day when you'll be available to make it. :) And if I had the funds, I'd pay the tickets and pay you to go. You are expensive, but you are very worth it. :)

Thanks very much for the kind words Romaq. I sincerely appreciate it.

PaizoCon is a great event and I'm sure you'll have a fantastic time at this year's show. The PaizoCon 2015 artist GoH is the talented Jason Engle. Please do chat with him, he's a really nice guy.

Maybe I'll see you at PaizoCon 2016? :)

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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Apologies if this has been answered: Oracles can wear armor - so why doesn't the Iconic Oracle?

I seem to recall that armour wasn't mentioned in the art description for the Oracle.

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Triphoppenskip wrote:
It's been stated that there will never be any non core race iconics, but if they were to change there mind is there any one particular non core race you have an itch to draw?

Good question!

And a difficult one to answer because there are so many interesting races within Golarion.
I guess I'd have to go with one of the races I haven't illustrated before.... And probably one of the less humanoid races such as the Oreads.... or Gripplis.

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Shawn Oliver wrote:
Hello, Wayne. I've often wondered about the large bracelet-things that Sajan wears. They appear to be made of rope or wicker, maybe. Possibly for extra padding/weight for wrist strikes/deflections?

Correct. :)

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Krail Stromquism wrote:

Thanks for taking time out to answer questions and an even bigger thanks for sharing your talent with all of us. Your evocative work has given a sense of style to Pathfinder and breathed a real sense of life into the people and creatures you illustrate.

I haven't scoured the thread but do you do any of the online media for your reference/morgue files? Like pinterest? Do you livestream any of your work? if so what are those channels?

I know you are a busy guy, but is there any chance of you doing a run on the Pathfinder Comic? You mentioned wanting to work more with the ACG iconics and it'd be cool to feature them in their own six issue series, kind of like the Origins series now maybe?

thanks again!

Thanks for your interest in my artwork.

I'll occasionally check Google Images or Pinterest for visuals if I'm stuck on a particular subject, But I don't use it enough to keep a permanent account open.

I haven't done a livestream or posted video clips of my work process. I find that feeling of someone looking over my shoulder a bit too intrusive.
I have a Facebook page; Wayne Reynolds Artworks. And there's a Facebook fan page in my name as well.

I haven't done any comic work in a long time. I enjoyed doing sequential artwork but my career seemed to lead me more towards fantasy illustration. I'd happily do more comic work, although my work schedule is busy enough that I don't have any plans to do anything like that in the foreseeable future.
But who knows what the future might bring?

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Zhangar wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
Romaq wrote:
My favorite Iconic is Seoni, and my favorite character is Darsadi Callinova, loosely based on Seoni. What resources did you draw upon for Seoni's look?
Glad you like Seoni. :) I drew on slightly East Asian / Mongolian influences for her dress. Then created tattoos that looked maybe ancient Egyptian or Mesopotatamium in appearance but were obviously arcane.

Huh. Would it be fair to interpret Seoni's outfit as a Thassilonian dress?

(Thassilonian outfits and architecture often have an East Asian look, which Mr. Jacobs has advised is completely intentional.)

Also, thank you for starting this thread. Your work is fantastic.

Thanks very much.

Seoni was designed a long time ago. At the very early creation of the Pathfinder setting. I didn't know anything about the Thassilonian Empire at the time I illustrated her. So maybe the look of the Thassilionian Empire was decided after Seoni was designed?
I can see what you mean as there does seem to be a similarity but I guess you'd have to ask one of the designers for a definitive answer?

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the Queen's Raven wrote:
From the time you receive the written description to the time you hand in the final version that Paizo excepts, how much time do you put into each iconic? (Just the stand alone picture used for the class)

An Iconic character can take anywhere between 2 - 5 days to sketch. (12 hour/day )I have to take into account costume detail design, composition and pose at this stage.

They usually take no more than 2-3 days to paint.

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the Queen's Raven wrote:
This one has bugged me and my friend since the cavalier art was first released, Alain has a "T" shaped "stick" on his back. What is that? I mean now that I know you put so much effort and historical accuracy, when possible, into each item on the iconic characters it must be something important to a knight or armored horseman.

I think it's more accurate to say that I base my illustrations on real life historical artefacts and modify them to reflect a high fantasy setting.

Although, Alain's "T" shaped stick is an actual tournament shield/lance/banner rest.

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Halflens wrote:

Hey Wayne, I was super glad to meet you at Lucca last year and I'm still following your works and studying your artbook.

I read you get LOTS of reference from ancient weaponry/armory/stuff. Is there any good site or book we can approach to for such material?

Keep up with the awesomeness :)

My reference library is a result of over 20 years of collecting and compiling. There isn't really any one place / book that has all the reference you need. It's a case of searching for material yourself based upon what inspires you. Amazon is a good place to start. 2nd hand bookshops is another. Museum shops are good too.

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Kaladin the Radiant wrote:

I'm wondering if you can explain a bunch of stuff that's been bugging me about Seelah's armor. I'd greatly appreciate you spending the time to deal with an annoying nerd. ^_^

Her armor would seem to prevent her from being able to bend her ankle much at all, limiting stances. Is there something I'm overlooking?

Why is the couter concave? Also, I would think the scalemail/lamellar (not sure which it was meant to be, assuming lamellar based on the size of the scales?) would get caught in it.

Vambraces, greaves, and gauntlets all look oversized. Why is this? No way Seelah's limbs are that thick, right?

The spaulder overlaps a lot with the breastplate in the corner, and the attachments for the cape look pretty bulky as well. Seems like it would inhibit movement a lot.

I understand your reasoning for the boob armor, but as a female participant in Society for Creative Anachronism swordfighting, I have to disagree at least somewhat. Something like that would easily get in the way of moving one's arms, as well as channeling impact into the center of the chest. Plus, boobs squish. Bindings would work better. Anyway, if you want to draw the boob armor, I'd think it should be... uh, more pointed forward. Because range of motion for arms. Also, why is the top section of the breastplate separate?

The key is a really neat touch, but I think the location of it is a bit confusing. Armor is there to get hit. Ordinary nonmagical keys, at least, could probably get pretty badly bent if caught between armor and weapon, I think?

Curious why the gap over the knee like that instead of a normal articulated poleyn.

(On the positive and less nitpicky side, I love all the little details in this picture. The different layers of armor and all the stuff on her belt and the trinkets. Plus, it just generally looks pretty kickbutt. Honestly, the other things only bother me because it's so good overall.)

You have good understanding of armour. Your points about articulation are valid. (And I've said all I'm going to say on the boob plate)

The simple answer is, Seelah's armour is that way because it looks good. There are many occasions when I'll sacrifice real life mechanics in favour of visual aesthetics. My art style is a strange combination of pseudo - realistic combined with stylised exaggeration. Amiri's sword is another good example. It seems to work within a high fantasy setting. Although I base nearly all of my character designs on historical reference material, I'll change it to reflect a high fantasy setting and indulge my creativity and pathological need for small detail/decoration. In these cases it only needs to look like it might function. But in a high fantasy setting I'm hopefully trying to create something unique that no-one has seen before because my creativity is leading me in that direction. I like to throw in a degree of realism but depending upon what I'm illustrating, I'll blur the lines between fantasy and realism. If you're interested in seeing my historical illustrations, check out my old work on Osprey Publishing's series of books.

I based Seelah's armour on extrapolation of ancient Middle Eastern cultures/Ancient Egypt/ Ancient Assyria. The concept behind it was what a full harness would look like if it had evolved in these cultures. Throw a bit of divine magic in there and .........

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Aelryinth wrote:

Question for Wayne:

Seoni's Hair.

the early books seem to indicate she's blond. Later art seems to turn that to white.
What is it actually supposed to be, according to you, and has Paizo simply shifted it more to white?

Seoni's hair is platinum blond.

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Kevin Mack wrote:

Hi want to say ver big fan of your art have some questions about my favorite Iconic Lini

What insperations did you use for her design?
Does she wear actual boots or is it more bits of green leather tied on with twine?
Are the markings on her face tatooes or some other sort of marking (And do they have any significance?)
We know the significance of her twigs but what about her other items (Belt buckle, little twine dolls, Jewlery etc?)

Anywho thank you for your time

Whilst Lini's clothes may look like random shapes of leather stitched and tied together. They are actually a carefully considered design. I wanted to create an aesthetic that went beyond conventional human constraints but reflected non-symmetrical shapes found in nature. I avoided straight lines wherever I could. Swirl patterns and spirals from the Bronze – Age European Celtic culture seemed to lend themselves to this character concept. It seemed appropriate as these patterns are evocative of the druidic tradition and it’s connection to nature. Here jewellery and items are all made from objects occurring in nature such as stones, twine and flower petals. (With the exception of her sickle)Constructed items such as her corn dollies and bone hair slide are made fro naturally occurring objects also.

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extinct_fizz wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
LazarX wrote:
How does the Arcanist keep her cloak on?
Enora's cloak is held on with "Hook and eye". (Extinct_Fizz 's breakdown of the costume in another thread is correct.) The "shoulder flaps" of Enora's cloak has hooks on the inside. The eyelets run down the sides of that white "V". Enora's hair covers any visible signs or stitching of the hooks on the outside of the cloak.

I am so excited that you read, remembered and referenced my thread. This is a huge honor. I appreciate the time you're taking to answer questions!

On the subject of Enora, is that "white 'V'" metal or cloth (or stiffened cloth?)?

No problem :) Thanks for your interest in my artwork.

The "V" would be stiff cloth such as felt or reinforced with a few layers to keep it's shape.

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Romaq wrote:
My favorite Iconic is Seoni, and my favorite character is Darsadi Callinova, loosely based on Seoni. What resources did you draw upon for Seoni's look?

Glad you like Seoni. :) I drew on slightly East Asian / Mongolian influences for her dress. Then created tattoos that looked maybe ancient Egyptian or Mesopotatamium in appearance but were obviously arcane.

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baron arem heshvaun wrote:

Thanks for doing this Wayne!

Which Iconic would be the best at illustrating their creator the artist Wayne Reynolds?

Which Iconic could portray Wayne Reynolds in the "Paizo Goes to GenCon the Movie"?

Given that there are four Iconics in each Adventure Path, which combination of four would you love to see team up and illustrate that you have not been given the chance to yet?

Ezren

Alain.
Any of the new Iconics from Advanced Class Guide because I've not had chance to illustrate them much doing their thing.

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LMPjr007 wrote:
OK here is a question, what is your least favorite Iconic? I mean the one you had to really push to connect to visually?

I've been happy illustrating all of the Iconics. Though there have been some that I've struggled with to get the design I was looking for. I seem to recall Oloch the Warpriest was a tricky one to design. It was hard to strike that fine balance between priest and warrior. Each iteration was going too far one way or the other.

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Canada Guy wrote:

Hello Wayne, first off I love your character designs, you really get a sense of the character's personality, history, and culture, from your drawings. Just by looking at your designs you get a sense of the life the character leads. Also I really appreciate how all the little items like teapots, bedrolls, lanterns, and trinkets reflect all the different bits of adventuring gear a typical RPG character carries around with them. Your designs are almost like visual character sheets and truly epitomize the hobby.

Anyways I'm a big fan. ;) So, here's my question:

Your costume designs have so many layers and details to them, how do you generally begin your design process? Do you start with a figure drawing and build it up layer by layer "dressing" the character, draw a few rough sketches first, begin by drawing a key element and work out from there, or are you so practiced at this point that you can just go for it free form?

Thanks!

Thanks for your interest in my artwork. I sincerely appreciate your kind words.

Upon reading a character description I usually formulate a concept in my head of how they're generally going to look. I then make dozens of small thumbnail sketches which roughly work out the character's form and silhouette. Essentially, the characters come pre-dressed. Once I've decided on a shape I then start to tighten things up with detail. (Which probably consist of a dozen different thumbnail sketches of pouch, weapon and jewellery designs)

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Lucus Palosaari wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
Lucus Palosaari wrote:
I doubt I could ever match the mighty James Jacobs. :)

That thread has years on it, I don't doubt that the players have at least 50,000 questions to ask you. If you're still answering will be the bigger question ;-)

Wayne Reynolds wrote:

Good question Lucas.

Occasionally, the designers will specify a particular item or aspect to the character. In these cases I try to make the specified aspect visually fit with the concept that I have in mind also. (That fit within the parameters of any character descriptive specifications)

I have very little to do with the character's background story.
A great deal of the items I put into my character art has some sort of purpose, even if it's just purely decorative. I carefully consider each element and judge if it fits with the visual concept I have of the character. I usually have a pretty good idea of the substance it's made from. I'm very pleased that the designers have the option to pick up on an element that they feel is interesting or pertinent and add it to the background concept.

So its roughly as I had figured. Regardless, the level of detail you put into the Iconic's first image and into all of your images is greatly appreciated by me (and I'm guessing others). It feels rarer to find overly detailed work vs. the alternative in this field, which is sad, as those little things sometimes make all the difference in my mind and "sell" the world to me in a way that even perfect prose or game mechanics couldn't alone.

Thanks Lucas.

This thread will be either really cathartic for me to be able to explain some of my ideas and concepts behind my art and dispel some myths.... Or it'll make me really angry. Only time will tell. ;)

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Kajehase wrote:

More Lem, and not jokes about him having hat-envy this time. ;-)

What do you see his flute being made of? Depending on who draws him, it looks either like bone or like wood to me.

Lem's flute is actually made out of Silver.

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Haladir wrote:

Wayne, thanks so much for your artwork and also for taking the time to make this thread!

How much of your inspiration comes from existing characters in the zeitgeist?

For example, I've seen some crosstalk on these boards that your inspiration for Valeros was Val Kilmer's portrayal of the character Mad Martigan from the 1988 film Willow. Was that an intentional homage?

I was also wondering if you took inspiration for your design of the iconic hunter Adowyn from Rose Leslie's portrayal of Ygritte in the HBO version of Game of Thrones?

Val Kilmer as Mad Martigan was mentioned in the original character description for Valeros. However, it's the only iconic character that has ever had reference to an existing character in it's description.

I prefer to stay away from established characters in other fictional settings. Any resemblance to Ygritte or anyone living or dead is purely coincidental. Though as I've mentioned before, sometimes I subconsciously paint characters as people I've met before.

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Sarah Robinson wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
This thread is awesome.
This helps me too!

Yayyy!

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Adam Daigle wrote:
Great thread, Wayne! Thanks for taking the time to do this.

Thanks Adam. :)

We'll see how the allocation of time goes. ;)

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Auke Teeninga wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
Kryzbyn wrote:
Where'd you get the idea for Balthazar's eidolon?
My original sketch showed Balazar's Eidolon as a bear (I'm not sure if I have a copy of that?) However, the Eidolon needed to be an unearthly creature. I was considering some sort of snake creature because I liked the curved shape it created around the main figure. After putting on some feathers and playing around with different animal shapes, I eventually changed it to a deranged cockerel - like a Cockatrice.
Balazar's Eidolon as a bear

Thanks for digging out the image Auke.

It only occurred to me after I'd painted the Summoner that I could've easily made it into an Owl-Bear type of creature.

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ChrisLKimball wrote:

I am a huge fan of your art and you have been a huge influence on my own art since your BW pieces in the 3rd edition Class books!

Not sure this is exactly on topic, but knowing what you know now about golarion and pathfinder, and having grown as an artist over the years is there any iconic in particular you would like to take another stab at? Either an update or complete redesign?

Thanks for your continued interest in my artwork.

The self-critic that lives inside my head ensures that I'd redesign a many of the Pathfinder Iconics to some degree or another. In most cases it'd be small costume tweaks here and there but it's just one of those things that comes with hindsight.

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Kryzbyn wrote:
At what point in their adventuring career do you consider the iconics you create being when you imagine them? 1st level? 5th? Is it something you consider at all?

The character level is never mentioned in the descriptions that I receive for the Iconics. I figure that it's not something that the designers want to specify so I don't take level into consideration when designing a character.

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Ryan Pfefferle wrote:
There's one aspect of your artwork that I've always found odd - and that is that you always draw boot "coverings" for your characters. Sometimes it looks good, but on other characters it looks very out of place. I'm guessing that is some personal style preference of yours?

Personal preference.

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Lucus Palosaari wrote:

Thank you very much for starting (and in theory maintaining) this thread -- I suspect you will never run out of having people ask questions about your incredible Iconics and their images <and some day it may rival JJ's "Ask JJ ALL Your Questions Here" thread - 53,762 posts as of this posting>

I do have a general catchall about your artwork on Iconics in aggregate:
As original artwork, is there ever anything about the image you don't put in with purpose?

** spoiler omitted **

I doubt I could ever match the mighty James Jacobs. :)

Good question Lucas.
Occasionally, the designers will specify a particular item or aspect to the character. In these cases I try to make the specified aspect visually fit with the concept that I have in mind also. (That fit within the parameters of any character descriptive specifications)

I have very little to do with the character's background story.
A great deal of the items I put into my character art has some sort of purpose, even if it's just purely decorative. I carefully consider each element and judge if it fits with the visual concept I have of the character. I usually have a pretty good idea of the substance it's made from. I'm very pleased that the designers have the option to pick up on an element that they feel is interesting or pertinent and add it to the background concept.

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Aoann wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
Aoann wrote:

I want to say this is the best thread ever.

Does Pathfinder tell you what to put on the Iconic Characters or do you design them and they add the stuff to them? I would hope they give you lots of creative freedom by now :)

on the hunter, listed here, what are the green and bone looking fish hook thing supposed to be hanging off her armor? what is the symbol on the wolf's head?

Thanks Aoann. I'm very pleased you like the thread.

Most of the descriptions that I receive regarding the Iconic characters are fairly brief. Occasionally, they'll specify an element or item that they'd like to see in the illustration. Otherwise I consider myself fortunate that they allow me a degree of artistic freedom in the depiction.

I based a lot of the Hunter's items on Mid - European stone age artefacts. The hook is made from bone. I designed it as something like a good luck talisman for hunting. The jade ring has a carving of a ram on it. It's a belt loop of some sort for hanging items from. The symbol on the wolf's head is also echoed on Adowyn's Vambraces and Pauldrons. It's my attempt at a runic version of the infinity loop symbol considering Adowyn and Leyrn are bonded together.

:) very nice. I like it, she is my favorite Iconic. I just wish she looked a little bit more surly! it works very well though. What is the weapon behind her back?

Her weapon is a Shashqa with an antler horn handle. In game terms it'd be classed as a scimitar.

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Kryzbyn wrote:
Where'd you get the idea for Balthazar's eidolon?

My original sketch showed Balazar's Eidolon as a bear (I'm not sure if I have a copy of that?) However, the Eidolon needed to be an unearthly creature. I was considering some sort of snake creature because I liked the curved shape it created around the main figure. After putting on some feathers and playing around with different animal shapes, I eventually changed it to a deranged cockerel - like a Cockatrice.

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Aoann wrote:

I want to say this is the best thread ever.

Does Pathfinder tell you what to put on the Iconic Characters or do you design them and they add the stuff to them? I would hope they give you lots of creative freedom by now :)

on the hunter, listed here, what are the green and bone looking fish hook thing supposed to be hanging off her armor? what is the symbol on the wolf's head?

Thanks Aoann. I'm very pleased you like the thread.

Most of the descriptions that I receive regarding the Iconic characters are fairly brief. Occasionally, they'll specify an element or item that they'd like to see in the illustration. Otherwise I consider myself fortunate that they allow me a degree of artistic freedom in the depiction.

I based a lot of the Hunter's items on Mid - European stone age artefacts. The hook is made from bone. I designed it as something like a good luck talisman for hunting. The jade ring has a carving of a ram on it. It's a belt loop of some sort for hanging items from. The symbol on the wolf's head is also echoed on Adowyn's Vambraces and Pauldrons. It's my attempt at a runic version of the infinity loop symbol considering Adowyn and Leyrn are bonded together.

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LazarX wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
Decimus Drake wrote:
Why does Seelah's breastplate have breasts? Wouldn't that just make someone easier to kill?

I also wondered if breasts on breastplates of female characters was an aesthetic visual or if it was a necessity due to body shape?

I asked some of my armour-wearing female friends about it.
It seems the a lot of women can wear a normal shaped breastplate. However,I was told that as the bust size increases the more uncomfortable it gets. Many of them whilst training, wear protective sports breastplates designed for women that have extended areas to accommodate their busts. One friend said she needed those extra bits on a breastplate otherwise things got very painful indeed.
My conclusion is;

It depends upon the body shape of the wearer.

As for being easier to kill? No, I don't think so.
I train(Sword - fighting) with women who wear breastplates with breasts. It does not make them easier to hit than a flat - chested opponent, nor does it hinder their speed and skill with a weapon.

Cate Blanchett in the production "Elizabeth" wears completely flat chested armor. Complete "boob plate" is a liability, a potentially fatal one. Upper armor does need to take into account the overall different shape of the female body, such as the different shoulder to waist ratio, but otherwise practical armor is flatchested armor. Take a look at modern armor sized for women, no breast projections there.

Ms Blanchett is a fine actress. she's got quite a slim figure with a relatively small bust so I can see why she could wear completely flat chested armour.

With regards to the "Boob plate" query, please refer to my earlier comments. Especially those regarding my female friends with a larger chest size, who wear modern sports breastplates for martial arts training that feature boob plates to accommodate their body shape.
They don't see the boob plate as a liability. Nor does it compromise their skill in combat. Being a flat - chested male, I trust their judgement, skill and opinions in this matter.

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the Queen's Raven wrote:
Seltyiel, that little round silver object on a chain, is that a Wayfinder or pocket watch?

Neither. It's a locket. I don't know what's in it.

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Fashion Goblin wrote:

Thank you so much for this thread.

1) Is there a story behind Seoni's belt? It's very large, and angular, and metal looking. Which is a complete contrast to her soft, flowing dress.

2) Any significance to Enora's ring. Or is it just a fantastic cocktail ring?

3) Is Quinn's light (hanging from his belt) a reference to Diogenes?

Glad you like the thread. :)

1) Seoni's belt, Are you referring to the black angular piece covering her stomach? It's not made of metal. It's probably made from stiffened felt, padded silk or possibly tooled leather. Her belt attachments are made from leather with metal decorations.

2) Just a ring. Possibly magical?

3) No reference to Diogenes. Though it is a magical light.

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Set wrote:

Thanks for the teapot reply, and the teapot itself. It adds a ton of character to Harsk, and is particularly appropriate since there's already another Iconic (Valeros) with an ale-mug.

Two questions this time;

1) How about that Temple Sword in the Sajan picture. Was that an ordered item, or something you came up with?

It's only thing in the original Iconics that ended up involving new rules content (and, therefore, perhaps being an interesting thing to see on an 'iconic' character).

2) Do Seoni's tattoos (and sash-thingies) spell out anything specific in a (real or made-up) language, or did you just sort of pick some cool-looking squiggles and run with them?

1) I was asked to design a temple sword for Sajan. Though his Hora (knuckle - dusters) weren't part of the character description.

I believe the design team had to come up with a new rule for Crow Henge's mace too??

2) Seoni's tattoos don't spell out anything in any real-life language.

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Mikaze wrote:

Ooh, we have needed this thread! :D

What sources, if any, did you draw inspiration for Sajan's...sleeves? (is there a more accurate name for them?)

And what did you figure his sister, Sajni, should look like?

(been a big fan ever since connecting the Eberron mural covers to your name!)

I'm glad that you find the thread interesting Mikaze, thanks. :)

Sajan's sleeves are commonly known as Kote. Traditionally, kote are usually armoured with maille or metal plates. I took those components away to make a lighter piece of equipment that fit with the Monk concept better.

I haven't been asked to illustrate Sajan's sister Sajni yet.

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El Ronza wrote:
Speaking of Seelah, what's the significance of the key that hangs around her right thigh? It's such a captivating little detail, and I've always wanted to know - is there a story behind your choice to include it, or is it just a little visual touch?

I always intended it to be the key to her chastity belt.

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Set wrote:

Did the art order for Harsk include mention of the teapot, or was that your own little addition to our iconic dwarven unconventionalist?

Hark's teapot was my addition. It is actually an enchanted teapot +1 ;)

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Decimus Drake wrote:
Why does Seelah's breastplate have breasts? Wouldn't that just make someone easier to kill?

I also wondered if breasts on breastplates of female characters was an aesthetic visual or if it was a necessity due to body shape?

I asked some of my armour-wearing female friends about it.
It seems the a lot of women can wear a normal shaped breastplate. However,I was told that as the bust size increases the more uncomfortable it gets. Many of them whilst training, wear protective sports breastplates designed for women that have extended areas to accommodate their busts. One friend said she needed those extra bits on a breastplate otherwise things got very painful indeed.
My conclusion is;

It depends upon the body shape of the wearer.

As for being easier to kill? No, I don't think so.
I train(Sword - fighting) with women who wear breastplates with breasts. It does not make them easier to hit than a flat - chested opponent, nor does it hinder their speed and skill with a weapon.

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Here's a post of mine from a previous thread regarding the ideas behind Kess the Iconic Brawler;

"There seems to be a number of questions and theories about Kess’s costume and fighting style. And in response to Dark Psions’s request I thought I’d post some of the concepts I had when designing Kess.
The concept I had for the Brawler was a combination of a 2nd century European Gladiator combined with a 20th Century boxer. Her costume is an attempt to reflect both aspects without becoming too much of either and at the same time create something completely new.
She’s wearing sections of latticed leather armour combined with smooth sections of leather with padding underneath. The individual straps within the latticed leather provide a little bit more flexibility of movement than a complete hide. The “Criss-cross” pattern has been repeated throughout the armour to create a visual theme. The armour’s been designed around a gladiatorial aesthetic to enable Kess to fight mostly humanoid opponents. She hasn’t needed to be heavily armoured so far. All the impact points are protected; Knuckles, elbows, forearms, knees, feet and forehead. She’s relying on being able to move her vambraces, greaves and fascia to protect her vital organs - Just like gladiators and pugilists throughout history have.
On her left arm she wears a leather shoulder guard called a Galerus. Historically, a galerus would be made out of metal but as Kess wears leather armour I added the brass bull as both decoration and reinforcement. In Roman arenas, the combatants would wear these on their off- arm and present it to their opponent as a target. The gladiator’s fighting style was a series of responses to a blow. Not necessarily an efficient fighting technique but one that would look really cool and entertain a crowd. Afterall, the crowd wanted to see gladiators getting hit and a gladiatorial fighting technique was one that provided that aspect but also ensured that a gladiator wouldn’t get too injured by doing it.
Kess’s headgear was designed to look like a gladiatorial version of a boxer’s padded headgear. She’s never needed a full crown helmet. I added the brass lion as both decoration and reinforcement just like the galerus, again creating another visual theme.

She wears medals won in various bouts on her costume. This says “Hey, look how many fights I’ve won – I'm gonna win this one too!” The one on her pelvis depicts a stylised image of a griffon with peacock wings.
She’s armed with a Cestus and a spiked knuckleduster. Initially, I was just going to limit her to bludgeoning weapons. The punch dagger on her hip was added as an afterthought. Maybe for use in particularly viscous fights.
She also has a money pouch and a waterbottle. I figured she’d travel around looking for fight arenas so I added the mat with the marker sticks.
Oh, and her nose IS broken.
Hope that answers a few questions.
This is by no means a definitive explanation of this character class, just the reasoning behind the design. I'm not usually privy to planned game mechanics or the fantastic back stories. If there’s something that I’ve described that doesn’t quite fit with your concept of the Brawler, you always have the option to change it to fit your game. That’s the beauty of Pathfinder RPG"

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Cthulhudrew wrote:

Two questions:

1) You clearly put a lot of thought into the details of the costumes, do you keep a file of notes on things like where you get your inspirations from, fabric material, sumptuary laws of the Golarion cultures represented, etc?

2) Is your avatar a new iconic? :D

(I love it!)

Thanks for the kind words. I'm very pleased you like the artwork.

1) My inspiration and ideas are the result of years of study and research. I'm particularly interested in historical costume, armour and equipment. As you might guess, I've amassed a fairly comprehensive and expanding reference library on the subject. My reference library consists of books, photographs and magazine cuttings that I felt may have visual potential.
2) The avatar is a sketch I did of a hedgehog warrior. I like hedgehogs too. It was done as a goof-around. The sketch was made into a miniature by Reaper Miniatures and is part of their limited edition "League of Justice & Caeke". The proceeds of which are donated to the Child's Play charity.

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the Haunted Jester wrote:
There is a garter belt on Jirelle ' s (the Iconic Swashbuckler) right leg, is there a story behind that?

the garter belt was one of those details I added to an iconic illustration as an item of interest. (rather like the skull in the sketch of the Occultist)It's down to James, as the Iconic character's designer to decide if it has further meaning. However, garter belts are traditionally associated with weddings...........?

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Kajehase wrote:
To ask the same question, but a lot more specifically: The iconic investigator, Quinn, looks a bit like Danny John-Jules (Cat from Red Dwarf), doesn't he?

Ditto with famous personalities too. It's just a coincidence. However, I do like the acting talents of Mr John-Jules.

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Triphoppenskip wrote:
I don't have a question about a specific Iconic yet but are any of them modeled after real life people? Friends, family members, co-workers etc.

Thanks for your question. None of them are consciously based on real - life people. However, quite by accident there are a few of them that kinda look like people I've met before.

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Kajehase wrote:
Are the coins and the metal square thingy Lem has hanging from around his neck meant to signify something to him, or does he just like the look of it?

The metal square thingy is just a decorative pendant. The discs are indeed coins from different cultures that he's strung around his neck as decoration and potential use.

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