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Wayne Reynolds

Wayne Reynolds's page

Contributing Artist. Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 201 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


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Contributing Artist

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BobTheCoward wrote:

Mr. Reynolds,

When designing elements in golarion before the age of lost omens, do you use any historical periods as a guide? How strongly do you adhere to these rules? For example, would a Taldan character from that peak of the empire resemble an iron age fighter rather than middle ages knight?

Golarion doesn't adhere to the real - life rules of historical progression. Visual influences of different periods and cultures from real - life history manifest simultaneously within the imaginary setting of Golorian.

Consequently, that linear progression of culture and technology that we experienced in the real world history doesn't really apply to the Golorion setting. This implies that an older incarnation of a Golarion culture may not necessarily infer a lower level of technology.
Though earlier incarnations would probably include design aesthetics from it's later counterpart. The extent that these design aspects would manifest would be up to the design team or the individual artist.

I've not yet been asked to specifically illustrate historic variations of in-game cultures or kingdoms. However, I've occasionally illustrated ruins or ancient items where I've included design aspects from a specific culture to better enable the viewer to make the visual connection that what they're seeing is from the geographical setting's history.

Contributing Artist

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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
ulgulanoth wrote:
Talking about the iconics in general, when you are asked to change them up, say for mythic version of the iconics, where do you get the inspiration for the changes?

Damiel and Amiri briefly got new weapons in the Iron Gods Adventure Path. But I'd already designed those weapons for different NPC characters featured in the encounters.

Valeros, Seoni, Kyra, Merisiel, Seelah, Alain and Balazar have been the only Iconic characters that I've been asked to modify to any great extent. This was for the cover art to Mythic Adventures and Wrath of the Righteous Adventure Card Game.
Their costume design didn't change that much as it was a continuation of the themes I'd established in the original renditions. The modifications involved subtly accentuating the current designs to reflect their Mythic progression.

You didn't do the degenerate versions for the Horror volumne?

No, they were illustrated by a number of talented artists. :)

Contributing Artist

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Liz,you have my thanks and admiration for the amazing work you've done at Paizo. I know you will excel wherever you choose to go. Very best wishes for the future.

Contributing Artist

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ulgulanoth wrote:
Talking about the iconics in general, when you are asked to change them up, say for mythic version of the iconics, where do you get the inspiration for the changes?

Damiel and Amiri briefly got new weapons in the Iron Gods Adventure Path. But I'd already designed those weapons for different NPC characters featured in the encounters.

Valeros, Seoni, Kyra, Merisiel, Seelah, Alain and Balazar have been the only Iconic characters that I've been asked to modify to any great extent. This was for the cover art to Mythic Adventures and Wrath of the Righteous Adventure Card Game.
Their costume design didn't change that much as it was a continuation of the themes I'd established in the original renditions. The modifications involved subtly accentuating the current designs to reflect their Mythic progression.

Contributing Artist

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the xiao wrote:

Wayne, I have two completely different questions for you:

Have you ever refused to do a drawing for personal reasons, be them religious, political or moral? if not, have you regretted any?

If your acronym wasnt WAR, but GWAR, what would the G stand for?

The G would probably stand for ‘Goat’.

I’ve been asked to do some very odd sketches in the past.
However, I recall two occasions where I‘ve declined fan requests /private commissions/convention sketches on moral grounds. In both cases the requests involved graphic nudity or a sexual situation.
Whilst some of the oddest sketch requests I’ve received in the past have sometimes been slightly gross. I like to keep my illustrations PG rated.

Contributor

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BobTheCoward wrote:
You should totally ask Wayne Reynolds thoughts on his sticky thread here. He thinks a lot about older era design and what they are like in collation.

There's a massive real - life costume diversity in Pathfinder. With fashion styles based upon periods of real - life history ranging from 3rd century AD to early 18th century AD (Approximately) Depending upon the in - game region.

As of yet, I've not illustrated a Golorian equivalent of a 19th century tailored suit. I suspect if such a thing existed in Golorian (And I've no doubt that it probably does) then it'll have distinct medieval / renaissance aspects that fits with the Pathfinder visual aesthetic.

Galtic fashion (As worn by Aric) comes fairly close. It's loosely based upon 16th century Western European designs. But may be too decorative for a tailored suit.
Whilst Varisia and Cheliax resembles 14th or 15th century styles.
I would suggest that the sober and high-collared fashions of Ustulav might come the closest.
(Erasmus the Iconic Medium is wearing Ustalavian fashion though his outfit has a rural aspect to it rather than what someone may attribute to noble attire.)

However, you'd have to work out where your character would put all their equipment. As I tend not to include pockets into my medieval fantasy costume designs. I find that pockets make a costume look much too modern. Hence Pathfinder characters tend to wear pouches and bags.

I really like Dr Styx's suggestion that nobles might incorporate magical effects to their costumes. In a high fantasy setting it makes complete sense that they would do so. To some extent, they already do. Though it's not usually overtly flashy.
Perhaps small Bags of Holding strategically sewn on the inside of a tailored suit would preserve those pristine lines?

Contributor

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Wraithguard wrote:
Hey Wayne, it has been awhile since Zelhara popped up, but I just wanted to let you know that she is one of my favorite iconics. Awesome job with all the torture implements showing up.

Thanks Wraithguard. I'm really pleased that you like Zelhara.

The Hell's Vengeance Iconics were a lot of fun to work on. The Paizo design team devise some fantastic concepts that I feel really break away from stereotypes. These concepts provide a rich basis on which to create an interesting an unique character design.

Contributor

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BobTheCoward wrote:
Other artists have made interior pieces with iconics you designed. Do you have a favorite piece or artist that have used these characters?

I have lots of favourite artists that have worked on Pathfinder, rather than any particular one.

Among them are; Steve Prescott, Eric Belisle, Jesper Elsing, Eva Widderman, Lucio Parillo, Lucas Graciano and Mike Sass are ones that immediately spring to mind.

Generally speaking the standard of art is very high in Pathfinder. There's been more than a few occaisions where I've seen a fantastic piece of artwork but have been unable to identify the name of the artist.

Contributor

I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Molten Dragon wrote:

See, you posted the song lyrics then Rysky said this:

Rysky wrote:
But... but I like Wayne Reynolds' art...

Initials? I never thought of that (since I don't know his middle initial) - and only after that did I learn about his "Visions of War" collection-books.

Hence I was inclined to assume they were doing a gag together.

Looking through your art now, Mr. Reynolds, I'd say it's just fine and dandy (I like the Cavalier, the Barbarian, the unfamiliar Oriental Swashbuckler-ish girl, the Necropolitan, the Incarnum Knight, and the dear old Gondian Techsmith all in particular, and now at last I know who we can blame for...

Thanks for the clarification. It seems I took Rysky's comment out of context. I realise your post was not a personal attack against me. Apologies for any distress caused. Glad the misunderstanding could be cleared up.

Contributor

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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Rysky wrote:

??? Please tell me you're joking....

He works hard to give us all such wonderful art and you had to go and belittle him...
Yeah, well, if that's what that's all about, I think he needs to take a number and get in line behind Sun Tzu.

There is a difference between expressing an opinion and insulting someone.

It's perfectly OK for someone to say; "I don't like this artwork." That's their opinion. I don't necessarily have to agree with it, or like it. But it is just an opinion.

Making a comment along the lines of; "This artist/person is good for nothing" is a derogatory remark - Regardless of their profession or creative contribution. Even if it is your opinion.
Remarks like this breach Paizo's forum etiquette.

Contributor

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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:

[I]War! HUH! Yeah

What is it good for?
Absolutely NOTHING!
Uh-huh

I think you just crossed a line from expressing an opinion to an implied personal insult - even if done in jest.

Your card is marked.

Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Nekomimi^w^ wrote:

What race did you pictured most?

What race you *enjoyed* drawing?

For Pathfinder single character illustrations, I have depicted;

39 humans
3 elves
4 Half-Elves
3 Dwarves
2 Gnomes
3 Halflings
3 Half Orcs
and 17 "Other species".

I don't really have a particular race that I enjoy illustrating most. However, I do enjoy creating costumes and design themes for new cultures.
I quite like depicting demi - human races because I get to play around with facial features and body shape a little bit more.

Contributor

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Rysky wrote:
Fooie, what about the lovely Nyctessa then?

I’ve mentioned previously that some of the characters I design have more going on than others from a visual point of view. Nyctessa is one of those designs that’s fairly straight-forward. There’s not a whole lot I can actually say that isn’t already apparent.

The art description specified white robes with red trim which I thought was a welcome departure from the conventional depiction of a necromancer.

The costume design was inspired by a fusion of the Mori fashion movement and a post-modern gothic style. (if that makes any sense? Inspiration is sometimes hard to define) I liked the tattered fabrics, frayed edges and spiralling folds of fabric. Introducing red trims at random points helped to define the folds in the fabric.
Nyctessa only wears three pieces of metal; Two rings on her wand and a nail on her staff. The rest of her jewellery and costume adornments are made from bone – Which seemed completely appropriate for this character. Lots of vertebrae from different creatures such as snake, cat, dog – even human.
I thought it appropriate for her to have the jawbone from a vampire around her neck which might aid her in communicating with the dead.
She has an eyeball to maybe help detect the dead.
Even her buttons are made of bone. Her strap ties are made from animal horns or tusks.

Her leather flask bears the insect emblem of Urgathoa – The Goddess of Death, Disease and Undead.
Another reference to necro – culture is the flowing designs on the vampire skull, reminiscent of the Mexican Day of the Dead patterns.

And that’s about it…..

Contributor

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Zhangar wrote:

Do you have any commentary you may share at this time about the new Curse of the Crimson Throne cover?

Thank you.

Apologies that there isn't really a design commentary to go with that particular image at the moment.

Although you are welcome to ask questions.

Contributor

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baron arem heshvaun wrote:

Hi Wayne,

I saw this mini and thought of your own Iconic Villain Zelhara.

This mini will make a great stand in until Paizo releases your torturer in all her gory infamy.

Which of the Iconic Villains would you think you would enjoy playing?

Urgraz the Anti-Paladin or Lazzero the Cleric. >:)

Contributor

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Big Lemon wrote:

Mr. Reynolds,

I was looking through your art book (one of my prized three, the other two being Louis Van Barle's and Mike Mignola's) and, while taking a closer look at Imrijka's design, I noticed that, despite being an inquisitor of Pharasma, she doesn't appear to have Pharasma's holy symbol anywhere on her person.

Was her specific faith decided after the artwork was made, or is there something I am missing?

Thanks for buying the artbook and your interest in my artwork.

A deity was never mentioned in Imrijka's art description.
Her dedication to Pharasma was decided after the artwork was created.

Though the idol hanging from her belt was intended to be a nod to an unspecified female deity.

Contributor

4 people marked this as a favorite.

Urgraz; Deurgar Anti-Paladin.
The art description for this character specified; male Deurgar, wearing stone plate armour made from dark basalt. Armed with warhammer, steel shield and heavy crossbow.
I felt that it was essential to familiarise myself with the Pathfinder versions of the Deurgar for this character. Reading about their background enabled me to get a feel of their culture and how it would reflect in the design of his armour, weapons and equipment. From the source material, I figured that the Deurgar culture is would mostly comprise of hard working slaves with absolutely no time for frivolity. I surmised that this would give them an extremely dour demeanour to reflect their joyless existence. Additionally, if they were pathologically practical then things like art, music, poetry or gourmet cuisine wouldn’t really exist within Deurgar culture unless it had a practical use like the drum on a slave galley.
I envisaged that all of their stuff would be serviceable rather than flashy – with minimal decoration. Any marks or patterns on their clothes and equipment would be a way maybe to distinguish rank, possessions or profession.

The stone plate armour was a challenge. I was aware of only one real – life historical suit of stone armour which looks more like lamellar consisting of small rectangular slabs. However, that concept wouldn’t quite fit with the character description. Instead of looking at medieval plate armour I took inspiration from plate armour from much earlier periods of history. In this instance the Mycenean ‘Dendra’ (12c BC Greece) seemed like a good starting point.
I decided to shape stone slabs in a similar fashion but with a fantasy element to reflect the Deurgar culture.
As the Deurgar would be fighting mostly underground I imagined the armour to be almost insect – like with most of the protection focused towards the front of the wearer. There’s almost a kind of ball shape with the arm and shoulder pieces creating encompassing curved shape. I also figured that with the Deurgar being small that most of the attacks would come from above so I put most of the protection on the shoulders. (There is a helmet to go with the armour but I just couldn’t cover up that mean little face for the purposes of this illustration). The arms plates are overlapped ascendantly like a Japanese Sode. The uneven edges give the impression that the armour has taken a beating in the past. Around his neck is a collar to be reminiscent that the Deurgar are a slave race. I placed markings around the collar. Perhaps to denote who the wearer belongs to, what crimes they’re guilty of or how they should be executed if caught?
The brass plate on his right shoulder bears the emblem of Droskar – The evil Dwarven deity.
The plates on his left shoulder show an unknown rune and a stag beetle. Perhaps his mount?
At his belt he wears a waterbottle, a curved knife, a couple of coins and some mushrooms. All very useful. His belt buckle is a simple ‘M’ shape.
His crossbow quarrels are stored behind his shield.
I went through a high number of potential hammer designs before the final choice. (I now have a number of interesting hammer designs which I could use in future)
His hammer is designed to have a number of uses. Afterall, the Warhammer is like the Swiss – Army Knife of medieval weapons. Clawed hammerhead at the front for percussive damage, curved spike (Raven’s beak) at the back for hooking and piercing damage. Straight spike at the head. There’s also be a spike at the other end too. There’s a hooded eye motif on the hammer. (Make of that what you will) You may notice that the most sophisticated aspects of Urgraz’s equipment are his weapons.

Bear in mind that the character illustration was created before the backstory. Owen has done a great job in bringing this character to life.

Contributor

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Urgraz; Deurgar Anti-Paladin.
The art description for this character specified; male Deurgar, wearing stone plate armour made from dark basalt. Armed with warhammer, steel shield and heavy crossbow.
I felt that it was essential to familiarise myself with the Pathfinder versions of the Deurgar for this character. Reading about their background enabled me to get a feel of their culture and how it would reflect in the design of his armour, weapons and equipment. From the source material, I figured that the Deurgar culture is would mostly comprise of hard working slaves with absolutely no time for frivolity. I surmised that this would give them an extremely dour demeanour to reflect their joyless existence. Additionally, if they were pathologically practical then things like art, music, poetry or gourmet cuisine wouldn’t really exist within Deurgar culture unless it had a practical use like the drum on a slave galley.
I envisaged that all of their stuff would be serviceable rather than flashy – with minimal decoration. Any marks or patterns on their clothes and equipment would be a way maybe to distinguish rank, possessions or profession.

The stone plate armour was a challenge. I was aware of only one real – life historical suit of stone armour which looks more like lamellar consisting of small rectangular slabs. However, that concept wouldn’t quite fit with the character description. Instead of looking at medieval plate armour I took inspiration from plate armour from much earlier periods of history. In this instance the Mycenean ‘Dendra’ (12c BC Greece) seemed like a good starting point.
I decided to shape stone slabs in a similar fashion but with a fantasy element to reflect the Deurgar culture.
As the Deurgar would be fighting mostly underground I imagined the armour to be almost insect – like with most of the protection focused towards the front of the wearer. There’s almost a kind of ball shape with the arm and shoulder pieces creating encompassing curved shape. I also figured that with the Deurgar being small that most of the attacks would come from above so I put most of the protection on the shoulders. (There is a helmet to go with the armour but I just couldn’t cover up that mean little face for the purposes of this illustration). The arms plates are overlapped ascendantly like a Japanese Sode. The uneven edges give the impression that the armour has taken a beating in the past. Around his neck is a collar to be reminiscent that the Deurgar are a slave race. I placed markings around the collar. Perhaps to denote who the wearer belongs to, what crimes they’re guilty of or how they should be executed if caught?
The brass plate on his right shoulder bears the emblem of Droskar – The evil Dwarven deity.
The plates on his left shoulder show an unknown rune and a stag beetle. Perhaps his mount?
At his belt he wears a water bottle, a curved knife, a couple of coins and some mushrooms. All very useful. His belt buckle is a simple ‘M’ shape.
His crossbow quarrels are stored behind his shield.
I went through a high number of potential hammer designs before the final choice. (I now have a number of interesting hammer designs which I could use in future)
His hammer is designed to have a number of uses. Afterall, the Warhammer is like the Swiss – Army Knife of medieval weapons. Clawed hammerhead at the front for percussive damage, curved spike (Raven’s beak) at the back for hooking and piercing damage. Straight spike at the head. There’s also be a spike at the other end too. There’s a hooded eye motif on the hammer. (Make of that what you will) You may notice that the most sophisticated aspects of Urgraz’s equipment are his weapons.

Bear in mind that the character illustration was created before the backstory. Owen has done a great job in bringing this character to life.

Contributor

Wayne Reynolds wrote:
Nutcase Entertainment wrote:


There are occasions where art descriptions contain more information. Especially if specific elements are required to be illustrated. It's a fine balance to get right. There can be a danger of overloading the artist with too much information which can confuse or restrict creativity.

It's never a good idea to add optional elements into an art description. Just in case those optional elements never get used, or get dropped during the creative writing process. You run the risk of ending up with a piece of artwork that doesn't quite fit the brief.
Better to stick with key elements of the character. Sometimes details such as nationality and culture isn't an issue within the context of the design. That sort of thing can often be decided upon later or influenced by the illustration itself.

What I had in mind was things like "raised in the streets", "farmhand", "grew in/near...", etc, something that could come with a souvenir or two: trinket, jewelry, scar, awesome looking gears, etc...

Same answer as before ^. :)

Contributor

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Nutcase Entertainment wrote:
Adam Daigle wrote:
And to add to what Wayne said above... While we have a glimmer of an idea of an iconic when we plan them and send the art description to Wayne, we almost never write the backstory until we get the art in. Seeing the final piece always gives a wealth of inspiration for the character write up. For example, I started to make notes for what I wanted to do with Zelhara when the first sketches of her came in, but I didn't even get close to finalizing her until I saw her (wonderfully creepy) final painting.
True, but adding some (optional) backstory elements in the art description could help with a few things.

There are occasions where art descriptions contain more information. Especially if specific elements are required to be illustrated. It's a fine balance to get right. There can be a danger of overloading the artist with too much information which can confuse or restrict creativity.

It's never a good idea to add optional elements into an art description. Just in case those optional elements never get used, or get dropped during the creative writing process. You run the risk of ending up with a piece of artwork that doesn't quite fit the brief.
Better to stick with key elements of the character. Sometimes details such as nationality and culture isn't an issue within the context of the design. That sort of thing can often be decided upon later or influenced by the illustration itself.

I'm always appreciative that the design team will often allow me a degree of visual freedom with the designs I create. It helps that I'm extremely familiar with the world setting to allow me that degree of freedom but stay within the parameters of the subject matter. However, I'm just as able to accommodate additional or specific aspects should the illustration require it.
It's a good creative collaboration that catalyses the creativity and imagination of everyone involved.

Reading the backstories for the Iconic characters is interesting and enjoyable. It's always rewarding when a writer will notice an element I included in the illustration and make it part of the character's backstory. It's that shared imaginative part of the whole creation process that appeals to me. I feel that the writers add another exciting aspect to the design which really brings the character to life.
Hopefully it encourages GMs and players to do the same with their characters and NPCs

Contributor

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Nargemn wrote:
Obviously you are provided an art description for the characters you illustrate, and you do a great deal of research into real world sources to find inspiration. How much do you research into Golarion itself? With Zelhara as an example, were you familiar with Nidal and Zon-Kuthon? Did you do a read over of Nidal's entry in the Inner Sea Guide and Zon-Kuthon's entry in Inner Sea Gods (seeing as she's an inquisitor of his faith)?

It helps that I play Pathfinder and own a substantial Pathfinder library. Being a PF gamer means that I get to familiarise myself with the Golarion world setting to a point where I recognise most fictional aspects and terminology when it is mentioned in an art description.

Occasionally I might have to look things up in a sourcebook or rulebook if I need more information. Books like Inner Sea Gods, Inner Sea World Guide and all the Bestiaries are essential reference material.

Nidal didn't get a mention in Zelhara's art description but Zon-Kuthon did. I was already aware of Zon - Kuthon So I had a fairly good idea what sort of character she was, based upon her patron deity.

Contributor

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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Sooo, Kess the Brawler...I suppose her resemblance to Tasha Yar is strictly coincidental, right?

Yep. Purely coincidental.

"Everything looks like something to someone else".

Contributor

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Visual design notes;

Zelhara.

I wanted to stay clear of the obvious clichés for this character. There’s plenty of “Bondage babe” art in fantasy out there already and I always try to create something new when designing a character. It helps that character stand out from the rest.

The art description mentioned pale skin, shaved head and black lipstick.
I immediately decided to give her a very slim body shape. I also wanted to convey a degree of insanity with this character so elected a rather angular stance. The pose suggests a certain amount of reticence, awkwardness and innocence. The angle of the head and direct eye contact helped to convey an unnerving aspect to this seemingly graceless character. The sharp and cruel - looking elements to her costume and equipment create a juxtaposition to contradict the vulnerability implied by the stance. Hopefully it creates an uncertainty in the viewer whether or not it would be safe to approach her.
The art description had mentioned piercings and scars. I decided that any exposed skin had to be covered with scars. I’d decided that some of the scars were deliberate cuts or scarification patterns or as a result of her equipment. You can see that I left in the corresponding marks from the facemask on her head. (Discarded earlier design)

The usual amount of research went into this one.

She’s covered in various medieval torture implements. Many of these are sourced from real life instruments. The ingenuity that someone has applied to creating tools that inflicting pain and suffering is quite harrowing. However, it’s that twisted intelligence that really fit with this character so I chose some of the more imaginative devices;

A Heretic’s Fork is attached to her right forearm. “The device was placed between the breast bone and throat just under the chin and secured with a leather strap around the neck. The punishment made it nearly impossible for them to talk. Also, a person wearing it couldn't fall asleep. The moment their head dropped with fatigue, the prongs pierced their throat or chest, causing great pain.”

On her left arm is an Iron Halo. This was used to secure people in chairs –either around the wrists, ankles or head. The inward pointing spikes could be moved closer by use of a screw thread to ensure the captive had to sit immobile.

She wears a thumbscrew to her waist. A small vice designed to slowly crush digits.

At her thigh is a nasty little device called a “Pear of Anguish” or “Choke Pear”– “Historically reserved to punish adulterers (Female) and homosexuals.” The device was placed into an orifice (normally inserted into the “lower openings” or the mouth) and the sections could be expanded by turning a screw key. The sections and spindle were often spiked.
She’s wearing a smaller version on her chest (With two sections).

At her waist she wears various serrated knives, cutting implements and a corkscrew (I don’t think she’s using it to uncork bottles) The small shaped “razor” ring has sharp edges on the inside and placed on fingers or toes. A chord was tied to the ring which could be pulled to cause severe lacerations. The semi-circular blade was initially a leather – workers tool but it was also used to slice sections of digits away.
She holds a combat razor in her hand. Its design based upon a folding cut-throat razor.

Even her costume details incorporate torture devices. Her bag strap includes serrated clamps. The metal work is reminiscent of the pattern inside a razor blade and her buckles and the links in her spiked chain are angular and pointed. These triangular design - shapes help to convey a “sharp” aspect to the character.
She even has a handy scroll for when her victims confess. (The nib is in her pouch. But no ink bottle. She doesn’t need ink)

I did various versions because there were so many different aspects that I could include. At times I wasn’t sure if it was too much – or not enough.
The face mask came from a notion to include a Scold’s Bridle. Historically, a Scold’s Bridle is a bit more substantial and covers a fair amount of the face. I wanted something that you could still see a good deal of her features. I played around with the number of vertical bars and their placement. 3 seemed the optimal number to register as a mask but still show enough features.
The other option (See earlier link) was to include a portable rack/ giant thumbscrew on her back, complete with manacles.

She’s pretty messed up.

Contributor

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Zelhara.

I wanted to stay clear of the obvious clichés for this character. There’s plenty of “Bondage babe” art in fantasy out there already and I always try to create something new when designing a character. It helps that character stand out from the rest.

The art description mentioned pale skin, shaved head and black lipstick.
I immediately decided to give her a very slim body shape. I also wanted to convey a degree of insanity with this character so elected a rather angular stance. The pose suggests a certain amount of reticence, awkwardness and innocence. The angle of the head and direct eye contact helped to convey an unnerving aspect to this seemingly graceless character. The sharp and cruel - looking elements to her costume and equipment create a juxtaposition to contradict the vulnerability implied by the stance. Hopefully it creates an uncertainty in the viewer whether or not it would be safe to approach her.
The art description had mentioned piercings and scars. I decided that any exposed skin had to be covered with scars. I’d decided that some of the scars were deliberate cuts or scarification patterns or as a result of her equipment. You can see that I left in the corresponding marks from the facemask on her head. (Discarded earlier design)

The usual amount of research went into this one.

She’s covered in various medieval torture implements. Many of these are sourced from real life instruments. The ingenuity that someone has applied to creating tools that inflicting pain and suffering is quite harrowing. However, it’s that twisted intelligence that really fit with this character so I chose some of the more imaginative devices;

A Heretic’s Fork is attached to her right forearm. “The device was placed between the breast bone and throat just under the chin and secured with a leather strap around the neck. The punishment made it nearly impossible for them to talk. Also, a person wearing it couldn't fall asleep. The moment their head dropped with fatigue, the prongs pierced their throat or chest, causing great pain.”

On her left arm is an Iron Halo. This was used to secure people in chairs –either around the wrists, ankles or head. The inward pointing spikes could be moved closer by use of a screw thread to ensure the captive had to sit immobile.

She wears a thumbscrew to her waist. A small vice designed to slowly crush digits.

At her thigh is a nasty little device called a “Pear of Anguish” or “Choke Pear”– “Historically reserved to punish adulterers (Female) and homosexuals.” The device was placed into an orifice (normally inserted into the “lower openings” or the mouth) and the sections could be expanded by turning a screw key. The sections and spindle were often spiked.
She’s wearing a smaller version on her chest (With two sections).

At her waist she wears various serrated knives, cutting implements and a corkscrew (I don’t think she’s using it to uncork bottles) The small shaped “razor” ring has sharp edges on the inside and placed on fingers or toes. A chord was tied to the ring which could be pulled to cause severe lacerations. The semi-circular blade was initially a leather – workers tool but it was also used to slice sections of digits away.
She holds a combat razor in her hand. Its design based upon a folding cut-throat razor.

Even her costume details incorporate torture devices. Her bag strap includes serrated clamps. The metal work is reminiscent of the pattern inside a razor blade and her buckles and the links in her spiked chain are angular and pointed. These triangular design - shapes help to convey a “sharp” aspect to the character.
She even has a handy scroll for when her victims confess. (The nib is in her pouch. But no ink bottle. She doesn’t need ink)

I did various versions because there were so many different aspects that I could include. At times I wasn’t sure if it was too much – or not enough.
The face mask came from a notion to include a Scold’s Bridle. Historically, a Scold’s Bridle is a bit more substantial and covers a fair amount of the face. I wanted something that you could still see a good deal of her features. I played around with the number of vertical bars and their placement. 3 seemed the optimal number to register as a mask but still show enough features.
The other option (See earlier link) was to include a portable rack/ giant thumbscrew on her back, complete with manacles.

She’s pretty messed up.

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Milo v3 wrote:
Quote:
I think it looks cool, don't get me wrong, but what was wrong with the original Red Raven art?
Well for one... it was a horrible disguise. Two, I'm pretty sure this is a different Red Raven.

I think that's a pretty good assumption. I got the impression I was designing a completely new character. Especially considering the original Red Raven design was never referenced during the creation process. The name was only mentioned after design sketches were submitted.

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Liz Courts wrote:

Linkified.

Possibly a promotional image for Reaper Miniatures (judging by the copyright), and that's definitely Wayne's style.

Thanks Liz.

The above link is to my cover artwork to "Savage North". Copyright Reaper Miniatures.

Check through the galleries on my website; www.waynereynolds.com

I suspect the one you're thinking about is in the "Magazine Art" Gallery. Copyright to Inhabit Media.

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Twigs wrote:

I'm finding it hard to pay the Red Raven reveal any mind in the mad frothing excitement that the Hell's Vengeance player's guide's sneak peak of the Duergar iconic has instilled in me. I love how squirrely and shrunken and otherworldly he looks and can't wait to see more.

The talon motif has really sold this particular design to me. The devil's in the details! Thanks for sharing so much of your design process with us, Mr. Reynolds. As somebody whose very earliest character concepts had their beginning in a sketchbook, it's awe-inspiring to see just how many niggly little details you can squeeze in.

Thanks Twigs. Glad you like the artwork.

I'll resist saying anything about the new Evil Iconics until their official release. However, I do have the design process written - up along with some alternative sketches for the next one. I hope these will meet with approval also.

There's certainly lots of exciting things happening in Pathfinder at the moment. I'm happy and honoured to be able to contribute artwork to a subject matter that I'm passionate about.

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JiCi wrote:

I really, really, really, REALLY don't want to sound mean to the artist, but.. I would have picked a different pose, because right now, it's strikingly similar to the iconic slayer's pose. It lacks a certain dynamic sense, it feels stiff.

A crouched battle pose or a sideway focusing pose would have done a better justice to it.

Like I said, I don't want to sound like a jerk, but there is something awkward about the Raven's pose.

(Please don't hate me :( )

Thanks for your interest in my artwork.

The pose was designed be both a heroic stance and an unobstructed costume reference for other Paizo artists.

Whilst I respect your opinion, I completely disagree with everything you've said.
Don't hate me.
;)

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Auke Teeninga wrote:
Purple Dragon Knight wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
Red Raven concept sketches here.
Hi Wayne - my Search Fu is pretty low... all I see when I click this is an earliest post in this thread. Thx!
Correct link

Thanks Auke. :)

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Kryzbyn wrote:

Reminds me of Science Ninja Team Gatchaman a bit.

I can assure you that Science Ninja Team didn't play any part of the character design process. :)

But artwork has different visual connections and meanings for the individual viewer regardless of it's creation process.

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Red Raven concept sketches here.

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Red Raven concept sketches here.

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Here's the full write -up on the character design for the Red Raven.
It's already been posted onto my "Questions about Iconic Art" thread. Apologies for posting twice but I felt it was relevant to this thread also;

The Vigilante Iconic character was one of the more tricky ones to design.
The art description specified the character had two distinctive daggers and a whip.

My initial sketches had the character looking too much like the thugs from the cover of Guide to Absalom. I didn’t feel that a visual connection with a criminal gang was appropriate for a vigilante.

At this point I required further clarification of the character archetype with regards which direction to go. This character had to be a little bit more than just a swashbuckler wearing a mask but could neither be a spandex – wearing superhero. A hybrid of the two was necessary but the Iconic also had to fit in with Golorion world setting visual aesthetic too.

Creating a theme for the leather armour was an essential step in conceiving the overall look and feel to the character. Creating a theme would assist in distinguishing the character from the swashbuckler archetype. I’d also depicted many other Pathfinder characters wearing themed armour so it was essential to create something on par with established visuals.
Eventually, I’d decided to go for vandyked (Jagged) edges to his clothes and equipment. His mask was an extended hood. His armour had a lot of triangular and ‘V’shapes with lattice work to add texture. I’d created the daggers to resemble bird talons. The costume had a decidedly avian feel to it. The unexpected effect of the themed armour and mask now pushed the concept closer to the “Superhero” visual. I felt that it was necessary to bulk the armour up slightly to move the visuals away from something that would associate too closely to spandex.

Upon seeing the sketch, Erik suggested that the Vigilante should be the Red Raven.

This idea fit very well and focused the visual direction to move the design forward.
The vandyked hems and ‘V’ shapes were pretty close to feather shapes so that it was easy to incorporate those aspects into the design.
The lattice work was replaced with feathers and the shape of the cloak was created to resemble two bird wings.
The mask was given a more beak – like nose.
I’d not yet decided upon a colour scheme. Fortunately, the Red Raven concept suggested a combination of scarlet and black.
I was able to refine the clasps on the shoulder doublings into bird designs.
The belt buckle and whip bulb was made into a 3 - talon shape to coincide with the shape of the daggers.

The mask was always a problem. It went from looking like a hangman’s hood to looking close to Batman’s cowled mask.
Upon reflection I felt the superhero mask shape better helped the viewer to immediately associate the visuals with that of the Vigilante concept.

In terms of equipment, the Red Raven is fairly equipment – light for a Pathfinder concept.
He’s armed with a whip and two daggers.
I deliberately stayed away from adding a utility belt because it would be yet another visual connotation to a recognisable superhero. I wanted to keep those connections down to a minimum. Instead the Red Raven only has a single pouch to place any items that he may carry.

Red Raven is wearing two items that could associate him to his secret identity. - The necklace around his neck and the silk scarf on his left arm.
At least one of these items may have a significant relevance to the Red Raven’s origin story. However, that is yet to be revealed.

The concept sketches and design process will be uploaded to my Facebook page within the next few days.

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the Haunted Jester wrote:

Dear Wayne,

Regarding the new Iconic, the Red Raven, can you tell me your thoughts on the broach which was placed near the center of his chest as well as the garter belt on his left arm? I would love to know any information you are willing to divulge. Thank you for your time.

Here's the full write -up on the character design for the Red Raven;

The Vigilante Iconic character was one of the more tricky ones to design.
The art description specified the character had two distinctive daggers and a whip.

My initial sketches had the character looking too much like the thugs from the cover of Guide to Absalom. I didn’t feel that a visual connection with a criminal gang was appropriate for a vigilante.

At this point I required further clarification of the character archetype with regards which direction to go. This character had to be a little bit more than just a swashbuckler wearing a mask but could neither be a spandex – wearing superhero. A hybrid of the two was necessary but the Iconic also had to fit in with Golorion world setting visual aesthetic too.

Creating a theme for the leather armour was an essential step in conceiving the overall look and feel to the character. Creating a theme would assist in distinguishing the character from the swashbuckler archetype. I’d also depicted many other Pathfinder characters wearing themed armour so it was essential to create something on par with established visuals.
Eventually, I’d decided to go for vandyked (Jagged) edges to his clothes and equipment. His mask was an extended hood. His armour had a lot of triangular and ‘V’shapes with lattice work to add texture. I’d created the daggers to resemble bird talons. The costume had a decidedly avian feel to it. The unexpected effect of the themed armour and mask now pushed the concept closer to the “Superhero” visual. I felt that it was necessary to bulk the armour up slightly to move the visuals away from something that would associate too closely to spandex.

Upon seeing the sketch, Erik suggested that the Vigilante should be the Red Raven.

This idea fit very well and focused the visual direction to move the design forward.
The vandyked hems and ‘V’ shapes were pretty close to feather shapes so that it was easy to incorporate those aspects into the design.
The lattice work was replaced with feathers and the shape of the cloak was created to resemble two bird wings.
The mask was given a more beak – like nose.
I’d not yet decided upon a colour scheme. Fortunately, the Red Raven concept suggested a combination of scarlet and black.
I was able to refine the clasps on the shoulder doublings into bird designs.
The belt buckle and whip bulb was made into a 3 - talon shape to coincide with the shape of the daggers.

The mask was always a problem. It went from looking like a hangman’s hood to looking close to Batman’s cowled mask.
Upon reflection I felt the superhero mask shape better helped the viewer to immediately associate the visuals with that of the Vigilante concept.

In terms of equipment, the Red Raven is fairly equipment – light for a Pathfinder concept.
He’s armed with a whip and two daggers.
I deliberately stayed away from adding a utility belt because it would be yet another visual connotation to a recognisable superhero. I wanted to keep those connections down to a minimum. Instead the Red Raven only has a single pouch to place any items that he may carry.

Red Raven is wearing two items that associate him to his secret identity. - The necklace around his neck and the silk scarf on his left arm.
At least one of these items may have a significant relevance to the Red Raven’s origin story. However, that is yet to be revealed.

The concept sketches and design process will be uploaded to my Facebook page within the next few days.

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No-one seems to have noticed the "Easter Egg".>:)

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BobTheCoward wrote:
As the iconics move through the art of an adventure path, has there ever been discussion about "leveling" them up?

The nearest thing that has approached linear progression in Adventure Path art is for Iron Gods

In which Lirianne replaces one of her pistols with a laser pistol in part one.
Amiri replaces her greatsword with a chainsword in Part 3.
Damiel also gets grenades in part 4 but they're hard to distinguish in that particular image due to size.

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nighttree wrote:

You have outdone yourself again Wayne, she is outstanding.

I do have one question, regarding the wheel "collar" I can't really tell how it's attached ? It almost seem to be floating above her shoulders...also begs the question how does her helmet get in place (as it looks to ride rather low)...does it slide under the collar ? or is it actually attached at the breastbone, and the helmet fits over it ?

You can see the full background illustration for Wrath of Thrune. Linxia is wearing her helmet.

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nighttree wrote:

You have outdone yourself again Wayne, she is outstanding.

I do have one question, regarding the wheel "collar" I can't really tell how it's attached ? It almost seem to be floating above her shoulders...also begs the question how does her helmet get in place (as it looks to ride rather low)...does it slide under the collar ? or is it actually attached at the breastbone, and the helmet fits over it ?

Thanks Nighttree,

I imagine that the collar would be attached to the breastplate with a slot and groove section which would affix to the breastplate via a sliding rivet.
Her helmet doesn't go over her head as low as you think it does. When the art description mentioned a sleek helmet a decided to create something extremely elongated like African wood carvings. The eye slots are exaggerated and actually go further up above her face so that the helmet sits higher on her head.

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Darrell Impey UK wrote:
When I looked at the image, it appeared that the pupil of her right eye was missing. Is this a something caused by the web site/my software, or is that how you drew her?

Yeah, not sure what happened there. I deliberately made her right pupil higher than her left to convey a degree of crazy (Bearing in mind that I don't get to see any background story before I create a character illustration)There's an alternative view of the artwork on my FB page where you can see her right pupil.

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Rosgakori wrote:

Just saw the new picture for the Hellknight iconic in the paizo blog. It is VERY good, one of my favorites. It actually reminded me of one old character art that was in Finnish RPG magazine years ago.

My question is about the collar she has. Is it supposed to be like reverse halo? And again, is there a real life equivalent for it? I really liked it, nice splash of bright color to her :)

Thanks, I’m glad you like the art.

The collar is a representation of the spiked wheel motif associated with the Order of the Rack. (As far as I'm aware there's no real-life equivalent)
Order of the Rack plate armour is supposed to resemble exposed musculature (As if the skin has been flayed off) I introduced the spiked wheel motif around the elbows, knees and neck. I kept the designs inside the collar to an angular /triangular shape to contrast with the organic shapes contained in the armour and cloak.
The cloak was particularly tricky. I wanted to convey the different texture of flayed skin to fabric. However, there aren’t many visual references to flayed skin available on the web. I started my search at St Bartholomew. There’s a particularly fine - but gruesome classical statue of the saint which shows him wrapped in his own flayed skin – like a toga. It was a good starting point for visualisation of the exposed musculature and what flayed skin might look like. There’s also a modern sculpture of the saint by Damian Hirst. Eventually my searches lead to examples of flayed skin found in an unnamed museum. The examples were in tatters but it lead me to create the distinctive tattered effect on the cloak. I felt the effect was evidently not fabric but also helped convey that gruesomely creepy vibe of the character.

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Twigs wrote:

Happy holidays Wayne! I've been trawling the books for any representation of what Damiel's mutagenic form might look like since his appearance in the comics. I even picked up the Alchemy Manual only to have my hopes dashed (although Kerem Beyit's cover art is phenomenal). Does such a thing exist?

If not, do you have any preliminary thoughts on what a "changed" Damiel might look like? If so, are you able to share one or two of them with us? (If not, I can hold out in hope that we'll see "The Change" somewhere in the Hollow Mountain arc...)

Festive greetings to you too Twigs.

It's difficult to speculate on imagery that I've not been commissioned to illustrate.
In most cases, I'd have to depict what I'm instructed to by Sarah or Sonya - the art directors.
The description would likely come from the design team.
If there's an existing image in circulation already, then I'd design something along those lines in the interest of continuity.

I'll add your request to write a visual explanation of Damiel to my list of things to do. The write - ups take me a while to create (I draw quick but write slowly) My work on Hell's Vengeance has taken up a considerable amount of time to allow much writing recently.

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Queen Moragan wrote:

Thank you for your response Mr Reynolds.

I assure you that I meant disrespect what-so-ever to you as an artist, as I am a HUGE fan of your work.

The sum of my actual experience in dealing with an artist to commission a specific piece, was a meeting with a local artist who specializes in pointillism. And while I have talked to many, many artists over the years, I have not even considered commissioning any.

I must say however, that I do consider that your artwork is the definitive look of Pathfinder. And I mean no disrespect to all the truely great artists that have illustrated Pathfinder throughout all the various products. But owning just a character sketch of one of my characters, or of our table of PCs, done by you would be just fantastic!

And I thank you for answering my question in this public forum, with what I assume is the correct answer.

Please contact the artist directly concerning commissions and art fees.

Thanks Queen Moragan. No offense was taken. Most people never experience business dealings with freelance illustrators so never get familiarised with any professional etiquettes that may be involved.

I figured that you were a nice person, asking innocent questions in the wrong place. No offence was intended towards you. :)
I'm a wholly commercial illustrator. My work on commercial products doesn't allow me additional time to accept personal commissions. Sorry.

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Terevalis Unctio of House Mysti wrote:
Mr. Reynolds, thank you for being on these boards and answering questions!

Thanks for your interest in my artwork Terevalis. I'm really pleased that you find the thread interesting. :)

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Queen Moragan wrote:

Ok, I have to ask, how much would you charge for;

1 - Bust character portrait - full page pencil sketch, with brief description of the character for your reference but otherwise your interpretation.

2 - same but in ink.

3 - same but painted.

4 - Full body character portrait - full page pencil sketch, with brief description of character for your reference but otherwise your interpretation.

5 - same but in ink.

6 - same but painted.

Time frame sometime in the next year, no real hurry.

You're probably not aware, but...

It is somewhat inappropriate, unprofessional and slightly unethical for me to discuss commissions and art fees on a public messageboard. Especially one hosted by a valued client.

Sincere thanks for your interest in my artwork. However, I must respectfully decline to answer in this instance with apologies and no offence taken. :)

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Nutcase Entertainment wrote:

Would you make comic strips of the Iconics' backgounds/backstories if someone asked?

Anything you love to draw, but lack in opportunities to do so?

.?

Like any commercial commission request, it would depend upon;

How quickly does the client need it?
How much art does the client need?
And how much does it pay?

Though considering that I've not accepted any comic art commissions in quite a few years, the answer is likely no. But I don't rule out the possibility.

I'm very content illustrating fantasy games as it offers a wide variation of subject matter that constantly keeps things interesting. Occasionally, I get yearnings to illustrate certain things when inspiration takes me. Such as a snow - scene, angels, undead, gladiators, etc. I'll sometimes do small thumbnail sketches if time allows. But the ideas usually get put on the back-burner when the next deadline looms.
Maybe one of my projects will materialise one day soon.

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AlgaeNymph wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
The artist here has gone for a slightly 'Classical Greek' look which I think really works for this deity.
I do too! But...how can you tell Arshea was given a slightly Classical Greek look?
Her clothes look similar to a two-part Ionic chiton, as worn by women in ancient Greece.
This is pretty much an excuse for me to talk about Arshea more, but...why do you think lightly Classical Greek looks good on em? I'm not a clothing connoisseur, so I think it simply goes well with Arshea's body.

You kinda answered your own question there. :)

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AlgaeNymph wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
The artist here has gone for a slightly 'Classical Greek' look which I think really works for this deity.
I do too! But...how can you tell Arshea was given a slightly Classical Greek look?

Her clothes look similar to a two-part Ionic chiton, as worn by women in ancient Greece.

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AlgaeNymph wrote:
If you were asked to, how would you design Arshea?

Arshea; "Arshea is androgynous and has been depicted as both male and female, but in either case, always dressed in many-colored veils of gossamer. Arshea has a perfect face, a lithe body, and wings of gray and blue"

In the interests of continuity, I'd follow this text description and depict Arshea along the lines of how they're shown in Chronicle of the Righteous
The artist here has gone for a slightly 'Classical Greek' look which I think really works for this deity. I'd probably add a number of multi-coloured veils that swirl and move around Arshea's form.
If no specific gender was mentioned in the art description I would attempt to convey that Arshea can switch gender by illustrating them in an androgynous form that has both feminine and masculine qualities.

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mellowgoth wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:


However, (As an armour - wearer myself) I assert that...

In what capacity do you wear armor, Wayne? (longtime SCA fighter, here...)

I belong to a few different medieval re-enactment groups in the UK (Since 1990) as well as doing independent combat demos.

I have different sets of armour and weapons depending on the time period or combat demo I'm participating in.
Short - sleeved maille (Haubergeon helm & shield for 5th - 11th century, (Helmet and shield differs depending upon time period)
Long - sleeved maille (hauberk), coif, chausses, helm & shield for 11th - 13th century,
Coat of plates and helm for 14th century (Though I can interchange bits for this time period)
Full plate harness for 15th century.

My experience in historical re-enactment and research helps with visualising fantasy artwork images. Knowledge of what historical items look like in real life gives a good starting point at which to illustrate items, before imagining what they might look like in a high fantasy setting.

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Concept sketches for Lazzero - Cleric of Asmodeus (featured on the cover of Hell's Vengeance part1) can be seen on my Facebook page here;

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