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Urman's page

Goblin Squad Member. 1,933 posts (2,028 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 3 aliases.


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Goblin Squad Member

Pyronous Rath wrote:
Go read about the mongol archers go watch Legolas in LODR's. After that try telling me rooting ranged attack is not "stupid". The only reason it would not be stupid is if it's temporary. If rooting ends up sticking a lot of elven archers are going to look stupid and so will GW and the community that wrecked their own game.

Your two examples are horse archers and a fictional character (who was epic).

Let me try now. "Rooting ranged attacks is not stupid." (Success!)

In my opinion, whether GW makes ranged attacks rooted or not, or if they make it temporary or not, really shouldn't depend on whether some archers in our world used bows from horseback. It shouldn't depend on whether some fictional character immortalized in a movie shot his bow on the move. It should be based simply on: does it work within the game; does it, in balance, make space within the game for archers and melee and spellcasters?

Goblin Squad Member

Yes, it changes things a bunch. Removes a lot of bottlenecks that were affecting us in the first 3 days.

Goblin Squad Member

Fierywind wrote:

Saying someone's idea is stupid, while generally serving no constructive purpose, does not necessarily imply the person is stupid. Very intelligent people have stupid ideas all the time, just like everyone else. ...

However, saying someone else's idea is stupid is in itself a statement that the speaker truly knows if something is stupid or smart, and the other person doesn't. It is pretty arrogant language.

Goblin Squad Member

celestialiar wrote:
Ryan Dancey wrote:
There is no leashing in Pathfinder Online, despite what people keep saying. The game does not work the way you think it works.
What people are talking about is that the mobs run back at a set distance. ...

I think that the disconnect is that some think mobs run back at a set distance and actually that leash isn't there. The devs have said that.

Mobs gain agro by things like someone getting close, them taking damage, them doing damage to a target, or some other things. They lose agro over time. If mobs run back at about the same distance when players repeat a technique, it might look like the distance is set. The mobs agro can be subject to variables and the players are putting in the same (or similar) variables each pull. Maybe the players expect to see a leash, so they interpret the event as a leash.

Goblin Squad Member

sspitfire1 wrote:

But yes, "Either stop doing it, or go back to whatever puissant MMO you crawled out from to come troll this one."

Puissant means having great power or influence. Did you mean pissant?

Goblin Squad Member

Bluddwolf wrote:
If you had to get to Subterfuge 18 in order to advance to Rogue 6, you would have to grind Short Box and Light Blades to 9, each requiring well over 1000 kills.

Actually, Subterfuge and Martial points increase geometrically.

Short Bow kills 1 gives +1 Subterfuge Points. Short Bow 2 gives +2 Subterfuge points, so your total is 3. Short Bow 3 (+3) gets you to 6. Short Bow 4 (+4) gets you to 10. Short Bow 5 (+5) gets you to 15. Short Bow 6 (+6) gets you to 21.

You can get to Subterfuge 21 with Short Bow (Or Light Blade) at 6. That's 500 kills.

You can get to Subterfuge 20 with Short Bow at 4 (100 kills) and Light Blade at 4 (100 kills). It doesn't take over 1000 kills on each.

Goblin Squad Member

KoTC Edam Neadenil wrote:
I never did complete the tutorial Goblin quest in my achievements. I sort of got distracted and forgot all about it. I am however something like level 5 goblin slayer with about 400 goblin kills up . Just never bothered finishing that quest.

The quest is worth finishing, I think. I think it unlocks the crafting tutorial and the skill tutorial - the crafting tutorial gets me 1 crafting point in bowyer. (Maybe the crafting quest can be started w/o finishing the goblin quest, though).

Goblin Squad Member

I'm not a healer. We have had healers in our parties in Alpha 8 who have been quite successful at (a) keeping characters alive despite enemy attacks and pursuit and (b) saving downed characters before they bled out. Both of these actions help the party stay in the fight against PvE escalations. I think it will be more of a challenge to use healers in PvP, but I think many things will be more of a challenge in PvP.

Goblin Squad Member

@Caldeathe I think that's maybe off. In my experience, I've seen a few yellow, red, and purple mobs (except for ogres) in normal hexes. I've seen a lot more of them in escalations. I think there's some drops from those advanced mobs. I picked up 3 trophy charms this morning, for example, from broken captains or commanders, and one recipe. Not sure of the rest of the loot - my inventory is a jumble.

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celestialiar wrote:
I wanted to weigh in on this as well. I am already mapping the easiest way to farm crafting points. I guess I am a power gamer after all.

We've had this discussion in my team's voice chat. The basic idea that we have come to is this: My commoner character is a commoner with a smelter focus, not a smelter who happens to be a commoner. Every commoner who does refining is likely going to need to get crafting points from a number of skills. So will experts who do crafting.

It's just like a roled Fighter who wants to be a medium-armored archer. If the player of such a character refused to get martial points from anything except archery kills, we'd shrug and accept that that is one way to slow your character progression.

I think almost all fighters will be using a mix of weapons to get martial points. As a commoner, I'll be using a mix of refining and crafting to get crafting points. I'm a commoner, Jim, not a smelter.

Goblin Squad Member

I figure we're getting pelts from scavenging as a representation of trap lines and other harvesting. They are readily available, outside of mountains. More common in open hexes.

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Being wrote:

The ratio of consumption to availability should roughly equate.

I think it will be best if settlements do not select their settlement type (Wizard/Rogue, Fighter/Cleric, etc.)until they are confident they know what the initial mix of resources will be locally available. Later on there will be a system of supply between settlements/areas, but initially we should not pick what type of settlement we have based on what people want to play but on what will be supported by the local environment.

Where there is little pine or the components for bowstrings and varnish it doesn't make sense to count on longbows. Where the components for sepia crystals are scarce a cleric settlement will face difficult times.

To some degree it balances out: you need pine for bows and yew for arrows. But yes, some town that is planning on going fighter/whatever because they are sited on a mountain may be in for a rude surprise when the find no iron, only copper. I'd offer that maybe non iron metal deposits could be smaller blobs than the iron, so iron is probably available within 5 hexes. Pine/Yew should be the same way.

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Having just been given a +2 copper bar recipe (unbugged) by a company-mate, I'm looking forward to +3 Crafting Points in 8 hours. That's another level I can advance when I have the xp to buy it. I think that's how it's supposed to work. Now I owe that guy big time.

I think the player economy will be much more robust in EE; we have limited numbers here and it's not for keeps. We need gear as our starter gear breaks.

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Keign wrote:
I am not attempting to make the case that crafting should be easy - I love the depth added by the crafting system. However, if one refining skill grants you one uncommon recipe and one common recipe, all should - otherwise it has an unseemly advantage in the ease of advancement. This is in the interest of balance - I'm not suggesting that things must be 'fair' but the system becomes obtuse and unpredictable without consistent progression throughout.

Except... each of us crafters will have to dabble in multiple crafts and refine skills to get enough Crafting Points. So there's no reason we can't dabble in one of the nice ones. Not every craft has to be an easy one.

Goblin Squad Member

I'm working my way through this as a refiner - I don't see it as impossible. Refiners and Crafters will dabble in side tracks. It might make it pretty expensive for a Fighter, say, to also be a renowned Armorsmith.

The #1 problem I have is that recipes don't work much of the time. I don't mind spending 229 xp to unlock Gemcutting in order to use a +2 recipe. It's much more disappointing to spend the xp so you can learn the recipe, then find that it's bugged. I could have spent the xp on a different skill (to find a different recipe was bugged, no doubt).

Recipes will need to be fixed sooner rather than later if the crafting economy is to work. Other than that - we're all in the same boat, working under the same rules. As a refiner I'll be training crafting skills to get crafting points for advancement maybe as often as I train refining skills on the side.

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There used to be a cracker called Pilot's Bread available; I haven't seen them for a while. Big, heavy 3" disks. Not quite hardtack, but I liked 'em.

Goblin Squad Member

Eigengrau wrote:
Can you explai. These statements better for me? I am barely getting the understanding of the character mechanics as it is and i have not paid attention to anything revol ing around the Land Grab or having settlements.

In the Land Rush, the various companies competed to get claimed sites across the map. Those sites have been assigned. People who join EE will likely work from the NPC towns for a while, or join one of the winning groups from the Land Rush.

The current map for Alpha 8 is the top 1/3 of the map for Early Enrollment (EE), when the game starts. So in Alpha 8, anyone who belongs to a settlement that will be in that area of the map will be reconnoitering their eventual home.

There was at one point a plan to have EE start with the top 1/3 of the map, only. That would mean the people in settlements in the top 1/3 could harvest and bank either at or near their home, while people in the bottom 2/3 would not be able to do so.

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Bringslite of Fidelis wrote:
If it is just a mule to transfer things, couldn't you just "reroll" it everytime it's "low rep" disease got to the contagious point?

Which is why I'd prefer that we not be allowed to reroll. One character per current subscription in place (or three characters - some fixed number). If you're using traded training time, you can run existing characters, but can't create new ones. For trial accounts, whenever we see those, require a new download of the client for each trial character; add enough bloat into the trial software that it takes some time.

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I'd prefer cooking remain somewhat abstracted. I think that to some decree, the camping doesn't need to go into detail of what is available to eat - the best campsites have good food, the worst are sort of hardscrabble.

I'd like to see inns abstracted. While most of the inn upgrades might be focused on improving the basic living conditions, the best inns (ie, the ones that give max benefits in shortest time) might also need the kitchen functioning well to give full benefits. A well-functioning, high-standards kitchen might need game (mountain/forest food), meat from herds (hill food), and fish (water/swamp), as well as lots of bread and beer (plains food and drink) and wine (hills drink). A lesser inn with a more pedestrian table might be able to operate at full benefits with only a few types of food, but full benefits would be less than the maxed out inn. Food outlay would depend on usage; more visitors to an inn should also increase the food usage.

I'm thinking that tying the abstract inn food to bulk food would drive some amount of trade - it gives mountaineers reason to build at least a few hunting camp Outposts. Also, the privations of war and sieges might be more significant when such supplies must be taken into account. When the inn used for an army's mess runs out of meat and is down to breadstuffs and water, it could take longer for Injury points to be healed and Power to recharge.

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People who expect to be able to duel or kill players in the NPC towns should be aware they'll lower their character's Reputation stat. It can get low enough, even with one assault, that the NPC guards will kill you repeatedly and you'll have to leave town or won't be able to get into town. No town means no crafting and no new skills. Reputation recovers slowly.

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One of the guys in my gaming group climbed down from the tree and went looking for a cave. We never saw him again.

Goblin Squad Member

Maybe we liken it to a TT game. You can play an RPG with flat cardboard counters to represent the players' characters and mobs. It's better - or at least more appreciated - to use figurines. Say we put effort into it and spend an average of 3 hours to paint each figurine. If we were to spend 30 hours per figurine, would the game be 10 times as good? I'd say that art is good, and some amount of art is really required. But art can only can do so much.

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T7V Jazzlvraz wrote:
albadeon wrote:
(after a transition period?)
We've no affirmative statements either way, but I've seen no indications that there's a re-adjustment period. As soon as one joins a Settlement with appropriate support, one gets one's abilities back.

There might be a transition period in that it takes 24 hours to shift from one company to another company, and from one settlement to another settlement? Which does raise the question whether shifting from an NPC settlement to a PC settlement takes any time. I'd hope shifting from no company to a PC company would be almost instantaneous.

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Lifedragn wrote:
I saw a pack of Worgs out near Cloverdell last night. I was solo, so decided not to run up close.

Yup, when the crowd was doing the PvE escalation runs last night we went through 2 or 3 groups of those. It was our high level characters from Alpha 7 - so it will be interesting to see how tough Worgs are with lesser characters.

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<kabal> Bunibuni wrote:
And you get a couple of attack powers out of the tutorial, which sounds a bit lame since it is for your starting club but my rogue is still using his club as his second weapon. Does more damage than a mace or sword, haven't found a short sword to try that out yet.

A trick on the tutorial that might not be usable in the next Alpha: while the trainer was there and you could buy those three skills, you didn't have to. Buying any three skills (one each time you were prompted) would advance the quest. Likewise, you didn't have to equip those 3 feats. The quest would advance if you equipped, when prompted, any primary attack; any secondary attack; and any passive feat.

Goblin Squad Member

KoTC Edam Neadenil wrote:
Urman wrote:
Yup. I'll be at Brighthaven, and if there's a market at Keeper's Pass, 5 hexes away, I'll use that instead of Thornkeep, 14 hexes away. I'll let people playing merchants keep the market stocked. (If the price differential is large between the two markets is large, I'll just consider getting into the merchant game and shipping goods myself.)
Their is usually a price differential in smaller markets. Your goods sit around far longer before selling so you need a bigger markup to maintain the same profit per week. ...

I'm fine with a price differential. If I have to take the time to carry goods to a distant market there's an opportunity cost - what could I have done in that time? - as well as more risk.

There may be a markup in the regional markets compared to the NPC towns. It might not apply to all goods, because high skill people will usually belong to settlements. For example, if there are more Tier 2-3 weaponsmiths in the hinterlands, then good weapons might be readily available there. Tier 3 weapons might be more dear in Thornkeep.

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Shaibes wrote:
I think the success of regional auction houses will also depend on their distance from Thornkeep and their proximity other "frontier" settlements. Anyone facing an hour-long overland haul to Thornkeep may find an auction house three or so hexes away very attractive.

Yup. I'll be at Brighthaven, and if there's a market at Keeper's Pass, 5 hexes away, I'll use that instead of Thornkeep, 14 hexes away. I'll let people playing merchants keep the market stocked. (If the price differential is large between the two markets is large, I'll just consider getting into the merchant game and shipping goods myself.)

Goblin Squad Member

So I got into Alpha and I played the last two weekends. I've done some solo and some grouped PvE, and I think the grouped PvE is a blast. Today we (TEO) had two 6-character parties clearing an escalation hex, with another 3-4 non-aligned characters working with us. The groups finished off one escalation then broke up and people fanned out to find another escalation. Then we reassembled and worked at that as well.

It's not as choreographed and practiced as a raid dungeon, but we're practicing and figuring out the game as it develops.

I'd recommend that if you can, get into the Alpha and figure out the UI and the skill system before the game starts for real. I made at least one false start before getting a starting set of skills that I liked. And try the PvE in a group; it's a lot of fun.

If you're not in a company or settlement yet, check out the mountain hexes northeast of Sotter Hill. If you like that, you'll love TEO and Brighthaven: we're bordered by 6 mountain hexes and it's 5 hexes to our closest neighbor, Keeper's Pass - and they're all mountain. We've got woods and plains close by, too, but lots of mountains.

Point of contact info? See the post above :)

Goblin Squad Member

KoTC Edam Neadenil wrote:
The main problem with crafting is the casual crafter who generally wants to dabbler and has no inclination to go to the alpha forum and check the ingredient/substitute/recipe sheets is totally lost. There is nothing in game to indicate a perfect bloodstone counts as a lesser vital for example.

Yup. The scrap goblinoid and bandit weapons can be used as a substitute for copper ore. The nonstandard silver coins can be used as a sub for silver ore. Enough of those and a gem I think is all that is needed for a trophy charm.

I've had cloth, light, medium, and heavy armor drops, and all weapons except knife/dagger and shortbow. Kill enough stuff and eventually things drop.

Goblin Squad Member

As a smelter, my Tier 2 recipes range from Dwarven Steel blanks and ingots at rank 7 though Silvered Steel blanks and ingots at rank 11. It varies by skill.

Goblin Squad Member

Bluddwolf wrote:
But as Pino brings up, will they have the influence to maintain those towers? I also add, we will have to discuss what we do with "designated towers" that remain unclaimed because the company / settlement does not have the influence to hold them?

Until people have advanced to a point that they need the towers to gain skill, those towers might be considered sparring sites. Likewise, if a settlement's companies don't have the influence to hold them, the sites could be used as terrain for PvP.

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Send me a pm with an email address, GrandpaDJ.

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Guurzak wrote:

Exp cost per level of what? There are a dozen* different advancement tables for different categories of feats.

*may not actually be a dozen

I think it's thirteen sheets in that one feat advancement file. So a dozen.

Goblin Squad Member

Tyveil wrote:
Maybe I'm misunderstanding then. If you have a +10, does that mean the cost to get to 11 is the same cost as somebody getting to 1 who doesn't have the bonus? I was assuming the cost to train 10->11 would be the same. But if the bonus is in the background, IE you are really training to level 1 even though your effective skill is 11, then this is the same effect as what I mentioned on the % training bonus. I'm happy with that system and it will always have an effect early and late game.

I think it means that a dwarven miner, for example pays the same xp to buy Mining 5 as the next guy. But with his 20% bonus, he'll either be mining faster, or will be consulting the Mining 6 loot table, or will just get a +20 result on a unified loot table.

I think it might means the dwarven smelter has a better chance of getting a random +1 or +2 to refining rolls. And the dwarven smith can skimp a bit on materials and still match the results of a human of the same skill.

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KotC Carbon D. Metric wrote:

My concern is that between any two "Class Role" focused settlements the training for any given skill/feat/craft will be available between them, completely bypassing any advantage the ACE role Settlement will have had. If the towers determine what level the Settlement training is, then having all non Role training advance at the same level or rate that the "Class" settlements will be just as good at crafting/harvesting/refining, without having to make those hard choices.

I'll be a crafter (refiner) for a settlement that will have class roles in WoT. To get our crafters' skills up, we're going to need a crafting settlement somewhere. To do routine high-level crafting we're going to need a high-level crafting settlement nearby. If we don't have that... then our class warriors will have to trade for every bit of the good gear - the stuff that lets them use their high-level feats. I'm likely going to be living out of the crafter town, where I can craft and bank materials.

(I rather every town had a bit more self-sufficiency. We're being wedged into blocs of 3+ settlement by these rules, as well as being herded into settlements.)

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Oh, yes. The book title and quote are as fabricated as my reasoning there; I don't have a clue as to what the canon is.

Goblin Squad Member

Nihimon wrote:
I fail to see a rational explanation why learning to wear Light Armor (Chameleon, Scout, and Swashbuckler are the most efficient ways for a Wizard to raise Dexterity) should help me learn to wear Clothing Armor better (Clothing Armor Proficiency 2 requires a 12 Dexterity).

From Seven Movements before Dawn: "Someone who intends on working and fighting in robes or other fabric clothes can be trained to be better aware of her movements and actions by spending time practicing moves in leather armors or a similar outfit. By training in an unfamiliar garb that is just a bit too constricting or encumbering the student will gain an understanding of how she can move more surely and quickly in any light garment."

In other words, instead of looking at something and deciding it isn't rational, create a rationale for it. And maybe a book title and a quote at the same time. :)

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Bringslite of Fidelis wrote:
I kind of wish that elves got a Forester bonus, but I can also see that taking wood out of the forest is not thier favorite (as a general racial stereotype).

Doesn't Forester cover herblore as well as logging? And the logging isn't clear-cutting but removing some wood from the forest. While dwarves have advantages with enduring hard work, I think the Forester should be in the elves' corner. Likewise dowsing - they just seem a more magical folk..

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I've always been impressed with Kadere. He really is a stalwart and inventive star in these forums; a prominent poster without peer. I often skip the forums entirely and just go re-read Kadere's posts without bogging myself down in the silliness of other posters. Some day I expect a collection of his posts will be bound into a handsome leather-bound set of tomes, titled something like, "The Uncanny and Unerring Predictions of Kadere, Seer of Sunholm." I hope to get a copy myself. And don't get me started on Sunholm. That place deserves a coffee-table book that captures its vistas and an economic treatise to record the wily trades of its merchant class. Its inhabitants could fill a Who's Who book of renowned strategists and tacticians, cunning bandits, and wizened wizards. Kadere's portrait would undoubtedly be on the cover of that book.

(I'll have to pass on the prizes, though)

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Cydeth wrote:
Great. I took time off work for the first day of EE...and now I find out its been moved. *sighs*

Ayup, I imagine several are in that boat. Guess I'll look at the honey-do list and try to make some progress before EE.

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Mbando wrote:
7) Reputation: do we really want it to be that easy to lose that easily by accident in your party? In the middle of combat with some ogres, I somehow (I think it was...

A long time ago, I thought GW was talking like we wouldn't be able to do things that gave negative consequences without a cautionary check or window. So if I have a neutral tabbed, and click a number by mistake on my keyboard, I should get a "woah - you sure about that?" confirmation window. At least that's what I expected to see.

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Being wrote:

... Destroying the siege-camp bind point, interdicting rations and material supply (charges for wizard and cleric, arrows for bowmen).

In fact, what if rations work for fighters as charges/arrows for the others?

I assume supply (campfire stacks, arrows, spell charges) and exhaustion (injury points from criticals, power use) may end up being pretty significant.

I'm not sure fighters need some specific counter like arrows or spell charges. In my gut I think we're going to be using our arrows and spells in PvP and conserving those resources in PvE - we're all going to get pretty adept at melee.

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T7V Jazzlvraz wrote:
Being wrote:
I'm unclear what benefit the power to control other players' characters bestows on the game.
It feels as if the various proposals for doing something involuntary to another player's character have the primary "benefit" of not killing that character, with the accompanying invocation of the wrath of the Reputation system. I'd prefer my only loss of agency be death, because the cost to both parties may, occasionally, keep me alive.

It also removes that piece (character) from the board for the duration of the fight, which would allow the captor to achieve their objectives more quickly.

For PvP in feuds and wars, how does one side succeed?
- In the War of Towers it's simple enough, the side with the most combatants in the box will eventually get enough points to own the tower for another day.
- In a raid (or other attack on a location), the aggressor wins if he can get the loot or destroy the structure. The defender wins if he can field enough people to prevent the attacker from gaining those objectives. The fight goes on until one side dominates by numbers. (This might happen because the other side is out of gear, has accumulated injury points and is out of healing power, or people had to log off - or gave up.)

I'm not keen on characters losing agency. I can see the usefulness of PvP fights having win conditions beyond total attrition - or of mechanics like broken threads, injury points, or whatever possibly taking a character out of a fight. Maybe non-lethal trapping/imprisonment is the "good" counterpart to assassination.

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Alpha 7.1 was my first entry into the game. I was a bit stunned for the first hour with all of the decisions I needed to make to build a character.

I started as neutral/tolerant of the attribute/stat mechanism. After running around for a day or two I actually liked the mechanic. Yes, I had to make decisions as to what secondary skills I'd buy for stat increases, but those decisions seemed to me to adds breadth to the character.

Would I be a miner who could also help in the smelter and tannery, or would I be a miner who is also a buffed, high-hit point fighter, or some combination of the two? Or would I be a good miner with the barest smattering of a lot of abilities that I would never use (because I min-maxed and used the very cheapest Con:XP gains I could find)? Decisions, decisions...

I am really looking forward to EE, and its promise of decisions, work, and social interactions that will matter in the long term game.

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If there were an exception, maybe it should be limited to crossbows - give them a purpose. Standing up with a 6 foot long bow and taking a shot would be more visible than a crossbow that could be fired prone or near-prone.

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I've wondered if the twice marked are people who lived in earlier times, died and were reincarnated in an earlier Pharasma event, lived through that and then were saved/kept by Pharasma to reincarnate and seed her next experiment. That wanders towards guessing the motives of gods, which I try to avoid.

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In my head, I'm picturing this town. Some priests were given a calling to be here, at this moment. Then people started appearing, naked and helpless. We might have actually appeared 10 hours ago, weak and befuddled. We were given clothes, allowed to rest, and told to find our way to the statue when we were ready.

The priests likely starting asking us for our stories, at least at first. Perhaps they stopped in the flood of miracles, or perhaps they are still asking each newcomer what they remember.

We characters have already been comparing stories. Many of us might remember dying. Some of us don't. Some of us died in the River Kingdoms, don't remember dying, but will find out from family that there was a body and it was buried.

The possibilities are endless. A character can be in deep denial that she ever died. Others will nod at her story, and politely not ask, "So how did you end up on the slab, newborn? How were you shorn of your knowledge and skills and finery? Pharasma's Sheep, that's what we are."

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@Hobs - I think our characters start day 1 of EE with 1000 xp. They gain 100 xp per hour. The mark hasn't been doing its thing long. There might have been a similar Pharasma event before, but I think this one has just started.

I think the first thing our characters had in common is that they did die. They might have died penniless or alone or just away from a cleric and weren't able to be resurrected. Or they died and were taken by Pharasma, and somewhere a cleric is explaining that the spell doesn't always succeed. Or they died peacefully in their sleep, not in a traumatic event.

The second thing we have in common is that we appeared in Thornkeep, probably naked and without gear, and were given rudimentary gear by the priests of Pharasma (Pops?). None of us appeared earlier than Day 1. Maybe someone did, but it wasn't one of us. And we know people will appear after us.

I think our backstories can have us in the River Kingdoms before Pharasma marked us. For some of us, like owners of taverns or the like, it makes perfect sense that we have resources here to fall back upon.

Goblin Squad Member

Once we get ammo consumption, those bows are going to be resource drains. But so is dying and taking damage to one's armor.

Goblin Squad Member

Ryan Dancey wrote:

If you are using the new Quick Start guide, I need to know which Feats are missing. I did the Walkyhrough on Wdnesday to verify it was working and correct the text from the previous edition, and it was all correct. If something has gone sideways I need to know ASAP.

If you didn't get Wizard 1 until you took all the caster Feats you probably skipped taking Evoker 1.

btw, to the GW folks, I like the quick start guides and other materials you've put out. Single player RPGs typically have pretty good user guides. MMOs often make do with tutorials - which can't be pre-viewed or re-viewed. Despite missing the info on Evokers, the information you've been providing for PFO is good; it looks solid and professional.

What would be very cool is if there was (later, of course) a way to look at the user guides from inside the game.

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