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Kobold

Trinite's page

Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Society Member. 1,430 posts (1,448 including aliases). 2 reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 1 alias.


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Sczarni

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Wonderful srt, as always! And a great backstory.I love the shoutouts to White Estrid's crew, and especially to his brother Ostog. And he's got an artifact -- awesome!

Sczarni

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Erik Keith wrote:
Trinite wrote:
When should backers start being contacted about fulfilling our backer rewards? I backed it through my wife's Kickstarter account; I want to make sure she hasn't missed something already.
I've sent you an email regarding this Trinite, hope to hear back from you soon!

Erik has sorted this all out for me. Once again, they Paizo's customer service team prove themselves to be the best.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

My least-liked rule on the other thread was Encumbrance, so here's where I defend it:

Encumbrance rules can be very helpful if you're running a tight survival-style game: you're marooned in the desert, or stuck in a huge dungeon, and you won't be able to resupply very easily.

In that case, it's very important to keep track of ever little piece of equipment, how much it weighs you down, and how fast you can travel.

As much as I dislike fiddling with it, I'd probably use encumbrance rules if I were running Souls for Smuggler's Shiv or a long-distance traveling adventure. Or at least I'd consider running a simplified version. :)

Sczarni

3 people marked this as a favorite.

I'd like to play a Monk (drunken master)/Barbarian (drunken brute) -- you have to take the monk levels first, then do an alignment shift -- to get double benefits from drinking. For the Skull & Shackles AP, he'd be an unarmed fighter who rages after consuming cans of fermented alcoholic spinach.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

The whole campaign is under the ocean. An ancient underwater empire has returned through a 10,000 year time rift, after they fled a catalysm into the future. You're a ragtag group from the current aquatic races. Deal with the consequences of a complete civilization suddenly appearing from nowhere into the existing ecosystem and political order of your oceanic home.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
Criminals of the Inner Sea: An examination of thieves guilds throughout the Avistan and Golarion, covering methodology and psychology of groups like the Sczarni, the Outlaw Council of the River Kingdoms, Westcrown's Council of Thieves, and Korvosa's Cerulean Society. It'd be a great way to give your rogues more flavor.

Yes, yes, yes. But PLEASE not until I have a chance to earn myself a spot on the contributor list for this book. All of my best organization ideas are illegal groups in some manner or another.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

The biggest problem I have with Magus is that shocking grasp is so obviously the best choice for spellstriking, pretty much every Magus uses it exclusively. The only possible competition is from frostbite and frigid touch for the debuffs. It turns out that there just aren't that many low-level touch spells. Paizo could really stand to write some new ones and open up some more unusual Magus builds.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Yeah...I just don't see ol' Tar Baphon going down that easy. The map ought to have a little bitty empty circle around Gallowspire as the demons judiciously decide to save him for later.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

"The Make a Limited Wish Foundation" -- that's pretty awesome. :)

Welcome!

Sczarni

3 people marked this as a favorite.

About linearity and "railroading":

Ask yourself exactly what is bothering you about the game. Is it the feeling that your PCs don't have any important decisions to make? Is it a feeling that the adventure is only one encounter after another, like a long hallway with monsters lined up in it? :) That's what you should talk to your GM about. There are very good ways to avoid those feelings even in a very linear campaign.

Experienced GMs will tell you that "railroading" isn't actually a problem of adventure design. Nearly all adventures are going to be linear to some extent. They have to be, if they're going to present a coherent story.

"Railroading" is actually a mindset of player perception, caused by clumsy GM behavior. It's the players feeling like they don't have meaningful choices. A good GM can make sure the players never feel this way, no matter how rigorously he structures the plot.

The best way to solve it, of course, is to actually give the players meaningful choices that affect the plot. But sometimes, honestly, this just isn't possible. This is especially true when you're using a published adventure designed by someone else, and it's only going to work if the PCs follow the main plot and do what they're supposed to do.

In that situation, the important thing is to give them choices that *seem* meaningful: choices that affect their experience of the plot, even if they don't actually affect the course of the plot.

For example, the GM could present the PCs with a variety of tasks to pursue in any order they choose. But the order doesn't really matter much; the main plot doesn't move on until they accomplish all the tasks. This can defuse the feeling of "railroading" without messing up a linear plot. Or they can choose between different ways to solve a problem: negotiate with an NPC, sneak into his base and assassinate him, frontally assault it, trick him into coming out, whatever. But no matter what they choose, so long as they neutralize him somehow, the plot can move forward afterward.

A third technique, also very important, is to present the plot in ways that specifically appeal to the characters. Give them motivations to pursue the line of the plot that fit with their characters. Then they'll be happy to pursue the linear plot, since it fits with their role-playing. I like captain yesterday's example, of having siblings trying to rescue their sister.

As a player, you can help your GM out by developing a character with interesting motivations that he can use to hook you in. You can also look for ways to personalize your experience without messing up the expectations of the linear plot. Look for ways to solve problems creatively, but respect the fact that you are going to have to achieve certain specific objectives to move the plot forward.

Hope this helps, and you can start enjoying this (in my opinion) wonderful AP!

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Aaaaaah, this is cool.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Should Dirge of Doom allow a save against the effect?

Sczarni

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My initial impression is that this looks like a very fun class. However, it also seems like another blatant trampling on the poor ol' Rogue. I would take this class over Rogue even if it didn't have extracts. With extracts included, it's no contest. And hey, look, we even get a strong Will save, which the Rogue ought to have always had. Overall, I can't imagine playing a Rogue instead of an Investigator, unless I was going for a Sneak Attack-heavy combat build -- in which case I'd go ahead and play a Ninja instead.

So for me, I like the class's design -- it just makes me sad that we can't travel back in time and rebuild the Rogue to use these mechanics. I guess this new class is the only way to "fix" the Rogue. :(

More specific comment: I would think that Underworld Inspiration would also grant free Inspiration for Bluff. Is there a reason why there are currently no Talents that make Bluff a freebie?

EDIT: Also, if the book contains an archetype that removes the Extract ability entirely and substitutes in something else nice, then it will definitely obsolete the Rogue in my book. Though honestly, I would love to see and play that archetype.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Encumbrance. The only good thing about it is how easy it it to completely ignore. :)

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Aberrant Templar wrote:
Paladin of Baha-who? wrote:
Just keep in mind possible emotional triggers for your players. Make sure in advance how graphic they may be comfortable with you getting.

This is a big part of the reason why I played Nidal as a Film Noir kind of place. Noir is risqué but not necessarily gratuitous. I can imply depravity effectively without showing anything except what happens before ... and after.

Mostly, it's because I feel like Nidal (specifically Nisroch) has all the proper elements for good Noir ... starting with the shadows and working out from there. But also because Zon-Kuthon is a corrupted god of beauty, art, music, and love. I feel like it is important to emphasize that aspect of his faith and noir gives a great outlet that isn't limited to just black leather and spikes (those only come out on "special" occasions).

Plus, I feel like there needs to be some temptation. If you over-emphasize the "spikes and pain" aspect of Zon-Kuthon's faith then it starts to get hard justifying why anyone (particularly PCs) would volunteer to work with them or where you'd find enough worshippers to qualify as a major religion. I also have trouble working out how a society like Nidal's would function on a daily basis, or why people (especially pirates from the Shackles) would ever choose to visit Nisroch if there's too much "Demons to some" and not enough "Angels to others."

Ultimately, I just think a worshipper of Zon-Kuthon would make a perfect femme fatale and a campaign world with everything from robots to mammoths to flumphs has room for a little Dashiell Hammett, Harry D'Amour, and Lauren Bacall.

That's a great idea. It helps answer the fundamental question, "Why the heck would anyone ever go to Nidal?" They don't commence the floggin's the second you step off the boat. And most people aren't walking around with open wounds or anything.

I could see Nidal as being an extremely polite society. , with the horrible stuff hidden underneath. And there's the added wrinkle that a lot of the "criminals" are actually just good people trying to survive in an oppressive culture.

Maybe another good real-world influence would be Soviet culture. Everyone officially tows the party line, even if only a few people really buy into it. But if you ever show signs of disbelief, you'll find yourself getting "reeducated"...

Sczarni

3 people marked this as a favorite.

The present American system is basically a mess because it has been haphazardly kludged together into what we think of as a "modern democracy" out of a system that was never intended to be such.

Wall of text time...

Spoiler:
The most important issue that affected the design of the Constitution actually went away a long time ago. The Constitution was primarily designed to deal with the tension between the existing strong state governments and the desire for a strong unifying central government. That issue was pretty much resolved by the Civil War, with the federal government winning. So now the main issue that the Constitution was designed around is not nearly as significant anymore (though it hasn't gone away entirely).

There have also been a number of significant changes to the Constitutional system that have combined into the extremely messy system that we have now:

  • The 12th Amendment changed how the President and Vice President are elected, so that candidates now run as teams representing the political parties (though the original system definitely had some huge problems).

  • The 17th Amendment made Senators elected by popular vote instead of by state legislatures. Originally, the idea was that the Senate would represent the state governments. Instead, we now have basically two chambers that both theoretically represent the populace, but with different rules and internal structures, which then fight each other over influence.

  • Since the 1930s, the Supreme Court has started interpreting the Commerce Clause of the Constitution in such as way as to give Congress basically unlimited power to legislate on any subject. The court even ruled that food a farmer grows only for himself to eat, and never even sells, could be regulated by Congress due to "interstate commerce."

  • The Supreme Court's interpretations have also completely transformed the meaning of the constitution in a whole lot of other ways: from discovering a "right to privacy" lurking in the "penumbras" of several amendments, to the concept of "executive privilege" for the Presidency, to an interpretation of the "separation of church and state" that would seem very strange to the Constitution's writers.

  • Beyond the specific impact of these decisions, the bigger effect has been that the Supreme Court has become a major political actor, in a way that it was never intended to be. That's why nobody -- liberal or conservative -- tries to actually amend the Constitution anymore, but just waits for their opponents on the Court to die off in the hopes of replacing them with members of their own side.

  • Not to mention the many, many extra-Constitutional ways in which the two major parties have thoroughly entrenched themselves into the entire electoral system.

So you could say that there are so many "house rules" in the American government that it doesn't really bear any resemblance to the "rules-as-written" anymore. Maybe we're due for an edition change to clear up the bloat. :)

Sczarni

3 people marked this as a favorite.

In my real life game, I GM because I'm the only one who really studies the rules -- or really thinks about the game when we're not actually playing (which is once a month at best). My problems aren't with martial-caster disparity, or monks, or whatever -- they're with cell phones at the table, teenagers who forget how attack rolls work between turns, and trying to keep our Skype player connected.

So yeah, I enjoy a little theorycrafting now and then -- specifically because it bears very little resemblance to my real life game. :)

Sczarni

5 people marked this as a favorite.

Yes. Better to laugh than to cry. Think about how us non-crazy fiscal conservatives are feeling. Does anyone know of another conservative political party that might be available for us to use? This one seems to be defective. I'm gonna check Craigslist...

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I've got a player who's a Ranger with a little animal companion -- he really wanted a ferret, so I statted up one based on the weasel animal stats, adjusted to approximate the standard small animal companions.

The problem, is, he almost never actually uses the little guy. The party is level 6, meaning the ferret only has 3 HD (for a whopping 16 hp), and he's too afraid that the little sucker will get killed. It doesn't really do much damage, either -- bite +6 for 1d4, big whoop. But the ranger really *likes* the ferret, and wants to use him more often.

So the obvious idea is that he needs to use him for more non-combat stuff. Here's where I need some advice: what are some things that I could suggest for him to do? Scouting seems good; the Ranger can prep speak with animals and send the little guy off to scout. Are there any other things that could be cool?

Sczarni

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Part of the problem with this discussion is the very idea that we can "punish" Assad for using chemical weapons. This supposes that limited American strikes will actually harm him in some way, either by weakening him militarily or else by reducing his ability to use chemical weapons again soon.

Neither of those is likely. All we'd really be doing is striking to prove that the President wasn't lying when he called chemical weapons a "red line" way back when. It would merely be a transparent face-saving measure for the President. But who would care? Not Assad. He just cares about winning the war. And the kind of action being promoted by the executive branch right now would have virtually no effect on the larger war.

It's preposterous to think that we can just make some limited strikes and expect them to actually change anything. That means we're just setting ourselves up for much deeper intervention down the road. What do we do when it becomes obvious that our strikes have done nothing? What does that do for our "national reputation"? Or worse, what do we do when Hezbollah responds by attacking some of our embassies or ships? What do we do when Assad orders another chemical weapons strike next month? This is how escalation happens.

Strikes now mean a very good chance of boots on the ground sometime in the next 1-2 years. The congressional vote now might be our last chance to stop another Iraq situation.

Sczarni

2 people marked this as a favorite.
DeciusNero wrote:
Trinite wrote:

From Rule of Fear, its seems that mainly it was a poor decision made by an insecure new monarch. He was surprised by Barstoi's aggression, and by the time the war was underway he didn't feel that he could stop it. It's one of the consequences of having a weak monarchy; sometimes they're paralyzed by the fear of getting overthrown.

That's also a lot like things that happened in the real Middle Ages.

I'd like to add that it also hinted that, when Count Neska staged his invasion, he made a big ado about the Count of Ardeal being a "traitor" - some of that political-speak may have cause other counts to either support or ingore Neska's warmongering. Varno is mentioned as a county that was aiding Ardeal with troops and supplies.

And that was a very good move on Neska's part. Accusing people of treason is the perfect pretext for civil war within a feudal society.

If you want a fun simulation of this kind of stuff, I recommend the game Crusader Kings 2. It'll teach you about how building a strong dynasty and court through marriage is *at least* as important as actually controlling lands, and how tough it can be to keep all your vassals both loyal to you and not at war with each other.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I think Ustalav, along with Brevoy and Taldor, is one of the best places in the setting for political games. A good political game needs a higher amount of "realism" in its economic and governmental structures than other game types, so that the players can see believable results of their political actions. I'd say Ustalav has a pretty good setup for this, with the fun added horror wrinkle.

I know I'd very much enjoy playing or running a political intrigue campaign set in Ustalav.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.
James Jacobs wrote:

First off, simulacrum is a really wacky spell. It presents some really cool adventure possibilities and plotlines, but it is also a spell that can cause a bunch of weird things to happen if you really start digging into it. So, Handle With Care!

1) Not really... it'd be a 13 HD version of a Wyrm blue dragon. It would be the same size, in other words, but would have half everything HD related.

2) It wouldn't be a juvenile dragon, so this question isn't an issue.

3) A simulacrum does not possess any of the original creature's memories. It's personality is whatever you as the caster want it to be. It's knowledge is determined by how it spends its half-of-the-original's skill ranks and feats and the like.

4) Nope. The simulacrum is what the caster wants it to be.

5) The more accurate and detailed (as determined by the result of your Disguise check) the statue is, the more realistic and alike to the original the completed simulacrum will be.

Thanks for the advice, James! Simulacrum is pretty kooky which I guess is why I love it so. :) Since there's so much room for interpretation on it, I really appreciate your expert advice on using it flavorfully. Here's a followup or two...

1. How might I go about building a 13 HD Wyrm blue dragon? Would it only lose the additions to its HP, feats, skill ranks, BAB, saves, and ability score increases, and everything else would stay the same?

2. Specifically, would you have it keep its spellcasting ability as CL 15 with 7th level spells, or would you recommend reducing that?

3. Is there any possible way I could figure out a reasonable CR for this sucker? It's gonna have really weird ratios in places. Like having crazy AC but really low saves, and having a 22d8 breath weapon with a very low Reflex save for half...

4. So for creating a simulacrum of a creature, you'd say that it could have completely different feat and skill selections from the original, depending on the creator's choice? Would that also go for class levels? Could you create a simulacrum of a 20th-level wizard and have it be a 10th-level fighter?

Sczarni

2 people marked this as a favorite.

I pronounce it "AIR-in-yees", or sometimes "air-IN-yeez". It's a real ancient Greek word (though the real word "Erinyes" is plural, and the singular is "Erinys"). The online dictionaries recommend the pronunciation "air-IN-ee-eez," with four syllables.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.
thejeff wrote:
Trinite wrote:

As several people have said, having productive farmland be incredibly expensive, far beyond the means of most farmers, is actually quite historically accurate. Owning significant amounts of farmland is pretty much what made you an aristocrat.

And if you *did* happen to be a small landowner who worked your own land, it was because your long-ago ancestors got it for free, or else you managed to acquire it through non-financial means (e.g. getting a land grant for serving in the army).

OTOH, having land be worth vastly more than can possibly be earned from it in a lifetime of farming is nonsensical. At least in an agricultural economy. If I have a choice between earning say 200 gp a year from my land (not counting living expenses and the like) and selling the land for ~10000gp, which would be enough to live on for 50 years?

Let's just set aside the question of whether you could find a buyer, or whether 10,000 gp really would be the sale price.

Even if you could get 10,000 gp for it, you're not just selling 50 years' worth of production. You're selling your children's and grandchildren's and great granchildren's livelihood, security, and social status.

So you've got 10,000 gp. If you can't find a way to ensure that your 10,000 gp will keep your family fed, clothed, and out of slavery for three generations, you've made a bad deal.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I don't know if someone has quite mentioned this yet:

Having separate attack rolls and damage rolls.

I could totally see an alternative system where you just make one roll for how well you hit, and that translates into how much damage you do. All AC is damage reduction, so if you don't get past a certain threshold you don't deal any damage.

Weapons and class abilities could add bonuses to this roll; for example, maybe a fighter gets +1 per level, and having a longsword adds an extra d8. So you roll 1d20+1d8+x, and that's how well you smack the dude. If he's got 10 AC, you're hoping to roll more than 10 total.

Interesting idea?

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'm planning to run a Dwarven religious ceremony in Highhelm for an upcoming game, so I was reading up on Torag. Apparently, he is not supposed to be on good terms with Sarenrae for some reason. Supposedly, the Dwarves don't understand sun worship.

Now, I get that Paizo likes to make divine relationships more interesting than "Team Good vs. Team Evil," and that's coo. But it seems to me that the Dwarves, with their Quest for Sky, ought to be more appreciative of, you know, *cool things in the sky*.

So in my ceremony, on the anniversary of the End of the Quest for Sky, the high priest of Torag gives jewels to priests of Desna and Sarenrae: a yellow topaz "to brighten the sun" and a white diamond "to make another star". Then the priests give these jewels back to the Dwarven King, to add to the royal treasury. This symbolizes that the Dwarves are Torag's gift to the surface world, and that the beauty of the sky is Torag's gift to the Dwarves.

I think this helps the Dwarves be more interesting than the standard xenophobic cave-dwelling smiths that they are in every other fantasy setting.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Gorbacz wrote:
Laithoron wrote:

Just got my pawns in and had a look thru them. One thing that's nice is that there are many characters for which we receive multiple copies. That said, a few of the choices on who received multiple pawns left me wondering what sorts of games the Paizo staff play behind closed doors.

Lots of recruits and initiates? Looks legit.
1 barmaid and 4 lawyers? *eyebrows rise*

:P

Sebastian, Clark Peterson, myself ... who's the 4th Horsema...I mean, Legal Wrangler?

Michael Kortes, I would presume...

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

My first experience with RPGs was sitting in while my brother played a D&D session with his friends. If I hadn't been allowed to do that, I might never have been able to get into the hobby. Now, granted, I was there specifically because I was interested in the game and wanted to see how it was played. That's not the same as someone who was just there to socialize. Plus I happily kept my mouth shut the whole time and made sure not to bother anyone.

I have had the girlfriend of one of my players hang out around us while we play. She's also a quiet type, and hasn't cause any problems.

It depends a lot on the personality type of the visitor. Some folks, even generally nice and decent ones, just can't sit there for several hours while everybody does something they aren't involved in. If they're gracious, they realize this and go do something else. If they aren't, they cause problems. Some other people are just fine sitting around doing their own thing, or quietly listening in.

I can understand the blanket no-visitors rule, since gaming groups and sessions can be such fragile things. But keep in mind that a rule like that might mean that potential gamers never get exposed to the hobby.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'd say that between Carrion Hill, Wake of the Watcher, Into the Nightmare Rift, and the stuff in Distant Worlds, Varisia, and the Darklands, there's plenty of published material to help a GM create an excellent 100% Lovecraftian AP for themselves.

Though I'm sure it would be chock full of stuff I'd like, I'd rather not see a purely Lovecraftian full AP. It would run the risk of consigning all that type of stuff into a single easily-marginalizable box. I like the current technique of mixing mythos/cosmic horror elements into other things much better.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Beyond the basic aesthetic issue, there's also a certain class animosity involved. People associate crocs with poor rural folks, or suburban folks that haven't moved up from their poor rural tastes.

This goes double for camo-patterned crocs.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

173. Larenzetti Investment Company Ledger: This large, cheap paper ledger contains nothing but columns of numbers in red and black ink, apparently indicating the deposits and withdrawals from a bank account. However, it radiates feint conjuration magic.

If any number is written in the book in common black ink, an equal amount of GP will disappear from the pockets or bags of the person who writes it. This gold becomes stored in the book. If the writer does not have sufficient gold on their person, the ink immediately fades away from the page. Similarly, if any number is written in the book in common red ink, that amount of GP will appear in the writer's pocket, so long as there is sufficient gold stored in the book. Otherwise, the ink fades away.

A DC 10 Intelligence check can establish that there is currently 641 GP stored within the book.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Jeff Erwin wrote:

Have you ever read Gormanghast, Wes?

Opinions?

What about CS Lewis' fantasies? just wondering what your opinions of Narnia and such is, (though they may have been childhood reading)?

(wrongly posted originally, but, actually, Wes has a lot more in common with Peake's work, anyway)

Not really a question, but I'll add a second recommendation for Gormenghast. I have no opinion of the BBC series, but I don't see how one could possibly do the books justice without using hand-drawn animation.

They read like a combination of Edgar Allen Poe's mood and Charles Dickens' grotesque characters and sense of humor, but far more surreal.

I agree that your work on Ustalav makes me think that you would appreciate them.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Lord Snow wrote:
Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:


My answer: Yes. Immediately. Where do I sign up?
Well, you are only saying this because you are not smart enough to understand that it's a bad idea. Wait and see :)
I'm well aware it could go horribly wrong, but as mentioned I'd wait until at least the tenth generation. At least that way it's proven tech.

Well, the only problem with that plan is that before you get to take it...

The First Generation users have developed psychosis and tried to blow up the world.

The Second Generation users have developed psychopathy and become unstoppable serial killers. Fortunately, they killed the First Generation users first.

The Third Generation users have developed sociopathy and taken over the world.

The Fourth Generation users have developed paranoia and ruined all of the Third Generation users' plans. But they destroyed civilization in the process.

The Fifth Generation users have developed delusions. They rebuilt civilization, but made everything look like coconuts and giraffes.

The Sixth Generation users have developed narcissism. They took all the attractive people on earth, and manipulated them into co-dependent relationships.

The Seventh Generation users have developed borderline personality disorder. They discovered the perfect ways to make their Sixth Generation partners miserable -- and everybody else, too.

The Eighth Generation users have developed monomania. They figured out the perfect optimal strategies for all games. You can never play anything without an Eighth Generation user telling you you're doing it wrong.

The Ninth Generation users have developed wisdom. They realized that the world would be a better place if nobody else could ever take the drug. They erased it from human knowledge.

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I can sympathize, Sincubus -- but I can understand why Paizo wouldn't want to do so, for the purpose of preserving their relationships with 3rd party publishers.

If a 3rd party publishes their own version of a Paizo beastie, it's not going to hurt Bestiary sales too much. If Paizo publishes their own version of some 3rd party beastie, it could kill the 3rd party publisher completely.

That said, I agree that real-world mythological creatures ought to be fair game in a way that original monster concepts aren't. But sometimes it can be hard to tell the boundaries between those two things, too.

Sczarni

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Dinklage has a realy god point, but I'm not sure it applies strongly to halflings in Golarion.

The concept of fantasy races is deeply rooted in folklore and mythology, and has a lot of complex elements going on in its expression.

Non-human races play off of traditional tropes associated with magical beings (gnomes, especially), and such beings are often traditionally portrayed as differing from humans in some striking physical manner. Sometimes this manner is in being strikingly smaller than most humans. Or resembling human children, or some such.

In Pathfinder, Gnomes are a lot more overtly magical beings, with their strange appearance and fey connection. They hew very close to the classical folklore style. To my mind, that makes them unproblematic. They're not "little people," they're weird creatures.

Halflings, being based on Tolkien's basically non-magical Hobbits, are a more interesting case. I can understand why one might apply Dinklage's criticism to them. On the other hand, maybe they're exactly an illustration of the opposite of what Dinklage is criticizing: they really *are* just normal people, except smaller. Maybe such things as "Halfling luck" or their unusual propensity for optimism are a bit problematic, though.

What would be interesting to me, perhaps, would be to build an actual human character with dwarfism in a setting that also has halflings, gnomes and dwarves, and explore the implications of people assuming that he's not a human based on his appearance.

Sczarni

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I'd allow it.

But only if he promises to wear a pointy hat that has "Wizzard" written on it. And his familiar must be a piece of animated luggage.

Sczarni

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I love these guys. They're hilarious.

Sczarni

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Trace Coburn wrote:
Oh, man, are those skeletons about to get whupped. :D

Ya mess with the paladin, ya get the SMITE!

Sczarni

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Orthos wrote:

Merisel looks so damn happy.

Also what is that guy doing to Seltyiel (I think) in the last panel of row 2?

Merisiel is getting ready to come out and tell Valeros, Ezren and Kyra and that there's nothing in the next room but some extremely dangerous traps that she was unable to disarm...

It's always dangerous to send the rogue in first.

Sczarni

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For episodic adventures, I'd recommend that you check out some Pathfinder Society scenarios, since they're built to be short and mostly standalone, and built to be played by a slapdash party of random adventurers.

I had a really good time playing through The God's Market Gamble a few months back, and it seemed especially ripe for some RP hijinks. :)

You may need to dial back the combat difficulty a little for some PFS scenarios, though, including that one. But that's a pretty easy adjustment to make, I think.

Sczarni

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So you're saying that Pope Francis is responsible for the historical mistreatment of South Americans because he is a Jesuit?

That's like President Obama is pro-slavery because he is a Democrat, since the Democratic Party supported slavery in the 1800s.

Sczarni

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My advice: don't punish them. What they've done can create a really interesting plot twist. This is the beauty of tabletop gaming. Run with it!

If I were running things, I'd have Peppery know exactly what she's supposed to know in the published adventure -- but since they are rescuing her several months early, maybe she doesn't know quite as many details.

So yes, now the PCs have a much more urgent mission to stop Harrigan's plan. They'll need to come up with a strategy for doing that. And like sabadoriaclark said, he should be fully tipped off that they're on to him. So maybe he flees to Cheliax to join the fleet. Or maybe he fortifies his base to resist the inevitable assault.

If the PCs simply tell Tessa and then expect her to just sort it out somehow, then you could use an old GM standby: she fails, disappearing without a trace. Now the PCs' patron is out of the picture, and they now know that things are *really* bad! (It was good enough for Tolkien!)

They will then probably be feeling too under-leveled to just go face Harrigan themselves -- that's good! That's your chance to get them back on the level progression that Chapter 5 expects them to have. If they're no longer interested in cleaning out their island, give them side quests to retrieve powerful weapons and equipment that they will need for the big showdown. Or you could encourage them to finish the island and throw the feast as planned -- what better venue for them to reveal to the Free Captains that invasion is upon them!

Sczarni

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Merisiel uses her Stand Up rogue talent to immediately spring to her feet. This takes the Mirror Man in front of her by surprise. She deploys a concealed dagger from her spring-loaded wrist sheath, and hits for maximum damage thanks to her Underhanded talent. Boom, dagger through the mirror.

She also wins initiative. She draws two daggers with the Quick Draw feat and throws them at at Mirror Man #2, who is still flat-footed. Thanks to her Two-Weapon Fighting, they both hit for sneak attack damage. Down he goes.

Mirror Man 3 is still up. He charges at her, but she nimbly dodges his sword stroke. Then on Round 2, she uses a dirty trick combat maneuver to breathe in its mirrored face, clouding up the glass and temporarily blinding it long enough for her to disappear down a side street.

Sczarni

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Here's a Campaign Setting product that I think would sell -- at least, I know I'd buy a copy. :)

I love maps. All kinds of maps. And Pathfinder has some great maps, that's for sure. And it's got a great world, too. But it seems to me that most of the maps of Golarion are pretty narrow in their focus. They've got cities and towns, labels for major geographic features like forests and mountain ranges, and places for adventures to happen. So far, so good; that's probably what adventurers care the most about.

But I'd love to see more varied maps of Golarion that convey more information about the world:

I'd like to see the road networks that connect cities and towns together, complete with mileage and normal travel time. How far is Westcrown from Augustana, by road, ship, and overland flight?

I'd like to see environmental maps, showing the differences in climate in different regions (fun fact: most of Cheliax has a Mediterranean climate. How many players know this?).

I'd like to see maps of trade routes and economic products. What are the endpoints to the Isger trade route? What does Andoran export? Where does all of Katapesh's Pesh go? How much merchant shipping goes through the Shackles?

How about an ethnic map? Where are the lines where you could expect to start seeing fewer Varisians and more Ulfens, then less Ulfens and more Kellids?

In short, what I'd love to see is a fairly complete Atlas of Golarion, or at least an Atlas of the Inner Sea: a variety of maps each showing different important features of the same region.

Oh, and one other thing: I'd love to see a real world-style political map, with colored countries to clearly indicate the national borders, and flags on each nation. Maybe that could also include alliances and enmities between countries, too.

Who else thinks this would be a really fun product to use?

Sczarni

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Damon Griffin wrote:
rknop wrote:
But... without... SCISSORS... included? How THOUGHTLESS of them!
Scissors are included in the deluxe collector's edition.

They really ought to package the scissors with the PDFs, too. Yet another way in which PDF customers get screwed!

Sczarni

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James Sutter wrote:

Hey everybody!

While you're welcome to keep posting your opinions and ideas--feedback is always useful!--the Adventure Path team has gotten together and come up with a solution that we *hope* will satisfy a bunch of folks from both the "hooray for fiction" and "hooray for directly applicable adventure material" camps. I think we're going to keep the idea under our hats for a bit as we get more specifics hammered out, but I can say that we're all really excited, and that if all goes as planned, you should see some changes coming to this part of the book after Wrath of the Righteous. So thanks again for all the feedback, and stay tuned!

Well, neat! I still think that a survey would be a good idea, though. Surely the ratio of opinions on this particular thread isn't an accurate representation of the entire AP subscriber base.

Sczarni

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Oh, come on, just cut that page out with some scissors and fold it into a paper airplane. Then write a post thanking Paizo for the free extra paper airplane paper they included with their book!

Sczarni

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Mahavira wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Pendagast wrote:
can you enlighten us as to why members of the winter council turned into Drow in SD? Presence of Demons? Energies from a darklands artifact? Never washed his undies??
As detailed in that adventure, the spontaneous transformation of an elf into a drow is SUPER rare, but can happen if an elf is sufficiently chaotic evil AND worships a demon lord, and even then it's super super rare. It's happened twice in hundreds of books we've published—both times in the Second Darkness adventure path (once with an event that starts things rolling by creating the AP's big bad end gal, and once "on-screen" so the PCs can see it happen).

Hm, hadn't realized the BBEG was a demon worshipper from the start. I'd always assumed she was a cleric of Callistria who didn't realize she had long since ceased to be CN, and converted to Abraxus after joining house Azinrae.

Presumably transformation didn't happen on Castrovel because of distance from the source of corruption, the surface of Golarion is close enough that it's possible but super rare, and once you're deep enough to be in the darklands proper, it's more likely (if a pregnant elf was held prisoner in Darklands for an extended period, would the baby be drow, I wonder...).

Back to the original thought, based on his eminence's contributions, it seems likely that Drow syndrome as such can't be readily transported to Castrovel, you'd have to find or create a similar source of corruption and even then the result would probably not be precisely drow but would rather have features relating to the source.

Heh, not *readily* transported, but I could imagine some enterprising demon lord thinking that there was a nice big untapped pool of potential worshippers out there, and hatching a plan...

Sczarni

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It's my first time GMing Pathfinder, starting what's supposed to be a highly atmospheric horror-themed campaign. The players are in a creepy graveyard.

ME: "The ground shakes and trembles! Then suddenly, up from the ground come --

[DRAMATIC PAUSE]

PLAYER: "A bubblin' crude?"

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