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Todd Stewart's page

Contributor. Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Society Member. 2,040 posts (2,187 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist. 3 Pathfinder Society characters. 6 aliases.


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Normally I require some candles, a circle of salt, and a few goetic sigils written in blood, or coffee, or diet code red mountain dew. Any of that will do. But this time I'll make an exception I suppose. :D

I should point out that of the information on Aesdurath, that which doesn't appear in BotD3 isn't strictly canon. Obviously feel free to use it in your own games (and I'm humbled if you do), but Paizo has complete authority on the canon issue, and if it didn't appear in a printed source, it doesn't count.

A very large number of the Harbingers simply have no additional information written on them, because they began and ended with just a name, title, and the brief information that appears in the appendix in BotD3. Some of them have some brief write ups, while others appear in the next elsewhere in passing, but without dedicated information.

Zelishkar was mentioned in the 3.5 Osirion book, the PF followup IIRC, in BotD3, and had a very nice writeup in Inner Sea Monsters.

Hopefully we'll see more of many of them in the future, but such is Paizo's decision. If you want that sort of material, urge them politely and let them know your interest. I'd of course be gleefully open to writing about more daemons and other planar critters in the future (and especially daemons, proteans, and perhaps sceaduinars and jyoti too).

FWIW, I'm working on submitting a (non-canonical) story involving Vorasha for Wayfinder.

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mogwen wrote:

hi everybody,

Well, first news I'm back, back with a vengeance, mwahahah!
(Sorry, I'm watching too much horror movies these times)
Here aremy news from France:
Since the laws for same-sex marriage, what we call "mariage pour tous", things are getting pretty preocupating.
Let me explain: The "front national", an extremist party is on the rise, as its leader, Marine Lepen, this party is homphobic, racist, agains abortion, weel, you know the profile!
This party is especially on the rise because of the economic crisis we've been through those last few years, and the medias that in a wicked way relay their speech because it sells!
Not a very good moment in France, and when I hear people talking at the supermarket, I feel quite worried.

I don't follow French politics that much, but is the FN actually homophobic in its current incarnation? I know that the group's founder was to an extreme, but as for his daughter who now runs the party, not so much and she's been (at least in the news I've seen in English language media) aggressively moving the party away from its earlier extremes (at least in regards to homosexuality and anti-semitism). One of its deputy presidents (Florian Philippot) is gay AFAIK.

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Chiming in alongside what others have already suggested, as the Horseman of War, consider exactly what Szuriel is and isn't concerned with. Unlike various gods of War, she isn't a profane patron of strategy, tactics, glory, victory, etc. She's concerned with War only insomuch as it leads to greater and greater death, and specifically -mortal- death.

She's unlikely to just send in assassination squads. That's not really her style and it's frankly going to be just flat out lethal to your PCs if you used her resources in that direct of a capacity.

I would suggest (as others have already) using clerics of Szuriel and some select daemons in her thrall to bolster the PCs enemies, pushing them to battle and into situations where the collective slaughter is going to be increased. Collateral damage is best damage, civilians and soldiers have zero demarcation between them, and there are no rules of fair play, no battlefield mercy, etc.

Have mercenary groups hired by Szuriel's followers wreck havoc along a path that the PCs have already followed, suggesting that it's specifically about hurting them. If Sandpoint for instance is swallowed up by these events, there won't be survivors, and very likely any injured mercenaries would be killed rather than healed. The place would be burned to cinders and the earth salted, with summary executions of the population and a flock of cacodaemons hovering about, making sure that each fallen mortal's soul was taken as payment.

The whole thing could go very very grimdark, very very quickly. If that doesn't fit your playstyle, or might go in directions that your players won't be comfortable with, keep that in mind and tone it down as needed. Even in that worst case scenario above, allow the players the option to eventually turn the tables and kill the person or persons tasked by Szuriel to handle this as her proxies on Golarion (and letting the PCs gain any captured souls to allow for the victims of the carnage to either be raised or pass on their proper afterlife rather than a daemon's larder).

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Congrats Amanda! :)

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Posting just to take note of this at the moment. I'll read and reply later tonight. :)

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Religious institutions are generally quite slow to accept concepts that weren't around, understood, or part of their society at the times of their founding. Many of them have elements fighting modernization and reform (thankfully most of the time it's only yelling or stern looks rather than barbaric violence in much of the world), but a lot of them also have pushes from within to retain modern relevance, adapt to modern society, or simply to admit they carry cultural baggage developed over hundreds or thousands of years that's at odds with their own founder.

Those of us with religious beliefs are trying as much as we can to push for greater tolerance/acceptance and reform against older social mores that continue to haunt us. It will be a longer struggle for some of us in some religions or sects within said religions than others, but we're working on it [I'm Russian Orthodox, so allow me to sigh and lament that it's going to be slow going at the moment].

Pope Francis meeting with gay and transgender inmates

The above made me smile.

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mechaPoet wrote:
Todd Stewart wrote:
Let's also not shame the act of gendering when its hard coded into our brains to do just that (studies have looked at infants differentiating male and female faces well before social influence has any role at all).

I'm gonna nitpick here, so apologies in advance. :P

I believe I've heard of a similar study, if not that one. I know there are techniques to determine whether infants make a distinction between different stimuli, but as I understand it, human infants have pretty bad eyesight. So the main thing they were looking for was "does the infant think this face is more mom-like or dad-like?," which pretty much came down to hair length (because despite humans' incredible talent for facial recognition, babies have bad, blurry vision). Which, again, comes back to gender norms for hair length. It could be a different study entirely, or that all could have been accounted for.

A number of studies have been done in the past several years, both in human infants and in non-human primates. Depending on their exposure to either a primary caregiver being female or male, they show a decidedly preferential focus on new female or new male faces. They identify an ability to differentiate as early as 3-4 months (there may be studies that look at earlier ages, but 3-4 months is the earliest age pool that I found with a cursory look).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1878929313000571 Is one of those studies, with more referenced within the text.

They appear to have controlled for hair length to not be a factor (much older studies may have not, but I'm not familiar with them, and that doesn't appear to play a roll at all in the data in the above paper).

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Gendering people we meet isn't a social thing, or a Western thing, or an oppression thing, it's a mammalian thing, or really more just any species with a gender binary*. We add social gloss on top of biology, but biology is there regardless of what words we use or customs we develop. Evolution biases us to see a strict binary, but thankfully as a species we can adjust to seeing beyond just two options even if those two options are a vast majority. Let's also not shame the act of gendering when its hard coded into our brains to do just that (studies have looked at infants differentiating male and female faces well before social influence has any role at all).

*(and even some species with only one gender, because those parthenogenesis reproducing all female lizards frequently mate with males of other species to introduce genetic diversity)

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The planes and a guide to planar adventuring. I would love love love something like this. I'd double love getting to contribute on it. ;)

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Yay! Welcome back! :)

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Todd Stewart wrote:
I've worked in preclinical drug development and metabolic testing for a decade, so I have a good idea of industry standards for testing new drugs. I'll have more to say tonight about the nuance here for testing parameters, race, gender, etc to give an overview of where the science is right now.

During the preclinical period you can do extensive metabolic profiling of target compounds in order to identify the specific enzymes in the liver responsible for their metabolism (grouped into Phase I and Phase II enzymes). Many enzymes are rather evolutionarily conserved so the species doesn't matter as much for some at this point, so using rats or mice can be considerably cheaper to use in order to rule out certain drugs before spending millions to start human trials.

You're just looking for broad results at this point, so often the standard historically speaking has been one of a number of highly inbred Norwegian Brown rats (specifically Sprague-Dawley, Wistar, or Long Evans, among others). Male rats have typically been exclusively used at this stage given that you're just looking for very broad results. If you're looking for more specific things, you can use different lines or female animals for a particular study for a specific compound.

For instance if you find that a drug is specifically metabolized by the Cytochrome P4503A4 enzyme in the liver, you can already plan for it complicating the intake of other drugs with similar profiles (such as the statin class of drugs).

Also, I'm referring to only in-vitro testing here, not in-vivo. You typically isolate and plate hepatocytes within a collagen matrix for drug compound investigation (or freeze for later use).

Monkey and dog are also commonly used at this stage because they're relatively cheap by comparison to human cells. You can get human cells from liver tissue discarded after surgery or whole livers donated for research due to factors that rule them out for live transplantation. Human hepatocytes are the gold standard here, both cultured in suspension or plated. Since they come from individual people with their own metabolic profile, this is all mapped out prior to being used in research so we know of any non-standard polymorphisms showing up in their liver enzymes that would impact metabolism, transport, etc.

In my experience, we sold roughly equal numbers of male and female hepatocytes to drug companies doing their own in-house testing. They aren't under any constraints for risking teratogenic activity in unknowingly pregnant female test subjects at this point, so they can get lots of data for a broad population, and they do, and they pay through the nose for it because it prevents more expense and safety issues later.

Race is also a genuine factor in drug dosage. The idea of race of course is on somewhat arbitrary lines admittedly, but you do find specific CYP polymorphisms that map along ethnic origins. As an example, CYP2D6 is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of around a quarter of all drugs on the market today, and a number of polymorphisms in 2D6 cause very low metabolism of those drugs. About 8% or so of patients of European heritage have low 2D6 activity, the African-American population shows a much higher prevalence of this, while patients of Asian heritage don't commonly show this. There are lots of situations like this that really impact how drugs are prescribed and dosed for people on a population scale.

Of course the ideal situation is to do personalized dosage of a drug for every individual by determining the genes and expression levels of each person's phase I and II enzymes. We aren't quite there yet, but that's the goal and it's within reach.

This is current practice in the industry. We're no longer in the dark ages of assuming that male and female biology is absolutely exactly the same. We now increasingly see fewer drug companies thinking that they can save money and not test on one gender or the other. There's a lot going on and we need to gather as much data as we can to insure patient health as a primary objective, tailoring studies to the drug and population (or individual) in question.

That was long winded, but hopefully gives an idea of how we go about drug testing at the earliest stages now.

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I've worked in preclinical drug development and metabolic testing for a decade, so I have a good idea of industry standards for testing new drugs. I'll have more to say tonight about the nuance here for testing parameters, race, gender, etc to give an overview of where the science is right now.

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BigNorseWolf wrote:
mechaPoet wrote:
But some people will say I'm "biologically" not nonbinary.

*headscratch*

This would make no sense if someone holds to the view that gender identity has its roots in biology. In that view you are non binary. Therefore you are biologically nonbinary.

This.

While the male/female dichotomy is a useful generalization that works for the general population somewhere in the high 90s percentages, those of us that fall outside of that strict binary do so absolutely with biological reasons.

Whatever your brain's internal sense of gender identity influences you to self-identify as (be it male, female, or otherwise) it's important that your decision there is respected.

Most people don't understand biology past the simple XX versus XY dichotomy they learn in highschool, when it's massively more subtle than that (be it by chimeric mosaicism, non-binary masculnization or feminization of the brain, androgen insensitivity, a myriad of other factors). Education here is key, because a lot of people simply aren't aware of the amazing complexity at play.

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Samnell wrote:
The thing I've never liked about the argument around the science of human sexuality is that it presumes human sexuality requires some kind of special justification.

Speaking as a scientist myself, I don't feel that I or anyone else needs any sort of special justification for our gender/sexuality.

The science of the biological underpinnings of human behavior, gender, and sexuality are just absolutely fascinating, complex, and just really really really cool. *insert happy stars in my eyes*

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Welcome! Also nosoi are so cool :)

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Krensky wrote:
Todd Stewart wrote:
The same clique of thought of social influence is everything that allowed for Lysenko to flourish. It must gall them to find that empirical data shows for biological influence or outright determination in higher behavior across the animal kingdom. When an ideology runs up against falsifying evidence it dies, but in the meantime it draws out the most stubborn, ignorant defenders be it this, anti-vaxers, segregationists, misogynists, etc.

True, but some good can come out of even the most bugshit anti-scince like Lysenko.

Look the cute siberian fox kits!

Belyaev and Trut did some fantastic genetics work on domestication and neotony. Belyaev was also seriously opposed to lysenkoism, which was a genuine risk to his career and life in the Stalinist era.

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BigNorseWolf wrote:
Todd Stewart wrote:
mechaPoet wrote:

Actually, speaking of gender and sexuality choice, I read another interesting article recently on the matter:

No One Is Born Gay (Or Straight)

That article's grasp of the current scientific consensus is laughable. Study after study supports it being innate and fixed at or prior to birth.
"But science is wrong!" is a common cry from some sectors.

The same clique of thought of social influence is everything that allowed for Lysenko to flourish. It must gall them to find that empirical data shows for biological influence or outright determination in higher behavior across the animal kingdom. When an ideology runs up against falsifying evidence it dies, but in the meantime it draws out the most stubborn, ignorant defenders be it this, anti-vaxers, segregationists, misogynists, etc.

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mechaPoet wrote:

Actually, speaking of gender and sexuality choice, I read another interesting article recently on the matter:

No One Is Born Gay (Or Straight)

That article's grasp of the current scientific consensus is laughable. Study after study supports it being innate and fixed at or prior to birth.

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Allow me to smile as I see Pathfinder being played in my original hometown. Why couldn't RPGs have been a thing when I was growing up there? XD

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Evidence Supporting the Biological Nature of Gender Identity Very good review paper covering a wide range of examples supporting the current theory that internal gender identity is a fixed, biological trait, not subject to social factors.

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There's a map of Finder's Gulch, a town in western Isger, in 'Undead Unleashed'

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KSF wrote:
Todd Stewart wrote:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25392513

Very interesting paper, building on some other recent studies. This particular one included both FtM and MtF subjects as well as cis-gendered controls, though I'd be most keen to see the data segregated out into those on HRT and those not on HRT.

Todd, would it be possible for you to clarify what the abstract is saying? (For those of us who don't do this kind of thing for a living.)

The methods used here are outside my field, but here's my best shot. The math used to calculate the images for the DMRI (diffusion MRI) is beyond me.

The paper's authors used a very specific type of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging - basically a giant electromagnet) that allows for imaging/measuring of neuronal fine-structural as a result of the diffusion of water molecules. Previous studies have found differences in brain white matter in trans individuals versus cisgender, and this study observed a clear pattern in the mean diffusivity (the physical correlation here would be higher white matter density leading to lower diffusivity). They observed cis females with the highest diffusion rate, cis males with the lowest, and trans individuals in between in virtually all white matter regions mapped.

The diffusivity numbers also matched up with the plasma testosterone levels in their bloodstream (I don't have access to the full paper at home, so I don't know if the trans individuals were on HRT or not, which could make a difference here). The study suggests that the observed brain differences are the result of testosterone exposure levels during prenatal development of the fetal brain and possibly the earliest post-natal stage.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25392513

Very interesting paper, building on some other recent studies. This particular one included both FtM and MtF subjects as well as cis-gendered controls, though I'd be most keen to see the data segregated out into those on HRT and those not on HRT.

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Congrats to the Top 32 and alternates. It's awesome to see new folks and some familiar names as well. :)

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Congratulations to everyone this year! I notice some familiar names and I also see some new folks as well. I can't wait to see what you all come up with for round 2! :D

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Best of luck with the surgery and the recovery afterwards Lissa. :)

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Rysky wrote:
Todd Stewart wrote:
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:

There are hints that the upcoming Rat Queens issue, Rat Queens Special: Braga #1, will deal with a topic of much interest to this group. Must. not. spoil. it. further.

(And really, if you're hanging out on an RPG messageboard, you should already be reading Rat Queens anyway.)

I'm so looking forward to that one-shot special, and then after that I'm just about dancing because of Stjepan Sejic coming on as their new artist.

Where have I heard that name before...

*googles*

SUNSTONE!

Precisely.

He's also done work for Image before, with Witchblade being where I first came across his work. He's also doing his own comic 'Death Vigil', and apparently he's working on a 'teen witchblade' spinoff comic. I have no idea how he manages to sleep with that workload. :D

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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:

There are hints that the upcoming Rat Queens issue, Rat Queens Special: Braga #1, will deal with a topic of much interest to this group. Must. not. spoil. it. further.

(And really, if you're hanging out on an RPG messageboard, you should already be reading Rat Queens anyway.)

I'm so looking forward to that one-shot special, and then after that I'm just about dancing because of Stjepan Sejic coming on as their new artist.

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Thanael wrote:

My favorite possible heresy: Grazzt as the son of Pale Night and unknown to even him Asmodeus.

Not sure where I have this from though.. ..though it is even on this FR wiki

I suspect it's an amalgamation of lore from 2e/3e and 4e. In 2e and 3.x, Grazzt was explicitly the child of Pale Night. However 4e used an entirely different cosmology and in-game history, and placed Grazzt as the child of Asmodeus IIRC.

The subtext to suggest the pairing is easy to pick up on, and in some nebulous form it has probably been dancing around for a long time.

To be honest it's a fun idea to suggest that Grazzt was born of a chance meeting on the battlefield of the earliest years of the Blood War, when Pale Night encountered Asmodeus prior to his fall from LN to LE, and that his encounter with her may have been the original trigger of his corruption by Evil. And even if that never happened, even if the story was 100% false, I'm sure that the 'loths would happily whisper it just to put seeds of doubt and confusion into Grazzt and Asmodeus's minds.

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And I'm already 700 words into a story to submit. :D

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Lemartes wrote:

Despair.

Granted in the current state of the Oinodaemon madness seems appropriate.

Prophecy might also make some sense as the Oinodaemon has uttered prophecies...ones that I think even scared the other horsemen. So Despair again.

Also, I guess prophecy about the end of times etc. is kind of fitting.

I'm also wondering if rebirth makes a slight bit of sense. As the horsemen destroy which gives way for something new. However, that makes no sense for a Daemon. Unless that is why they turned on him in the first place. I doubt it.

I'm thinking more Terror, Loss, Forgotten, Forsaken, Finality, the end...Despair.

I guess if I say every word in the English language maybe I'll get the right one.

If there was a tangent point for Obsession/Despair/Hunger/Agony you'd have the Oinodaemon, at least in my headcanon. :D

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thejeff wrote:
But by singling out Islam as inherently political, you're doing just that. Or at least defining fanaticism and political aspirations as outliers in Christianity, but the norm in Islam. Which is very hard to justify historically. Even if it might be the case at this point in time. That doesn't mean it's inherent in the nature of either religion.

I'm curious what exactly you mean by this? Christianity began among the politically marginalized and faced Imperial sanction and suppression up until 311CE and was legalized in 313CE. It took centuries before it had political power and became the Roman state religion in 380CE.

Islam on the other hand (assuming here for the moment the historicity of largely 9th century sources discussing 7th century events) began with the spread of faith by violence and then empire building in the vacuum of collapsing Byzantine and Sassanian power in late antiquity. Among the earliest titles for the Caliph was 'commander of the faithful' with no real difference there between religious authority and secular/military power.

That's a very distinct difference between the two religions.

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Hama wrote:


I wonder what you think about Hitchens.

Difficult to say, because I'm utterly unfamiliar with him and his positions (outside of skimming over his wiki page just now).

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Cool! :D

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I'll be reading everything later on tonight, but at first glance everything looks awesome.

I'm also proud to have a story in this issue, 'Lamashtu be Praised!' which I co-authored with my partner in crime.

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Night hags primarily worship Alazhra the Dream Eater. Though it might be termed propitiation more so than veneration.

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Mikaze wrote:

Finally came out of the closet today.

"God I love my friends" is all I can say right now. The relief is amazing.

You know who truly good friends are and how wonderful they can be in times like this. Congrats Mikaze :)

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Ray Vallese wrote:

1. Yes.

2. Yes.

Sorry, I couldn't resist. To be honest, I never intended Kylie to be the literal daughter of Shemeshka. I figured it was part of a scheme or mind game.

And A'kin has a bit of Garak in him (from Deep Space Nine, one of the best shows on TV at the time), so at any point he can be as friendly or as devious as the DM needs him to be. I think in Faction War we fingered him as the brains behind The Factol's Manifesto, which of course called that book's veracity into question.

*chuckle*

1) Well now I'm quite glad that I kept the truth of that relationship ambiguous when I wrote up the Marauder in Dragon magazine a few years ago. :)

2) Garak was a great character on DS9. As for A'in, that's largely how I always played him as well, much to my players curiosity and eventual lament. Such a fun character to use.

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Factol Ray,

In 'Faces of Sigil':

1) Did you intend for Kylie the Tout to actually be the Marauder's daughter as implied or just to have the Marauder's protection of her from Autochon be something just to mess with the Bellringer's head?

2) A'kin is indeed just a really friendly shopkeep I assume? ;)

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Greatbear wrote:


So, while there isn't a single book by Paizo describing the planes,

It's called 'The Great Beyond: A Guide to the Multiverse', it just hasn't been updated from the original 3.5 publication to the Pathfinder ruleset formally. But the fluff still describes all of the planes in overview, with later books like the BotD series going into specifics on their area of focus. :)

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Gaberlunzie wrote:
Also, it should be noted that until very recently, the law required anyone who juridically transitioned should be sterilized (even if there where no medical issues with them getting kids) and any saved eggs/sperm be destroyed

:O

That's an absolute abomination. What was the medical or ethical rationale used to even vaguely attempt to rationalize that? That's horrific. :(

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Tarinia Faynrik wrote:
*reasonable questions*

While Lissa and Crystal both gave some pretty comprehensive answers to your question, I'll chip in what I can.

Each of our experiences is going to be unique on some level. The best way that I can relate from my perspective is that it's on some level like phantom limb syndrome in that it feels like portions of my body are missing and things that shouldn't be there are. Looking in a mirror is often jarring and I try to avoid it if at all possible, even if by most standards -and most importantly my spouse's standards- I'd be considered an attractive male.

It's a combination of that gnawing physical perception of things being -off- and then the social perceptions and reactions from other people that likewise register as being wrong. For me at least I very much could care less about other people's perceptions of me, clothing, etc versus just having a body that didn't feel like a costume with a broken zipper so it can't be removed.

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Qstor wrote:
memorax wrote:
Nicos wrote:


Agreed. Hopefully will happen someday.
I wish they would have published something like this . Instead of the strategy guide imo. The Great Beyond is in need of a update yesterday. Considering the great work they did wiht Inner Sea Gods vs the old Gods and Magic companion. I hope it's a 2015 release.

I'm surprised they haven't done it yet. I'm hoping for 2015 too.

Mike

Let them know that you want such a book and it might happen. :)

Paizo also knows the extent to which I'd go to contribute to such a book, including no longer bugging the hell out of them at GenCon for that, and buying them all pizza, among others. :D

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Marroar Gellantara wrote:
The way I see the transgender experience is that such people have a gender that requires a different physical expression than the intelligible gender sphere our western thought wants to place them in at birth. This way gender is still something core about a person that we should allow them to express, but it does not depend on genders being essentially different. It would also explain why not all transgender individuals require genital surgery or even hormones.

It's becoming increasingly clear from the scientific literature that internal gender identity is neurologically hard coded into brain structure during early fetal development, but due to certain events (likely included an interplay of genes and maternal hormone exposure) specific regions of the brain are masculinized/feminized on a sliding scale, allowing for a very diverse degree of potential internal gender identities, some of which may lead a person to desire to ultimately transition and some of which do not, with a ton of variation thereof.

We're still figuring out everything that's going on, but it's fascinating. It also arguably IMO makes non-emperical theories of gender somewhat irrelevant.

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David knott 242 wrote:

Little Red Goblin Games published a Xaoling rece -- it is a chaos-based native outsider race.

That one was by Rogue Genius Games actually (I wrote it).

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KSF wrote:
And in Not-Good-News, Republican Congressmen ask Labor Dept. to withdraw the LGBT Protections the Dept. recently set forth.

Frown. :(

They're asking for a 60 day public comment period during which the labor dept ruling would not be in effect. I strongly suspect that the two members of Congress behind this may be surprised at how much flak they're going to get from a good chunk of their own party over this. It's rapidly becoming an issue of civil rights that's supporting by people across the political spectrum. This is a good thing. Those railing against equality for LGBT folks are an old and dying breed on both the Left and Right.

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James Jacobs wrote:
graystone wrote:
James, since you've been playing with it, what do you count as small stowed object and/or small unattended object? Just curious where you draw the line between small and non-small.

Rob McCreary is my GM in that game, so he's the one that gets to draw that line.

If I were running the game, I'd allow the tail to pick up light weapons, one-handed weapons, wands, bucklers, light shields, potions, scrolls, holy symbols, torches, most alchemical devices, and pretty much anything else that you could comfortably pick up with one hand. I wouldn't set in stone specific weights and the like, but would make those decisions as the need came up on a case by case basis. Since you can't use the tail to attack or activate items or defend yourself, it really doesn't matter if the category of what you can pick up is vague.

Precisely.

The feat wasn't written with a weight limit in place, which I'd leave more to DM adjudication than not, as it's less about weight than it is about fine control which the tail lacks in comparison to a full hand. Hold, pick up, and stow objects but not wield weapons, shields, use spell components, etc (though in my home campaign I could personally be persuaded to allow the tail to perform somatic components of spells).

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James Jacobs wrote:
I've been playing a tiefling with this trait and the associated feat in a Way of the Wicked campaign for about a year.

You have no idea how flattered I feel right now that you're playing a character using that trait and that feat. :D

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As the one who wrote the feat, no. My answer isn't gospel since I'm not a Paizo employee, but the intent did not include it being used for shields.

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Il'setsya Wyrmtouched

Protean-blooded tiefling sorcerer, aka 'Crazy-Hooves'

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