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Downer

The Eldritch Mr. Shiny's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 11,738 posts (19,023 including aliases). 5 reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 53 aliases.


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2 people marked this as a favorite.

"The first and foremost [discovery] was blindingly obvious, once someone showed it to me: that Shakespeare's plays were written to be performed, that they are not books to be read, or indeed, studied, but they are manuals on how to perform his plays[.]"
- Ben Crystal


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
Mariel Hemingway is the granddaughter of Ernest Hemingway and Elizabeth Hadley Richardson. She is the younger sister of Margaux Hemingway, born in 1955, and Joan Hemingway ("Muffet"), born in 1950.
And in the 80s I had the Playboy Magazine issue with her in it. Rowr rowr.
I think every dude had that issue.

I... wasn't born yet. That issue came out almost 35 years ago. I had to look it up.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The 2003 film Master And Commander: The Far Side Of The World, starring Russell Crowe as Captain Jack Aubrey, also features actors Paul Bettany and James D'Arcy as Dr. Stephen Maturin and First Lieutenant Tom Pullings, respectively. A decade later, both would appear in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, with Bettany playing the artificial intelligence J.A.R.V.I.S. (later Vision) and D'Arcy portraying J.A.R.V.I.S.'s namesake, Edwin Jarvis.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Blockbuster turned down it's chance to acquire NetFlix in order to partner with Enron. (Yes, THAT Enron.)

Oh jeez...


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The instructions printed on the back of the flameless ration heater found in US Army MREs (Meals, Ready to Eat; alternatively Meals, Rejected by Everyone) direct users to keep the heater inclined using a "rock or something."

Other gems of wisdom contained in the instructions include "After heating, the heater bag and MRE pouch will be very hot," and "Heater and its byproducts are not intended for human consumption."


1 person marked this as a favorite.

My latest RPG-themed piece


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"I can always guess how many jelly beans are in a jelly bean jar, even if it's not right."
- Brick Tamland (Steve Carell), Anchorman 2


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Though primarily taking place in New York City, the 2012 superhero action film The Avengers (AKA Marvel Avengers Assemble) was mostly filmed in Cleveland, Ohio. The "museum gala" scene in which Loki (Tom Hiddleston) reveals himself to the people of Earth and is captured by Captain America / Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) and Iron Man / Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.), ostensibly taking place in Stuttgart, Germany, was filmed in and around Tower City Center, a shopping mall in Cleveland's Public Square. The first time I saw The Avengers in the theater, I went with a friend of mine who had grown up in Cleveland. During that scene, she couldn't stop laughing, and throughout the film, she recognized various recognizable Cleveland landmarks.

Additional filming was done in and around Albuquerque, New Mexico: the "Calcutta" scene was filmed in the old Santa Fe Railyard, and the exterior of the secret S.H.I.E.L.D. base destroyed in the film's opening was actually the exterior of Atrisco Heritage Academy High School. The base's interior was largely filmed at the Creekside Mushroom Farm in Worthington, Pennsylvania.

Tony Stark’s "Stark Tower" was added digitally to central Manhattan, replacing the MetLife Building. One of the few scenes actually to be filmed in New York was the scene in which Black Widow / Natasha Romanoff (Scarlett Johanssen) and Hawkeye / Clint Barton (Jeremy Renner) crash-land an airplane on the plaza in front of 101 Park Avenue, a location prominently featured in Joe Dante's Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) and Terry Gilliam's The Fisher King (1991).


1 person marked this as a favorite.
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

The real question is, who isn't up for a hot dog?

Jews, Muslims, and Hindus?

I really walked into that one, didn't I...


3 people marked this as a favorite.

“When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years.”
― Mark Twain


1 person marked this as a favorite.
MageHunter wrote:
Otto von Bismarck wrote:
Laws are like sausages. It’s better not to see them being made.
Amen! Anyone up for a hot dog btw?

The real question is, who isn't up for a hot dog?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

“Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested, and the frog dies of it.”
- anonymous, paraphrased from E.B. White

“Humor can be dissected, as a frog can, but the thing dies in the process and the innards are discouraging to any but the pure scientific mind.”
- original quote, E.B. White


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Japanese game designer Shigeru Miyamoto (creator of numerous Nintendo flagship games, including Super Mario Bros., Donkey Kong, and Star Fox) named the titular princess of his Legend Of Zelda games after American socialite and novelist Zelda Fitzgerald (née Sayre, 1900-1948), wife of novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald. Zelda Fitzgerald herself was named after the titular character of author Jane Howard's 1866 novella Zelda: A Tale Of Massachusetts Colony.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Top job application of the day: no spelling mistakes, but the entire form is in Comic Sans. Radical.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

You humans are all racist!


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Rysky wrote:

Yeah we get the everyone forgets how to drive thing over here. But what annoys me more is everyone buying up all the f~@*ing milk and bread.

WTF is that gonna do for you if you get snowed in? Other than go bad?

Never understood that one either. Though, people do seem to get panicky about food when it snows. After the big storm in Buffalo two years ago, a bunch of people swarmed and robbed a Doritos truck that had gotten stuck in the snow.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

Billy Ray Cyrus' multi-platinum hit single "Achy Breaky Heart" was originally written by Nashville songwriter Don Von Tress 1990 as a single for The Oak Ridge Boys. However, Oak Ridge Boys lead singer Duane Allen thought that the lyrics were too silly and passed the song off to California country band The Marcy Brothers, who changed a few lyrics (for example, "achy breaky" became "achy breakin'") and released it in 1991 as "Don't Tell My Heart."

That same year, Billy Ray Cyrus heard Von Tress's original version of the song, and chose to include it on his debut album Some Gave All in 1992. "Achy Breaky Heart" is written in the key of A major and possesses only two chords: A and E. The song is considered by some as one of the worst songs of all time, featuring at number two in VH1 and Blender's list of the "50 Most Awesomely Bad Songs Ever."

I was the lighting tech for a country band that covered a lot of songs during that time period. It got the point people were requesting the song 5 or more times a night. We finally put up a sign in front of the stage that said we would walk out if the song was asked for me than three times. We did, twice.

It's the "Freebird" of country music.

I will say, though, that I greatly enjoyed "Achy Breaky Heart" when I was a young child. Good thing I grew up.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Theconiel wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Star Wars Episode II: Attack Of The Clones (2002) is the longest Star Wars film to date, clocking in at 142 minutes. The shortest film in the series is Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977), with a running time of 127 minutes.

Oh...

I thought Attack of the Clones just seemed like the longest film. Ever.

I'd venture that the interminable awkward "romance" scenes between Anakin and Padmé helped both to pad the actual and perceived length.

My personal vote for "longest Star Wars thing ever" would have to go to the eight-minute-long lightsaber duel between Anakin and Obi-Wan at the end of Revenge Of The Sith. Every time I have to sit through it, it feels like an hour.

For comparison, the next-longest duels in the series (the two-on-one duel between Obi-Wan, Qui-Gon Jinn, and Darth Maul from The Phantom Menace, and the one between Luke and Darth Vader from The Empire Strikes Back) were just four minutes each, and the iconic duel between Luke and Vader in Return Of The Jedi clocked in at just under two minutes.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Neriathale wrote:

Nobody's mentioned this yet?

It ought not to work, but somehow it does.

"The uploader has not made this video available in your country."


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Though "Colonel" Harland D. Sanders (1890-1980), founder and mascot of the Kentucky Fried Chicken fast food franchise, served in the United States Army from 1906 to 1907, he never rose above the rank of private. Sanders' appellation of "Colonel," however, is legitimate, being derived from Sanders' award of the title of Kentucky colonel by Kentucky governor Lawrence Wetherby in 1950.

Interestingly enough, in a 2016 advertisement for Kentucky Fried Chicken, Sanders was portrayed by actor and comedian Rob Riggle, who served in the United States Marine Corps Reserve for 23 years and saw combat in Liberia, Kosovo, Albania, and Afghanistan. Riggle retired in 2013 with the rank of lieutenant colonel.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Billy Ray Cyrus' multi-platinum hit single "Achy Breaky Heart" was originally written by Nashville songwriter Don Von Tress 1990 as a single for The Oak Ridge Boys. However, Oak Ridge Boys lead singer Duane Allen thought that the lyrics were too silly and passed the song off to California country band The Marcy Brothers, who changed a few lyrics (for example, "achy breaky" became "achy breakin'") and released it in 1991 as "Don't Tell My Heart."

That same year, Billy Ray Cyrus heard Von Tress's original version of the song, and chose to include it on his debut album Some Gave All in 1992. "Achy Breaky Heart" is written in the key of A major and possesses only two chords: A and E. The song is considered by some as one of the worst songs of all time, featuring at number two in VH1 and Blender's list of the "50 Most Awesomely Bad Songs Ever."


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Sky the color of rotten milk, high winds, blown-down trees, wet leaf piles, brownouts, freezing rain, and wet snow turning the ground into an ice-cold muddy soup. Just another beautiful fall day in central New York.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
TOTALLY John Kretzer wrote:
It is I, John Kretzer, making my first appearance on this thread.

Who?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

A sort of brief "what the hell am I doing?" update


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Star Wars Episode II: Attack Of The Clones (2002) is the longest Star Wars film to date, clocking in at 142 minutes. The shortest film in the series is Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977), with a running time of 127 minutes.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

The word "lightsaber" is only used once in the original Star Wars (1977).


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Kajehase wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Over the past year or so, I've started growing my hair longer than the "'81 Henry Rollins" cut I used to have. On the upside, I no longer look like a Straight Edge half-orc, but on the downside, I'm starting to slide into the whole "Londo Mollari" look.
As long as it's not season 1 Vir Cotto.

I can see certain similarities, especially just after getting out of the shower.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Patrick Curtin wrote:
So basically I have spent a good chunk of this semester learning skills that would have been very valuable in .... 1980

My college experience in a nutshell.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Italian exploitation film director Bruno Mattei (AKA Vincent Dawn, Jordan B. Matthews, and many other pseudonyms), famous for directing such classics as Hell Of The Living Dead (1980), Strike Commando (1987), and Robowar (1988), once stated that he didn't like the way his movies had turned out and would re-shoot every single one if given the opportunity.

Despite his misgivings about his own work, he once said that his favorite of his own films was Rats: Night Of Terror (1984), co-directed and co-written with fellow Italian filmmaker Claudio Fragasso, who would make cinematic history a few years later with the debut of his magnum opus, Troll 2 (1990).

Rats: Night Of Terror was filmed in Rome, Italy, on sets that had been built for Sergio Leone's film Once Upon A Time In America (1984), which had been filmed the year prior. In interviews, Mattei had stated that the rats used in the film "were actually guinea pigs," though anyone who has seen the film can tell that they are clearly real rats.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

Actress Haley Atwell has portrayed the Marvel Cinematic Universe character Agent Peggy Carter more times than actor Chris Evans has played Steve Rogers (Captain America), to whom Carter is ostensibly a supporting character.

When you get your own titled series, you're no longer "just a supporting character".

My point exactly.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Patrick Curtin wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

Somebody used a predictive text interface to randomly generate a fake segment of Dan Carlin's Hardcore History, and it is a thing of terrible beauty. Make sure you listen to the audio clip-- the guy does a spot-on Dan Carlin impersonation:

“After several months of unimaginable suffering, four years of glorious wealth acquirement, and a lot of interesting thoughts, Nicholas was like seventy percent shrapnel shells and like one hundred seventy percent heavy metal. This whole war maybe can’t be maintained but I think it’s probably safe to say there’s something wrong with our bloody generals today—they’ve got electric lights in their minds.” End quote.

I love Hardcore History. This...well, it's kind of funny, but it doesn't have that je ne sais lulz of true LOL humor. (IMO natch-humor, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder)

Shut your damn mouth. I laughed my ass off for at least 32 minutes after I finished listening to this.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Celestial Healer wrote:
gran rey de los mono wrote:
Hate to be pedantic (no, that's a lie, I love it) but "Desserts" has 3 s's.
Touché

Between 1975 and 1993, my uncle, David Clarenbach, represented the 78th District in the Wisconsin State Assembly. During his last few years in office, he debated frequently with his opposite number from the 54th District, Gregg Underheim.

After one such debate, Underheim had gotten characteristically wound up, and had ended his short speech with, "[something]...Gregg Underheim. And that's "Gregg" with TWO 'G's." My uncle, never one to pass up the opportunity to make a joke, leaned into his microphone and added, "Actually, Gregg, your name has 3 'G's."


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
*Apocryphal, but hilarious.
I would pay money to watch you in an Apocryphal But Hilarious web-series (or TV show on the History Channel).

On the History Channel, the title would have to be changed to Absolutely Totally 100% True, with no change in content, other than a possible higher level of focus on a) Nazis, b) aliens, and c) Nazi aliens.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
David M Mallon wrote:
Still would give anything to be a Jedi Knight or Commander Shepard for 10 minutes.

I feel this bears repeating multiple times.


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American actor Robert Stack, now most famous for his role in the 1980 spoof/comedy film Airplane!, spent many years as a Hollywood leading man, especially in westerns during the 1950s and 1960s. During the 1940s, he starred in war films, and served as a gunnery instructor in the United States Navy.

During filming of Bullfighter And The Lady (1951), produced by his friend Marion "John Wayne" Morrison, Stack was asked by some Mexican crew members what he had done during the Second World War. His response, "I taught machine guns," was interpreted by the Spanish-speaking crew as "I taught some chingas (prostitutes)," leading to great popularity among the locals.*

In 1952, Stack made film history as the star of Bwana Devil, the first 3-D movie released in theaters.

Aside from his role as Rex Kramer in Airplane!, Stack may be known to modern enthusiasts of more esoteric films as the inspiration for actor Brian Lewis' performance as the character "Brother Silence" in the 2008 film The Gamers II: Dorkness Rising.

*Apocryphal, but hilarious.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Air Traffic Control: "Flight Two-Zero-Niner, you are cleared for takeoff."
Captain Clarence Oveur (Peter Graves): "Roger."
Co-Pilot Roger Murdock (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar): "Huh?"
Air Traffic Control: "LA departure frequency One-Two-Three-Point-Niner."
Captain Clarence Oveur: "Roger."
Co-Pilot Roger Murdock: "Huh?"
Navigator Victor Basta (Frank Ashmore): "Request vector, over."
Captain Clarence Oveur: "Huh?"
Air Traffic Control: "Flight Two-Zero-Niner, clear for Vector Three-Two-Four."
Co-Pilot Roger Murdock: "We have clearance, Clarence."
Captain Clarence Oveur: "Roger, Roger. What's our vector, Victor?"
Air Traffic Control: "Outward radio clearance, over."
Captain Clarence Oveur: "That's Clarence Oveur, over."
Air Traffic Control: "Roger."
Co-Pilot Roger Murdock: "Huh?"
Air Traffic Control: "Roger, over."
Co-Pilot Roger Murdock: "Huh?"
Captain Clarence Oveur: "Huh?"
Navigator Victor Basta: "Who?"

- Airplane! (1980)


3 people marked this as a favorite.

The unincorporated community of Turkey Scratch, Arkansas, United States (pop. ~200), and its closest official settlement, Elaine, AR (pop. ~900), are the hometown of three highly influential American musicians: Delta blues guitarist Robert Lockwood Jr. (the only known student of the legendary Robert Johnson), steel guitar player John Hughey (known for his collaborations with Vince Gill and Conway Twitty), and drummer & singer Mark "Levon" Helm (first known for his work with folk icon Bob Dylan, and later with Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees The Band).


1 person marked this as a favorite.
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
As someone else put it on another thread recently, stop looking for a fight and you won't find one.

Right back at you, man.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:


Let's be frank: The US is better described as an "empire."

We're not starting on this again.
What's to "start on?" It just is. We may not like to think of it that way, but the history, geography, and social dynamics are all there. Even if you buy into the silly "salt water rule," Hawaii and our globe-spanning network of military bases fill that criterion. That's all. It shouldn't be a bone of contention.

Read my previous comment a second time.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:
What's amazing about that is it really underscores how big this country is. 55 other people, and not a single one within 75 miles from me.
Let's be frank: The US is better described as an "empire."

We're not starting on this again.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Cole Deschain wrote:
140 miles... that'll get me only a little ways past Delta Junction in a mad scramble for the Canadian border!

The closest pin to your location is in Skeena, BC, a distance of approximately 1250 miles.

The most isolated pin on the map is located in [unspecified], South Africa. Its closest neighbor is the pin in Cairo, Egypt, a distance of approximately 8800 miles.

Speaking of things that are f+*%ing huge... Africa.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
captain yesterday wrote:
What's amazing about that is it really underscores how big this country is. 55 other people, and not a single one within 75 miles from me.

According to Google Maps, the closest pin to your location is approximately 140 miles away.

The closest pin to my location is approximately sixty miles away, and my state has six pins in it. The US is f%**ing huge--it's the third-largest country in the world by total land area (after Russia and China), and fourth by total territory (after Russia, Canada, and China).


1 person marked this as a favorite.

A less humorous but more orderly breakdown:

United States: 56
United Kingdom: 22
Canada: 10
Australia: 9
Germany: 7
France: 6
New Zealand: 6
Finlnd: 5
The Netherlands: 4
Italy: 3
Sweden: 3
Denmark: 2
Mexico: 2
Norway: 2
Poland: 2
Spain: 2
Argentina: 1
Belgium: 1
Bulgaria: 1
Chile: 1
Colombia: 1
Croatia: 1
Egypt: 1
Ireland: 1
Israel: 1
Malaysia: 1
Russia: 1
Slovakia: 1
South Africa: 1
Taiwan: 1
United Arab Emirates: 1


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Female Human Soldier

"Just remember, everyone: a positive attitude brings strength, energy, motivation, and a +2 bonus to initiative."


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
My baby girl referred to her stuffed-animal Rudolph as her "precious".

One Rudolph to rule them all.


5 people marked this as a favorite.

When a good friend of mine was about 11 or 12 (he's 24-25 now), his house burned down. As he and his mother were standing outside while the firefighters tried to put out the fire, he stood in silence for a while, then said:

"Well, I guess the only thing we can do right now is keep a positive mental attitude."

He's currently studying to be a social worker.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Sharoth wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Sharoth wrote:
Two spaces. TWO!!! It will always be that way.
He who clings desperately to the past shall not surf the totally tubular waves of the future.

Two...

Spaces!!!

Only if you're using monospaced type, like on a typewriter. And who uses typewriters anymore? What is this, the Dark Ages? Everyone knows that wax tablets are the way of the future.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Patrick Curtin wrote:

*eyeroll*

Saving.... what? 15 spaces per page ? Max?

It is of vital importance.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Sharoth wrote:
Two spaces. TWO!!! It will always be that way.

He who clings desperately to the past shall not surf the totally tubular waves of the future.

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