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Downer

The Eldritch Mr. Shiny's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 11,738 posts (18,289 including aliases). 5 reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 53 aliases.


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2 people marked this as a favorite.

I've decided that Labatt Extra Light Lager is basically just mildly alcoholic seltzer water. It's not "bad," per se, it's just not "beer" either.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

There have been 43 people sworn into the office of President of the United States of America, and 44 presidencies (Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) served two non-consecutive terms and is counted chronologically as both the 22nd and 24th president).

Of the individuals elected as president, four died in office of natural causes (William Henry Harrison (#9; 1773-1841), Zachary Taylor (#12; 1784-1850), Warren G. Harding (#29; 1865-1923), and Franklin D. Roosevelt (#32; 1882-1945)), four were assassinated (Abraham Lincoln (#16; 1809-1865), James A. Garfield (#20; 1831-1881), William McKinley (#25; 1843-1901), and John F. Kennedy (#35; 1917-1963)) and one resigned (Richard Nixon (#37; 1913-1994)).

Four presidents (John Q. Adams (#6; 1767-1848), Rutherford B. Hayes(#19; 1822-1893), Benjamin Harrison (#23; 1833-1901) and George W. Bush(#43; 1946-)) lost the popular vote but assumed office. Bush was subsequently re-elected for a second term with a popular majority.

There are currently five living people who have held the office of President of the United States: James Carter Jr. (#39; 1924-), George H.W. Bush (#41; 1924-), William J. Clinton (#42; 1946-), George W. Bush (#43; 1946-), and current sitting president Barack Obama (#44; 1961-)


3 people marked this as a favorite.
David M Mallon wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
GIANT SPACE HAMSTER
Miniature giant space hamster

Regular space hamster


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Aberzombie wrote:
GIANT SPACE HAMSTER

Miniature giant space hamster


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Patrick Curtin wrote:
And the whole running hamster gag ... Well

BioWare really took that one and ran with it.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

One of the most widely-accepted origin of the generally pejorative term "cracker" (referring to Americans of European descent, especially the "poor whites" of the American South descended from the Borderer people of the northern British Isles) is that it is derived from the Middle English crak or craic, which originally meant the sound of a cracking whip but came to refer to "loud conversation, bragging talk".

In Elizabethan times this could refer to "entertaining conversation" (one may be said to "crack" a joke) and "cracker" could be used to describe loud braggarts; this term and the Gaelic spelling craic are still in use in Ireland, Scotland and Northern England. It is documented in Shakespeare's King John (1595): "What cracker is this same that deafs our ears with this abundance of superfluous breath?"

This usage is illustrated in a letter to the Earl of Dartmouth which reads:

"I should explain to your Lordship what is meant by Crackers; a name they have got from being great boasters; they are a lawless set of rascalls on the frontiers of Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas, and Georgia, who often change their places of abode."


1 person marked this as a favorite.

90% of English Puritan names were taken from the Bible. Some Puritans took pride in their learning by giving their children obscure Biblical names they would expect nobody else to have heard of, like Mahershalalhasbaz. Others chose random Biblical terms that might not have technically been intended as names; “the son of Bostonian Samuel Pond was named Mene Mene Tekel Upharsin Pond”. Still others chose Biblical words completely at random and named their children things like Maybe or Notwithstanding.

Wasting time in Puritan Massachusetts was literally a criminal offense, listed in the law code, and several people were in fact prosecuted for it. Another law just said “If any man shall exceed the bounds of moderation, we shall punish him severely”.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Just unlocked the Salarian Engineer class. Had to restrain myself from making CH's character.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Grace has been officially added to Mass Effect 3 multiplayer on Xbox Live...


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Canadian actor Rick Moranis (Ghostbusters, Spaceballs, Little Shop of Horrors) was an elementary school classmate of Rush bassist/vocalist/keyboardist Geddy Lee.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The role of villain Simon Phoenix in the 1993 sci-fi action comedy film Demolition Man was originally slated to go to Hong Kong superstar Jackie Chan, but ended up going to Wesley Snipes after Chan declined. Also, actress Lori Petty was originally cast in the role of Lenina Huxley, but was replaced with Sandra Bullock after less than a week of filming.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Tammy the Lich wrote:
Tammy's complicated.

She's a grade-A b~~$~.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Independent conservative political commentator Bill O'Reilly and liberal political commentator & comedian Jon Stewart are good friends in real life.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Alanis Morissette wrote:

Despite the popularity of Rickrolling and "Never Gonna Give You Up" garnering millions of hits on YouTube, Rick Astley has earned almost no money from the meme, receiving only ~$12* (U.S.) in royalties from YouTube for his performance share*. Songwriter Pete Waterman has only received ~$17* (U.S.) in YouTube royalties for it.

* As of August 2010

Rick Astley update, courtesy of Skeptic Stack Exchange (2012):

"[I]t wasn't until 2011 that YouTube settled the 2007 lawsuit to allow artists and publishers to enter into a licensing agreement with YouTube. This was after the "$12" quote was provided above. ...

[A]n artist/publisher has the following three options: keep the song there, take it down or make money off of it. If the third option is chosen the song appears with the artist information and typically a link to iTunes. ...

[I]f you look at the main RickRoll video from Youtube, the one with 64 million views, it isn't marked with artist information. However, the VEVO one does and so does another one that was added later.

So they have chosen not to make money from the original video. Thus the $12 is realistic, maybe the $12 wasn't even made from that version of the video. Considering the VEVO video now has over 50 million views and there are other videos marked as copyright, someone is making money from them. However, how much Rick gets directly from this is not currently public information."

Rick Astley weighs in:

"I think it’s just one of those odd things where something gets picked up and people run with it ... but that’s what's brilliant about the Internet. Listen, I just think it’s bizarre and funny. My main consideration is that my daughter doesn’t get embarrassed about it."


5 people marked this as a favorite.

Rant:
I was invited to a friend's bachelor party, which was tonight. I was asked to meet them at a local bar at 10 PM. I get there at 9:50 PM. I spend the next 30 minutes looking around the place for everyone, then spend another 40 just sitting in the entryway. Finally, I give up and go home. I check my Facebook account, and there are like five messages from the guy, all of which consist of "u here?" I inform my friend that no, in fact, I went home because I couldn't find him or his friends in the crowded bar, and he never called me. His response was to the effect of "But I sent you a message on Facebook." My reply: "I have a flip-phone, genius." To which he responded, "You can't get Facebook on a flip phone?" F!!~ing idiot.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The 1983 German Atari 2600 game UFI und Sein Gefährlicher Einsatz was released in the United states as both Alien's Return and E.T. Go Home. The title on the cover art in all versions reads, "E.T. Go Come."


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Received a piece of election mail today addressed to "The Mallon Family." Yes. Family. Me, my waifu, my 25-year-old son, and our pet mold.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

The facial features of the alien character Mordin Solus from the Mass Effect series of video games were based on those of actor Clint Eastwood.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The turkey is a large bird in the genus Meleagris, which is native to the Americas. Despite the name, turkeys are not found in the region (and modern nation-state) of Turkey, though the area does factor into two conflicting explanations for the bird's name:

1. When Europeans first encountered turkeys in America, they incorrectly identified the birds as a type of guineafowl – i.e., as members of a group of birds which were thought to typically come from the country of Turkey. The name of the North American bird thus became "turkey fowl", which was then shortened to just "turkey."

2. The birds came to England via merchant ships from the Middle East where they were domesticated successfully. These merchants were called "Turkey merchants" as much of the area was part of the Ottoman Empire. Hence the name “Turkey birds” or, soon thereafter, “turkeys."

In 1550, the English navigator William Strickland, who had introduced the turkey into England, was granted a coat of arms including a "turkey-cock in his pride proper." William Shakespeare used the term in Twelfth Night, believed to be written in 1601 or 1602. The lack of context around his usage suggests that the term had widespread reach.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The genus Basilosaurus, meaning "king lizard" actually represents a number of primitive whales. The first fossil of B. cetoides was discovered in the United States and was initially believed to be some sort of reptile, hence the suffix -"saurus", but it was later found to be a marine mammal. Renowned English naturalist Sir Richard Owen wished to rename the creature Zeuglodon ("yoked tooth"), but, per taxonomic rules, the creature's first name remained permanent.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The word "brandy" (a spirit produced by distilling wine) comes from the English "brandywine," itself derived from the Dutch "brandewijn" or "gebrande wijn," meaning "burned wine."


2 people marked this as a favorite.

The real-life American soldier Albert Blithe was portrayed in the HBO miniseries Band Of Brothers (based on the book by Stephen Ambrose) by actor Marc Warren. In the series, Blithe is shot in the neck shortly after the Battle of Carentan and sent home, dying a few years after the war.

However, the real-life Blithe was shot in the shoulder and spent the rest of the war in a military hospital. After a brief career with Westinghouse Electric, he rejoined the US Army and served on bases in Korea, Taiwan, and Germany from 1957 to 1967. He died of a perforated ulcer in 1967 at the age of 44.

Easy Company veterans interviewed while writing the book and mini-series had believed that Blithe was wounded in the neck, and that he did not recover and as such Ambrose's book stated that Blithe had died in Philadelphia in 1948. This carried over into episode 3, "Carentan," which ends with a slide stating that "Albert Blithe never recovered from the wounds he received in Normandy. He died in 1948." Though his family publicly corrected this error, not all editions of the book, or of the series, have the correction.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

In director Jun Gallardo's 1988 B-movie action film The Firing Line, an American commando (played by B-action veteran Robert "Reb" Brown) leads a group of rebels against a corrupt Central American government. The country is never specifically named, but in one scene, a map of the country's capitol city is shown-- a map of Melbourne, Australia.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
captain yesterday wrote:
I was four.

Yeah... I was a negative number.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

The Evolution of Philosophy (courtesy of Reddit):

"What does it mean to be good?"
- Aristotle

"What does it mean to be?"
- Rene Descartes

"What does it mean?"
- Friedrich Nietzsche

"What does "it" mean?"
- Bertrand Russell

"What does it?"
- C.S. Lewis

"What?"
- Lil' Jon


3 people marked this as a favorite.

On today's edition of incredibly lame jokes:
A Higgs Boson walks into a church. "We don't allow Higgs Bosons in here," shouts the priest, to which the Higgs Boson replies, "but Father, without me, how can you have Mass?"

Werner Heisenberg is out for a drive when he's stopped by a traffic cop. "Do you know how fast you were going?" asks the officer. "No, but I know where I am," replies Heisenberg.

A dangling modifier walks into a bar. After finishing a drink, the bartender asks it to leave.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
captain yesterday wrote:
I have no tattoos.

It's OK, I've got enough for the both of us.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

This never fails to amuse.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Feros wrote:
I don't think I will ever understand the US Health care system.

Here's a brief rundown.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

American actor Rami Malek (The Pacific, Mr. Robot) was born in 1981 in Los Angeles, California to Egyptian parents. Malek got his start in acting providing "additional voices" for the 2004 video game Halo II.

Malek made his feature film debut in the 2006 comedy film Night At The Museum. His character in Night At The Museum, Pharaoh Ahkmenrah, is one of a very small number of Egyptian characters in a major American motion picture that have been portrayed by Egyptian actors.

Season 2 of Mr. Robot premieres July 13.

He's also the only Egyptian I can think of who's played a Cajun on TV.

Snafu scrubs drums for no man.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The 1988 American release of the video game The Legend of Zelda for the Nintendo Entertainment System was the first home video game released in cartridge form to contain an internal battery backup for saving data-- the original 1986 Japanese game (The Legend of Zelda: The Hyrule Fantasy, for the Family Computer (Famicom) Disk System) had been released on Nintendo's proprietary Disk Card floppy disks. The American cartridge version, which included the save feature was re-released in Japan in 1994 as The Legend of Zelda 1.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

One of the earliest known uses of the epithet "dumbass" or "dumb ass" can be found in 2 Peter 2:16 of the King James Bible (1611):

"...[T]he dumb ass speaking with man's voice forbad the madness of the prophet."


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Of the 88 Academy Awards ("Oscars") for Best Picture, none have been awarded for a science fiction film, and only one has been awarded for a genre fantasy film (Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)).

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King also holds the record for the highest Oscar "sweep" of all time, winning all 11 Academy Awards for which it was nominated (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score, Best Original Song, Best Visual Effects, Best Art Direction, Best Costume Design, Best Make-up, Best Sound Mixing and Best Film Editing), and is also tied with James Cameron's Titanic (1997) and William Wyler's Ben-Hur (1959) for the most Academy Awards won by a single film.

The Return of the King is also one of only two sequels to win a Best Picture award, the other being Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather Part II (oddly enough, both films also won the award for Best Director).


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The famous "always be closing" monologue spoken by Alec Baldwin's character Blake in James Foley's 1992 film Glengarry Glen Ross was not part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning 1984 David Mamet play from which it was adapted. Mamet added the monologue to his screenplay adaptation in order to pad its length. The monologue is Alec Baldwin's only appearance in the film.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

American actor Rami Malek (The Pacific, Mr. Robot) was born in 1981 in Los Angeles, California to Egyptian parents. Malek got his start in acting providing "additional voices" for the 2004 video game Halo II.

Malek made his feature film debut in the 2006 comedy film Night At The Museum. His character in Night At The Museum, Pharaoh Ahkmenrah, is one of a very small number of Egyptian characters in a major American motion picture that have been portrayed by Egyptian actors.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

Everything you wanted to know about compact fluorescent lamps and more.

Also includes the EnergyStar CFL mercury fact sheet.

As for cleanup, seconded on the vacuum cleaner. Given the infinitesimal amount of mercury in a CFL, that part is really a non-issue. I'd be more worried about someone getting cut from the broken glass. I work as a commercial electrician, and when a fluorescent lamp (compact or not) breaks on the job, our instructions are simply to sweep up the big pieces and vacuum up the rest.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

American punk rock bassist Kira Roessler (of DC3, Black Flag, Dos, and Twisted Roots) largely retired from music in the early 2000s in order to focus on her career as a Hollywood film sound and dialog editor. She has worked on numerous films, including Under The Tuscan Sun (2003) and Twilight: New Moon (2009).

Roessler has won two Primetime Emmy awards for Outstanding Sound Editing, the first in 2008 for the miniseries John Adams, and the second in 2012 for her work on the television series Game of Thrones. In 2016, she also won a Best Sound Editing Oscar for the 2015 film Mad Max: Fury Road.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

In other news, drinking my first can of Surge in 15 years. I feel like I'm on an episode of Brad Tries.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

After years of having issues, I finally buckled down and set out to solve the problem of what was wrong with my wireless cable modem. Turns out that it's not an issue with the modem part or the cable part-- just the wireless part. Plugging my laptop or my 360 directly into the ethernet port solves 100% of the connectivity issues. Also, Mass Effect 3 Multiplayer works now.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

The title screen for the 2005 superhero film Elektra bears pseudo-Greek lettering that, when read as actual modern Greek, reads "Slsktrl."


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Freehold DM wrote:
It's eerie when noone is on the street. Absolutely noone.

And especially when the Noone in question is Peter Noone.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Patrick Curtin wrote:
One of more successful mental hacks this year has been overcoming my fear of crowds/cities.

I've found that alcohol helps.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Kyuss - Blues For The Red Sun


7 people marked this as a favorite.

"LOL" or "lol" (IPA pronunciation: /lɑl/, /loʊl/), derived from an acronym for laugh(ing) out loud, a popular element of Internet slang, was first documented in the Oxford English Dictionary in March of 2011. Those of you who feel that this is a corruption of the language should remember that the common English word "goodbye" derives from the Middle English abbreviation "godbwye" ("God Be With Ye"), which started being fully pronounced during the Early Modern period and eventually arrived at its modern spelling.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

During an early 1960 tour, several members of The Silver Beetles (later known simply as The Beatles), adopted pseudonyms: singer/guitarist John Lennon became Long John; lead guitarist George Harrison became Carl Harrison (after "Blue Suede Shoes" singer Carl Perkins), bassist Stuart Sutcliffe became Stuart de Staël (after painter Nicolas de Staël), and singer/guitarist Paul McCartney became Paul Ramón (note that The Silver Beetles did not at this point have a drummer.

In 1974, musician Douglas Colvin began calling himself "Dee Dee Ramone," in homage to McCartney, and his new as-of-yet-unnamed band (composed of ex-members of Tangerine Puppets and Sniper) decided to take "Ramone" as both a pseudonymous surname and band name. Over the years, the Ramones have included numerous members, including bassist/singer Dee Dee Ramone (Douglas Colvin), guitarist Johnny Ramone (John Cummings), singer Joey Ramone (Jeffrey Hyman), drummer/producer Tommy Ramone (Tamás Erdélyi), drummer Marky Ramone (Marc Bell), drummer/singer Richie Ramone (Richard Reinhardt), drummer Elvis Ramone (Clement Bozewski), and bassist/singer C.J. Ramone (Christopher Ward).


5 people marked this as a favorite.

These guys are f&!!ing lightweights.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Celestial Healer wrote:
Patrick, I plan to stay in the hotel, so as not have to commute home at night after much liquor. I am good with the floor if that is what's available :)

Hey man, I called dibs on the floor. You'll have to sleep in the bed like a loser.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

A friend recommended that I listen to Baroness' latest album, Purple. I haven't gotten around to listening to the whole thing, mainly because I've been listening to this one song on repeat for days:

Baroness - "Chlorine And Wine"

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