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Downer

The Eldritch Mr. Shiny's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 11,738 posts (18,404 including aliases). 5 reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 53 aliases.


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Treppa wrote:
I have a bunch of recipes passed down from a (possible) Scottish ancestor who was a baker's apprentice and journeyman baker before the industrial revolution put him into the factories.

The only culinary professional in my family (to my knowledge) was Typhoid Mary. (Look it up, I'm not joking.)


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In director Joe D'Amato's 1982 fantasy film The Blade Master (AKA Ator 2: L'invincibile Orion, Ator The Invincible, and Cave Dwellers), a fantastic editing mistake occurs around the 20-minute mark. The villain, Zor (David Brandon) is speaking to the wizard Sandur (Osiride Pevarello), and is in the process of delivering the line, "Sandur, there is someone I want neutralized." Just after the word "want," there are a few still frames of the characters in slightly different positions, and then halfway through the word "neutralized," there is an obvious cut to a different take. However, in the second take, the line is changed to, "There is someone I want eliminated." Since the cut occurs several frames too late, the line comes out as "Sandur, there is someone I want [pause] neutro-eliminated." Genius.


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captain yesterday wrote:

Try growing up a Swedish Irish Quaker.

*Sideshow Bob shudder*

Irish Catholic father, German/Scots-Irish Methodist mother. I understand.


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Aranna wrote:
Turns out what an animal eats affects the flavor and how it lives determines the quality of the meat. The vat meat eats nothing and has no lifestyle.

Speaking as someone who grew up eating fine Irish-American cuisine, if you boil or fry the s&*! out of it and coat it in salt, it all tastes the same.


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American professional wrestler, martial artist, and actor Dave Bautista (Guardians Of The Galaxy, Spectre) is an avid collector of vintage metal lunchboxes, with over a hundred in his possession. After the filming of Guardians Of The Galaxy wrapped, director James Gunn presented Bautista with a custom-made one-of-a-kind Drax the Destroyer lunchbox.


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Star Trek's Starship Enterprise (in its various incarnations) has had ten captains featured in onscreen appearances (not counting alternate timelines or former captains):

- Jonathan Archer (Scott Bakula); Enterprise NX-01; Star Trek: Enterprise
- Christopher Pike (Jeffrey Hunter); Enterprise NCC-1701; Star Trek: the Original Series (pilot episode)
- James Kirk (William Shatner); Enterprise NCC-1701 and NCC-1701-A; Star Trek: the Original Series, Star Trek film series
- Willard Decker (Stephen Collins); Enterprise NCC-1701; Star Trek film series
- Spock (Leonard Nimoy); Enterprise NCC-1701; Star Trek film series
- John Harriman (Alan Ruck); Enterprise NCC-1701-B; Star Trek film series
- Rachel Garrett (Tricia O'Neil); Enterprise NCC-1701-C; Star Trek: The Next Generation
- Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart); Enterprise NCC-1701-D and NCC-1701-E; Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek film series
- William Riker (Jonathan Frakes); Enterprise NCC-1701-D; Star Trek: The Next Generation
- Edward Jellico (Ronny Cox); Enterprise NCC-1701-D; Star Trek: The Next Generation


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A new set of Starfleet uniforms was intended to be introduced in the 1994 film Star Trek Generations, to be worn by the Enterprise-D crew. These new uniforms would have been similar to the television ones, except the collars would have been the same department color as the rest of the tunic and the rank pips would have been worn on the shoulder with a corresponding rank braid on the wrists. The uniforms were eventually nixed by producer Rick Berman.

The decision was then made to use both the uniforms from Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) as well as the uniforms from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993). However, toy company Playmates had already made an action figure line for the film with the Enterprise-D crew wearing the aborted uniforms. It was too late to retract the figures, which is the only place the aborted uniforms can be seen.

Patrick Stewart and Brent Spiner were the only cast members to have custom "color-top" uniforms (as used in seasons 1-5 of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and later on in Star Trek: Voyager (1995)) made for use in the film. Jonathan Frakes had to borrow Avery Brooks' uniform and LeVar Burton had to borrow Colm Meaney's uniform from Deep Space Nine (Meaney having also appeared on The Next Generation), neither of which fit the actors very well (Frakes had to roll up the sleeves and Burton's was obviously too big for him).


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The word "Japan" is an exonym, and is used (in one form or another) by a large number of languages. The Japanese names for Japan are Nippon (にっぽん) and Nihon (にほん). They are both written in Japanese using the kanji 日本.

The English word "Japan" has a circuitous derivation; but linguists believe it derives in part from the Portuguese recording of the early Mandarin Chinese or Wu Chinese word for Japan: "Cipan" (日本), which is rendered in pinyin as "Rìběn," and literally translates to "sun origin".


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The common idiom "lock and load" originated in American English, supposedly as an instructional command to prepare an M1 Garand, the main rifle used during World War II, for battle, though it is disputed if the phrase was actually used this early. The first documented use of the phrase "lock and load" was a line of dialog uttered by John Stryker (John Wayne) in the 1949 war film Sands of Iwo Jima.

The most likely theory of the origin of the phrase connects this order to the operation of the M1 Garand rifle. Before loading the ammunition clip into the rifle, the operating rod handle is pulled to the rear until the bolt is securely locked open. According to the M1 Garand Manual, loading the clip without first locking the bolt could result in an accidental discharge of a round.

An alternate theory involves the transposition of "load and lock" - to load the ammunition clip into the rifle, then to lock the bolt forward (which forces a round into the chamber, readying a rifle for firing). This order is notably featured in the 2010 HBO miniseries The Pacific.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Once upon a time, Nick Nolte looked like this.

Also, in 1972, Nolte appeared in a Clairol advertisement alongside a 22-year-old Sigourney Weaver. How's that for an odd image.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

"Blinkenlights" is a hacker's neologism for diagnostic lights found on the front panels of old mainframe computers, minicomputers, many early microcomputers, and modern network hardware.

The online slang dictionary The Jargon File provides the following etymology:

This term derives from the last word of the famous blackletter-Gothic sign in mangled mock German that once graced about half the computer rooms in the English-speaking world. One version ran in its entirety as follows:

ACHTUNG!
ALLES TURISTEN UND NONTEKNISCHEN LOOKENPEEPERS!
DAS KOMPUTERMASCHINE IST NICHT FÜR DER GEFINGERPOKEN UND MITTENGRABEN! ODERWISE IST EASY TO SCHNAPPEN DER SPRINGENWERK, BLOWENFUSEN UND POPPENCORKEN MIT SPITZENSPARKEN.
IST NICHT FÜR GEWERKEN BEI DUMMKOPFEN. DER RUBBERNECKEN SIGHTSEEREN KEEPEN DAS COTTONPICKEN HÄNDER IN DAS POCKETS MUSS.
ZO RELAXEN UND WATSCHEN DER BLINKENLICHTEN.

This silliness dates back to least as far as 1955 at IBM and had already gone international by the early 1960s, when it was reported at the University of London's ATLAS computing site. There are several variants of it in circulation, some of which actually do end with the word "blinkenlights."

The Jargon File also mentions that German hackers have developed their own versions of the blinkenlights poster, in fractured English:

ATTENTION
This room is fullfilled mit special electronische equippment.
Fingergrabbing and pressing the cnoeppkes from the computers is allowed for die experts only!
So all the “lefthanders” stay away and do not disturben the brainstorming von here working intelligencies.
Otherwise you will be out thrown and kicked anderswhere!
Also: please keep still and only watchen astaunished the blinkenlights.


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To this day, anyone sworn in to any state office, county office, or judgeship in the US state of Kentucky must declare under oath that he has not participated in, acted as a second, or otherwise assisted in a duel.


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The first appearance of the word "nerd" in the English lexicon is in the 1950 children's book If I Ran The Zoo, by Theodor "Dr. Seuss" Geisel, appearing in the following passage:

And then, just to show them, I'll sail to Ka-Troo
And Bring Back an It-Kutch, a Preep, and a Proo,
A Nerkle, a Nerd, and a Seersucker too!

The word's first use in its modern context* dates to the following year (1951), in which Newsweek magazine reported on its popular use as a synonym for "drip" or "square" in Detroit, Michigan.

* nerd [nurd] noun, Slang.
1. a person considered to be socially awkward, boring, unstylish, etc.
2. an intelligent but single-minded person obsessed with a nonsocial hobby or pursuit: a computer nerd.


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Behold: The Eye of Argon lives (with illustrations).

"With a nauseating thud the severed oval toppled to the floor, as the segregated torso of Grignr's bovine antagonist swayed, then collapsed in a pool of swirled crimson."


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ME AM PLAY GODS!


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Should be out of the woods for now.


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5th playthrough of Mass Effect trilogy finished.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

I believe we'd all agreed to drop that particular conversation thread on an earlier page. Not saying anyone's right or wrong, but I don't want this thread getting locked due to inevitable political bickering.

Makes me wonder how much good this thread is if we can't agree on facts. Election fraud isn't a "conspiracy theory;" it can be verified - and if one source is seen as dubious (for reasons that don't actually prove them wrong about a different topic), it isn't alone.

Like I said, I don't care. Stop.

This is supposed to be a fun thread, not a soapbox. If you want to discuss politics, go right ahead, but do it somewhere else.


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Though the title was correctly spelled in English language versions, as well as on the poster and (later) VHS box cover, numerous English language film reviews (and subsequent film database entries) of the 1989 Toho kaiju film Godzilla vs. Biollante (AKA Gojira vs. Biollante) listed the title as Godzilla vs. Bioranch. No explanation was ever given.


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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

Bush was subsequently re-elected for a second term with a popular majority.

That's a lie; read Fooled Again by Mark Crispin Miller.
Granted, Miller also believes that Bush orchestrated the 9/11 terrorist attacks, so I'd take that with a king-sized brick of salt. I doubt Bush could successfully have orchestrated a weekend barbecue, much less a massive government conspiracy.
I don't think the book gives Bush the leadership role. Rather the organising blocs behind the Republican National Convention, the same kind of conspiracy that got William McKinley elected and thought that making Teddy Roosevelt his VP would shut the latter up.

I believe we'd all agreed to drop that particular conversation thread on an earlier page. Not saying anyone's right or wrong, but I don't want this thread getting locked due to inevitable political bickering.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Upon the release of director Jon Favreau's 2008 film Iron Man, several news outlets referred to protagonist Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) as "Tony Spark." In addition, Metro.se accidentally swapped the name of Robert Downey Jr. with that of poet Robert Frost. Finally, Freeview.co.uk described the film as starring "Robert Downey Jr. as billionaire playboy Robert Stack."


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When American football player Brett Favre was traded from the Green Bay Packers to the New York Jets in 2008, numerous media reports made comments about Favre "wearing a different shade of green." The Packers and Jets use the exact same shade of green (Pantone 5535).


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In 2011, a German TV news program reporting on the killing of Osama bin Laden used a graphic of what they thought was the logo of United States counter-terrorism unit SEAL Team Six (United States Naval Special Warfare Development Group). Unfortunately, careless Googlers at the station used the logo of the Star Trek fan group Maquis Forces International SEAL Team VI instead. The logo in question includes a type II phaser pistol, a Klingon skull, and three Klingon bat'leth swords.


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Ridley Scott's Alien: typography & science fiction


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David M Mallon wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
"I will remove these restraints and leave the cell with the door open. ...and I'll drop my weapon."
Is it just me, or does it sound like he Americanized his accent for some reason?

Probably the same inexplicable reason that John Boyega did the film with an American accent (admittedly, he did quite a good job, unlike Craig).


3 people marked this as a favorite.

The modern English word "Earth" developed from a wide variety of Middle English forms, which derived from an Old English noun most often spelled eorðe. It has cognates in every Germanic language, and their proto-Germanic root has been reconstructed as *erþō. In its earliest appearances, eorðe was already being used to translate the many senses of Latin terra and Greek γῆ (): the ground, its soil, dry land, the human world, the surface of the world (including the sea), and the globe itself. As with Terra and Gaia, Earth was a personified goddess in Germanic paganism: the Angles were listed by Tacitus as among the devotees of Nerthus, and later Norse mythology included Jörð, a giantess often given as the mother of Thor.


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The Coolidge Effect (a term in biology and psychology describing a phenomenon seen in mammalian species whereby males (and to a lesser extent females) exhibit renewed sexual interest if introduced to new receptive sexual partners) was first referred to as such by behavioral endocrinologist Frank A. Beach in publication in 1955, crediting one of his students with suggesting the term at a psychology conference.

To quote Beach:

"[The source of the neologism is] an old joke about Calvin Coolidge when he was President … The President and Mrs. Coolidge were being shown [separately] around an experimental government farm. When [Mrs. Coolidge] came to the chicken yard she noticed that a rooster was mating very frequently. She asked the attendant how often that happened and was told, "Dozens of times each day." Mrs. Coolidge said, "Tell that to the President when he comes by." Upon being told, the President asked, "Same hen every time?" The reply was, "Oh, no, Mr. President, a different hen every time." President: "Tell that to Mrs. Coolidge."


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Somewhat counter-intuitively, the island nation of New Zealand is named after the Dutch province of Zeeland, not the Danish island of Zealand (Sjælland).

New Zealand acquired its current name in 1645 when Dutch cartographers began to refer to the island as "Nova Zeelandia," which was later anglicized to "New Zealand" by Capt. James Cook.

The island was first sighted by the Dutch in 1642 and called "Staaten Landt" (State Lands) by explorer Abel Tasman.


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Calvin and Hobbes is a daily comic strip by American cartoonist Bill Watterson that was syndicated from November 18, 1985 to December 31, 1995. The strip follows the humorous antics of Calvin, a precocious, mischievous, and adventurous six-year-old boy, and Hobbes, his sardonic stuffed tiger.

While the characters, typical of such media, never age throughout the strip's 10-year syndication, if Calvin was six in 1985, that would mean that at the present time, he is thirty-seven years old.

Similarly, under the same conditions, Bart Simpson (age ten in 1987) is thirty-nine, Stewie Griffin (age one in 1999) is eighteen, Bobby Hill (age eleven in 1997) is thirty, Charlie Brown (age four in 1950, though aged slowly up to age eight in ensuing years) is sixty-nine or seventy, and Archie Andrews (sixteen in 1941) is ninety-one (or, more likely, dead).


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Rysky wrote:
"Borrowed", eh?

Don't blame me, I just copied it from Wikipedia.


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The githyanki are a fictional humanoid race in the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Githyanki first appeared in, and on the cover of, the 1981 edition of the Fiend Folio, and were originally introduced by writer Charles Stross in his Advanced Dungeons & Dragons campaign.

Stross borrowed the name from a fictional race mentioned in the 1977 novel Dying of the Light, the first full-length novel by a critically-acclaimed but mostly unknown short story writer named George R.R. Martin.


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Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
007 James Bond actor Daniel Craig is a huge science fiction fan, in particular the television series Firefly, Doctor Who, and especially Star Trek. A self-described "old-hand Trekkie," Craig auditioned for the role of Montgomery "Scotty" Scott in director J.J. Abrams' 2009 Star Trek film reboot, but lost out to Hot Fuzz actor Simon Pegg.
the latter allows me to forgive the former.

Craig is also a fan of the Star Wars films, and after pleading with J.J. Abrams, got to portray an unnamed First Order stormtrooper (a fairly extensive cameo, but uncredited) in 2015's Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens.

"I will remove these restraints and leave the cell with the door open. ...and I'll drop my weapon."


5 people marked this as a favorite.

In the third supplement to the original Dungeons & Dragons rules (1974-1976), Eldritch Wizardry, writer Brian Blume invented two artifacts he called the Hand and Eye of Vecna. These were supposedly the only remnants of an evil lich, Vecna, who had been destroyed long ago. The name "Vecna" is an anagram of "Vance," the surname of fantasy author Jack Vance, whose "fire-and-forget" magic system is used in Dungeons & Dragons.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

007 James Bond actor Daniel Craig is a huge science fiction fan, in particular the television series Firefly, Doctor Who, and especially Star Trek. A self-described "old-hand Trekkie," Craig auditioned for the role of Montgomery "Scotty" Scott in director J.J. Abrams' 2009 Star Trek film reboot, but lost out to Hot Fuzz actor Simon Pegg.


6 people marked this as a favorite.

On a 1999 episode of TV series 3rd Rock From The Sun entitled "Dick's Big Giant Headache, part 1," series protagonist Dick Solomon (John Lithgow) meets the character Big Giant Head (William Shatner) at the airport. During the scene, Big Giant Head mentions "seeing something on the wing of the plane," to which Dick replies, "the same thing happened to me!" This is a reference to the fact that both Shatner and Lithgow played variations on the same character in the 1963 Twilight Zone episode "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet," and the "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet" segment of the 1983 film The Twilight Zone: The Movie, respectively.


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In case you needed more evidence for Final Fantasy X's status as a glorious train wreck:

The song "Otherworld," featured in the 2001 video game Final Fantasy X, was written by composer Nobuo Uematsu and Black Mages guitarist Michio Okamiya, with lyrics by translator Alexander O. Smith.

The song was already fully written and partially recorded when Smith was tasked with writing lyrics for it based on a scratch track. Smith's lyrics were loosely based on The Song of Wandering Aengus, a poem by W. B. Yeats.

During the writing process, Smith mistook a guitar solo as another part that he had to fill with lyrics, and so he wrote in a spoken word section as, in Smith's words, "one of those Limp Bizkit-style breakdowns." Uematsu liked the result and included it in the final song.

The final version of the song was recorded by the Black Mages, featuring lead vocals from Bill Muir, lead vocalist of American Straight Edge deathcore band XtillIdieX.


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The opossums, also known as possums, are marsupial mammals of the order Didelphimorphia. The largest order of marsupials in the Western Hemisphere, it comprises 103 or more species in 19 genera. Opossums originated in South America, and entered North America in the Great American Interchange following the connection of the two continents. Their unspecialized biology, flexible diet, and reproductive habits make them successful colonizers and survivors in diverse locations and conditions.

The word "opossum" is borrowed from the Virginia Algonquian (Powhatan) language, and was first recorded between 1607 and 1611 by the Jamestown colonists John Smith (as "opassom") and William Strachey (as "aposoum"). The word likely derives from the Proto-Algonquian word wapathemw, meaning "white animal".

They are also commonly called possums, particularly in the Southern United States and Midwest. Following the discovery of Australia, the term "possum" was borrowed to describe distantly related Australian marsupials of the suborder Phalangeriformes, which are more closely related to other Australian marsupials such as kangaroos.

Opossums have a remarkably robust immune system, and show partial or total immunity to the venom of rattlesnakes, cottonmouths, and other pit vipers, as well as ricin and botulinum toxin.. Opossums are about eight times less likely to carry rabies than wild dogs, and about one in eight hundred opossums is infected with this virus.

Opossums are usually solitary and nomadic, staying in one area as long as food and water are easily available. Some families will group together in ready-made burrows or even under houses. Though they will temporarily occupy abandoned burrows, they do not dig or put much effort into building their own. As nocturnal animals, they favor dark, secure areas.

When threatened or harmed, opossums will "play possum", mimicking the appearance and smell of a sick or dead animal. This physiological response is involuntary, rather than a conscious act. When an opossum is "playing possum", the animal's lips are drawn back, the teeth are bared, saliva foams around the mouth, the eyes close or half-close, and a foul-smelling fluid is secreted from the anal glands. The stiff, curled form can be prodded, turned over, and even carried away without reaction. The animal will typically regain consciousness after a period of between 40 minutes and 4 hours, a process that begins with slight twitching of the ears.

Adult opossums do not hang from trees by their tails, as sometimes depicted, though babies may dangle temporarily. Their semi-prehensile tails are not strong enough to support a mature adult's weight. Instead, the opossum uses its tail as a brace and a fifth limb when climbing. The tail is occasionally used as a grip to carry bunches of leaves or bedding materials to the nest. A mother will sometimes carry her young upon her back, where they will cling tightly even when she is climbing or running.

Threatened opossums (especially males) will growl deeply, raising their pitch as the threat becomes more urgent. Males make a clicking "smack" noise out of the side of their mouths as they wander in search of a mate, and females will sometimes repeat the sound in return. When separated or distressed, baby opossums will make a sneezing noise to signal their mother. If threatened, the baby will open its mouth and quietly hiss until the threat is gone.


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Sir Jacob Charles Vouza MBE, GM (1900 – 15 March 1984) was a native police officer of the British Solomon Islands Protectorate, who served heroically with the United States Marine Corps in the Guadalcanal campaign during World War II.

Vouza was born in Tasimboko, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, and educated at the South Seas Evangelical Mission School there. In 1916 he joined the Solomon Islands Protectorate Armed Constabulary. He retired in 1941, after 25 years of service, at the rank of Sergeant Major.

In mid-1942, Japanese forces invaded Guadalcanal. Vouza returned to active duty with the British forces, and volunteered to work with the Coastwatchers. Scotsman, Major Martin Clemens, a former British Solomon Islands Protectorate District Officer, was the officer in charge of Sgt. Maj. Vouza's brigade of native scouts. Vouza's ability as a scout had already been established when the US 1st Marine Division landed on Guadalcanal on 7 August 1942. That same day, Vouza rescued an aviator from USS Wasp who was shot down in Japanese-held territory. He guided the pilot to American lines, where he met the Marines (including memoirist Sidney Phillips) for the first time.

Vouza then volunteered to scout behind enemy lines. On 20 August, while scouting for suspected Japanese outposts, Vouza was captured by men of the Ichiki Detachment, a battalion-strength force of the Japanese 28th Infantry Regiment. Having found a small American flag in Vouza's loincloth, the Japanese tied him to a tree and tortured him for information about Allied forces. Vouza was questioned for hours, but refused to talk. He was then bayoneted in both of his arms, throat, shoulder, face, and stomach, and left to die.

After his captors departed, Vouza freed himself by chewing through the ropes with his teeth, and made his way through the miles of jungle to American lines. Before accepting medical attention from Lt. Col. Stanley Radzyminski MD, he warned Martin Clemens and Lieutenant Colonel Edwin A. Pollock (whose 2nd Battalion 1st Marines held the defences at the Ilu River mouth) that an estimated 250 to 500 Japanese soldiers were coming to attack their position at any minute. The warning against the Japanese surprise attack gave the Marines about 10 minutes to prepare their defences along the Ilu river. The subsequent Battle of the Tenaru was a clear victory for the US Marines.

After spending 12 days in the hospital and receiving 16 pints of blood, Vouza returned to duty as the chief scout for the Marines. He accompanied Lieutenant Colonel Evans F. Carlson and the 2nd Raider Battalion on their 30-day raid behind enemy lines.

Sergeant Major Vouza was highly decorated for his World War II service. The Silver Star was presented to him personally by US Major General Alexander A. Vandegrift, commanding general of the 1st Marine Division, for refusing to give information under Japanese torture. He also was awarded the Legion of Merit for outstanding service with the 2d Raider Battalion during November and December 1942, and was made an honorary Sergeant Major of the United States Marine Corps. From the British government, he received the Police Long Service Medal, the George Medal for gallant conduct and exceptional devotion to duty, and, in 1957, was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire for his long and faithful government service. In 1979, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.

After the war, Vouza continued to serve his fellow islanders. He was appointed district headman in 1949, and was president of the Guadalcanal Council from 1952 to 1958. He was a member of the British Solomon Islands Protectorate Advisory Council from 1950 to 1960. He made many friends during his association with the US Marine Corps, and Marines frequently visited him on Guadalcanal. In 1968, Vouza visited the United States as the honoured guest of the 1st Marine Division Association. He wore his Marine Corps tunic until his death on 15 March 1984, and was buried in it. A monument in his honour stands in front of the police headquarters building in Honiara, the capital of Solomon Islands.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

The name of the planet Triginta Petra in the 2012 video game Mass Effect 3 means "Thirty Rock" in Latin, a reference to the NBC sitcom 30 Rock. The description of the planet in the in-game lore mentions, "The farmer's maxim on Triginta Petra was "if you can last five seasons, you officially know what you're doing." 30 Rock had been on-air for five seasons when the game was in development (it would go on for two more seasons afterward). Finally, the capitol of the planet is referred to as "Licitron," which may be a reference to 30 Rock's Liz Lemon (played by actress Tina Fey).


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During the filming of the 1986 film Platoon, actor Keith David (The Thing, Pitch Black, Mass Effect) saved the life of co-star Charlie Sheen. While shooting in an open-doored Huey gunship, the helicopter banked too hard, and Sheen was thrown towards - and would have gone through - the open door. David grabbed Sheen by the back of his shirt and pulled him back in.

On a semi-related note, Charlie Sheen is the son of actor Martin Sheen, who played the villainous Jack Harper AKA The Illusive Man opposite Keith David (as Captain/Counselor/Admiral David Anderson) in the Mass Effect video game series.


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The oft-quoted line, "Live the good life in the off-world colonies," attributed to the sci-fi film Blade Runner (1982), is actually a misquote by actor Kevin Murphy (as the character Tom Servo) from a 1991 episode of Mystery Science Theater 3000 ("Gamera"). The actual line from Blade Runner is, "A new life awaits you in the off-world colonies."


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
Thankfully, I was forewarned when they swapped out Daeny's Fabio-lookalike boyfriend for Mr. Unremarkable the Stock Background Character.

The character of Daario Naharis on the HBO television series Game of Thrones has been played by Dutch actor Michiel Huisman since season 4 (2014). In season 3 (2013) (the character's first appearance), the character was played by British actor and rapper Ed Skrein, who was replaced between seasons due to "politics" (unconfirmed, but most likely a contractual agreement to appear in the 2015 film The Transporter Refueled). Though the character's physical appearance was changed dramatically, the character's costume remained the same between seasons.

After his roles on Game of Thrones and in The Transporter Refueled, Ed Skrein went on to play the villain Ajax (spelled F-r-a-n-c-i-s) in the 2016 comedy-action film Deadpool


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In 1997, Canadian actor Nathan Fillion (Firefly, Castle, Slither) played a small part in a little movie called Saving Private Ryan. It was only the second time Fillion had appeared in a feature film.


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The Minis Maniac wrote:
Ok here. Is a fun one. Favorite Comic Book series, hero/villain, and storyline.

Series: TIE - Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi (Dark Horse) / Hellboy (Dark Horse)

Character: Hellboy (Hellboy, Dark Horse)
Storyline: Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi: The Golden Age of the Sith / The Fall of the Sith Empire (Dark Horse)


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Rush - "Animate"


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Patrick Curtin wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
Anyone interested in a meat shield position in a Planescspe PbP?
Given my much-needed recent departure from Facebook, I'm in need of a distraction.
You feel like coming up with a 10th level heavy plate tank? It's Planescape so any race your little heart desires. Something with a good Con would help
Could you give me a brief rundown of the game concept?
Sure. A group of plane-hopping mercenaries are currently trying to figure out a mystery involving some dead and or erased gods and a sickened Yggdrasil. They are located out of Sigil, the big city at the heart of the multiverse. You could play a straight dwarf, or a half-earth elemental Orc, a fallen angel with a penchant for murder, a half-fiend paladin, a noble jinn stripped of power, you name it, the possibilities are endless. The group just needs someone to soak up some of the damage these beasties are tossing about at their level.

I just came up with the best character concept ever.


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The main character "The Avatar" in the widely-panned 1999 role-playing video game Ultima IX: Ascension was portrayed by voice actor J.C. Shakespeare. After his role in the ninth single-player Ultima game, Shakespeare played a handful of voice roles in the realms of film and gaming, such as small parts in the 2003 video game Freelancer (alongside Mass Effect's Jennifer Hale) and the 2001 animated film Waking Life (with Ethan Hawke). However, since 2004, Shakespeare has since become a licensed professional counselor and part-time new age religious blogger. And given the quality of his dramatic performances, it's a good thing, too...

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