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Downer

The Eldritch Mr. Shiny's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 11,737 posts (17,886 including aliases). 5 reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 53 aliases.


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Brad Jones drives himself insane watching The Oogieloves In The Big Balloon Adventure (NSFW)


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Celestial Healer wrote:

"Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall into an open sewer and die."

-Mel Brooks

"Anyone can s#@# their pants on purpose, it's not funny. Someone not realizing that they s~~! their pants-- now that's comedy."

- Noah "Spoony" Antwiler


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As per International Astronomical Union regulations, all montes (mountains) on Titan, a moon of the planet Saturn, are named after mountains from the fictional Middle-earth created by J.R.R. Tolkien. In addition, all colles (hills) are named after characters from Tolkien's Middle-earth, and freta (straits) are named after characters from Isaac Asimov's Foundation series. Finally, labyrinthi (intersecting valley/ridge complexes) and planitiae (plains) are named after planets from Frank Herbert's Dune universe.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

The name "William Shakespeare" is an anagram of "Here was I, like a psalm."

William Shakespeare was 46 years old when the King James Bible was created.

The 46th word of Psalm 46 in the King James Bible is "shake," and the 46th word from the bottom of the page is "spear."


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"Weird Al" Yankovic - "My Bologna"


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In March of 2000, BioWare and Wizards of the Coast writer Drew Karpyshyn (Mass Effect, Star Wars, Baldur's Gate) appeared on an episode of the game show Jeopardy!, finishing third.


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AdmiralAckbar wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
** spoiler omitted **
(Linkified... sorry)

Spoiler:
Well, it is a trap...

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Jennica Fortune wrote:

(Do You Wanna Date My) Avatar

The Guild

Yeah that's the problem with profanity filters... necessary evil. The Star Wars Old Republic profanity filter is a 'smart' filter that tries to catch attempts to mask profanity. So, Here is just a few legitmate things you can say that are censored.

OPS 7pm ********!
Yes! I just got the ************ title!
My gunslinger is ************ skill tree!

The offending words are, in order Saturday, Bar'sen'thor, sharpshooter.

Ironically, assassin they actually fixed to not trip the filter, showing it's possible to make exceptions, they just don't care enough to fix anything other than that class name despite me sending them a bug report about it every month for three years (every month since launch. Beta didn't have a profanity filter.)

Years ago on these forums, the word "cock" would trip the profanity filter, which led to the phrase "obscene head gesture" being used from time to time over in the play-by-post section.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The George Foreman Lean Mean Fat-Reducing Grilling Machine, commonly known as the George Foreman Grill, is an indoor, electrically-heated grill manufactured by Spectrum Brands (previously Rayovac Inc. and subsidiary Russell Hobbs / Salton Inc). Invented by Michael Boehm and Bob Johnson, concept was pitched by Tsann Kuen to Salton Inc. Salton sent samples of the grill to George Foreman's colleagues, who then sent the grill to George to test out. Boehm and Johnson had nothing to do with teaming up the grill and George, or with the final marketing campaign.

The worldwide popularity of the George Foreman grill has resulted in sales of over 100 million units since it was first launched, a feat that was achieved in a little over 15 years. Although Foreman has never confirmed exactly how much he has earned from the endorsement, Salton Inc paid him $137 million in 1999 in order to buy out the right to use his name. Previous to that he was being paid about 40% of the profits on each grill sold (earning him $4.5 million a month in payouts at its peak). It is estimated that Foreman has made a total of over $200 million from the endorsement, a substantially higher sum than that which he earned as a boxer.

The success of the George Foreman Grill spawned a variety of similar celebrity-endorsed products such as the Evander Holyfield Real Deal Grill, the Carl Lewis Health Grill, and the Hulk Hogan Ultimate Grill. In Asia, the George Foreman grill is jointly promoted by George Foreman and Jackie Chan.


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In 1994, at the age of 45, boxer George Foreman became the oldest world heavyweight champion in history after his defeat by knockout of 27-year-old Michael Moorer. Foreman still holds this record over two decades later, as well as the record for being the second-oldest world champion boxer in any weight class (after Bernard Hopkins Jr, who won the world middleweight championship title in 2011 at the age of 46). Foreman retired in 1997 at the age of 48, with a final record of 76 wins (including 68 knockouts) and 5 losses.

George Foreman has twelve children-- five sons and seven daughters. All five of his sons are named George, and one of his daughters is named Georgetta.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

The people of Canada consume more Kraft Macaroni & Cheese (sold under the name Kraft Dinner in Canada) than any other nation on earth, purchasing 1.7 million (~24%) of the 7 million boxes sold globally each week. The packaged dry pasta and cheese mix is the most popular grocery item in the country, where "Kraft Dinner" (often referred to simply as "KD") has become a generic trademark of sorts for macaroni and cheese.

Maybe it's the choice of labeling?

John Q. Canadian Shopper: "Ah-ha, yes! 'Dinner!' That is precisely what I want!"

Not sure if it's due to my growing up within relative proximity to the Canadian border, but that's basically my thought process when buying anything at the grocery store.

"Yes... yes... it says "food" right on the label. And it's on sale! This will go perfectly with tonight's selection of bottom-shelf intoxicants!"


3 people marked this as a favorite.

The people of Canada consume more Kraft Macaroni & Cheese (sold under the name Kraft Dinner in Canada) than any other nation on earth, purchasing 1.7 million (~24%) of the 7 million boxes sold globally each week. The packaged dry pasta and cheese mix is the most popular grocery item in the country, where "Kraft Dinner" (often referred to simply as "KD") has become a generic trademark of sorts for macaroni and cheese.

To quote Canadian writer Douglas Coupland, "Cheese plays a weirdly large dietary role in the lives of Canadians, who have a more intimate and intense relationship with Kraft food products than the citizens of any other country...In particular, Kraft macaroni and cheese, known simply as Kraft Dinner, is the biggie, probably because it so precisely laser-targets the favoured Canadian food groups: fat, sugar, starch and salt"


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The cover song collaboration you never knew you wanted:

Rob Zombie, featuring Lionel Richie and Trina - "BrickHouse 2000" (The Commodores cover (sort of))


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In-universe, The Phantom's skull ring was originally owned by the Roman emperor Nero, and was forged from the nails with which Jesus was hung from the cross. This ring, known as the Ring of Evil, is worn on The Phantom's right hand, and is used to mark villains and evildoers (generally by way of The Phantom punching them in the face). Lesser-known is the Ring of Good, worn on The Phantom's left hand, which is used to mark fellow heroes and those under The Phantom's protection (generally not by punching them, though).


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Finally, an explanation of why The Phantom is inexplicably purple.


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American comic strip hero The Phantom, created by writer Lee Falk and artist Ray Moore in 1936, was the first published* fictional hero to wear the skintight costume which has became a hallmark of comic-book superheroes, and was the first shown in a mask with no visible pupils. Comics historian Peter Coogan has described the Phantom as a "transitional" figure, since the Phantom has some of the characteristics of pulp magazine heroes like The Shadow and the Spider, as well as anticipating the features of comic book heroes such as Superman, Batman, and Captain America.

During World War II, U.S. Soldiers received care packages containing Phantom comics. The soldiers stationed in Papua New Guinea shared these comics with natives there, and The Phantom became extremely popular among the tribes. The Papuan people who could read English would read the stories and share the images with others. Since the character's introduction, The Phantom's image can often be found painted on ceremonial shields or alongside other tribal art.

*early designs of Superman from 1934-1935 show the character's familiar underpants-over-leotard costume design, but the character would not see print until 1938.


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Alfred "Weird Al" Yankovic acquired his future stage name while studying architecture at California Polytechnic State University. Yankovic originally chose the name for his stint as a college radio DJ (in tribute to Dr. Demento), and retained the name after beginning his career in musical comedy.


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Legendary actor Toshirô Mifune, though ethnically Japanese, was born in Qungdao, Shandong Province, China (to Japanese immigrant parents), and raised in Dalian, Liaoning Province. Mifune never set foot in mainland Japan until he was drafted by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service at the age of 20, where he served for the duration of World War II attached to the Aerial Photography Unit.


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The "W" and "C" keys are separated only by the "D" key on a QWERTY keyboard, meaning that you're just one finger-slip away from accidentally turning in a term paper on the history of armed wombat.


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British character actor Burn Gorman, famous for his roles as Karl Tanner on the HBO fantasy series Game of Thrones, Major Edmund Hewlett on the AMC historical drama series Turn: Washington's Spies, and Dr. Hermann Gottlieb in director Guillermo del Toro's 2013 film Pacific Rim, also performs on stage as a beatboxer under the name of "BB Burn."

Gorman performed as a member of human beatbox / hip-hop outfit Drool Skool alongside performer Simon "Shlomo" Kahn, and was crowned the BBC 1Xtra Human Beatbox Champion of 2003 after defeating performer Desebel in the championship round.


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I think... it might be time to stop trying to integrate with the people of Earth, and to return to my home planet. The experiment has been a failure.


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After a record-breaking warm December, we've now got a record-breaking snowstorm in January. 13 inches of snow in six hours today. Site still isn't fully enclosed*, and it's snowing indoors on the third floor. F$!+. This. Noise.

*work b$&!@%*@:
The building I work in is shaped like a big letter "J." As of right now, the bottom part of the "J" is wired, insulated, and rocked; the upright of the "J" is partially wired, partially insulated, enclosed, but not rocked; and the top of the "J" isn't even fully framed yet, with open eaves and giant gaps in the walls. Currently, there is no permanent power, and only three temporary gas-powered heaters in the whole building. Our wires are cold to the point of cracking, the plumbers' glue won't bond, the drywallers' mud is frozen solid, and now the framers are trying to hang siding in a f!&&ing blizzard. The mind boggles.


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If one were to inject reality into metaphor, given the properties of the metal, a cast-iron alibi would, ironically, be weaker and more brittle than a forged one.


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Water got into the main temp power box at work, froze, and jostled the neutral line loose, which is a Bad Thing. It took us six hours to figure out what the problem was, one hour of which (for me) was spent standing in knee-deep snow in a ditch, getting sandblasted by the wind while waiting to flip a switch. In addition, we now know what twelve lightbulbs exploding in quick succession looks and sounds like, and also what happens when you run 220 volts through a microwave oven.


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no no no no no no no


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Watching Gamers II: Dorkness Rising and thinking on better times.


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gran rey de los mono wrote:

So, there was a bit of a snafu at work recently. I tried logging on to the website where we get our pay stubs and whatnot from, and couldn't. I thought "Maybe I changed the password and don't remember", so I tried the "Forgot your password" link. It gave an error message. So, I asked some other people at work, and it turned out no-one could get into their accounts. We let the manager know, and he called corporate to see what the deal was. As it happened, someone had recently tried to apply and update to the website, and accidentally deleted the login information for over 3,500 employees nationwide. Whoops. So the tech team was busy reactivating all the accounts and issuing temporary passwords so people could login, set real passwords (and security questions, those got wiped too), and actually see their account info again.

Just a little mistake, could happen to anyone really. Just very glad it wasn't me.

The company where I work is in the process of switching to an all-paperless system of electronic time cards, online billing, and e-checks. Everyone looks at me like I'm from Mars when I tell them that I'd prefer to keep the old system. I've had way more experience with online payment systems getting completely borked for no apparent reason than with paper checks getting lost in the wash. (note: the current system entails payment being deposited directly into employees' bank accounts, then leaving paper pay stubs & other paperwork in employee mailboxes at the main office)

For example, when I worked for Sears (all-online system), I didn't get paid for six weeks, then received a month's pay via direct deposit over the course of two days. I'm still missing the last two weeks' pay two years later (I also remember getting locked out of the system numerous times). On the other hand, when I worked for Treadway Service Center (old-school paper time cards that were entered into a computer database, then filed), they never missed a paycheck.


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*accidentally tries to open beer bottle with car keys instead of (official Pathfinder RPG) bottle opener on same key ring*

To quote one of my coworkers, I'm not an idiot, I'm just incompetent.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Got slightly tipsy. Went to grocery store. Came back with a bottle of seltzer water, a bag of onions, and five packages of Polish sausage. This is real life right now.

*also bagels


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Got slightly tipsy. Went to grocery store. Came back with a bottle of seltzer water, a bag of onions, and five packages of Polish sausage. This is real life right now.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Tacticslion wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
I think I've figured out my problem. I started out wanting to paint like this or this, but now I'm trying to paint like this or this, but still market to the same clients. I don't know who buys the weird stuff.
I'm totally stealing these, unless you'd rather me not, in which case I won't.

None of these are mine-- images are (C) respectively: Donato Giancola, Frank Frazetta, Andrew Trabbold, Arthur Asa.

If you're interested in hiring me, though...


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Rosita the Riveter wrote:
Windows 10 Steam.

I'm guessing that the PC version is crash-prone then. I've had numerous crashes of games on the 360 (I'm looking at you, DA:I), but precisely zero on the original Xbox in the 12 years I've had it. Granted, I own a total of nine games between the two systems (Elder Scrolls III and V; Dragon Age trilogy; Mass Effect trilogy; KotOR), so my perspective lacks some breadth here.


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Rosita the Riveter wrote:
I love KOTOR, but it crashes. So. Much. Can't get two planets in without losing an entire sequence of saves.

PC or console?


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My knowledge of technology pretty much stops at about 1995.


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Back to playing KotOR for the original Xbox. Looks funky on the flatscreen I inherited from a previous roommate, so I've been playing it on my "garbage TV" (literally-- it's an old 26" Orion CRT-TV that I found in a dumpster) through an RF modulator box. Also, it amuses me to no end that the instruction manual for the (now 12-year-old) game has instructions on how to set up a DSL modem and connect it to your Xbox, as well as a warning that it could damage rear-projection "big screen" TVs if left playing for too long. Technology progresses fast these days.


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Limeylongears wrote:

Ex-Lady Longears wants to meet up in a couple of weeks.

I'm not honestly sure how I feel about this.

Know that feel bro. Times at least 2 or 3.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Rosita the Riveter wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Orthos wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:
Orthos wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Orthos wrote:
Rosita the Riveter wrote:
there aren't any Walmarts in San Francisco
O_o
It's a big city, so that makes a certain amount of sense. They tend not to grow them in urban centers, mainly sticking to the outlying communities. I bet there's a couple around Oakland or San Jose or somewhere.
... really? I always thought the bigger the city, the more likely one's going to show up. There were like six of them in the portions of the Phoenix metro area where I lived (Phoenix, Tempe, Mesa, Chandler), and there's almost always one or two in the cities in Tennessee and Georgia.
Wal-Mart is not as prevalent on the west coast.
I suppose that would explain it. I suppose the fault was mine for assuming that since there were enough of them to go around in Arizona, the same would go for California. Probably shouldn't be surprised I was wrong.
Sort of like how Dunkin Donuts has the slogan "America Runs On Dunkin," yet they have pretty much zero commercial presence west of the Mississippi River.
Growing up in San Jose, Dunkin Donuts was most certainly a thing. In San Francisco, donuts in general aren't really much of a thing.

Hence "pretty much." I've seen them out west, but their niche has been pretty well filled by Starbucks.

Meanwhile, in the northeast, they're multiplying like cockroaches. Just within the greater Syracuse area, there are 25-30 of them. Hell, there are two of them on my street, and another one on a cross street, all within 8 or 9 blocks of each other. It's our version of the "Starbucks across the street from a Starbucks" phenomenon.


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Icyshadow wrote:

Hey guys, kind of an important question.

Do any of you have any project in need of a fantasy writer with +5 years of experience, or know anyone like that?

Since I was given a rant about how I really should get my name out so I can actually fulfill my dreams, and my blog is far from enough to achieve that.

No ongoing projects, but would be willing to collaborate on a webcomic or something.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I think I've figured out my problem. I started out wanting to paint like this or this, but now I'm trying to paint like this or this, but still market to the same clients. I don't know who buys the weird stuff.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Orthos wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:
Orthos wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Orthos wrote:
Rosita the Riveter wrote:
there aren't any Walmarts in San Francisco
O_o
It's a big city, so that makes a certain amount of sense. They tend not to grow them in urban centers, mainly sticking to the outlying communities. I bet there's a couple around Oakland or San Jose or somewhere.
... really? I always thought the bigger the city, the more likely one's going to show up. There were like six of them in the portions of the Phoenix metro area where I lived (Phoenix, Tempe, Mesa, Chandler), and there's almost always one or two in the cities in Tennessee and Georgia.
Wal-Mart is not as prevalent on the west coast.
I suppose that would explain it. I suppose the fault was mine for assuming that since there were enough of them to go around in Arizona, the same would go for California. Probably shouldn't be surprised I was wrong.

Sort of like how Dunkin Donuts has the slogan "America Runs On Dunkin," yet they have pretty much zero commercial presence west of the Mississippi River.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The second-largest single employer (the first being International Paper, which employs roughly 15% of the town) in my hometown of Ticonderoga, NY (pop. ~5,000) is the local Super Wal-mart.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Orthos wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Orthos wrote:
Rosita the Riveter wrote:
there aren't any Walmarts in San Francisco
O_o
It's a big city, so that makes a certain amount of sense. They tend not to grow them in urban centers, mainly sticking to the outlying communities. I bet there's a couple around Oakland or San Jose or somewhere.
... really? I always thought the bigger the city, the more likely one's going to show up. There were like six of them in the portions of the Phoenix metro area where I lived (Phoenix, Tempe, Mesa, Chandler), and there's almost always one or two in the cities in Tennessee and Georgia.

Wal-mart relies a lot on volume, and most large cities simply don't have the space for them. For example, the closest Wal-marts in relation to New York City are across the border in New Jersey, and the closest one in New York State is in Valley Stream, Long Island.

On the other hand, small to mid-size cities, particularly in economically depressed areas, seem to be spawning pools for the damned things. There are six Wal-marts in and around Albany, NY, for example.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Last time I was in Oakland, I was stranded with no car and little cash for two days in a neighborhood that seemed to consist primarily of big box stores and abandoned warehouses.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Orthos wrote:
Rosita the Riveter wrote:
there aren't any Walmarts in San Francisco
O_o

It's a big city, so that makes a certain amount of sense. They tend not to grow them in urban centers, mainly sticking to the outlying communities. I bet there's a couple around Oakland or San Jose or somewhere.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Just had an illustrator friend of mine from college reconnect with me this morning. He'd dropped off the map for about four years after having some health problems (ditched his phone, deleted his e-mail and Facebook accounts), and I didn't even know he was still working and living in the area. Weird.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Tonight's jam


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Since the death of singer David Bowie on 10 January 2016, eighteen of his albums have re-entered the UK album charts (not counting his most recent release, Blackstar, which currently rests at #1). Of the nineteen currently charting albums, ten of them are in the top 40. In addition, thirteen Bowie singles have entered the top 100, including the song "Heroes," currently holding its highest top 100 position of all time (it peaked at #24 in 1977, and currently occupies the #12 slot). Of the thirteen currently charting singles, five of them are in the top 40.

Source: BBC News, 15 January 2016


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Dragon Age: Inquisition and all Xbox 360 DLC completed. Time to start saving up for that Xbox One so I can finish the damn thing, I guess. At least that will give me time to finish Knights of the Old Republic and play through the Mass Effect series again.

Or, you know, regain my lost social life.

Nah...

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