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Imron Gauthfallow

Tequila Sunrise's page

3,311 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


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Saw Berserk 1, and wow! Was not expecting a feature-length experience, and I was not expecting rated R material.

I'm not complaining though, and I hope Netflix gets more episodes soon!


Blayde MacRonan wrote:
Finally watched the 1st season of Psycho-Pass. Loved it. Can't wait to start the second season.

I will declare a personal holiday when it does.

Sorta Spoiler:

Spoiler:
I love how the last scene of S1 plays off of the first. A bit trite maybe, but it keeps the show on the gray side of black.


Hama wrote:
Rewatched Bleach. Pretty decent without the fillers. Fights are awesome.

How do you avoid the fillers? Is there a list of filler episodes somewhere?

I enjoyed season 1, and was psyched for season 2 by the time I got around to watching it. But the way that season 2 starts everything back at square one -- both in terms of characters losing most or all of their butt-kicking power, and in terms of being utterly clueless and powerless against the next big threat (bounts) -- killed my interest after five or so episodes.

Kind of like playing through a very tough 1-10 campaign with a hard-won victory at the climax, and then the DM saying "Does everyone have their old 1st-level CSs? Good! Trash your current ones, and bring the old ones next weekend..."


Vincent Takeda wrote:
Tequila Sunrise wrote:


Out of curiosity, why do you prefer 2e saves?

A 2e warrior starts out horrible against breath weapons, but ends up being the most resistant to them... because he starts out less educated than a mage or a priest or a thief probably would be about the nature of them... but they learn fast and they learn the hard way and by the time they cap out, they have a better ability to not let that horrible thing happen to them than any other class.

Rogues start out pretty good against poisons and paralysis because sure... They probably use a lot of it... But they dont every get much better at it over time because you're resistance to poison is more of a 'better at avoiding it' kind of way where a warrior starts out worse at it but at the end of the day is way better at resisting it because he's a badass and has more body control and just fights through it by physical superiority...

So every thing you could save against has its own 'personality'...

Wow, you gleaned all of that from a bunch of numbers in a game book? People really do think about things fundamentally differently!

Thank you for your thoughts. :)


DM Under The Bridge wrote:
Tequila Sunrise wrote:
Out of curiosity, why do you prefer 2e saves?
I prefer 2e saves, and how brilliant some classes were in certain areas, and absolutely abysmal in others.

Aren't the fort, ref, and will progressions part of what makes modern classes brilliant/abysmal in various areas?


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Hey James,

Do you have an opinion on healing spells as conjurations vs. as necromancies? It's one of the 3.0 changes that still has me scratching my head, not least of all because 3.5, PF, and 5e have all stuck with it.

Thanks!


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I learned to play rpgs with 2e during the 90s, but there're only three things that I miss from that era:

1. Tony DiTerlizzi's artwork, which I didn't begin appreciating until Planescape.
2. All of the amazing campaign settings, particularly Planescape.
3. Healing magic being part of the necromancy school, where it belongs!

Pretty much every other change has been a positive in my book, or at worst neutral, although I do now have a better understanding of why a lot of old school stuff is the way it is, and why many older D&Ders have stuck with pre-2000 editions or switched to retroclones.

I was a 'mayfly' until last year, but am now a happy 4e grognard. ;)

Vincent Takeda wrote:
I prefer the old older more narrow saving throws of 2e as well though.

Out of curiosity, why do you prefer 2e saves?


ElterAgo wrote:

This group (GM and all but one of the players) was absolutely stuck in the old strength Fighter, dex Rogue, Arcane Caster (blaster), and Cleric (healbot) as the only role possibilities. The guy they apparently usually talked into running the healbot refused to do so again (good for him) and no one else wanted to do it.

I tried to explain how it really wasn’t needed and most groups don’t do that anymore. Especially at the low level they were playing. I offered to make a cleric that would be capable of using the wands and stuff to heal out of combat, but wouldn’t usually be healing during a fight. I am obviously an idiot, since that would be “just be a waste of everyone’s time. It is completely impossible to play without a healer. Everyone knows that if they have any experience playing at all.”

I also offered to make a ranger scout to handle the stealth, perception, and disabling activities. At their low levels magical traps are nearly nonexistent. But if they seem likely, there is an archtype that gives them the trap finding to deal with magical traps. Again… “We don’t need that. Everyone already wants to play a fighter type. We need a rogue or cleric for healing.”

The frump is strong in this group.

I would've been tempted to stick around too, just to see what happened if they couldn't convince anyone to play what they wanted. Would they eventually stomp out in a huff, or eventually sit down to play and possibly have fun in spite of themselves?


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Alynthar42 wrote:
Thank you, Divinitus. You seem to see what I'm getting at. I'm not talking about the RAW so much as whether the RAW is actually right. I feel like animating a body is no different than animating a mud golem. There's no soul in the body anymore, and it may as well be used to kill some bad guys, rather than just sit there.

Hi, Divinitus! You're absolutely right that there's no philosophical reason that raising the dead is automatically Evil; it's just one of those legacies that's been inherited from 3e D&D. A lot of DMs either invent a good reason for undead and undead creation to be Evil, or rule this legacy away.

(The smarmy reactions you're getting are because this is a perennial hot-button topic that invariably ends in flame-wars.)

deusvult wrote:
I still say writers got it wrong to change them to "conjuration".

Yep, this is one of the things that TSR got 100% right.


GypsyMischief wrote:

@Glass, Fighters at least slowly amassed multiple attacks per round back in the day (Pre WOTC)

So, the answer to my question is yes, iterative attacks are part of what a large amount of people expected when they picked up Pathfinder for the first time and would have been missed dearly had the game been written without them.

I think at this point there'd be some carping about removing iteratives, but assuming they were replaced by something reasonable, most fans would get over it.


GypsyMischief wrote:


I don't know, man, total half baked thought, but has anyone else thought about this? I have no desire to like...re-write Pathfinder without iterative attacks, they seem like a sacred cow that we could let go of.

People have been talking about this since...well, probably since 3e came out in 2000. So you're not alone. :)

I think the 3e-style Star Wars rpg granted bonus damage based on BAB rather than iterative attacks, so if you're into house ruling you could do something like that. (I'd suggest bonus weapon dice every few levels rather than static damage bonuses, but that's a detail.) Couple this with Scythia's elimination of the full-round attack action, and I think you're onto something!

Alternatively, if you don't want to deal with the ripple effects of removing iterative attacks, there's 4e as Opuk0 mentioned. And contrary to what some would have you think, 4e has a lot of other perks!


Paladin of Baha-who? wrote:

I've noticed that a lot of people who like to think themselves superior to others pretend that their position is the result of pure logic, while their opponents is that of invalid emotional reasoning.

Which is nonsense, of course. Conservative positions are based on emotions just as much as liberal ones are. Emotions are what we humans use to make decisions. We don't generally use logic. Only in some very limited realms is logic used, and even then it's used to make logical inferences based on premises chosen by means other than logic (such as 'human life has inherent value', 'causing harm to others is wrong', 'freedom has inherent value', 'god exists', etc.)

Yup, everyone's the hero of their own story.

And the rationalist of their own story.

And the honorably-emotional-when-conventionally-appropriate character of their own story.


LazarX wrote:
Tacticslion wrote:
The problem with Carlin's idea is that then literally anything you say is perfectly okay as long as you mean it in jest. Considering words have actual meanings and some people attach great significance to those meanings, he is fundamentally incorrect. Words are used as a form of communication. If you communicate something hurtful, even on accident, you are still being hurtful and should change.

It's important to remember thqt Carlin was a comedian, not a philosopher, or a social scientist, and a lot of what he says, we can accept because he was saying it on stage and most importantly... had the talent to be funny while doing it.

Using George Carlin's standup routine as a blunt force model for one's social interactions can prove very hazardous to your standing in society.

QFT. Like many performers, there are different ways to interpret Carlin's acts:

1. We can take everything he said at face value, and thus come to the conclusion that he was a nutcase.

2. We can take everything he said as total BS, and thus reason that he only said it because people think it's funny and were willing to pay to hear it.

3. We can take everything he said with a grain of salt, and look for an underlying message. Which in Carlin's case is "Question everything."


Freehold DM wrote:
I like Carlin in limited doses.

That's fair. His routines are pretty intense.

Carlin began one of his later-life bits with: "I like people. But I like them in short bursts."

Being an introvert, I really relate to that. :D


Tacticslion wrote:
The problem with Carlin's idea is that then literally anything you say is perfectly okay as long as you mean it in jest. Considering words have actual meanings and some people attach great significance to those meanings, he is fundamentally incorrect. Words are used as a form of communication. If you communicate something hurtful, even on accident, you are still being hurtful and should change.

There is absolutely something to be said of being considerate of others. Some people have personal reasons to be sensitive to certain words, such as LazarX; and some words have been used against entire groups of people, thus truly warranting consideration as 'bad words.'

But four-letter words that society has arbitrarily categorized as 'bad words' for the sake of having bad words? Those are just society-imposed emotional pressure-points. Which I get; I was sensitive to cuss words when I was a kid. But then I went to college, met new people, discovered comedians, and realized that life is better after being desensitized to harmless words.

And it's not like I cuss a blue-streak now, or can't access my 'clean language mode' for an interview or whatever. I'm just not shocked when someone drops a "F#$! yeah, nat 20!" anymore, and I base my language use on my own judgment rather than which words my mother doesn't like.

This is why I support everyone making friends with a 'sailor' or two, or watching a few colorful comedian routines. For those who don't like GC, there have been plenty more since his career took off. :)


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On Cuss Words

Spoiler:

"There are no bad words; only bad thoughts and bad intentions."

-- George Carlin

On Topic

Spoiler:

"I drank your milkshake. I drank it up!!!

--Daniel Plainview, There Will Be Blood


Shisumo wrote:
Would it surprise you, then, to learn that there's a transgender channeler in the series? This shocks the hell out of everyone who realizes it when it happens, and the implications aren't explored nearly as much as I would've liked, but it's definitely a thing.

I remember nothing of this...I've got to reread this series!


Lord Snow wrote:
Quote:

This is speculation on my part, but I suspect the whole duality theme turns some people off because it plays on and emphasizes those traditional gender themes -- WoT has a variety of characters, but in many respects it's about men being good ol' fashioned men and women being good ol' fashioned women. The way that saidin and saidar act fundamentally differently, and how channelers live or die depending on their attitude toward their half of the One Power, for example.

I do love the series, but it can easily be read as an oversimplified metaphor for gender and a glorification of traditional gender norms. If I fit a bit less neatly into my traditional gender box, I might have been too turned off to get past the first book.

You know all of these things from reading the series - the constant bickering between men and women is really annoying in it - but just from hearing the concept of channeling according to the born sex? It seems a bit far fetched to denounce a story on something as simple as that...

*shrug*

Maybe the gender-based channeling concept is enough of a red flag for Scythia -- or maybe I'm completely wrong about Scythia's reasons for avoiding WoT. If Scythia replies again, maybe we'll find out.


Lord Snow wrote:
Scythia wrote:
Xzaral wrote:
The source is split into two gender based halves, Saidar and Saidin. Men draw on Saidin while woman draw upon Saidar. The Dark One managed to taint the male half of the source Saidin during his battle with Lews Therin Telamon. This in turn causes people who draw upon it to go crazy. The more you draw the faster it is, but it's inevitable.
Thanks. Jokes about padding aside, this makes me feel even better about deciding to skip the series.
Why? what do you find so objectionable about the idea?

This is speculation on my part, but I suspect the whole duality theme turns some people off because it plays on and emphasizes those traditional gender themes -- WoT has a variety of characters, but in many respects it's about men being good ol' fashioned men and women being good ol' fashioned women. The way that saidin and saidar act fundamentally differently, and how channelers live or die depending on their attitude toward their half of the One Power, for example.

I do love the series, but it can easily be read as an oversimplified metaphor for gender and a glorification of traditional gender norms. If I fit a bit less neatly into my traditional gender box, I might have been too turned off to get past the first book.


Xzaral wrote:
Reading through the comments here makes me wonder who besides myself actually finished the entire series.

*raises hand*

And someday I'm going to read them all again, consecutively this time...or possibly listen to the audio books. I've forgotten a lot, and so many books do tend to blend together. :)


Tels wrote:
On RWBY and Nora...

I realize that I'm late to the RWBY party, but I just have to comment on how much I love it!

It's rare that such a cutesy show grabs my attention, but RWBY has managed to be just the right mix of gonzo action, character development, fantastical physics, steady plot, allegories to messy real-life issues, music, and yes, gunblades!

There are of course the obligatory too-skimpy-for-school skirts and blouses, but there's also a bit of beefcake and a girl-on-boy ass-slap.

Apparently the creator died this very month though, which is a huge shame. :(


Aranna wrote:
So will you share who you identify with?

Hm, that's a good question, and I can't think of a clear answer. I don't think there's ever been an anime character who I felt a strong connection with; I guess I watch anime more for the fantastical physics and strange settings than the characters.


Freehold DM wrote:
Tequila Sunrise wrote:

Has anyone seen a cgi movie called Harlock: Space Pirate?

Yes, it's every bit as ridiculous as it sounds, and I'm still not quite sure what I think about it after watching it twice. It's a lot like some fan of Final Fantasy and Pirates of the Caribbean was given free reign and a huge cgi budget. The phrase 'so bad that it's good' comes to mind, and there's something about it that's planted itself in my head...

Indeed, it is a remake/update of the original series. Watch it with the fact that it was made in the 70s in mind.

I would not say it was "so bad it was good", I would say it was faithful to the original. I'm glad they didn't try to "update" it with ideas that make sense to modern sensibilities and continued with the rather outrageous 70's ideas.

Greylurker wrote:


if you want to watch the original they have it over at Crunchyroll

Oh wow, that's old school!

Maybe the original will explain the Mimay...


Alzrius wrote:
Tequila Sunrise wrote:
And no, I'm not up for dissecting all these post-fragments with you; I'm back at school and don't have the time or the energy.
So you want to respond, but don't have the time or the energy to engage in the actual debate that's going on. That's fine, but it makes it rather hard to discuss the issue with you when you don't want to have the give-and-take that's at the core of a conversation.

I was rather naively hoping that, despite your vociferous criticism of the other side of the fanservice issue, you might be willing to put yourself in another’s shoes to at least understand why others see a problem.

Sorry for the mistake; it won’t happen again.


Lemmy wrote:
There was talk that fanservice make men see women as nothing but sex toys...

So no talk of banning then, which means all this reaction against banning is just so much shouting at strawmen.

Lemmy wrote:
And I doubt any of the people complaining about fanservice were protesting the amount of pointless shirtless scenes in Twilight (you know... that series of books/movies that made an incredible amount of money despite its terrible story and bland protagonist).

*shrug* I can empathize with chicks without watching chick flicks.


Has anyone seen a cgi movie called Harlock: Space Pirate?

Yes, it's every bit as ridiculous as it sounds, and I'm still not quite sure what I think about it after watching it twice. It's a lot like some fan of Final Fantasy and Pirates of the Caribbean was given free reign and a huge cgi budget. The phrase 'so bad that it's good' comes to mind, and there's something about it that's planted itself in my head...


Tequila Sunrise wrote:

*If you're not convinced of the general overreaction, take a look at Sissyl's comment about these supposed pro-ban fans getting orgasms from taking fun away from others. Lol, talk about throwing stones from glass houses! I might as well speculate that fanservice lovers want fanservice to be mandatory, because they get their jollies from knowing that their softcore [often child-]porn actively undercuts self-respect and cultural improvement.

Freehold DM wrote:
oh come now, tequila. Softcore child porn? I fought through those accusations enough in the 90s.

Crazy, right? And yet nobody seems to bat an eye at Sissyl's equally vapid speculation about, from what I can tell, is a strawman position.


Alzrius wrote:
...

I understand a lot more than you think I do, and I think if you let yourself cool off a bit and consider the progression of this sub-topic, you'll see a different picture. And no, I'm not up for dissecting all these post-fragments with you; I'm back at school and don't have the time or the energy.

Although I suspect that you're too preoccupied with being right to try this, I'll again suggest that you put on your roleplayer hat the next time you watch a fanservice-heavy show and try to look at the wider picture, rather than focussing on all these little debate points.

...After you cool off for a while. Human empathy really benefits from a clear head.


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Lemmy wrote:
But don't try to stop others from doing it if they want. And yes, censorship is exactly what some people are advocating here.

Citation needed. And let's keep our goalposts firmly in place; 'censorship' is a wider term than 'ban,' and might cover sentiments beyond the supposed ban-desires that you and others are reacting against.

Keep in mind that this whole sub-topic began with cmastah recommending a show, mentioning that it has no fanservice, and then Freehold replying with 'Sounds cool, but no fanservice = no Freehold.'

Link

Afterward, Aranna said that she often finds that fanservice detracts from an anime, and that social awareness can and has led to improved entertainment. Before Alzrius badgered him into leaving the thread, Tels said that he doesn't mind fanservice in general but doesn't like watermelon boobs. And I followed up with my opinion that the world will be a better place when anime learns the meaning of 'everything in moderation.' No mention of bannings that I remember.

And then the thread exploded with a lot of overreactions* and [intentional?] misreading of posts. But hey, I could have missed these pro-ban comments, so feel free to link them. Because for the record, I do not support fanservice bans; what I do support is a bit of human empathy and social awareness.

*If you're not convinced of the general overreaction, take a look at Sissyl's comment about these supposed pro-ban fans getting orgasms from taking fun away from others. Lol, talk about throwing stones from glass houses! I might as well speculate that fanservice lovers want fanservice to be mandatory, because they get their jollies from knowing that their softcore [often child-]porn actively undercuts self-respect and cultural improvement.


Lemmy wrote:
Ban ban BAN ban baaaaaaan!

Is all this talk of banning in reference to my posts, or someone else's?


Alzrius wrote:
...

Sorry bro, but I don't argue with people who make so many offensive assumptions and misinterpretations of my words.

Good talk though. Maybe you'll figure it out someday on your own.


Haven't been finding many hits lately. Magi had great artwork, but was just a little too slow for me even after the first three eps. I've run through half a dozen eps of other series, and nothing even that noteworthy.

Ah well, I'm back to school now anyway!


On a personal note, I prefer that my hit points have some concrete meaning; but in D&D (and PF) this requires an absurd degree of mental gymnastics outside of 4e.


Bob Bob Bob wrote:
Hit points are a hideous abomination of several different descriptions merged into a generic term.
Mark Hoover wrote:
Hit Points are Hit Points. They are whatever you need them to be at the time.
Orfamay Quest wrote:
There was a lengthy section about this in the first edition AD&D DMG, and Gygax addressed this question at some length. Of course, there's no normatives involved, since you play the way you want to play, and it's silly to say you should play this way if it's fun for everyone at your table to do it another way.

All of this, yes!

According to Old Geezer of RPGnet, who played under Gary Gygax himself, hit points were originally just a rule to make the game more fun. That's it. There was no in-game explanation; hit points existed so that players had a finite resource to track as their characters progressed through the dungeon. Hit points create a tension which, barring cheap and easy healing, slowly builds up as a party progressed through a time-sensitive adventure. And at the hobby's start, that was the beginning and end of the concept of hit points.

But then fans started asking what hit points mean. After getting over his initial surprise that anyone even cared what such a game rule means, Gygax came up with the various situationally-dependent explanations that most D&D (and PF) gamers use today. I.e., skill, luck, endurance, divine favor, or whatever else the character and situation call for.

Alternatively, many gamers just don't think about it. In the words of Old Geezer, "Hit points are hit points. They represent hit points, and they simulate hit points." ;)

(Apparently Arneson didn't like hit points, favoring a 'damage save' mechanic instead.)


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Alzrius wrote:
Tequila Sunrise wrote:
Alzrius wrote:
Moreover, you have yet to demonstrate why this is at all worthy of moral outrage.
I can see why Aranna pegged you for a troll.
The irony is that, without expounding on that, your statement here is trolling in and of itself.

And the tragedy is that a role player such as yourself needs more expound-ment to see a problem with fanservice. Maybe the next time you watch a fanservice-heavy anime, role play an impressionable teenage girl with low self-esteem. And then imagine that you always have been and always will be that female anime fan until the day you die.

That'll be much more enlightening than spending hours and hours throwing every conceivable argument at some anonymous internet posters you feel compelled to argue with.


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Grimmy wrote:

Do you guys prefers subs or dubs for anime?

I greatly prefer subs unless I'm so tired I can barely read.

Subs, dude.

I get an inordinately large kick out of hearing words that got ripped right out of English, spoken with a Japanese accent. ("Japan doesn't have a word for that?!") Also, if I generally like an anime but not its voices/sounds, I can mute it and still know what's going on.


Alzrius wrote:
So I finished watching Magi: The Labyrinth of Magic - or at least the first season of it, as it turns out that there's a second season that's not on Netflix (yet) - and while I didn't have very high expectations going into it, I was surprised by how much it surpassed them...
Caineach wrote:
I found the first season really picked up with episode 4. The first 3 are a little cliche and simple on first introduction.

Thanks, you just convinced me to give Magi a second chance. :)

Alzrius wrote:
Moreover, you have yet to demonstrate why this is at all worthy of moral outrage.

I can see why Aranna pegged you for a troll.


Well, this thread exploded since my last post. People sure do love their fanservice!

Less controversially, I just watched about a dozen episodes of Legend of the Legendary Heroes. It started out promising, but got too campy-dark-predictable in that way that so irritates me. Skipped to the last episode to make sure, and sure enough I was right.

...I think I'll try Ghost in the Shell: Arise next.


VM mercenario wrote:

I think you got confused. That is Zaisters idea.

I think it's a pretty awful one. Martials don't need extra nerfs.

My bad. Sorry Zaister!


VM mercenario wrote:
Zaister wrote:
I'm thinking of implementing a house rule that basically says "for each +1 enhancement bonus of the weapon (not counting bonuses from greater magic weapon), reduce the DR by 5 points." In this way, DR/magic can become meaningful again.
Keep in mind that magic weapons are supposed to be somewhat rare and only in the hands of rich people or elite units. DR 15/magic is useless against PCs but allows the creature to walk up to an army, kill thousands and not take a single scratch.

I call that a feature.

DR isn't supposed to be a real obstacle for PCs, IMO; it's supposed to create another reason that the world needs heroes. :) And the '+1 weapons overcome any and all values of X/magic' always seemed silly to me, so I really like VM mercenario's idea.* It creates an incentive to get those higher enhancement bonuses without creating an insurmountable obstacle for characters whose magical weapons aren't quite up to snuff.

*Which isn't a new idea, to be fair; plenty of gamers have played by it. But kudos for coming up with it on your own VM!


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I'm surprised how difficult it seems for some anime fans to see why fanservice might be really objectionable to women. Does sex sell? Absolutely. Will fanservice ever totally disappear? No more than racism, homophobia, or boy bands will completely disappear.

But that doesn't mean we throw up our hands, and say "Oh f&#~ it, bring back the Backstreet Boys!" Because here's the thing: fanservice creates a very subtle but very real effect on women and especially girls. You can say 'Well if a girl doesn't like fanservice, there are other things to watch,' but the fact is that girls will end up watching some of it anyway. Aranna watches fanservice because some fanservicey shows have other redeeming qualities; other girls and women get peer pressured or 'I want to watch what my male friends, bf, husband, big brother, or daddy are watching!' into watching animes with fanservice. (As has been pointed out, an R rating is no real obstacle for a determined child or teen.)

And what's the effect of a girl and even a woman watching fanservice? A small but insistent voice in the back of her head telling her 'You only have small-to-regular boobs, you ain't nothing!' 'Your ankles are bigger than your wrists, you ain't nothing!' 'Your waist is too big for a man to wrap his hands completely around, you ain't nothing!' And so on. It's like how stereotypes like 'black people are stupid' and 'gay people are sex-obsessed perverts' create a kind of background mental chatter. Consciously, a person knows that it's absurd and irrational; but people aren't rational. That mental chatter is enough to undercut or even crush many people's self-respect, which results in all sorts of issues.

I'm not saying that fanservice is the worst thing since Hitler, or that it's not a byproduct of human nature. I'm saying that the world will be a better place when more anime (and other entertainment) learns what 'everything in moderation' means.


Arpeggio of Blue Steel is a fast and fun action-drama! More action than drama, which is just fine by me. :) It follows the adventures of Chihuya Gunzou, his crew, and various cyborg ship-avatars who help and hinder him as he struggles to give humanity a fighting chance to take back the seas from the mysterious Fleet of Fog, which had crushed all human naval power 17 years prior.

What I found unusual about this show is that all but one of the developed characters are cyborgs, and the one human character who does has some depth (Captain Gunzou) doesn't change during the first season at all. The show's drama is mostly about the cyborg ship-avatars 'evolving' through making contact with Gunzou and interacting with his other cyborg allies. All of the cyborgs apparently have 'emotional subroutines,' or some such, which can make them very very human.

Anyhow, lots of action as I already mentioned, and not a single slow episode! I think there's one well-justified flashback during the first episode, with the rest of season one happening entirely in the present tense. A medium amount of fanservice and a couple of highly suggestive comments about 'naval warfare,' but no watermelon boobs!


Alzrius wrote:
This is an anime that I wanted to like, but it quite clearly was too focused on itself to care how I felt about it.

That's a shame! I saw The Irregular at Magic High School on Netflix, but didn't add it to my queue...because the blurb made it sound too slice-of-life-y, oddly enough. :/


You're welcome, and sorry if my reply was a bit abrasive. This video caused a stir back when it was first filmed, and edition warriors jumped on it as evidence that '4e is a video/board/card game with some background fluff text!!!' Heck, this video might be the origin of this ridiculous meme.

Anyhow, all I really know about Chris Perkins is that he helped create 4e and that he DMed for the Robot Chicken guys that one time. I don't know anything about his attitudes or ideals, which for all I know I might find terrible or amazing.


2097 wrote:

To me, playing with actions like this feels like glimpses of another hero's life. It feels like the flavor text in games like Magic, Arkham Horror or Netrunner.

The super-mechanical, Melvin-y effect (“You gain concealment”) feels detached from what I’m doing and the flavor text puts me more into the role of a fan of this character rather than in the role of being that character.

Well you can't help how you feel, right? Everyone's got 'em, and yours are as valid as mine.

2097 wrote:

Chris has set up a room with a flame-throwing trap and a door that’s frozen shut. It’s possible to bust through the door on brute force with time, but he has the solution in mind to melt it with the flame thrower.

One of the players, I think Tom, has a power called Darkfire that can set a creature on fire. He tries to cast it on the door, Chris asks him to carefully read the power — it says “One creature” — and says it doesn’t work. That’s it. Here we have the one moment. A creative solution — shot down.

You mean darkfire, the drow racial power? The one that creates purple heatless 'flames,' just like it does in every other edition of D&D? (I.e., no fire type or fire damage.)

Well, gee you're right! I once tried to use a similar spell to disorient a foe in a 3.x game, and not only did it not work, but I had to actually waste my turn casting it before learning that it didn't work. What a creative idea shot down in its prime! That must make 3.x games super board-gamey and legalistic and punitive! /sarc

I hope you can see how misguided this particular complaint is, and how Chris' call wasn't any less justified in 4e than it would have been in any other game. His real mistake was using the power's targeting rules to explain why it wouldn't work, rather than its lack of actual fire. Which is a small mistake, considering that another DM might have simply let the player waste his turn trying to use a power with a misnomer name that never had any hope of working.


thejeff wrote:
Tequila Sunrise wrote:
plusonetshirt wrote:
When 1 of my game club members suggested we play Pathfinder( we mostly play Table-top minitures games, Warhammer ect) I asked him if it was like D&D he said yes. He said the player response to D&D 4.0 was less than desireable, so Pathfinder was created.He said think of it as D&D 3.75.I still have my 3.5 book,and I see many similarities.

This is very much how I see PF; it has some rules changes and some new classes, but the same is true of 3.5 compared to 3.0. All three are fundamentally the same game. PF 2e, whenever it happens, may truly be its own beast. We'll see.

I find it hilariously ironic that a vocal segment of the D&D fandom complains that 4e doesn't feel D&D because it changed too much, while PF carries the 'spirit' of D&D...but totally isn't D&D! Sometimes coming from the mouths of the very same fans.

It's not inherently wrong to say that PF carries the spirit of D&D without actually being D&D. In fact, that's what's usually meant by "carries the spirit of" or "spiritual successor to".

Of course it's not inherently wrong to think so, because it's all about feelings. Just like it's not inherently wrong for an abused spouse to love their abuser.

It just says more about the speaker than the topic.


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Anzyr wrote:
Kthulhu wrote:
I think it's really more of an attempt by the 3.x crowd to marginalize 4e than anything else.
I believe the MMO comments are more because the game has a severe (one might even say crippling) lack of creativity in regards to abilities. Everything is square this, status that, [x]W, xd6. Made a floating hand? Guess what? It can move in any direction but up. Up is forbidden, because allowing Up movement would unbalance things. There is 0 creativity allowed in the rules and anything that *could* unbalance things is errata'd to the point of needing a video-game like patch log.

This is an excellent example of the lies that edition warriors like to spread, and the double standards they live by. Powers absolutely work in three dimensions, and out of combat by the way. Unlike conjuring spells in PF, which can't summon creatures to a space in the air. (SO MMO GAMEY!) And like invisibility, which ends when the subject performs an arbitrary action. (NO CREATIVITY TOO MUCH BALANCE!)

Anzyr wrote:
Again, the above is not a criticism of 4E. It is merely a statement of how it is designed. That kind of inflexible design would be fantastic for say a board game. It may be wonderful for some gaming groups. I, however, happen to like the direction up.

PF has zero consistency in errata; the devs let casters get away with murder but anything nice that martials discover get nerfed into the ground. But hey, that's not a criticism of PF; it's merely a statement of how it is designed. That sort of haphazard design would be fantastic for say a collectible card game all about magic, and it may be wonderful for some game groups. I however happen to like devs who care about their product, and for consistent balance.


plusonetshirt wrote:
When 1 of my game club members suggested we play Pathfinder( we mostly play Table-top minitures games, Warhammer ect) I asked him if it was like D&D he said yes. He said the player response to D&D 4.0 was less than desireable, so Pathfinder was created.He said think of it as D&D 3.75.I still have my 3.5 book,and I see many similarities.

This is very much how I see PF; it has some rules changes and some new classes, but the same is true of 3.5 compared to 3.0. All three are fundamentally the same game. PF 2e, whenever it happens, may truly be its own beast. We'll see.

I find it hilariously ironic that a vocal segment of the D&D fandom complains that 4e doesn't feel like D&D because it changed too much, while PF carries the 'spirit' of D&D...but totally isn't D&D! Sometimes coming from the mouths of the very same fans.


Freehold DM wrote:

Down for freezing.

Especially because there's no snow.

I definitely recommend Freezing for you, Freehold! The most interesting thing about it is the reversal of the usual action-adventure gender roles: the women are the front-line warriors, while their male 'limiters' are the support *cough* casters *cough*. This reversal of gender roles even touches upon the show's non-combat events.

I ended up dropping it from my Netflix queue because the scifi-and-action-to-character-drama-and-fanservice ratio is too low for me, but it's not without its good points. Well-paced and action-packed, not too many flashbacks, and for fans of fanservice...!


3 people marked this as a favorite.
sacklunch wrote:

...he always said he "doesn't do point buy."

...told by him that "he doesn't do crafting"...

"Well then, you don't play."

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