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Anubis

Set's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 14,770 posts (18,848 including aliases). 1 review. 2 lists. 1 wishlist. 2 Pathfinder Society characters. 79 aliases.


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GM Niles wrote:
The defenestration of House Baratheon was a plot twist that I did not see coming. I mean, I knew the poor kid was gonna die at some point...but not like that.

There's still Gendry, who'se 'still rowing,' apparently. Perhaps Dany's fleet will find him out there in the middle of the ocean?

GM Niles wrote:
Little Lady Mormont shaming a room full of grown men and reminding them of their oaths was pure awesomesauce. It was so much better than Smalljon Umber doing it in Season 1...because it came from her!

She's my new Arya. Just awesome!

With so many members of ruling families being somewhat deficient / degenerate in mind or morals (those from the Vale, the Boltons, the Freys, the Lannisters, the Tagaryans), it's refreshing to see someone who has some moral fortitude (even if she might be a touch naïve, in the same sort of way that got Ned Stark decapitated...).

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Nohwear wrote:
Since Sifkesh is also about heresy, then the best thing to do would be to make them swear of their faith first. Try to convince them that their chosen god(s) is the source of all of their misfortune.

Building off of this;

Trick them into an act of heresy, or leading others astray, so that they unwittingly cause a schism/mass heresy within their faith, by impersonating a divine messenger or portent or vision of some sort (perhaps as simple as drugging them and playing dressup, perhaps as complicated as illusion and sending spells and summoning up real outsiders capable of delivering the 'divine message'). Let them lead a bunch of people astray, perhaps convincing them that their god will protect them from something, that totally kills them because they didn't take any sane precautions (the fatal brain-rotting STD only affects impure degenerates, not honest gods-fearin' folk like us, debauch away! handle those serpents / drink that poison kool-aid / stand linked arm in arm in peaceful resistance to the orc invaders / trust the ghost dance to stop the white-eyes bullets, gods will protect the faithful!).

Bunches of people basically off themselves, and it's heresy to boot. The 'leader' you've selected as pawn may or may not kill themselves out of regret, when they see the results of their inspired leadership on their congregation, or might cackle and join your character in devotion to Sifkesh, depending on how badly broken they are by this sort of plan.

Alternately, convince some good folk that the celestial realms are under attack *right now* by an unnumberable army of fiends, and that they need more angels/archons/agathions/azata *right now.* Any virtuous person willing to 'skip the queue' and report to heaven will be assigned a powerful new angelic body, and join the fray to protect all that is holy and righteous from wickedness and degradation (a process that normally takes centuries, but heaven can't wait!). The process will be painless, and the transition take but moments. Whatever poison used will cause a sort of wide-eyed death rictus that leads those watching to believe they died in ecstasy, glorying as they are seeing the gates of heaven before them.

It goes without saying that this is the sort of wickedness that the PCs should be putting a stop to, not engaging in, but hey, whatever makes for a fun game.

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Otyugh garbage disposal. Oh wait, Paizo already ran with that one!

Dragon (non chaotic) working for the bank of Abadar, guarding the treasure horde of hundreds of bank clients, noble families, other churches, trading houses, moneylenders and mercantile consortiums, etc. Intellectually, he knows that all the treasure he sits on isn't *his*, particularly since clerics come in and make withdrawals and deposits all the time, but he is happy just getting to sit on a pile of gold ten times larger than anything he could have amassed on his own. He also knows that any dragon hunter who comes after him and 'his' gold has to storm a fortified bank, and fight their way through dozens of mid to high level clerics of Abadar!

Doppleganger advisor / herald to the ruler, reminds him of everyone's names (and reads the minds of everyone coming before the throne).

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Kobold Cleaver wrote:
Insects have six legs. Pillbugs have, like, twelve. They're closer to crabs and shrimp than beetles and crickets.

But do they *taste* more like crabs and shrimp than beetles and crickets, that's what inquiring minds want to know!

'Cause you're gonna want to eat it before it eats you.

Now just imagine a chitinous hydra-thing that has those for heads. And it's telepathic and suggesting that you swim down and down and down into the dark cold crushing depths, where it has something wonderful to show you...

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John Kretzer wrote:
I Blame Cosmo that the above post has gotten three favorites....I didn't think it was that awesome.

We were just amused by the thought of *how* exactly Cosmo put you to sleep. Was it the classic 'chloroform handkerchief' trick? Long-distance mind control through the Paizo forums? Some sort of tonic immobility*?

*Not to be confused with the immobility that comes from drinking too much (gin &) tonic.

I blame Cosmo for the amount of time I just spent watching shark videos for, ah, research purposes, yeah, that was it...

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Lemmy wrote:
spoilery stuff

Seemed to be a running theme.

Oh noes, Mereen is being toasted and apparently has no defenses! Cue Dany returning right on time.

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Kobold Cleaver wrote:
A god who doesn't approach of constructions could favor a sling, an unarmed strike, a club, or a quarterstaff—all are weapons that require essentially no industry.

I like the sling (or some sort of upgraded 'warsling?') as a favored weapon for someone like Azathoth, all concerned with planetary movements and orbital dynamics and the angular movement of the spheres.

OTOH, I don't really like giving out favored weapon options that the cleric already has as Simple weapons, like staff or dagger or spear or mace.

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Thomas Seitz wrote:
I don't blame Carol, Jen, or Greer for their choices. I DO blame bad writing for Reed and Tony.

Oh true, I don't blame the *characters* for the bizarre behavior, just as I don't blame Scott Summers for killing Xavier or Scarlet Witch for 'decimating' mutantkind. It's all on the writers.

But it does leave a lingering distaste for those characters in my mouth, and makes it harder for me to accept when they are later being pushed as hard as they are (particularly in Carol Danvers case, who received a righteous ethical/moral smackdown from *Emma Frost* of all people, when she showed up at the X-Mansion to sell them on Registration, only to get a mindful of every dead mutant kid ever, most of which the government did nothing to save, if not actively helped kill, beamed straight into her noggin), or their past hardliner behavior is being swept under the rug and they are becoming whacky likable folk again, like Stark or She-Hulk (who, in the latter case, is just being, IMO, 'written right again,' while Stark is just being turned from comic-book Tony Stark into MCU Robert Downey Jr. Tony Stark).

IMO, a lot more than ignoring it needed to happen to redeem these characters. On the one hand, ignoring it might be the best of all possible worlds, since I didn't like it and don't really *want* Reed, Tony, Carol, etc. to be supervillains in all but name, but it just comes across as a weird sort of dissonance.

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Quesada has to answer for that, no question.

That and One More Day (was he to blame for that?). Double ugh.

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Generic Villain wrote:
There's a beautiful Stephen King short story called My Pretty Pony about a grandfather and his grandson. The grandfather thinks to himself "Only fools give advice, and only fools take advice." It's human nature to want to "fix" one another, especially those we care most for.

Part of it is the frustration of being helpless to do anything, leading one to try all sorts of 'magical thinking' solutions to the difficulties a friend is facing. Wanting to help, and not feel powerless, is a strong motivator to try all sorts of ill-advised things (including offering some unintentionally terrible advice...).

Another part, unfortunately, is the notion that one size fits all, and that a coping strategy that works for someone *who doesn't even have a problem* will somehow 'fix' what's 'wrong' with someone who very much does have a problem. 'You know what I do when I feel down?' 'No. And I don't care, because you don't have crippling depression. So stop humble-bragging about how you have brilliantly coped with not being depressed all the time.' One size does not fit all, and what worked for one person, once, might not even work for that same person in another situation, let alone for someone else whose circumstances are just amazingly different and in no way comparable.

Even something as reductionistic and 'science-y' as drugs aren't guaranteed to affect two different people the same way, and 'try smiling more' or 'lose weight' or 'go outside and get more sunlight' or 'try to focus on the positives' or 'meditate and do yoga' or 'eat less red meat' are even less reliable.

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phantom1592 wrote:

'What if' Captain America was Hydra.

'What if' Cyclops killed Professor X

Eh, at least it wasn't some nobody like the 'X-Cutioner' this time. What a meaningless 'death of Xavier' that was, to pump up some villain nobody had ever heard of, and I don't think anyone has seen since...

The inconsistent writing afterwards just mucked it all up. One minute it's all 'I was hopped up on Phoenix, I had no control' and the next it's 'He was totally asking for it, he's to blame' with a dash of 'I would have done it anyway, even if I wasn't possessed by a world-destroying cosmic entity.'

Whatever. Crap or get off the pot, Scott. You either wanted to kill him or you didn't. You don't get to answer, D) all of the above.

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'What if' the super heroes were skrulls all along.

'What if' Bucky wasn't dead

Quite possibly the only 'shock' that I've really liked, after all the sturm and drang died down. And the Winter Soldier remains a relevant character, unlike some others (looking at you, Jean Grey. Why did you come back again?).

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'What if' the Registration act had passed.

I wish they'd had tighter plotting on that, so that it didn't end up so ludicrously one-sided (Iron Man being written as a fascist, pretty much, and Reed Richards offering three different reasons why he supported it, one of them being 'The Mad Thinker tricked me into thinking it was a good idea.'). The pro-registration side *could* have had some good arguments, but since the writers mostly seemed to be on the other side of things, it just got ridiculous (such as one scene where, attempting to 'apprehend' the teenaged Runaways, pro-reg military forces opened fire with heat-seeking high-explosive missiles in the middle of New York City, which missed and took out an apartment building full of people!).

Plus, if they were going to go that route, some *real* consequences, like a continuation of some of the Initiative teams, or further development of interesting characters like Cloud 9, Komodo, Hardball, etc. introduced during the event, and / or some lasting effects of the really terrible decisions made by some characters, with Reed, Tony, Carol, Jennifer and Greer, in particular, making some bone-headed choices, and basically skating on them. Pym got the out of being replaced by a Skrull, but Reed sent 'cape-killer' supervillains after his wife, brother-in-law and best friend *over a political disagreement* and the response from Quesada was 'eh, Sue will forgive him, he'll cook her dinner or something and it will be back to normal.'

Ugh.

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Kineticist Love the idea. Hate the burn mechanic, but hey, there's an Archetype that does away with it, and even another class Archetype that grants Kinetic Blasts, so I don't *have* to use burn!

Medium Eh. I like the idea, but I think I'd prefer one that channeled the gods or something (although the pantheon for Golarion is pretty large, and that would take a lot of wordcount...).

Mesmerist Reminds me of the Alchemist, in that it's got three really cool ideas shoved willy-nilly into a single class. I could play an entirely Stare-based Mesmerist *or* an entirely Trick-based Mesmerist, but as it stands, both options seem like half-measures, and then there's stuff like Touch Treatment, which I don't 'get,' and them not having access to the 'psionic attack/defense mode' spells, which I also don't get, since they seem thematically appropriate as all heck for this class.

Occultist Neither fish, nor fowl. Nor anything I'd want to deal with. I love versatility, in theory, but, it turns out, I totally prefer overspecializing... I embrace this hypocrisy.

Psychic Doesn't seem to have enough individualization to warrant it being something other than a new school of Wizardry or bloodline for Sorcerers or flavor of Witch.

Spiritualist I always thought the Summoner was a great 'chassis' to build other variants, like a 'Dread Necromancer' who had an undead Eidolon and more necromancy than conjuration, or a 'Shadow Summoner' who had a shadow eidolon and more illusion than conjuration, or even a 'Thrallherd' who replaced the eidolon with a perma-charmed minion, and had more enchantment than conjuration. The Spiritualist is just that seed bearing fruit. Cool.

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I mentioned upthread some Druid/Ranger animal companion / wild shape options from alien fauna and flora, via some sort of 'xenonaturalist' Archetype or Feat or whatever (which could also apply to Animal Domain Clerics, Nature Oracles, Cavaliers, Hunters or even Paladins, and if alien familiars are included, Wizards, some Sorcerers, Witches and Shamen, as well!).

This could be a fun opportunity to look through the latest Bestiary (Bestiary 5) or the Occult Bestiary for Universal Monster Rules options that aren't currently represented among animal companions, like bleed, blood rage, burn, etc. (bearing in mind to keep them balanced against the sorts of things already available, and that 'balance' ranges from the woeful bear to sexy options like tiger, velociraptor and roc. Ideally, something alien and exotic and player-made shouldn't be as good as the *best* of the best...).

Alien companions (particularly those gated off from casual use by a Feat or Archetype) could be the usual suspects of Animals, Plants and Vermin, but also funkier fare, like Aberrations, as well.

Best of all, it's a 'two-fer.' Create a monster entry, and then create a short 'X as Companion' blurb or 'If taken as a familiar, it grants a +2 to Skill Y' or 'A Xth level Wizard/Witch can take this critter as an Improved Familiar' for the better-than-tiny-animal-equivalent alien beasties. Monster entry *and* class option.

Write ups on Numeria have focused quite a bit on the robot side of things, but not nearly so much on the alien wildlife that may have escaped one of the habitat modules and managed to eke out a living in the Felldales, and even an alien herd animal, or alien carrion scavengers, or a dangerous form of alien plant-life, could make for an interesting encounter, and use the sorts of mechanics not generally used by earth-like Golarion animals, such as all-around vision, distraction or sound mimicry.

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Ciaran Barnes wrote:

I put NG on there twice too. Dang it. Those are both great alignments. :)

You are welcome to modify the list however you like. I just used the 33 Paizo domains that appear on PFSRD website.

I checked the source and Ruins and Vermin are Druid domains, and probably shouldn't be listed as Cleric options on PFSRD.

OTOH, any of the Druid domains can be used by other nature-themed classes, which would presumably include Clerics of nature-themed gods, according to their writeup in Ultimate Magic. That would open up a lot of new options.

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Greylurker wrote:

Titans rebirth was nice

Green Arrow shaping up pretty good
Superman looks promising

I haven't been buying much DC lately, but Titans Rebirth shows promise.

Love Brett Booth's art, ever since the days of Image/Wildstorm, and characters like Backlash and Taboo. Generally 'though, the man loves him some dinosaurs and 'furries,' so I'm counting the issues until the team ends up fighting dinosaurs and / or anthropomorphic animals. :)

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I blame Cosmo that I see ***crack at work every day. There are hundreds of people where I work. There are even a few that I wouldn't mind seeing the ***crack of. But it's entirely Cosmo's fault that the ones I do see are, well, let's just say that I'm not saying I'd rather receive electrical shocks, but I'm not not saying I'd rather receive electrical shocks, if ya know what I mean...

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1) Cleric.

2) Summoner.

3) Druid? Witch? Hunter? Mesmerist? I can't pick one!

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Thomas Seitz wrote:
*sponsor the use of a Mecha Iomedae against Kajiu. *

The Kuthite darksteel mecha are powered by the suffering of all the 'volunteers' chained up within it.

Meanwhile, the Sheylinite mecha is all bright colors and gentle curves, and has hundreds of people inside it painting as fast as they can, because it's powered by art...

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Tacticslion wrote:
Tacticslion wrote:

Cerulean Seas, you will (hopefully next week) at last be miiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnneee~!

(Here's hoping the sale is still going by the time I have full computer access.)

YYYYYYYYYYYYYEEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS~! IT IS DONE.

Also, in case anyone is curious, here you go.

Bask! Bask, I say!

BASK in that Cerulean glory!

Yeah, that was an amazing deal. I feel a little bit guilty for getting so much product for so little money.

But not guilty enough to not pounce on it like a leopard on a wounded gazelle...

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Aberzombie wrote:
I only ever recall one shot of Juggernaut in street clothes - the issue when he was attacked by Nimrod. Were there others? I always thought it would make more sense than having him in costume all the time.

I vaguely recall him in a suit the day he showed up to the mansion with his lawyer (riding on his back!) to take custody of the mansion and property since Charles had died during the X-Termination Agenda or something (at the hands of the X-Cutioner? Oh, Marvel, stahp, you're killing me!). But the mansion had just been gutted and all the cool stuff (alien tech, etc.) he was hoping to score was gone, thanks to some nano-bomb from Bastion or some such nonsense, and it was just an empty shell of a house, so he lost interest and leapt away.

These stories. My brain grins when I try to describe them.

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Thomas Seitz wrote:
Set wrote:
I remember an Iron Man story in which Doom time-travelled them back to Arthurian times, and the two of them had to work together to reconstruct a time-travel machine to get home. Stark's thinking 'I've never met someone with such a ferocious intellect!' and Doom, who has no idea that Iron Man is Stark, 'If his *lackies* are this clever, Stark himself must be a genius!' Heh.
Actually that was when the Mighty Avengers fought Doom and he was getting tutoring from Morgan Le Fay.

This is the story I'm thinking of, from the early 80s, although I have no doubt there were other times they bumped into each other and the Avengers got involved.

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Arcaian wrote:
As far as I can tell, Continual Flame is an Evocation(Light) spell, so it should work - you're literally creating real light with it. But as mentioned above, a powerful Permanencied Daylight should work better for the purpose I'm imagining. Would be a cool plot hook too - the lights gone out, and no-one knows why.

Ooh, my total mistake! Since the flame produced heatless light, I assumed it was illusory flame! Learn something new every day.

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Yeah, there really are a lot of choices for the food chain - solid stone is a very nice one, I was actually having an idea for small plankton-like creatures that survive by eating the ever-replenishing jade from their islands, which gives the surrounding fish-life a bit more of a not-evil vibe, although still extremely alien for anyone from the surface. The more evil creatures would have the food chain starting from heat and chemicals from vents on the bottom, likely helped by the Aboleth initially, as well as from the radiation in the Darklands. Thanks for the help with the food chain - it's been fleshed out nicely! :D

I really like the jade purifying the radiation, but my main issue with it is that it seems that the Munavri only stayed good because of good luck, and not because they chose not to stray. I'd like the Munavri to be Good because of extreme effort and sacrifice on their side, rather than because they chanced upon their jade islands.

It could be that the jade islands resonate with what is brought to them, so that it's the munavri using the nature of the islands to save themselves, and if they brought wickedness or suspicion or whatever, the jade would have amplified those tendencies instead.

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Also - they stayed Good for some time in Soltrua, before they had their jade islands, so they must have some form of farming that doesn't make them fall. There's also Azatum Neta's settlement on the coast of the Arcadian side of the Sightless Sea that is not on jade islands, so can't just be the jade, but I think I'll have it help them out, definitely - see the jade-eating critters.

Sounds cool!

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Thomas LeBlanc wrote:
With Taldor gone, Androffan should become the new common language!

That certainly makes sense!

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Yeah, I'm not a fan of secondary mutations as a concept (including Emma's diamond form). It's not like they didn't already have a ton of mutants with two or more mostly unrelated powers (Nightcrawler, Jean Grey, Banshee - one of dozens of mutants with 'power X, plus I can fly for no darn reason at all...', etc.) so it's not like they needed a special excuse for why Emma developed a power unrelated to her telepathy.

But there they are.

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the David wrote:
The deities from Golarion grant their followers the ability to cast certain spells that you can't find in the standard spell list. (Gods and Magic mentions this, as well as various adventurepaths.) You could give that god of electricity and technology something similar. Or you could turn [fire] spells into [lightning] spells.

This is probably the best solution, right here, to toss into the bottom of the deity write-up that Paladins of LightningBro can use the following spells as Paladin spells (shocking grasp, divine trident, lightning bolt). You could even tweak divine trident to take on the form of the deity's favored weapon.

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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
The problem is Masque can't remake himself. And because his psychology is so twisted, he really can't bring himself to do anything other than hurt others with his power.

Thanks to the wonders of secondary mutations (his kicked in when he tried to fleshwarp the Apocalypse-changed Caliban back to normal), he now can change himself (and has transitioned into a woman!).

But yeah, still with the cray-cray, so he is unlikely to make productive use of his powers, even if that sort of thing was common in the comic-book universes. (Where someone like Storm could pretty much change the world single-handedly, by bringing rain wherever it's needed, and sending hurricanes into the middle of the ocean to spin themselves out.)

Eh. Comics. Lots of people with world-changing powers, and only the super-villains actually try to use them to change the world (and when heroes attempt it, such as in the Squadron Supreme mini-series, it becomes a self-justifying morality tale about why they shouldn't have bothered and stuck to reactively punching super-villains professionally). Lots of super-genius inventors who can create tiny infinite power sources or weapons or armors or teleporters or whatever that could make them billions, and then say, 'Hey, I'll use my new super-gizmo to knock over a bank!'

So it goes. Still, as for Masque specifically, it's not like there aren't people with amazing potential who are currently posting on messageboards about comic book characters instead of changing the world. :)

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Greylurker wrote:

Emma would know how to contact all kinds of different mutants, including Flesh Sculpters. I can think of at least one off the top of my head that does pretty good work, turning Callisto from scared one-eyed punk to major hottie.

As long as you can trust him not to turn your arms into tentacles.

Masque could make *so* much money with that power, and yet he lives in a sewer and eats rats. Ugh!

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thejeff wrote:

I'd hesitate to ascribe that to surgery rather than to different artist's styles and interpretations of the character.

Try to take that too literally and some characters would be enlargement and reduction surgery on a regular basis - sometimes issue by issue. And not just on breasts, either.

Oh, I agree on that point, in general. Byrne is famous for trying to put some different body types into his work (Heather Hudson was also short and waifish and flat-chested, until he left, and the next artist drew her as a towering amazon a full foot taller with bosums individually as large as her head), and even male characters change radically depending on who is drawing them, with some going from lean and slender (Scott Summers even having the nickname 'Slim' until he's drawn as a bulgy veiny 'roid-monster by the next artist down the road).

But Emma's been written at least twice referring to her augmentations (first by Morrison, IIRC, then again by Whedon), so I'd go with it being more than just artistic license, or a failure to be able to draw more than one basic body type.

And then there's the real world version of this phenomena, as art becomes life... :)

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phantom1592 wrote:

In Astonishing X-men #1, when Scott and Wolverine were fighing over Jean's memory again, she complained

"Superpowers, a scintillating wit and the best body money can buy... and I still rate below a corpse"

Sooo yeah, she apparently bought that body :P

Which kind of makes sense, if you look at the artwork from her first appearances, where Byrne drew her as a skinny little thing (and quite a bit older).

Pre-augmentation.

First appearance.

She's come a long way since then!

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thejeff wrote:
Canonically (at least back in the day, he learned magic to rescue his mother's spirit.

Another missed opportunity. I'd love to see an Invaders flashback in which they get help against the occult Thule forces allied with the Nazis (who are attempting to tap the power of slumbering Cthon in Wundagore Mountain) from a young gypsy witch named Caterina, who is dating another gypsy, a young swordsman name Konstantin von Doom.

The Invaders and allies barely succeed, and put Cthon back to sleep, after the Thulian sorcerers attempt to rouse him in a last-ditch effort to punish their foes, but Caterina is cursed by the last dying sorcerer to be hellbound, for her interference...

There's so much rich potential buried in Doom's backstory. If Anton Arcane, over at DC, hadn't already had this storyline, I'd love to see Doom go to hell to rescue his mother, backed up by magical resources back on Earth, and end up warring with Mephisto, and *conquering part of hell in the process.*

'Cause, Doom.

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Arcaian wrote:
Nice ideas! Yeah, definitely an energy source is required - I was actually considering the psychic energy of the jade islands that the Munavri live on be a source of energy, which provides some of the stranger food sources for them, and then all of the typical fungi, lichens and the like growing off of the radiation present. There's precedent (see Deep Tolguth) in the Pathfinder universe that fake sunlight can cause crops to grow as they do on the surface, so was also considering that Beryl Isle has a 'farm' where they can grow normal food, maybe from a very powerful Continual Flame-like spell cast by an Empyreal lord to help them out.

Continual flame is an interesting choice, because it's an illusion spell, and, IMO, illusory light shouldn't be able to grow plants any more than illusory grain can feed livestock. That said, the illusion school does include the [shadow] descriptor, in which an illusion spell can draw upon 'real' extradimensional energy. A continual flame item that is cast as a [shadow] spell *could* paradoxically create light that is nourishing to plant-life, despite coming from a plane of darkness that is notoriously 'low energy' compared to the material plane...

But other sorts of magic or 'unnatural' options could work as well. A thermophilic form of plant or fungus or lichen or plankton or even tiny animal life (like brine shrimp), similar to, but not as dangerous as, brown mold, could turn heat from volcanic vents into food, or, at the minimum, serve as a base level of food for larger forms of life that can themselves be eaten.

The bottom of a subterranean food chain has lots of options, in a fantasy universe with creatures able to subsist off of heat (brown mold), any sort of organic material (some slimes and oozes), solid stone (thoqqua, xorn), magical energies (those magic-item eating tentacle-donkey things), etc.

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Might seem too 'normal', but I do want something to set the Munavri a little bit aside from the other Darkland dwellers, especially as it's consistently portrayed as the fungi and lichens of the Darklands corrupting people.

Given that the 'mysterious darklands radiations' of Golarion may be leaking straight from the cage that holds Rovagug, then yeah, it does kind of mean that many darklands critters are someone, directly or second- or third-hand, *metabolizing evil and rage* with their daily bread...

Perhaps the jade islands of the munavri somehow purge the evil and rage in the darklands food cycle, with a powerful dose of serenity. An association of jade with serenity, and the islands with a calming effect on the otherwise savage and merciless darklands surrounding them, feels on-theme to me.

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Gosh, this thread. Can we have a fun bitter acrimonious argument now about whether or not Namor should have silly little ankle-wings, or rock a green scaly-taint speedo when he probably doesn't ever appear in a hypothetical Invaders movie that isn't likely to ever happen anyway?

Or can we just stipulate to that and move on to why Namor's teammate Captain America can't fly with the little wings on the side of his head, 'cause that always confused six year old me.

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I'm generally not a fan of spells that are only available to a single class, although I'm okay with spells that specifically interact with a classes abilities being restricted (such as spells that play off of an Inquisitors Judgement, or Paladin's Smite, or Ranger's Favored Enemy bonuses).

One example I'd like to see spread out is the various scaling psionic attack/defense mode spells on the Psychic list (mind thrust, ego whip,. intellect fortress, etc.), which, IMO, would be very appropriate on the Mesmerist list as well.

Other spells just seem to be kind of arbitrarily linked to one class, such as produce flame, which seems like a perfectly good spell for a fire sorcerer or wizard to have.

And then there's the practicals. Druids have lesser restoration, but lack restoration, which is kind of vital for a class filling the 'healer' role, and creates a sort of artificial bottleneck where every party eventually needs a Cleric, and can accept no substitutions. If someone *wants* to play a Cleric, then that should be encouraged, but not by just *forcing* someone to play that class, because they have some cures that nobody else has.

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Ninja in the Rye wrote:
I don't know, I think that over the majority of Marvel history I'd say that Reed and Doom have, by default, been understood as a cut above the rest, particularly in terms of being polymaths who are masters of almost every area of science (and Doom, of course, is a near Dr. Strange level master of magic as well).

Doom's 'mastery' of magic seems to come and go. For decades he was *said* to know stuff about magic, but rarely, if ever, *did* any magic. So when he's touted as a potential Sorcerer Supreme, I'm all 'the what now?'

But yeah, he (and Reed) are very much the 'Professor' sort of scientist, just arbitrarily good at *everything,* which does set them a cut above specialists like Tony Stark or Hank McCoy or Emma Frost (who was a genius inventor, once upon a time, able to create mind-switching psi-tech that even Xavier found perplexing, until she reverted to a stripper with telepathy and fake bazongas).

I remember an Iron Man story in which Doom time-travelled them back to Arthurian times, and the two of them had to work together to reconstruct a time-travel machine to get home. Stark's thinking 'I've never met someone with such a ferocious intellect!' and Doom, who has no idea that Iron Man is Stark, 'If his *lackies* are this clever, Stark himself must be a genius!' Heh.

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A servant of Jaidz at first calls out for a young character, one out to prove themselves by facing their fears. Courage isn't the absence of fear, they'd claim, but the wisdom to recognize that you are afraid, and then do the right thing anyway.

In fear there is wisdom, they would say, because anyone who *isn't* afraid when a dragon is bearing down on them is clearly an idiot, and you should run the heck away from them before they get everyone around them killed with their overconfidence. Fear is a warning. A survival instinct. Not to be shunned or mocked, but to listened to, sometimes heeded, sometimes set aside when the need is great to act, but never ignored out of hand.

Accept your ignorance, because the 'dumbest' thing you can do is assume that you know all that you need to know about a situation, and march into it blindly. You don't conquer ignorance by (over)confidently saying, 'I got this' and sticking your hand in the fire. You conquer it by learning.

Going against the grain, I'd make an old man (or woman) servant of Jaidz. Perhaps they expected to much of their own child, children or wards, and taught them to be fearless, that it was shameful or craven to show fear, and then they died stupidly, too afraid to be *seen* to be afraid to sensibly avoid a fight that they could have avoided (or even won, with more 'cowardly' tactics, like setting up traps, or preparing some reasonable precautions, or asking someone else for help). Perhaps they avoided this sort of grim backstory, and just have a strong parental / nurturing streak, and want to set a good example for the young people who don't see themselves as brave or meaningful or able to make a difference and could use some encouragement.

Since Jaidz is a rare Empyreal Lord whose favored weapon is a light one-handed weapon, the short sword, I'd want to capitalize on that with a class able to get good benefit out of a two-weapon fighting style, such as a rogue, or even a paladin (TWF smite? Why not!), and get double duty out of weapon specific feats like Weapon Focus, Improved Critical and / or Weapon Specialization. That suggests a character with a good Dexterity, such as a human (able to put that +2 anywhere), or an elf (and a century-old elven devotee of a god of *youth* has all sorts of delightful oddity to it, with the elf perhaps thinking of all humans as 'youth' of a sort, since they have such brief mayfly lives).

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Axial wrote:
I think a Munavri market would be filled with fungus, blind fish, fried bats, and cooked vermin.

Yeah, eels, bats, giant cave crickets, centipedes, etc. would seem like good choices.

There'd need to be some sort of 'energy source' for the bottom of the food pyramid, but the Darklands tend to have strange energy sources, like 'mysterious underdark radiations' or whatever, on which tiny brine or plankton-like critters could feed, as well as 'deep vent smokers' providing chemicals and heat in some of the darkland 'seas,' and these tiny critters could serve as the bottom of a food chain that includes schools of fish and eels, creating a marine ecosystem that works without sunlight, or having to subsist on whatever meager nutrients wash their way down from the surface world.

Some forms of plant creature, such as lichens, might be able to, in a fantasy world, replace their need for sunlight with these sorts of 'underdark radiations,' or subsist on decaying magical energies in ancient sunken ruins, turning them into nutrition for themselves, and therefore food for the next critters up the food chain.

And in a creepier occult direction, some of these bottom tier producer organisms might even feed off of the spiritual residue left behind that becomes haunts, causing the haunts to fail over decades, or perhaps even centuries, as they slowly grow, and perhaps flaring into sudden dangerous growth when something dies in the area, fattened by the sudden outpouring of spiritual energy, and, ironically, becoming more dangerous than the haunt that they were feeding off of in the first place...

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Rysky wrote:
I Blame Cosmo that I keep getting rejected everytime I apply for a Credit Card.

It's not for everyone, but I've never had one (debit cards, on the other hand, are wonderful!). Given how in debt some of my friends are (and how bad I am about managing my money), it's probably for the best.

I blame Cosmo for that rain that started when I left the house and ended the second I got to the (sheltered) bus stop. Perfectly timed, as usual. :(

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technarken wrote:
I kinda want most divine Spellcaster to be the "Old Guard" of sorts in Starfinder. Iomedae's clerics still wield longswords of the traditional sort, Desnan clergy still use Starknives. Even more so than Holy Symbols, the fact that they do use traditional weaponry distinguishes them in a very Jedi-esque way.

[tangent] I want sneaky clerics of Desna that use shuriken, instead of starknives, darnit! [/tangent]

That said, yeah, some gods, particularly more lawful or tradition oriented gods like Erastil, Iomedae and Pharasma probably wouldn't upgrade their favored weapon. Others, like Abadar, Brigh and Torag, are kind of 'gods of civilization' or 'gods of artifice,' and so an update to a more 'modern' weapon, like a blaster or energy weapon, might make sense for them.

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Ninja in the Rye wrote:
Wasn't the "Eternity" who told Hank Pym he was "Scientist Supreme" actually Loki in disguise, and then he mocked Pym for being a gullible twit?

That was definitely something Loki said to Pym, but since Pym had just teleported into one of Loki's castles and set up a magic-nullifying trap that was holding Loki powerless, Loki's word on the subject is even less reliable than usual.

That said, the whole 'Scientist Supreme' thing seems like bad fanfic, and I say this as a fan of Pym.

Different writers veer wildly in different directions with the character. One wants him to be Scientist Supreme, up there with Reed and Tony (both of whom Eternity *also* gave special titles). Another wants Scott Lang to know more about Pym particles than him.

Sometimes who is 'smartest' depends on who is writing the character. One week it's Reed, the next week it's T'Challa, and then it's Pym's turn on the 'I'se tha smarterest!' merry-go-round.

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Matthew Morris wrote:

As to Agent Carter

I do hope to see some visibility both in further movies (via flashback) and in the series (AoS Obviously, but some flashback stuff in the netfli series would work.)

I feel like the jump forward to the modern day in the end of the first Captain America movie missed some opportunities for later stuff, such as further 'untold tales' of stuff that happened in the war years. It felt to me like it closed some doors in a rush to set up an Avengers franchise, and even a few throwaway lines indicating that a lot of weird stuff that didn't make it into the press releases about the war had occurred could have left that door a little more open.

For instance, upon meeting Quicksilver, Cap could have dropped an enigmatic 'Not my first speedster' line during the fight, which wouldn't have proved anything, but served as a plot seed that could be used later in an Invaders-era flashback (or limited series, or whatever) with Spitfire or some other Invaders-era speedster.

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Krensky wrote:
Regardless, Pym's one of the seven smartest since him coming back to Earth bumped Cho down from seven.

The whole 'whose the smartest man' in the world comic-book stakes bug me, since they assume that the smartest person in the world is a man, and also assume that the smartest person in the world is a human (and not an Inhuman, Eternal, Atlantean, Deviant, etc.), and assume that the smartest person in the world is someone we've seen as a superhero, and mostly ignores non-superheroes (and super-intelligent sorts like the Leader or High Evolutionary, who are *explicitly* smarter than Richards or Stark or Pym could ever be, just as Thor is stronger than Captain America, because it's an actual super-power they have).

Meanless junk-measuring, IMO, and it seems to change with writers and over time as new smart people are introduced.

Although I'm pretty okay with Stark, Richards and Pym individually thinking they are super-clever, while people like the Mad Thinker and Arnim Zola just kind of scoff at the kiddies squabbling over whose tiny still-human brain is bestest at meat-thinking.

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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
My parents have a giant mango tree in their back yard that produces a prodigious amount of mangoes every year. We pick them up in a 5-gallon bucket and put them out with the yard waste because no one will take them. Once they are past ripe and start to ferment, the squirrels start eating them and seem to get drunk-ish off them. Thankfully the cats are exceptionally lazy, even for cats, and have no interest in hunting the staggering clumsy little fuzzers.

One of the places I worked had a groundhog living in a den against the building, and an apple tree out front. He was shy, and we almost never saw him, but when the apples fell and started to ferment on the ground, he'd gorge himself and sit out in the sun, flat on his back, showing us his belly as we walked by, not a care in the world.

So, not only a drunk, but also a flasher! Animals these days!

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Cuup wrote:

[dice=Alignment]1d9 Chaotic Neutral

[dice=Domain 1]1d33 Glory
[dice=Domain 2]1d33 Water
[dice=Domain 3]1d33 Ruins
[dice=Domain 4]1d33 Plant

...Uhhh....

Ja'Daar is the God of...hypocrisy. His lust for Glory is always, uh, stymied by his veneration of that which has all but disappeared from the world. At times he channels his love for legendary, sunken cities, like the fabled Atlantis, but then he wonders what the F*#k plants have to do with that. Occasionally, he's dabbled in teachings of being self sufficient and lowering your carbon footprint, like growing your own food and finding old abandoned structures to squat in, but then he felt so unglorified, he kicked himself. He's even considered himself a bit of a fixer-upper god, finding dilapidated cities or buildings and making them as good as new, letting others share in a new home where there once was none, but he's Chaotic Neutral, so then he stopped.

Favored Weapon: Improvised Weapons
Holy Symbol: Guy next to a fire, shivering

I had no idea there was a Ruins domain! (Or Vermin, looking at the list.)

Random thoughts to gussy up this odd collection of Domains, running a bit with (and a bit away from!) some of the themes you've already begun to explore;

A theme for those domains could be the tearing down of civilization, allowing erosion and wild growth to dismantle and replace buildings of wood and stone, that such things are making people weak and soft, and that to reclaim their true power they have to learn to live without these luxuries. (Kind of grasping here to find 'Glory' in all of this...) The god's temples, always held in ruins of other (preferably lawful) god's shrines or churches, would include an order of Brawlers would seek to prove their strength and capability without forged weaponry, for instance, embracing the wilder and savage instincts of nature in a way that Monks, with all their lawfulness and self-discipline, never could. Despite being fans of the wild, they still consider animals basically tasty and / or inferior creatures, to be exploited as the worshipper wills, since they 'glory' in their own mastery of the natural world, even as they shun constructed buildings (and, as such, the faith seems fairly popular among less explicitly-evil gnolls, who agree with both ruthlessly domesticating lesser creature, that that building anything is a waste of time). Taming animals (or, for the more evil branches of the faith, slaves) is considered part of showing your strength, but forging bonds with them, such as via the Animal Domain, is sometimes looked at askance, as it is seen as lowering oneself, although that opinion is kept quiet around particularly deadly Rangers, or powerful arcane spellcasters with animal familiars...

The faith would be a strong proponent of 'the past was better' or the 'golden age' notion that everything was more pure or whatever back in the old days, and everyone is softer and weaker and less than they were in the dissipated modern days, and be filled with a lot of older grumblers who long for the 'good old days' and are willingly to selectively ignore various hardships and diseases and wars and famines and social ills that have been overcome in the 'decadent' modern day.

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Freehold DM wrote:
Marvel has done considerably better with non-white characters through their history than DC has. I'd also say Marvel has less of a problem with limited series to give fans a chance to warm up to a new character than DC does. I think race plays a role here, but not as large a role as some might think.

DC has a problem getting away from their perceived 'Trinity' or top-tier characters. It's Batman and Superman, or bust, and they resist non-original characters*, such as Flashes not named Barry Allen or Green Lanterns not named Hal Jordan, both of whom they've managed to kill of and replace, sometimes for *decades.* As a result, a big chunk of their stories about white guys.

Sony is kind of doing the same thing with the X-Men films, first being 'Wolverine and his amazing friends' and now being 'Magneto and Mystique and their amazing friends' for the most part.

(*Granted, I should be able to type Alan Scott and Jay Garrick there, for 'original,' but they predated Geoff Johns childhood, and so don't count as 'original.')

Marvel has somewhat lucked out in having so many 'iconic' characters scattered between the X-Men, Fantastic Four, Avengers, Hulk and Spider-Man that they've generally not been as stuck making twelve Batman titles and calling it a day. That said, without the X-Men, which is a treasure trove of different races and ethnicities and strong women, the rest of the MCU can come across almost as white-dude-heavy as the DCU, and Marvel has fairly recently gone a bit Iron Man-happy, including him in other characters movies, or throwing him in titles where he feels kind of like stunt-casting, such as having him join the Guardians of the Galaxy. Iron Man might be turning into Marvel's Johnny Everywhere (as Wolverine was, for a time)...

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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Not to mention all that frothing about at the quantum level.

In Starfinder, disintegrate is a dimensional anchor variant designed to interdict quarks from entering a given volume of space, causing matter to collapse into nothingness as the quarks pop out and are *not* replaced. Spells that create or magnify / enlarge matter do the opposite, allowing quarks to enter the affected volume of space, but not leave, so that the affected matter grows in size or quantity.

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Phase Spider + Aranea or Jorugumo

Nightmare + Bearded Devil (Centaur - style)

Hell Hound + Deinonychus (fiery fiendish dogs? Ha, no. Try fiery fiendish *dinosaurs*)

Wyvern + Behir (eight wings along it's serpentine length, electrical breath, from the elemental plane of air)

Hydra + Naga (a half-dozen venomous spellcasting heads, oh yeah)

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I should clarify that while I want an Enterprise with all the toys, I would lock the doors to the holodeck, since that thing flips out and tries to kill anyone who uses it at least once a season...

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I imagine favored weapons (laser pistol, plasma whip, grenade launcher, flame thrower) will be the biggest change to the Cleric class. :)

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I want all the toys that come on the Next Generation Galaxy-class Enterprise. Transporters, food replicators, a decent medical bay, etc. All the toys.

As for the *look* of a ship, I don't care if it's a spaceship and could be a random collection of junk held together by force fields, I want sleek and aerodynamic. The Defiant, the White Star, that chrome SR-71 thing the Queen of Naboo was flitting around in during The Phantom Menace or a Cylon Raider, for sure.

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phantom1592 wrote:

Then Dick got his own series... and he was EVERYTHING that I wanted in Batman. He was friendlier, he wasn't obsessed with vengeance... he wanted to HELP people. A fantastic fighter and detective... but never 'the bestest ever was...'

GREAT series.

One of the better moments in the Young Justice cartoon had the League arguing about whether it was appropriate to have Captain Marvel on the team, now that they knew he was only ten years old, and Batman sticks up for him being at least allowed to remain in the room while they discussed his membership and Wonder Woman says, 'Sure, you'd stand up for him. What was Robin, eight years old, when you started training him to be just like you..' and Batman snaps back, 'I started training him so he *wouldn't* be just like me.'

That's kind of the whole deal with Dick Grayson, IMO, and where the comics seem to get it so wrong when they have him take up the cowl, as if his destiny is to replace Batman, when it always seemed kind of the point that Bruce never wanted him to be the Batman, or to have some sort of grim neverending quest for justice/vengeance take over Dick's life, the way it kind of did his own.

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JoelF847 wrote:
Will there be a SF iconic spaceship for the SF iconic characters to use?

Toot toot, all aboard the HMS (Her Majestrix's Starship) Starfinder!

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