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Anubis

Set's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 13,670 posts (17,746 including aliases). 1 review. 1 list. 1 wishlist. 2 Pathfinder Society characters. 79 aliases.


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Scarab Sages

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The White Wolf World of Darkness games, Vampire the Masquerade, Mage the Ascension, etc. often had 'splats' (such as the Akashic Brotherhood, Assamites, Black Furies, or Dreamspeakers) devoted to groups composed primarily by different ethnicities or groupings in the setting, or even entire sub-games (Kindred of the East, Mummy).

Aeon/Trinity concentrated on a future setting where the dominant cultures were China and Brazil, with Europe and America being in decline (and Australia and the 'United African Nations' also being strong powers). Aberrant, less so, but still set the most relevant 'centers' of the game in places like Addis Ababa and Ibiza (unlike the comic books that inspired them, which seemed to set their 'Greenwich Mean Time' with the assumption that New York City/Metropolis are the center of the universe).

Scarab Sages

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Holy necromancy!

Anywho, he's an 8th level specialist Diviner, with an amazingly inflated local reputation and a soul-searing collection of porn involving him and various goddesses and female rulers (none of which have ever heard of him...).

He does have some great intel, for a guy tucked away in East Nowhere, 'the Dales,' and is a great source of adventure hooks for people who *can* deal with the situations he's become aware of.

Scarab Sages

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I blame Cosmo for manipulating people into blaming each other for stuff, instead of him, the 'Cos' of all trials and tribulation.

Scarab Sages

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Religious practices might include staking people (captured enemies, people who broke arbitrary laws, whatever) out for nocturnal predators / vampire bats, to 'keep them happy' and from devouring the local worshippers.

That this might end up with the unfortunate result of encouraging local predators to lurk around the communities and wait for their free meals of long pig would be amusing to the CE god, and kind of a 'stupid tax' on his followers, since they'd be inadvertently training the local monsters that they are yummy and that lurking around their communities is a great way to stay fed.

On the other hand, well-fed beasties might also be prone to not eating the local priests and their followers, since they have grown accustomed to not eating people that aren't tied up and incapable of putting up a fight (or smeared in aromatic butter, or wearing tinkly bells, or some other sign that this here one's for eatin' and that one there's not for eatin'), leading to the local priesthood perhaps having 'trained' (kinda/sorta...) nocturnal beasties like dire vampire bats, or stirges, or whatever, on call to impress the hoi-polloi (and secure their own positions of power in these communities) and fight off rivals.

The followers might consider it in their best interests to propitiate their god, and feed the beasties, because it's the way the god (or, his priests) taught them how to live in this monster-infested area, and also sort of 'protects' them from rival tribes or communities, who *don't* have this special sort of tactic for co-existing with the local nocturnal predatory creatures. They might think themselves blessed with the gods protection, or just cleverer than their neighbors, who live in fear of the beasties they've (more or less) 'tamed' by feeding them regularly. The priests of Camazotz would encourage this sort of thinking, and suggest that the followers of less clever / less brave / less worthy gods in neighboring communities are fit only to feed the beasties, encouraging raids on those communities to take captives to bring home and stake out for the beasties.

The fact that their practices are the *reason* why their area has such a thriving population of man-eating nocturnal beasties, while neighboring communities don't have to take prisoners and feed them to the predators, because they have heroes who go out and kill them / keep them away from their communities, is an irony lost on these Camazotz worshippers, who grew up with the simple formula of 'feed monsters, don't get eaten by monsters' and are not eager to stop doing what has worked for them for so many generations.

Camazotz probably finds it funny that he's got entire human communities trapped in a cycle of degeneracy, increasingly incapable of even conceiving of breaking free from this tradition of feeding each other to monsters...

Scarab Sages

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I'm not necessarily agreeing with that logic, but I've heard it argued that dividing up the damage of scorching ray into discrete chunks, and how that makes it less effective against fire resistance, is intentional design, and keeps it from remaining the 'go to' spell used by people who should be using 4th, 5th, etc. level spells in combat.

IMO, if the individual rays need individual 'to hit' rolls, then they count as separate attacks for the purpose of energy resistance / spell resistance.

If there was a 'Vital Strike' like feat for spellcasters using magic missiles or scorching rays or similar multiple-attack spells, that would be a different kettle of fish.

Scarab Sages

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thejeff wrote:
LazarX wrote:
I'm not so sure that manspreading is a gender issue as opposed to a general decline in civic values. Most manspreaders are essentially men who eschew the notion of common courtesy to their fellow passengers, if not actively revolting against it.
Given that there have been campaigns against it (under other names) and other bad subway behavior since before I was born, I doubt it has anything to do with a "general decline in civic values".

[tangent]

My History of Rome had a poster of some speech about 'declining standards' and 'youth disrespectful to their elders' and 'not like it was in my day' and 'sign of general moral decay' that was given before the Roman senate, a couple thousand years ago and sounded pretty much exactly like something you'd read in a newspaper editorial today about social decay and lack of civility and whatnot.

Every generation is living in it's own end times, where things 'couldn't possibly get any worse.' And yet, we've mostly gotten rid gotten rid of slavery and trepanning and polio and infant mortality rates in the double digits, so it's a pretty groovy sort of 'end times,' compared to the glorious 'golden age' that always seems to have existed when our grandparents were our age.
[/tangent]

Scarab Sages

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Kobold Cleaver wrote:
The most insane thing is that this actually exists already in the Monster Codex (as a feat). I didn't know that at the time. Apparently the idea of bouncey goblins is just a universal constant.

Now we just need a variant that can eat a bunch of cabbage and inflate comically to float over an area, and then 'attack' by discharging the gas that's holding them aloft as a weak stinking cloud effect (just sickness, not nausea), at the risk of sending them careening around wildly and slamming into folk in the process. (Because of this tendency, they strap on spiked armor before going into fights, and ground bound goblins keep them from drifting off by holding ropes tied to them, pulling them along like swollen goblin balloons...)

Scarab Sages

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31: Tempest Tossed - This sodden fellow spied on the priestesses of the god(dess) of the sea and storms practicing their rites 'sky-clad' (i.e. nude), and was cursed to have a permanent 5 ft. storm cloud above his head whenever he is out of doors. The effects of wind and rain on him, and anyone else sharing his space, give him a -2 to all attacks and skill checks. If he dares to go outside during a thunderstorm, he has 5% chance per round to be struck by a weak lightning bolt for 1d6 nonlethal damage.

32: Love the Sun - This thief attempted to rob the temple of the sun-god(dess), and was cursed to always be in bright sunlight. Outside, a beam of sunlight comes down upon him from the sky (even when it is overcast, or in the middle of the night), but even indoors, he is always illumined as if by faerie fire, although he provides no illumination to anyone outside of his square. Stealth, needless to say, is no longer much of an option for him, although he does benefit from a +2 to Fortitude checks to avoid nonlethal damage from environmental cold (and a corresponding -2 penalty to Fortitude checks to avoid nonlethal damage from environmental heat...).

33: Hell's Brand - An evil priest has marked you with a visible brand that he can activate as a swift action whenever he is within 100 ft. of you, causing you to suffer 1d6 nonlethal fire damage and intense pain that sickens you for 1 round. He uses it to boss you around and torment you at his leisure.

34: Commandment - You have been cursed so that each day that you do not make an active attempt to further some goal stated at the cursing, you suffer pain leaving you sickened all day long. As long as you move towards the goal selected for you, or take action to advance it, the pain subsides and you are unpenalized. This 'quest' has to be attainable, but can certainly be ridiculously hard... ("Collect the seven shards of the sundered Topaz of Tybalt!")

Scarab Sages

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My issue with the sling (and the crossbow) is that they are Simple weapons, which is exactly one feat away from the longbow, a Martial weapon.

As such, mechanically, it should take no more than *one feat* to bring them up to longbow standards. They don't need to be *identical,* and, ideally, shouldn't be, but there shouldn't be a 'no-brainer' choice of one being clearly better in every case than the other.

Halflings of Golarion introduces a *three feat chain* that makes a sling about as good as a longbow, a weapon that is only one feat 'better' than the sling, which, IMO, is friggin' ridiculous.

Scarab Sages

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Lord Snow wrote:
Not really a relevant question. When you are watching a movie you don't judge it based on the question of whether or not you could have done it better yourself (in all likelihood, you like most people wouldn't be able to pull off any movie at all, just about regardless of how much time and money you had), you judge based on whether it's a good movie.

Exactly. I don't need to be a gourmet chef to know whether something tastes good or bad, or an award-winning writer or journalist to know if something is clearly written or kinda murky, or have a bunch of platinum records to have an opinion on whether or not the Beastie Boys or David Bowie are more 'classic' than the other.

There's actually no pre-qualifications at all for someone to have an opinion on something. :)

Scarab Sages

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Oh hey, a new thread to inspire creativity! Woo!

17. Aquagoblins / Gillblins - standard goblins with the aquatic subtype, reduced land speed to 20 ft., added 40 ft. swim speed and a bite attack using their shark-like teeth (1d4 damage, crits on a 19-20). Fingers and toes are boneless and tentacular, separated by webs, which also manifest between arms and torso, and their legs.

18. Goblotaurs - combines features of a goblin and a minotaur, having hooved feet and furry bodies and the head of a bull, but the size of a goblin. Has a gore attack for 1d4 damage and powerful charge (x2 damage with gore on a charge). Racial attribute modifiers are +2 Dex and -2 Int (no Str or Cha penalty), and replaces the racial +4 bonus to Ride & Stealth with a +2 racial bonus to Perception, Stealth and Survival. Can use oversized (Medium) weapons without penalty, due to large build, preferring greataxes and longspears. Rarely found in Medium size, using Large weapons.

19. Gobblers - gobblers jaws can distend, and have a flexible bulging sac-like throat and stomach, affording them not only a bite attack out of proportion to their size (1d6), but also the grab and swallow whole property (only applying to size Tiny or smaller prey, 1d4 acid damage, AC 10, 1 hp), generally of no concern to adventurers who don't have familiars.

20. Bargobs - these goblins claim to be in some way related to or 'blessed' by the barghests spawned by their demi-deities. They have a bite attack (1d4 damage), supernaturally tough hides (DR / silver equal to HD, max 5), and some limited supernatural abilities, such as the ability to feather fall (self only) for a number of rounds equal to their HD, and the ability to dimensional step as a Conjuration Specialist Wizard of level equal to their HD (although they gain this capability at 1 HD, instead of 8th level).

21. Goblin Bears These goblins emulate bugbears, whom they idolize to the point of near worship, in all things. They possess no traits any different than any other goblin, despite these pretentions of 'scariness,' and bugbears kill them on sight, being offended by these tiny skulking poseurs.

Scarab Sages

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I blame Cosmo that I've had to know the difference between magma and lava in the last two posts I made. What's up with that?

Is it some sort of portent? Oh dear...

Scarab Sages

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Kelsey Arwen MacAilbert wrote:
Should I be using the term Underdark, or is that specific to the Forgotten Realms only?

The inhabitants of the 'bowl' might consider themselves the inhabitants of the original cradle of life, in an area sheltered from danger, sort of an 'Eden' analogue, and residents of the outer brighter-lit area to be kind of crazy, by comparison, living on the wild 'underside,' as they think of it. (The fact that you tunnel down to reach magma, and place a fire on the bottom of a bowl, would make their assumption that they are living on the 'top' of the bowl seem logical.)

They might call their own dark area 'the Cradle,' while thinking of those clinging to the sun-lit side as 'Outsiders' or 'Downsiders.'

The world being bowl-shaped would likely lead to great glacier-topped mountain ranges along the edges (from whose monster-haunted peaks all rivers flow), and a vast sea at the very center, around which the various nations, empires and lands of the world are arranged in a crude circle.

Scarab Sages

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Random thoughts on monsters on which PF hasn't said a ton;

Gargoyles and their relationship with Xoveron, the Horned Prince, the Glutton, Demon Lord of Ruin. Tying that into some variation of the ruin-fueled magic (mentioned in Heart of the Jungle?), or power gained from ruining / destroying / consuming stuff, for an Oracle Mystery or Sorcerer / Bloodrager Bloodline, could be an avenue to explore. (Gargoyle Bloodragers of such a destructive / consumptive bloodline seem like a natural fit.)

Lamia, and an exploration of the sorts of addictive techniques and charming / illusory magics (or mixing the two, and designing some addictive spells that create pleasant visions and sensations in their victims?) they use to work their machinations among desert folk.

Merfolk, and magic and mundane methods they use to thrive in an ocean filled with threats like the sahuagin. Lots of avenues for undersea adventuring options, here, some of which may already have been covered in 3P products like Kobold Press' From the Shore to the Sea. Rules elements involving coral, water, pressure, etc. could be explored.

The stages of 'evolution' (or devolution) that can lead a person (or collection of people?) to a new existence as a Gibbering Mouther, assuming that such a thing is possible. I vaguely recall Wolfgang Bauer mentioning such a Lovecraftian possibility in an old issue of Dragon magazine, and it's too cool to not explore. Perhaps this can be the result of an aberrant sorcerer pushing the envelope too far, or is a rare consequence of a bunch of people being attacked by a Chaos Beast at the same time, and collapsing into each other to become a single creature.

Salamander society. Everyone and their dog has written about the City of Brass and it's Efreeti inhabitants. How about those other denizens of the Plane of Fire, the Azer, Mephits and Salamanders, who might have cultures and 'empires' of their own in the endless conflagration? Rules elements could include mechanics for hurling globs of lava at people or ensnaring someone in a red-hot chain or scorpion whip, with siege engines throwing massive glops of molten stone at people, not to burn the largely fire resistant threats they face on the plane of fire, but to slow them down and encumber them in cooling tons of stone.

Do Phase Spiders have a society, chittering together in their webs on the ethereal plane? What is it like? Do they manufacture fine 'phase silk' trade goods and swap information gleaned from their observations of other worlds? Could members of such a 'nest' or hive hire humanoid adventurers to deal with the raids of a nearby Xill collective, offering fine 'phase silk' clothing that can be cheaply magically enhanced to function as cloaks and boots of elvenkind, or cloaks of displacement?

Scarab Sages

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Cosmo's older than dirt.

Seriously. On the third day, God was like, "What should I make today?" and Cosmo said, "Dirt!"

Scarab Sages

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Thanks for bringing this up from the depths Freehold DM!

954. Infernal Steamworks Your body is the reddish-gray of iron ore, and your hair sticks straight up, thicker than hair, and being composed of cylindrical metallic tubes, like the pipes of a tiny pipe organ. Your teeth fit together like the cogs of a clockwork wheel and the red spoked irises of your amber eyes rotate as you focus on a subject, with a barely perceptible whirring sound. When you speak, a hint of warm steam issues forth from your 'pipes', and the effect is greatly enhanced if you shout loudly, with a low moan of escaping steam accompanying your cry, as of a distant steam engine of some sort.

Scarab Sages

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Set blames Cosmo for Loki being the cool trendy god of evil.

Loki? Really? Dude turned into a mare, got knocked up by a stallion and gave birth to a freaky eight-legged horse (proving that he can't even do *that* right, it's a horse, not a spider!).

Still waiting for the adult version of the story where Loki shortens Thor's 'hammer.' And by 'hammer,' I mean exactly what Captain Hammer meant.

Scarab Sages

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Bardess wrote:
Monsters with class levels can benefit from favored class bonuses, but there aren't favored class bonuses for monsters. Mmmm... maybe a piece on favored class bonuses for angels/other outsiders could be worth it?

Ooh, neat!

Favored class bonuses for aberrations, fey, dragons, undead, etc. could be interesting as well, broken out by type(*), rather than by individual critter, to keep it under a bajillion wordcount...

*Or subtype. A FCB for creatures with the Fire subtype that gives bonus damage to fire attacks, or, allows fire damage they cause to ignore 1 pt. of fire resistance / time it's taken, could be nifty.

Scarab Sages

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So I just read the River of Souls article in AP 34 (which was awesome, and neatly addressed stuff like 'why does Pharasma oh-so-conveniently never judge/sort people before they get resurrected'), and noticed a bit about outsiders 'quintessence' sort of flowing back (eventually) to the Maelstrom or their plane-of-residence if they are destroyed, and that tied interestingly to the bit about souls kind of 'showing up' when a new mortal is born.

Would it be possible for someone to explain their infernal bloodline sorcery to be the result of an imp dying somewhere in their hometown of Korvosa the night of their birth, and part of its 'quintessence' getting mixed up with it's fledgling soul?

Similarly, could the death of demons in the Worldwound/Mendev area, and lingering abyssal quintessence swirling around the area, having not yet spiraled into the giant crapper that is the Worldwound, have some sort of effect on local mortal births (perhaps both humanoids and animals), as they 'get a little bit of demon in them,' resulting in everything from a completely normal child of two mortals being born a half-demon (woops, got a big chunk of demon in that one!), or a tiefling, or with a gift for abyssal bloodline sorcery (or bloodragery, or whatever), or just freakish events like chicken eggs cracking open to reveal crawling eyeballs or two-headed calves with people faces?

That would be kind of neat, and lead to some interesting story options, particularly in the Worldwound / Mendev area, or devil-haunted Cheliax (where a particularly ambitious/callous/strange sort of parent might arrange to have a few imps or lemures called up and ganked just before the birth of their latest little bundle of joy, to give the infant an infernal advantage baked in from the start, as it's newly forming / arriving soul is awash in infernal soulstuff/quintessence...), or even Qadira / Katapesh, home to both lots of genie-summoners *and* lots of Ifrits, Sylphs, Undines and Oreads, perhaps not-so-coincidentally.

Scarab Sages

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I was very excited to buy Mummy's Mask at my local gaming store, because there was this awesome write up of the Egyptian gods, including stats for Set.

The game shop had five of the six AP volumes. Guess which one they were out of? COSMO!!!

Scarab Sages

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Wheldrake wrote:
Why cater to requests for a specail snowflake race that is even more special than the existing special snowflakes?

Why cater to special snowflake GMs whose precious brainchild cannot countenance any story or rules element other than those they already chose? (and by 'chose' I mean, 'let someone else choose for them, by using only the core races in the core book')

It's all relative, and in no case warrants insulting people who chose peanut butter over chocolate by calling them 'special snowflakes.'

Scarab Sages

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Bandw2 wrote:
robert best 549 wrote:
How about a human soul-knife.
no, human fighter.

Something about taking that human bonus feat and extra skill point per level and reassigning them on a daily basis?

Play on those human racial features!

Scarab Sages

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Lord-of-Boggards wrote:

My personal list as it stands is:

Lizardfolk (Kinda a classic fantasy race that got the most basic generic treatment in the ARG which really surprised me)

I'd drop the natural armor bonus to +2 (for PC and NPC lizardfolk, and trogs, and sahuagin), before opening them up for PC use. If I, as GM, want to bring them back up to a buffer AC for an encounter, I can just pop a chain shirt or breastplate or whatever on them.

Quote:
Gnolls (Ditto for what I just said. Was really expecting Gnolls getting a full write up with racial archetypes and everything in the ARG)

Xendrik Expeditions Organized Play (convention games) for 3.5 just dumped the racial HD and used them as is. Seemed simple enough, and added another +Str race (other than half-orc or certain shifters) to the options available.

Not as much of a fan of the others you've picked, but I'd similarly just nuke any racial HD they have (across the board. NPC members of those races would have warrior levels or whatever to bring them back up if I want them to function at a higher CR).

Other options;
Bugbear
Centaur
Dark Folk (needs a lot of work...)
Derro (ditto)
Mite
Satyr / Fauns (less magical powers, but still fey peeps with goat or deer legs and a musical bent)
Serpentfolk (more like the Green Ronin version from the Freeport adventures, or the Scarred Lands' Assaathi, than the more Mind-Flayer-level version used by Paizo)

Aquatic elves and / or aquatic hobgoblins, who may or may not exist in Golarion.

Scarab Sages

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Myth Lord wrote:


Zlatorog

The Zlatorog or Goldhorn is A Chamois/ibex like creature that lives on high mountains and which has golden horns and its blood will bloom beautiful red flowers which are known for their powerful healing properties.

A cool evil version would of course spawn black flowers which cause poison or death. Maybe Obsidianhorn or Onyxhorn can be the evil variant.

This could even be the same creature, with the horns changing color by season, or due to environment, or by gender, or perhaps even determined by the creature at the time of injury (choosing to 'bleed red' to create healing flowers or 'bleed black' to create poison flowers, depending on the situation).

Variations using other animals could include a magical beast that appears to be a large intelligent cobra with an ankh on its hood, and whose venom can be milked to function as a cure wounds or lesser restoration potion, if it is willing, or functions as a deadly poison that also carries disease, if it doesn't perform this service willingly...

Dragon78 wrote:

Planar Dragons- Holy(NG), Dark(NE), Chaos(CN), Axiom(LN), and Eternal(N)

Gem Dragons- Diamond, Ruby, Emerald, Sapphire, and Pearl.

Psychic Dragons- Astral, Chakra, Dream, Esper, and Spirit.

Planar dragons based on morality / ethos sound awesome! 'Imma summon a dragon made of elemental good!'

I'm not a fan of pearl being included as a 'gem,' since it's pretty much shiny oyster phlegm. (Then again, organism-derived substances, like Amber, Ivory and Pearl, perhaps even Silk and Venom, could make an interesting basis for a similar grouping...) Perhaps Topaz, instead?

There's also the five elements of Chinese (earth, fire, metal, water, wood) or Japanese (air, earth, fire, water, void) to consider. Instead of dragons that breathe fire or water or wind, one could be actually *made* of fire, water or wind, more elemental in nature than corporeal.

Scarab Sages

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Random thought;

Sorcerer bloodlines, not for humanoids gaining magical abilities evocative of dragons, fey, genies, outsiders, undead, etc. but for actual dragons, fey, genies, outsiders and undead.

A 'draconic' bloodline *for dragons* could kick several types of booty.

Same for a 'celestial' bloodline designed to synergize with the features (like their auras and immunities) of angels, archons, etc. while not saddling them with class features that replicate racial features they already possess (such as non-stacking resistances to things they already have resistances or immunities to), making some thematically perfect bloodlines, like Infernal for an Erinyes or Undead for a Lich, less than ideal mechanically.

Scarab Sages

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Bardess wrote:
Hmmm... How to transform your familiar in other shapes? How to choose greater monstrous familiars? How to give them class levels? Would this be in theme?

Scaled-down monster familiars could be fun. Cat-sized griffons or wee dragons (that spits alchemist's fire 1/day) or a little basilisk (with a 'petrifying' gaze that only causes some slowing or numbness or whatever). Tiny to Small versions of other 'classic' beasties, like Chimera, Manticores, Naga, Phoenixes and Trolls could be fun to see as 'monster familiars.'

'What? No, Beaky's not a hawk, she's a miniature Roc, you imbecile! Look at the plumage!'

Scarab Sages

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Thinking about some Central American beasties, for an Arcadian monster submission.

Adapting mythical beasties from African or Australian lore, for an article about critters of southern Garund or Sarusan, could also be an option.

Other notions;

Variant monsters - rather than full stat blocks, a listing of 'reskinned' monsters that could be created using current Bestiary stat blocks, with different flavor, or some different mechanical options.

An exploration / ecology article about Dark Folk or Derro or Lamia or Naga, any of whom could use some love.

In depth looks at races that are more Pathfinder-y than traditional D&D races, such as Boggards or Cyclopes or Genie or Linnorms or Mites or Tengu.

Scarab Sages

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Clearly, the theme will be dinosaur-riding half-dragon Gninja.

I'm already writing an article on deadly (yet delicious) throwing cookies and the under-your-nose-the-entire-time links between the Gnomes of the Linnorm Kingdoms and the megafauna of the Mammoth Lords lands.

Scarab Sages

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Dreaming Warforged wrote:

One possible tweak I'm thinking of would be to allow players to move one of the +2/+2/-2, as long as it stays in the same ability type (physical or mental). Thus, a Dwarf could choose +2 Con / +2 Chr / -2 Chr, for example, or an Elf could go +2 Str / +2 Int / -2 Con.

What do you think? Other ideas?

The Dwarven Charisma penalty and the Elven Constitution penalty both feel completely off-flavor for those races. The elves live in the wild, for a ridiculous long time, and, more likely, would have a Con *bonus.* Dwarves are never described as lacking in strong leaders or forceful personalities, as a Charisma penalty would suggest. They *are* described as short with stubby sausage like fingers, and rarely as acrobats or whatever, so a Dex penalty (which, in 3.X/PF would have nothing to do with their Int based craft skills).

Since I don't see any reason to take options away, I allow for dwarves to either take +2 Con, +2 Wis and -2 Cha, and be more surly hard-headed fellows, or be the craftsmen who make their society work, with +2 Con, +2 Int and -2 Dex. Elves can either be recent arrivals from Castrovel, not acclimated to the world of Golarion and it's diseases, etc. with +2 Dex, +2 Int and -2 Con, or long-term visitors who have adapted to the local environment and cultures, but lost some of their ancient lore, +2 Dex, +2 Cha and -2 Str.

Without a half-dozen subraces, just two options for each, there's a lot more versatility, and plenty of room for dwarven geomantic sorcerers and earth mystery oracles, who aren't held back by a Cha penalty. (IMO, Cha penalties and bonuses are way too common anyway, compared to Str bonuses, and sometimes feel less racially thematic and more like some sort of min-maxing attempt.)

Scarab Sages

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mplindustries wrote:
Yeah, why is everyone's answer, "I'd make him suffer!"

I never got that. When I GM, and I grant a PC a wish, that's a *reward,* not a passive-aggressive trap.

Even demons and devils *want* people to make wishes, to draw them into their snares. If every wish ever granted brutally screwed over the wisher, then *nobody* would make deals with glabrezu (efreeti, whatever). They'd be in alleys, "Hey buddy, want a wish?" and even the most desperate person would be like, "What, you think I'm suicidal? Nobody's ever gonna fall for that one. It literally *never* works. Might as well ask if I want to spoon out and eat my own eyeballs."

As GM, I have an infinite number of ways to make PCs suffer. I don't have to twist their wording and piss off my players, who, generally speaking, *are my friends,* by being deliberately obtuse, when, again, generally speaking, I know darn well what they *meant.*


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demontroll wrote:
The solution is to have the babies raised by wolves

I am a wolf and I support this solution.

Send us your poor, your huddled masses, your succulent babies, yearning to be free...

Scarab Sages

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I blame Cosmo that everyone from New England sends maple syrup to family for Christmas, and 73% of it ends up splattered all over the floor in the post office, where I have to clean it up. (I'm sure that's also sad for the people whose Christmas gift is a box full of sticky broken glass and an apology from the postal service...)

I blame Cosmo that anything worth watching on TV has gone on haitus for the last two weeks. 200 channels and nothing is on!

I blame Cosmo for the cold I've had for two weeks. Coughing fits so bad that I got light-headed and saw stars. Delerium dreams about zombies and serial killers. The inability to taste the only magical thing left in this season, eggnog. Cosmo!

Scarab Sages

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[tangent]
The concept of Rune Giants, being Stone Giants modified by the Thassilonians for their armies, could be adapted to other races, such as Orcs or Hobgoblins, by making a sort of 'Rune Template' (designed based on the differences between Stone Giant and Rune Giant) and stepping it down for a lower HD recipient.

And so the *concept* of Rune Giants could be used without actually using Stone Giants as the base. (Going along with Golarion history, hobgoblins may not have existed yet, to be so modified, no matter how old-school appropriate Asian-esqued hobgoblins might be, but orcs surely did.)

The Thassilonians (of Eurythnia?) also dominated the heck out of Black Dragons. Applying such a treatment to create a Rune Dragon would surely not help the 'too high CR' problem, but make for a memorable creature, one which 'mundane' dragons would be as eager to see destroyed (since, like Rune Giants commanding other giants, a Rune Dragon would be able to command and dominate non-Rune dragons!).
[/tangent]

Scarab Sages

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Mikaze wrote:
  • Were Erastil and Fandarra an item way back in Golarion's more primitive era?
  • Given his interests, it's almost impossible that Erastil *didn't* have a spouse and / or family, at some point, or else he's the big ol' god of hypocrisy, telling everyone else they need to settle down and plant some roots, while he's out there stagging it up. (Although I still hold out that his partner was Cernunnos.)

    Although Erastil and Fandarra (or Erastil and Gozreh?) are interesting options as well. Of the male gods, Erastil and Irori seem like the ideal choices for sexed-up images. Erastil may not be Herne or Cernunnos, a god of the wild and virility and male potency, but he's as close as this setting gets. And Irori seems to be all about lean muscles and little clothing, although he seems to have gotten hosed on artistic portrayals, thus far.

    Ditto, Pharasma, goddess of childbirth, *must* have a child or two banging around the universe. Perhaps several. Nobody's really clear on Abadar's parentage, or Gozreh's, or Sarenrae's. Could Pharasma be the 'All-Mother' of the gods? Or perhaps a very interesting story as to why not... (Had to give up her own power of creation to become the judge of the dead? Lost that option when undead came into existence with Urgathoa, explaining the grrrhaterade for a goddess who literally doesn't give a moldy fart about her in return? Is actually with child even now, and has been for as long as anyone remembers (millennia, at least), with her due date being 'the end of the universe?')

    Scarab Sages

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    I can just hear the Paizo folk debating whether Elf on the Shelf is more or less existentially terrifying than Gnome in your Home or Dwarf on a Wharf. (The entire line of 'deadly monsters that leap out of your dinner', such as Dragon in your Flagon, Troll in your Bowl and Drider in your Cider, tested poorly in marketing...)

    Scarab Sages

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    Kobold Cleaver wrote:

    Okay, I'm going to share my philosophy with regards to these gods.

    A god's official alignment is actually a distinct entity from its alignment as a character.

    Think about it. As a PC, if I help an orphanage, then burn down another, I don't get away with anything less than Lawful Evil! But it's common behavior for gods like Gozreh, Boccob and Nethys. "Balance", right? And let's talk about gods like Gorum. Gorum is pretty much a warmongering a@+&+&&. I have a bit of trouble buying his character not being some shade of evil, but can I buy him having good-aligned worshipers? Absolutely.

    A god's alignment is less a reflection of that god's true character and more of the compatibility of that god's portfolio with differently-aligned worshipers. At least, that's how I rationalize it.

    That's pretty much my take on it.

    Sometimes a god's alignment fits like a hand in glove (Abadar, for instance, the only Golarion god who is both aligned and actually a *god of that alignment*), others, it seems like they were made alignment X to fill the quota of 'we need two CN gods, even if both of them strongly lean evil' or 'we want Pharasma to be not-good and not-lawful, despite her hating both evil and people who break her laws, and having serious problems with her own Domain spells, her own NE and CN clergy, etc...'

    Still, this does create some fun opportunities.

    What does the CN church of Lamashtu look like? Could they have some freakish uneasy alliance with Sarenrite redeemers, savagely protecting humanoid children with deformities or mental disabilities from cultures that would discard or shun them?

    A NE cult of Pharasma, sending holy assassins to cull those who have, according to their teachings, defied the sacred cycle of life and death (either by being created, instead of born, like androids, or by cheating death by seeking immortality)?

    A CG temple to Gorum, teaching those in war-ravaged lands to fight in their own defense, making sure that anyone capable of holding a weapon and wearing armor is capable of exercising that right?

    A LN sect of Kuthites, all about strengthening *themselves* through physical hardship and overcoming pain, seeming, to the outside observer, more like a harsh group of self-perfecting Irori worshippers than refugees from a Clive Barker movie?

    The Godclaw is a great example of this. LN Hellknights who revere Iomedae (if not her every good tenet) stand side by side with LN Hellknights who revere Asmodeus (if not his every evil tenet), and both of those gods continue to grant spells to LN clergy, so neither of them are necessarily 'getting it wrong.'

    Scarab Sages

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    Random thoughts I had while picking a subject;

    Thanks to the Order of the Palatine Eye (Occult Mysteries p 24-25) and their Osirioni focus, leftover article ideas from the previous issue could find use here.

    The usual class powers / options based on the theme. Alchemical discoveries or Rogue talents or Monk style feats or Sorcerer Bloodline or Wizard sub-school or Oracle mystery or Cleric sub-domain derived from Old Cults or vampire / werewolf / ghoul / etc. themes. (A werewolf or vampire totem trio of rage powers, for instance, or new rogue/ninja tricks that mimic vampiric or undead qualities, like momentary bursts of wall clinging or gaseous form.)

    Vampiric 'fangblades' made with a vampire tooth in the handle that does +1d6 damage when it strikes a living a target, half of which (round down) is received as healing by the user (the other half of which is magically transmitted to the blades vampire creator!). An assortment of similar magic weapons / items that, like Hag Eyes, link one to a monstrous creator in some way.

    Sanguine spells (animate dagger using blood from a bleed effect, transfer life-force between living creatures using blood, etc.)

    Silver magic / werewolf magic, using silver as a power component to cause magic weapon spells to make the effected weapon count as silver to bypass DR, or during casting some detection spell to make it reveal lycanthropes instead (perhaps detect undead?) or to dispel magic to instead cause lycanthropes in the area to involuntarily change shape.

    Pharasman holy water obscuring mist / fog cloud / riptide variants (holy water power component added to standard casting), variant Water Domain powers to to create a burst of holy water around self or in a life effect, holy water alchemist-like Bombs as high level Water Domain power for Pharasmans

    Side Trek - bog bodies from Anactoria (Rule of Fear p 16) are actually specially prepared zombies (or even mummies) being used to infiltrate Lepidstadt, to provide a distraction for someone who wants to raid their library during the confusion (not to steal something, but to *change* some recorded information, perhaps to make a summoning fail, or to steal or deny an inheritance by adding or removing record of an heir to a noble family, etc.)

    Secret of county of Berus and 'Mother Sighle' (Rule of Fear p 12), Bokrug-worshipping hag, vampire or ghoul weather controlling witch the source of the well-guarded bounty, demanding sacrifice for good crops?

    The mysterious 'lost pages.' Page 10 of Rule of Fear mentions that Kavaspesta is detailed in Chapter 3. Page 30 of Rule of Fear mentions that Carrion Hill is detailed in Chapter 4. Neither entry exists, leaving plenty of room for someone to make stuff up! :)

    Scarab Sages

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    Nice to see all the 13th Warrior love! That movie bombed hard, and yet is one of my favorites.

    Also Sahara, Labyrinth, The Incredibles, Rock & Rule, The Avengers, either Captain America, Aliens, Big Trouble in Little China, Tequila Sunrise, Highlander, The Muppet Movie (the original), The Crow, Prophecy, Vamp, The Thirteenth Floor and Lost Boys.

    If I had to pick one, it would be Sahara or the first Captain America movie, both are feel-good movies for me.

    Scarab Sages

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    Article sent (it was written a month ago, I just got around to stripping out the formatting, 'cause I've been some combination of too busy and too lazy...).

    Everyone knows I can write me some 10,000 words about undead in less time it takes to bake a lasagna, so I decided to not write about undead.

    The great thing about writing for a game is getting to do 'research' that consists of reading books and looking up stuff I really wanted to read more about anyway. Oh no! Don't make me go read about ancient vampire legends, or Dagon-worshipping fish-peeps! I feel like one of those upscale restaurant reviewers whose 'job' is to eat really awesome food and then write about eating really awesome food...

    Scarab Sages

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    DM Under The Bridge wrote:
    If a player or kingdom wanted to be "good" then fight off, best and negotiate with the demihumans/monsters, not engage in genocide or cultural genocide, or abducting them, and then brainwashing them to be utterly against the culture of their people.

    The original premise of the thread was what to do with children of hostile races that survived hostilities, not 'abducting' children of other races and brainwashing them. It was pretty much 100% the *opposite* of genocide (since actual genocide, killing the youngsters before they 'grow up evil', was the accepted solutions for Paladins who would find hauling the young orcs / goblins / whatever off to the local church of Sarenrae to be terribly inconvenient).

    If the orc / goblin / etc. 'culture' includes stuff like genocide of other races, cannibalism, etc. then it's hardly a fair comparison to what's happened to various native American or Australian aborigines or even just slower-than-average kids in attempts to 'mainstream' them into whatever group is dominant. It's more similar to a jobs training program for kids in juvie, giving them tools to avoid spending even more of their lives in correctional system.

    Scarab Sages

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    Fiendish Perfection is uber-creepy! Also inspiring, in a horrible way...

    951. Unborn. Your form is seven feet tall and androgynous, in an inconsistent manner, with some parts more 'masculine,' and others more 'feminine' (and perhaps even recognizably those of your 'parent'), as you were never born from your mothers womb, but instead grew within her and merged with her body, mind and soul, in a freakish twist on Vanishing Twin Syndrome. You weigh over 300 lbs, as you have the combined mass of your mother and the man you would have grown to become (in a stranger twist, perhaps it was a 'father' who became host to the seducer-fiends spawn, in a cyst on his belly, and this 'daughter' instead merged with the flesh of her unsuspecting parent, which is a typical 'be careful what you wish for' result from willingly enjoining with a succubus...). In any case, you are now a single being, both containing the memories, experiences and drives of the absorbed parent, as well as the new wonder and sometimes fiendish urges and motivations of the 'child,' no longer capable of distinguishing between the 'old you' and the 'new you,' being one flesh and one spirit.

    Scarab Sages

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    Christina Stiles wrote:
    The world surrounding Freeport would be a great project.

    Indeed. Those gargoyle-enslaving Iovan gnomes sound super-fun.

    Loved their use of Serpentfolk and Yig and the Elder Sign / King in Yellow, etc.

    Scarab Sages

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    Lord Snow wrote:
    Quote:
    Ward is supposed to be just below Romanov in terms of martial competency.
    Well, we know that May is a step above him (their fight last season was a close thing but she did end up winning rather decisively), and she still seems leagues below Romanov... are you saying something that was mentioned by someone with the authority to say that for sure? Because I'm pretty sure that all the characters in this show are supposed to be small fish compared to any of the Avengers.

    I *think* that Ward had the 'best scores since Romanov' in infiltration and undercover work, which, kind of pointedly, is what SHIELD trained him to do and rewarded him for doing to other groups for SHIELD, while, the whole time, he was doing it to SHIELD for Garrett as well...

    "Why yes, Director Fury. All that schmoozing my way into organizations and gaining their trust and betraying them from within that you were so proud of me doing for SHIELD? Must be terribly confusing and shocking to you that the dog you trained to bite people could bite you."

    Scarab Sages

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    Loving this show, so far, and the longer it takes before we see Batman, the better. It's a great look at his surrounding cast and setting and mythos.

    Scarab Sages

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    I like the modularity of the class design, leaving room for easy expansion to more 'Eastern' elements like wood, metal or spirit/void.

    Scarab Sages

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    Orthos wrote:
    steelhead wrote:
    Jaelithe wrote:
  • Not providing the "required"/desired magical paraphernalia on schedule
  • I have no idea what you are saying here. What magical paraphernalia and on whose schedule?

    Some players will complain things like "The game mechanics and Wealth-by-Level charts say we should have a magic weapon by level 4! Why haven't you given us magic weapons yet?!"

    I do not actually know if it's level 4, and I'm too lazy to actually look it up.

    I'm totally this guy.

    I remember a game where we made it to 7th level, and my character was still wearing his 70 gp. worth of starting gear, and the GM kept complaining about all the near-wipes, because of our 'poor tactics' against swarms and incorporeal foes and foes with DR that we couldn't affect.

    Several APs, in my experience, go by the assumption that clerics and wizards don't need treasure, at all. In Council of Thieves, we were 5th level before the GM deliberately added a couple of scrolls of wizard spells as a bonus, since there had, by the end of book two, not been a single item of treasure (or enough gold to craft even a potion, let along purchase a wizard spell) for a wizard (or, if there was, we missed it all, despite attempting to sell everything we found for cash and taking odd jobs around town for money to equip the party fighter with a masterwork weapon...).

    Gah.

    I don't need Stormbringer or anything, but an orcbane short sword and a mithril chain shirt could be handy (I'll pass on the ring of invisibility with the massive curse...).

    Although, being a fan of games like Mutants & Masterminds or Vampire the Masquerade, which don't have 'loot' at all, I suppose D&D/PF characters can go fine with no loot, so long as monsters that require magic loot to defeat (incorporeal foes, foes with lots of DR, etc.) are either changed or removed from play.

    Saying 'you must be this tall to play' and then arbitrarily capping height at 5" below that just seems weird and frustrating.

    Scarab Sages

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    RuyanVe wrote:
    time's fleeting...

    Madness takes it's toll.

    Scarab Sages

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    Feros wrote:

    I, however, got BOTH my great golem sale order AND my regular subscription sent.

    *smug*

    I blame Cosmo for the evil impulse that caused me to post this. >:D

    Fiend. It's been weeks, and I haven't even got the confirmation email allowing me to read the PDFs I ordered during the Great Golem sale!

    Which is totally all on Cosmo.

    Along with those dudes who try to talk to you in the bathroom. You know when I don't want to talk about sports with random strangers? When I have my **** in my hand, that's when. Cosmo!

    Scarab Sages

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    Man-Spider! Threat or Menace?

    Masked aranea engaged in lawless vigilantism, leaves purported 'burglars' webbed to the roof of the constabulary!

    Scarab Sages

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    Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
    While you are away, your fellow party members begin to whisper of their indescribable unease behind your back... until you return, when they forget what they were even discussing, or how many times they've had this same conversation.

    "So you're saying that Ben might have some connection to Glory?"

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