Brodert

Scientific Scrutiny's page

34 posts. Alias of quibblemuch.


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Tacticslion wrote:
Tacticslion wrote:
Scientific Scrutiny wrote:
Given the ratio of calorically accessible material to waste in typical foodstuffs, this thread implies that casters have to spend ~23 hours and 45 minutes a day in the outhouse. This explains the whole "15 minute adventuring day" problem.
I'd meant to say earlier: we all knew that, in the end, we'd result in the potty-humor, but I'm just impressed it came out so quickly.

That said, one supposes that four posts in is pretty bog standard around here.

I can quitnnaytime I want! I don’t have a problem, you have a problem! S-shush!

Hey! It was a 19 minute response time. That's two minutes to spare on the "in 20 minutes or your poop joke is free" guarantee!


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Scientific Scrutiny wrote:
Given the ratio of calorically accessible material to waste in typical foodstuffs, this thread implies that casters have to spend ~23 hours and 45 minutes a day in the outhouse. This explains the whole "15 minute adventuring day" problem.

This line of thinking also casts new light on Gandalf's "YOU SHALL NOT PASS!"

Perhaps, as he so often did, he was speaking to himself.


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Given the ratio of calorically accessible material to waste in typical foodstuffs, this thread implies that casters have to spend ~23 hours and 45 minutes a day in the outhouse. This explains the whole "15 minute adventuring day" problem.


The Sideromancer wrote:
Saldiven wrote:

I still find it humorous that people are looking for rational explanations behind religious strictures.

If anything, I think Pathfinder religions in general are entirely too rational. There aren't anywhere near enough arbitrary restrictions and requirements akin to those that we see in "real world" religions.

Considering we're talking about access to a powerful energy source, in my perspective it's like asking hydroelectric plants to make sense.

*narrows eyes*


Metal? Pfft! Purest hogwash. Stuff doesn't even exist.


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*looks other way, whistling casually*


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Oh gods... they’re going to introduce a “metaphysical hands of effort” type concept called “feet of stank” aren’t they?


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Well, we know there's a smizmar involved...


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Quibblemuch is lying again. That is his real mutant superpower.


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Are we talking Hausdorff distance or Jaro-Winkler? Also: African or European swallow?


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The act of killing a good person causes a negative fluctuation in the Higgs field, which leads to an accretion of E-bosons on the killer's soul. This accretion increases the attraction between the killer's soul and the lower or "evil" planes, leading to both an increased likelihood of their soul drifting that direction once it is no longer fixed within the corporeal matrix and also a shift in the corporeal matrix towards a negative euthyphro number. The consequences of a negative euthyphro number include reacting to the leptonic packets from spells with the [good] descriptor as an evil boson and vice versa.

Obvs.


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Captain Yesterday's Phallacy wrote:
Maybe he meant waxed cylinder (or as it's commonly referred to in Europe "futball").

Or, as the Native Americans called it, "maize".


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The Sideromancer wrote:
In a vacuum, I'm entirely capable of driving.

How does your internal combustion engine work in a vacuum?!


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The Drunken Dragon wrote:
Honestly, the question that confounds me, pedantically, is what happens when an android gets a heart transplant? Are they an anti-cyborg or something?

All I can picture is an android with a still-bleeding heart duct-taped to their chest, proudly proclaiming: "I'm real! I'm real!"


Elmdorprime wrote:
Maybe it's secretly a Small goblin in a Large goblin suit?

Maybe it's a Diminutive goblin inside a Small goblin suit inside a Large goblin suit?

Oh! Oh! Oh!

Maybe it's a quantum-sized goblin inside nested suits, culminating in a Large goblin suit. Hence the need for a quantum dogslicer...

Yep. That checks out.


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Triune, The All-Code wrote:
I think we're focusing too much on the drift, and not enough on this box of kittens I'm handing out to the next person that uses their drift drive.

We have to put the box of kittens into the Drift drive, don't we?

IT RUNS ON KITTENS! SOYLENT DRIFT RUNS ON KITTENS!!


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Triune, The All-Code wrote:
So close! It's actually toasters.

Fun science fact: The Planck time is the smallest unit of time that has physical meaning. By strange coincidence, this is the exact same time it takes for my toaster to turn bread from perfectly toasted deliciousness to something with the consistency and flavor of roof shingles. I have to watch it like a freaking hawk...


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Matthew Downie wrote:
Most lungs are not that big.

Assuming a spherical cloud, the cloud shape spell has a volume of ~113,097 cubic feet. A good maximum lung volume is .212 cubic feet.

The resulting increase in temperature and pressure of squeezing a cloud shape into a Medium creature's lungs, assuming the ideal gas law, is left as a proof to the reader.


The answer to the age-old question: "Which came first, the chicken or the egg" is: "The rooster. They are notoriously selfish lovers."


Snowlilly wrote:
Scientific Scrutiny wrote:

The spell description does say that it has to be an object you can see. If we take that to mean see the object in its entirety, then that sets a hard limit as the visual frame within 400 ft. +40 ft. per level.

To the optics copter!

Are we going to argue mountains cannot be seen because they are too big?

Makes you wonder what all those trees are growing on ...

What trees? All I see is a forest.


Chromantic Durgon <3 wrote:
would that mean only exterior walls if trying from the outside?

In this simulation, it might not even mean that. A sufficiently imposing castle would be large enough to exceed the field of view of a person standing on the ground at that distance. Therefore it would not qualify as an "object" in this particular definition.

And as long as part of the wall was outside of the field of view, the entire outer wall could not be said to constitute an object either (again, only with this particular definition).

Of course, one might note that this is a high level spell and there are plenty of ways of walking through walls if you have access to 6th level psychic or 7th level wizard spells... so letting somebody say "the castle isn't there" probably is just fine and debating what constitutes an object is a task better suited to philosophers...


The spell description does say that it has to be an object you can see. If we take that to mean see the object in its entirety, then that sets a hard limit as the visual frame within 400 ft. +40 ft. per level.

To the optics copter!


Mudfoot wrote:
So are you going to stat up a Bile Vampire? It sucks the juices from your gall bladder...probably with a straw.

And of course the Phlegmpire has pointy lower canines, to reach up the nostrils...


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Matthew Downie wrote:
Scientific Scrutiny wrote:
The entire Four Element System is deeply flawed. Water is a molecule. Air is, at any given moment, a mixture of several elements and molecules, as is Earth. And Fire is just the visible sign of a chemical reaction. What were those Greeks thinking?
They represent the states of matter. Solid = earth, liquid = water, gas = air, plasma = fire.

Gonna have to quibble with you there. I'm pretty sure the ancient Greeks didn't know about phase states--especially plasma. I mean, we're talking about people who were initially appalled by the idea that the sun might be an enormous very hot chunk of rock or iron...

Also, the texts are pretty clear that they believed things were actually made of these elements, as opposed to the 'elements' being the form which they took. The theory was not metaphorical.

Of course, Democritus and Epicurus sorted it out (partly), but once they got labeled filthy heretics by monotheists, their ideas got lost for quite a while.

FUN FACT: The Mishnah uses the word "apikoros" (derived from Epicurus) to refer to heretics and unbelievers.

Don't even get me started on the inconsistent lack of vampires for the other three bodily humours...

NOTE: The use of my 'Scientific Scrutiny' alias means I'm just goofing around.


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The entire Four Element System is deeply flawed. Water is a molecule. Air is, at any given moment, a mixture of several elements and molecules, as is Earth. And Fire is just the visible sign of a chemical reaction. What were those Greeks thinking?


Yep. That's true!


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The Sideromancer wrote:
At the smallest scales, all matter is made of vibrating strings snakes.

Herp Energy Physics? Yep. That checks out.

*Hey, it was that or a CsssssssssERN joke.*


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Ring_of_Gyges wrote:
Funny, I worry about the reverse. How does civilization get off the ground if there are 1d4 wraiths on the wandering monster table?

Seriously. The first time I played in the classic Hommlet village, I couldn't believe they maintained a stable society under those ecological circumstances. How does anyone farm, when you get killed by giant frogs literally every time you walk an hour outside the town limits?


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Gorbacz wrote:
Non-euclidean geography.

Yep. That checks out. In fact, recent research into pocket dimensional tectonics suggest that Golarion has what can be termed a "mantle of holding." This may have something to do with the imprisonment of Rovagug--which means that any effort to reconcile the distances in Orv to expected Euclidean norms could free the Rough Beast...


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Ventnor wrote:

I'm of the opinion that there are 4 main subatomic particles in the pathfinder universe: good, evil, law, and chaos. They're mixed fairly evenly in most mortals, but outsiders are composed heavily of one or two kinds of said particles (except for Aeons, because they're weird like that).

If alignment is objective in the Pathfinder universe, it would make sense that it was baked into the very building blocks that make up everything.

If particles of evil were several orders of magnitude more massive than particles of good, this would certainly explain the ease of falling into wickedness compared to the difficulty of ascending to goodness...

The model might be amended to include very light particles of neutrality. Neutralinos, if you will.


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I'm going to have to ask all of you to stop now.


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Fromper wrote:

Dinosaurs + Evolution = Birds

Dinosaurs + Magic = Dragons

Yep. This checks out.

It should be noted that the evidence is still inconclusive on the Crichton Corollary:

Dinosaurs + Jeff Goldblum = Fun


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
Dragons are guardians of the earth. You took the gold out of the earth. The dragons put it back, and make sure it stays there this time.

Yep. That checks out.


Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
The Flanking Fairy darts hither and thither and bestows flanking bonuses and options for sneak attacks on good little girls and boys and monsters who set themselves up in combat in a manner pleasing to her. And that's that.

Yep. That checks out.