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Gabe

Samnell's page

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber. 3,317 posts (3,357 including aliases). No reviews. 2 lists. No wishlists. 5 aliases.


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Don Juan de Doodlebug wrote:


Actually, it was more like free birth control pills, public discussions of masturbation, nudism and, when the wall came down, a higher rate of female orgasm.

Sanity actually prevailed? Don't see that very often.


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Don Juan de Doodlebug wrote:


I, alas, wouldn't know, but it's about hawt times in the ol' DDR who, apparently, refused to abide by that totalitarianism and prudery connection that we talked about some time past.

We already have the Stasi; might as well get the jobs, health care and higher rate of female orgasm! For workers revolution!

I remember seeing footage back in the mid-90s where the Stasi recorded people using the toilet. Can't imagine they didn't have some hot sex tapes too. Probably some stereotypically depraved commie sexy times too, like doing it with the lights on between busts of Lenin and Marx, bourgeoisie on top.

Right then, topic. Finished Mays' Dream and started Underground. He has a fascinating chapter detailing filibustering attempts against Canada, including a few years of fairly constant cross-border shenanigans. Then the Webster-Ashburton Treaty took all the fun out of it and people went to molest Mexico instead.


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Long time, no post.

Slavery By Another Name is going to have to wait. It's great, but could not command my interest. I slipped over to Alan Taylor's The American Colonies and got quite a bit out of it before my copies of Robert May's The Southern Dream of a Caribbean Empire and Manifest Destiny's Underworld arrived.

The latter two actually fit into what I'm working over for the blog lately and so hopped to the front of the line. I've got the first almost finished. So far as I know, it's forty years old and still, I think, the standard text on filibustering. That's odd because Mays himself isn't and hasn't been happy with it for decades. His introduction to this edition lays out how he ought to have begun before 1854 and talks about a few areas where he'd write more now.

But he wrote Underworld in part to shore that up, I imagine. I've yet to read it, but it covers quite a bit more time and expands to include filibustering up against Canada. So that's next.

Regrettably neither appears to do much about the burning of the free port of Greytown in southeastern Nicaragua in retaliation for the inhabitants tossing a bottle at Solon Borland, American Minister to Central America. This appears to all have really been about the Accessory Transit Company finding Greytown's authorities an impediment to their profits and so trying to stage an outrage that would warrant wrecking the place. The Navy did that job for them in 1854, shelled the town and then burned it to the ground.

But it seems like nobody much cares in the anglophone academy. The most in depth account I've gotten is from Allen Nevins, writing back in the early 50s. He goes on for five pages, which is fine, but I'd have liked much more context and detail. Nevins' stuff is more about the political fallout than the act itself. I've gotten some stuff out of Horace Greeley's paper which has been helpful, even if the scans are killing my eyes, but the apparent smoking gun linking the Commercial Agent, Joseph Fabens, with the Transit Company's plot appeared in another paper that is only online behind a paywall.


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Sean K Reynolds wrote:
Fear not! Though I am leaving Paizo, the official unofficial Paizo guilds on Borean Tundra shall continue on with me as their steward. Other than a brief hiatus during my cross-country drive to Indiana, I expect to be online at least once a day. :)

It'll be twice as officially unofficial now! :)


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Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Yeah, it's pretty dense. On my third try and still haven't finished it.

I read every word. :) Made me want to slap Genovese again. In Freehling's Road to Disunion endnotes he takes a cordial swipe or two himself, while also conceding that his work ignores the breakup of the national churches and thanking Genovese for pointing it out. There's also a line where he says something about thinking he and Genovese reached some kind of mutual understanding in an exchange of papers. I haven't read the papers, but the note has a kind of "I'm so sick of dealing with this guy" whiff about it.

Sadly River of Dark Dreams only came out this last year and so I don't know what Freehling would has had to say about it. His account of the master-slave relationship scans much more like Johnson's work than Genovese's.


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MagusJanus wrote:

Cool. Learned something ^^

Won't stop my using the horrific oversimplification, though. And I apologize for that.

I should have marked my post as using horrific oversimplifications...

Since you showed contrition, I'll suspend the conventional sentence of three spankings with a paddled labeled "history is complicated".

Just keep your nose clean. Recidivism risks confinement on the Dry Tortugas with only John Wilkes Booth's doctor for company.


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MagusJanus wrote:
It isn't until the Civil War that the U.S. truly became a singular nation; even the language changed as a result. Before the Civil War, people said "the United States are" and after they said "the United States is."

This is a popular notion, which I think we can probably blame in part on Shelby Foote telling everyone on PBS, but it's not clearly so. Rather it appears that "United States is" and "United States are" constructions had roughly equal popularity between 1800 and 1820, with various periods where is came up ahead, and then the is phrasing pulled decidedly ahead in the 1830s. There is some narrowing in the 1840s but by that point you have to look at it in part as an expression of deliberate political rhetoric being consciously developed in contrast to the then-dominant tone.

A more likely situation is that the phrases were used interchangeably in the early nation without much distinction of meaning between them. Only as the slavery controversy heated up and it became clear that the slave states were on the losing end of the demographics (a point Calhoun liked to gripe about) that it suddenly became important that the Constitution established a bizarre alliance even less firm than the Articles of Confederation, in the service of their goal of preserving the interests of the white minority section in slavery against the will of the white majority section.

But don't believe me, you can look at the data right here for the general English corpus and here for the American English corpus. Broadly the same trend.


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Lissa Guillet wrote:
Malachi Silverclaw wrote:
While I was growing up I was amazed that the country that had this as their defining statement ever had slavery. But it is unreasonable to expect perfection. It is simply our job as a society to move toward perfection. Even though we never expect to be perfect, the struggle toward it makes us better and better, and that is enough.
It was somewhat contentious, even in it's time but because of the problems of passing the Declaration of Independence which basically required not just a majority but a unilateral commitment from each of the colonial states. It was a statement of war against the King and the southern states wouldn't sign without the express promise of slavery not being outlawed. Much of the northern and midatlantic had already abolished slavery, though many slaves still existed in the north by good old boys looking the other way. One of the few constitutional clauses that couldn't be ammended was the requirement that no laws hindering slavery would be passed federally until sometime in the early 1800's.

Minor historical derail:
In 1776, all thirteen colonies had slavery and none had abolished it. Pennsylvania was the first state to abolish, in 1780. Massachusetts slavery was invalidated by a court decision in 1783.

The institution never quite caught on so well in New England as it did in the South, for the obvious reason that the South had the prime tobacco land. Outside the southern colonies, slavery also did pretty well in New York and New Jersey. New Jersey still had 16 slaves on the books due to its very gradual emancipation law in 1860. They didn't even pass that law until 1804.

Those laws left lots of slaves in place, to serve a term before freedom and liable to be sold off into a jurisdiction with more slavery-friendly laws before their freedom dates came. Between legal cutoff dates and mandatory service to a certain age, most states outside New England still had residual and superannuated slaves up until the 1840s when separate legislation freed the lot.


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Dungeon Master Zack wrote:
Pepsi is for people with good taste.

We're drinking the pop, not the person. Mostly. People are mostly not for drinking. Too many solids.


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GreyWolfLord wrote:
Vod Canockers wrote:


Separation of Church and State, except that a clergyperson can sign off on that Government issued marriage certificate.

The US Government should switch to recognizing only the legality of Civil Unions, and then let the Churches deal with Marriages.

I actually would agree with this. ALOT. Except perhaps have one termed government/civil marriage and the other the religious or traditional marriage.

I think if this was done, it would solve a LOT of the debates regarding issues that surround definitions and freedoms in regards to marriage rights.

The debate has literally nothing to do with the words. It's a straight argument over whether non-heterosexual relationships are worthy of the same treatment as heterosexual relationships are. The words are just a poll-tested way of saying answering that question in the negative.


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Looks like it'll be Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II now that I have finally finished with Freehling.

Until I read his book on wartime anti-Confederate resistance. But it's Slavery by Another Name for now. I'm getting up to go read a chapter this very instant. Or this one. Or-

The instant I get up and go read a chapter is the instant I will get up and go read a chapter. So there.


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I just checked and discovered that I am less than forty pages from ending my long ordeal of generally not reading William W. Freehling's The Road to Disunion, Volume Two: Secessionists Triumphant.

It's still a great, well-written history. I still have no idea why reading it has been an uphill battle.

After that? I'm kind of making eyes at Robert E. Mays' books on the filibusters. Or maybe some fiction.


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Haladir wrote:
Cilice of Shared Suffering

:
Thanks for reviewing it. :)

I did retype it, as I forgot to save a copy of the final draft and so only had my printout from the voting screen. Which I did not think to just copy and paste at the time.

The original cilices were hairshirts and the like, but I took the more modern usage as any device meant for self-mortification because I thought it gave a more evocative visual and avoided weird issues imagining having the hair shirt under your plate armor, or wearing it above. Also I didn't want an item that inflicted friction burns on foes because that seemed a bit goofy.

I wanted to avoid the kyton association to minimize reliance on Golarion knowledge and put forward a more neutral flavor. Kytons seemed to put the thumb on the scale for it being a villains-only kind of thing.


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Cilice of Shared Suffering
Aura faint necromancy; CL 5th
Slot wrist; Price 31,500 gp; Weight 1 lb.
Description
This finely made silver chain bears many garnet studs and numerous barbs curved inward to pierce the wearer's skin when worn wrapped around the wrist. The barbs inflict five points of piercing damage on the wearer when donned. This damage cannot be whiled while it is worn. The wearer may remove the cilice as a standard action. A single chain occupies the wearer's entire wrist slot.

Twice per day, upon suffering damage from a melee attack, the wearer may invoke the cilice's power as an immediate action to influct half the damage just suffered from that attack upon the attacker as piercing damage. The cilice inflicts only hit point damage, not ability damage or any other conditions or effects that the wearer suffered from the attack. This damage manifests as a series of puncture wounds in the pattern of the chain's barbs around the attacker's wrists, or center of mass for creatures without comparable anatomy. The attacker must also make a DC 14 Will save or suffer the effects of a howling agony spell for five rounds from the pain of the wounds. Whether or not the safe succeeds, an attacker cannot again be the target of the chain's effect for one day.

For the duration of the howling agony, the cilice's garnets glow red, providing light equivalent to a candle.
Construction
Requirements Craft Wondrous Item, howling agony, inflict serious wounds, light; Cost 15,750 gp

What I think could be better:

1) There's some clunky writing that mostly appeared in last second editing in the submission box. In particular, I used a pronoun in the first paragraph when I really ought to have called it a chain or something again.
2) I probably overwrote the primary effect.
3) It's not a weapon, per se, but is awfully weaponlike with how the primary thing it gives you is a nasty, damaging surprise for the first pair of dragons to try chowing down on you each day.
4) The pricing of the damage effect was a pure stab in the dark.
5) The light effect was probably gratuitous and certainly not useful.
6) I ought to have linked howling agony and did not. Changing the save from fort to will was deliberate since it's an item that's meant to be used against big brute monsters who usually have good fort saves. A really cool effect that just never happens against what ought to be the item's primary targets is lame.


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A goat bled to honor the victors! Because I found another one after all and, you know, it's a goat. :)

Must invest in a better goat organizer...


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Jiggle the cord? Unplug it and blow on the contacts? Some suggestion that doesn't have that kind of subtext?


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Time to bleed one more goat!

But I'm out of goats?! Nooooooooooo!!eleven


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Finished Wise Man's Fear. I'm unsure that this series is really a trilogy. It seems like we have far more story to get through than one more book could contain, especially if that book is also supposed bring a return of the old Kvothe like Bast wants. The narration generally seems to be on Bast's side in the present day scenes and we get enough glimpses to see that he's still in there, but something is badly wrong. Maybe more wrong than Kvothe knows.

Not sure what's up next.


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James Sutter wrote:
Rysky wrote:

Interesting.

Also since Ceyanan is an usher does he have a Favored Weapon and Domains to grant?

Probably! If we ever do a planar book covering psychopomps, I'll have to figure out what they are. :) Though I'm hoping to do some major reveals about Ceyanan's backstory in a third Salim novel...

Your hand is reaching into my pocket from the future twice over.

And I'm cool with that. :)


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Tequila Sunrise wrote:
Samnell wrote:
A friend coming out as bi helped a bit, since suddenly I had someone to talk to about these things. At roughly the same time, I received my first exposure to the political aspects. ("There are laws against this? Why?!") Slightly later on, toward 2000, I read a sexuality FAQ that helped quite a lot too.
Judging by how many folks seem to go through a gradual realization, a FAQ seems like it could help a lot of people. Is it 'net accessible, or in a book or pamphlet or something?

It was on the internet at the time. I no longer recall what it was titled or where it was. I only remember that it had a discussion of homosexuality in early Australia in addition to the usual stuff.

Later on I read Is it a Choice?. Despite the name, it's actually a very positive, helpful FAQ in book form. By that time I just knew all the stuff already so it wasn't very helpful.


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Tequila Sunrise wrote:


So I'm curious about other LGBT folks: How long did it take you to realize you weren't 'normal,' and was it a single moment of epiphany or a gradual realization?

Very gradual. Back in the 90s there were very few even remotely sympathetic or realistic depictions of non-heterosexuals on TV or other media that I consumed. It took me the better part of a decade for it to even cross my mind that having sexual thoughts about other guys might be an indicator of gayness and a year or two after that to progress from

"Ok, I have a gay side and that's fine" to "You know what? No straight side here at all. Never has been."

A friend coming out as bi helped a bit, since suddenly I had someone to talk to about these things. At roughly the same time, I received my first exposure to the political aspects. ("There are laws against this? Why?!") Slightly later on, toward 2000, I read a sexuality FAQ that helped quite a lot too.


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Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:

Hey Dicey (or anyone else for that matter), you read this Unwritten shiznit?

After many years, I finally picked up the second trade, which jumps straight into The Song of Roland!!!

I remember Samnell's read this stuff and I think he liked it, too.

It's kinda like I died and went to nerd/used-book-store-junkie heaven.

Yay!!!

I liked it, though I haven't kept up. For a while new trades were coming out just about the time I was hitting a big box bookstore downstate. I go there less now and tend to forget about the story in the interim. I think I've read the first three.

The stuff with how the protagonist's writer father made him memorize endless literary trivia? I once met the daughter of a guy who taught me history and she told me that their every road trip was like that. I guess it took for her, but his son was better at tuning it out because the guy hit me up for tutoring a while later.

Me: "I would love to take your money and tutor you and can certainly handle college-level tutoring, but I'm a history guy. I can't do anything for you that the old man can't. I bet he's free."

I'm a terrible capitalist. :)


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*looks at list*
*scrolls a bit*

My item!

*hugs a goblin*


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Dragonchess Player wrote:


I actually stopped reading Philip Farmer a long time ago. For pretty much the same reason I stopped reading Terry Goodkind (or Sharon Green): I find it disturbing when the author's own sexual fetishes, preferences, etc. start becoming too obvious (or the sex scenes are there primarily for "shock value" and have little, if any, impact on the plot). If they want to use their writing as a catharsis method (or as a way to boost sales), I don't need or want to read it.

Goodkind's sex stuff was off-putting, but the first few weren't too awful except for the chapters-long BDSM session. Or I blocked out the rest in the decade plus since I last touched them. But as things went on it became increasingly obvious that the chief conflict was between psychopathic idiotic fanatics and psychopathic idiotic fanatics. I think I struggled through the one where Richard got kidnapped for the second or third time, spirited away for the second or third time, and decided to spend his time in captivity making a statue. As I recall, that one started with Richard off on a pout because his army full of people ready to die for him wasn't good enough for him. I really should have put the book down right then.


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Limeylongears wrote:
While poking about on Project Gutenberg I found The French Revolution: A Study in Democracy by the thoroughly pleasant and reasonable Nesta Webster. No link to the book - you can find it fairly easily yourself in the unlikely event that you feel like curling up with a swivel-eyed 1920s anti-Semite.

I've arguably spent some time with worse, but try to keep it to a minimum. Sometimes I'm really glad I don't read German.


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Quiche Lisp wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
[...] the definition of Free Market is a "system in which buyers and sellers mutually and freely agree to exchange, on the basis of perfect flow of information, perfect competition, and perfect availability".
In other words, by this definition, a free market is a fable, or an utopia.

But who wouldn't want to live in a world full of omniscient sociopaths?


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Samnell wrote:
Decided I needed fiction and got The Name of the Wind. If anybody has ever wondered, RL Samnell resembles Pat Rothfuss.

Finished today. Surprised how understated the plot was for such a compelling read. I got to the last hundred pages and wondered where the climax was. But I suppose that makes sense for something trying to be an autobiography. Lives don't really have plots.


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Redneckdevil wrote:


Used to play religiously until wrath of the lich king came out. The loot die are never in my favor lol. Gave it up and gave my account to some friends. Just bought it again because its on sale for 5 bucks and wondering which side yal mainly play on. Allience or horde?

Alliance is generally more populous, but there are some Horde regulars too.


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Kegan Stormsmile wrote:
I would love to join you guys, How does one go about getting a guild invite for the horde?

There's a command you can do, I think /whoall Paizonian Horde, which will return online members. Send someone on the list a whisper. I think most of the regulars have invite powers. If one of the characters you see is Oodledoodles or Momorka, it's me.


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Don Juan de Doodlebug wrote:

Do you often pose like that, Sam?

[Crosses fingers]

I don't normally wear that much clothing when I pose.

Rothfuss and I are of similar girth (and also given name, as it happens). His hair is a little bit lighter, quite a bit curlier, and more resident on the head. Given what is on display, I suspect that the hair he has on his head is simply distributed in other locations on me. Perhaps if he can be induced to shave, it will transpire that we share a single supply of hair and mine would redistribute.

But black boxer-briefs? No. Ok, maybe in spandex but that's a for special occasions kind of thing and I drape my glorious corpulence over things far too often to call it special.

*kissyface*


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Decided I needed fiction and got The Name of the Wind. If anybody has ever wondered, RL Samnell resembles Pat Rothfuss.


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Confession time:

I just (well, they came today) re-bought two books to replace one book I already owned. I got volumes 1 and 2 of Nevins' Ordeal of the Union in a 1990ish omnibus. Retired library book, paperback, ok condition for $25. It's one hell of a lazy omnibus, though. They didn't even combine the indices. Also I've been using the crap out of it and the library tape holding the spine together is starting to show the wear.

I go online, mostly thinking about getting the next volume or two, and land on the original volumes for a penny each. Hardcover. Snapped those up and got the next one in the series too. The first arrived a week ago and the thing's beautiful. First printing, original dust jacket, not even a library stamp on it. The the other two appear to also be first printings, but are withdrawn library stock. The Fruits of Manifest Destiny came sans dust jacket and so will not look cool on the shelf next to the other, but it's this great maroon cover with faded fake bronze writing on the spine. It looks like an old book should look. Douglas, Buchanan, and Party Chaos has the jacket, plus that plastic coating libraries put on the things. So it'll look swanky next to A House Dividing.

And I can keep using the crap out of Nevins without feeling like every page turned is a day taken from the book's lifespan.

Also: I'm still inching my way through Freehling's Road to Disunion: Seccessionists Triumphant. I really don't know what it is about his prose. It's not bad and the information is very good but the second I put the book down I usually forget it exists for a week. I'm even up to early 1860 now!

I've been "reading" it alongside "reading" How the States Got their Shapes which is not anything like the book I hoped it would be. I wanted something more like a history and it's more like a coffee table book without the glossy production values.


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I think I would have respected the last episode more if it ended with 20 minutes of every named character still living putting a gun in his or her mouth and pulling the trigger. That would have been a fitting, even kind of beautiful, end to the series. It certainly would have been more honest than the version we got, where everyone went off camping.

But I do have a soft spot for Adama & Roslin's final bit.


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Limeylongears wrote:
Can I just say that linking to Donovan tracks without a clear warning is the absolute height of irresponsibility?

Oh man, I had to sit through the movie about Francis of Assisi that he wrote songs for years ago. It was all about how Frank the pusher jammed a dozen tabs of LSD up your ass and then sung you off to his harem in the hills to do fabulously decadent things. You can't convince me otherwise.


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Comrade Anklebiter wrote:


Yeah, Americans don't like him, but most of our advocates for mass murder haven't taken much of a hit. Last time I checked, Andrew Jackson, for example, was still on the $20 bill.

And we put Bobby Lee on stamps, more than once, despite his instrumental role in murdering far more people. And those people were even mostly white! Though the four million he fought to keep slaves were not, and fighting for that kind of thing is the sort of thing that a lot of Americans historically have admired.


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Aaron Bitman wrote:
Supposing future people "fix" things by making them better in their own eyes, but worse in ours? Supposing their idea of "progress" is towards some dystopia?

Everyone's idea of progress is someone else's dystopia. If that doesn't stop us now, why should we worry about it in the future?


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Also: reading Freehling on and off, but mainly I made a project of reading Iron Man comics from the 80s since I've meant to for years. Polished off David Michelinie's run a few nights ago and started in on Dennis O'Neil. Pretty good so far. The set rate is three a night, but sometimes I'll read extras.

Very distracting how none of the artists seem to know that Tony is supposed to look like Robert Downey, Jr, though.


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Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:


Yes, our ancestors would consider us horribly obscene and immoral.

Hip-hip-hooray!

Now and then someone will tell me that I should not judge the past so harshly (even though I don't, really) because we will be judged harshly in the future. At this point, I tell them that I hope we're judged harshly and the sooner the better. I want future people to look back at us and think us savages for enduring all the things they've fixed, or at least made progress on. Who wouldn't?


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In the unlikely event that facts could possibly enter into it:

Corey Robin wrote:


before this vote, senators representing a mere 11% of the population could block all presidential appointments and all legislation.

From now on, senators representing a mere 17% of the population can block most presidential appointments; senators representing 11% can still block all legislation and all Supreme Court nominees.

The march of democracy.

What a f%+@ing scandal that institution is.


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Travis Walton "UFO Guy" wrote:
What color was the helicopter? You need to know the color of the helicopter.

For reference:

Unmarked black helicopters: World Government. Best stay inside.
Blue: Sheriff's Secret Police. They'll keep a good eye on your kids, and hardly ever take one.
Complex murals depicting diving birds of prey: We don't know, but a few months back they took all the children. Then gave them back, much better behaved than before. So probably ok.
Yellow helicopters: You're screwed. Believe in a smiling God.


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Usagi Yojimbo wrote:
bugleyman wrote:

So...

Healthcare.gov is complex software. Check.
Complicated software has vulnerabilities. Check.
Therefore Healtcare.gov likely has some vulnerabilities. Check.
Ergo, the ACA is bad. Wait...what?

Actually, I think the logic continues from '...has some vulnerabilities' (sure, as you say)

to: therefore, people will die, because Obama

And then pick back up with 'Ergo, the ACA is bad'

If you can't follow that, you must be willfully blind!

You guys, Barack Obama was just here. He grabbed me by the neck and lifted me out of my chair and slammed me down on my bed. I tried to explain that, while I'm sure he's an accomplished lover, he is not my type.

Obama would hear none of it. He pressed his fingers together, like he was going to make a karate chop, and then just slammed them into my abdomen, fingertips first. Before I could even process what happened, Obama pulled out, my appendix in hand. I'll never forget what he said next, hand dripping with my blood as he stood over me:

"North Korea hacked healthcare.gov and gave you appendicitis. Put a band-aid on that, drink some Robitussin, and take two aspirin. You'll be fine. And get a haircut, hippie."

Then Obama threw the bloody appendix in my face and climbed out my window into a flying bidet that, as I understand it, became Air Force One as soon as he mounted the thing and blasted off. I got up to get the band-aid and realized that he took my Lego C-3PO on the way out.

Gotta call dick move on the 3PO, Obama.


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I know I'm coming to this late, but wouldn't arachnocapitalism be a system where the rich systematically feed the poor to hordes of ravenous spiders for their personal entertainment?

I can't see any rightist going for that. They'd be too jealous of the spiders.


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Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
The library system has finally proffered up Who Wrote the Bible?, which will be the last (for now) in the series of Comrade Samnell recommendations.
This Who Wrote the Bible? shiznit is as good as all the reviewers say it is. It's a bit older than The Bible Unearthed and accepts that whole "David-ruled-a-united-kingdom-that-split-in-two" agitprop, but it gets way more into other things like D&Desque internecine church politics with the Aaronids and the Shilonites squabbling over high places and statues. Way cool.

Circa 2002, I was talking to a Jehovah's Witness about how the different accounts of the plague in Kings and Chronicles tell a really interesting story about the evolving theology of the day. As I get about these things, I was quite excited. I mean, it's HISTORY!

He took extreme offense at the idea of theological diversity in his holy book and so spent half the time griping at me and the other half just staring blankly. I'm reasonably sure that his brain inserted Chronicles' additions into the Kings version and just ignored the rest. Bummer.


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Samnell wrote:
Finished a pair of short stories and dove into Charles Stross' The Fuller Memorandum. Fun so far.

And done. That was really good.


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Finished a pair of short stories and dove into Charles Stross' The Fuller Memorandum. Fun so far.


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Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:


Hi, Sam!

Im n ur thread, readin' ur postz. :)


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thejeff wrote:

Not to mention that a flat 20% rate (or even the 15%) would be a huge tax cut for the majority of the rich. Even those relying mostly on capital gains would at worst break even.

And a massive tax increase on the poorest. The ones already working full time and relying on food stamps.

Is that really what we want?

Past experience with flat tax fans has suggested to me that this is their preferred outcome.


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Finally finished The Time Traveler's Guide to Elizabethan England. Nothing at all wrong with the prose, though the epilogue got a bit gushy. Just haven't had time. Very frustrating.

Now doing some actual fiction. I picked back up The Laundry books (Lovecraft meets James Bond by way of office politics.) and burned through a short story last night, then hit a novella I wasn't awake enough for. I think I'll proceed until I finish the next novel, then wear a cup and go back into Freehling.


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Doodlebug Anklebiter wrote:
Limeylongears wrote:
Anybody managed to find any Charles Saunders books recently?

[Adds to list]

In other news, I finished the Foner. Liked it a lot. I was going to go on to the third Comrade Samnell recommendation on my list, but all the above talk about Lancastrian douchebags has made me think of picking up some Christopher Hill. We'll see, we'll see.

** spoiler omitted **

I'm still reading The Time Traveler's Guide to Elizabethan England. Still fun, but between the daily reading for the blog and various other stuff I haven't had the time. Totally unfair. A man man in a blue box needs to come fix this.

Currently working through the chapter on food and a bit nauseated by the constant refrain of eels. You'd think the English had to eat a pound of the things every day just to keep the roads clear.

Going to have to go back to Freehling soon, though. I think I'm almost done with Kansas-Nebraska.


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bugleyman wrote:

And, I get money out of politics. Or at least try:

1. Require anyone accepting federal office to agree to an absolute moratorium on lobbying for a period of ten years, or twice their tenure in office, whichever is greater. Incarcerate violators for the duration of the moratorium.

Include spouses, siblings, children, and anybody who shares a household with the officeholders too. They often get sweetheart deals long before the officeholder retires.

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