Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Ross Byers

Ross Byers's page

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32. RPG Superstar 2014 Star Voter. Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 9,019 posts (9,638 including aliases). 3 reviews. 2 lists. 1 wishlist. 8 aliases.


1 to 50 of 1,034 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Attack bonus vs. sheep

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

7 people marked this as a favorite.

She doesn't grow a beard. She has breasts and hips. Her family recognizes her as female. If she's reached a point where she is comfortable in her own skin, why exactly do genitals matter? That's only relevant to her and whoever she is considering taking to bed.

It's her body.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Werebat wrote:
In other words, she has male genitalia and would be unable to bear children, etc.

Maybe she does, maybe she doesn't. That's between her and the spirits.

And maybe you're right that at higher level, she'd invest in an elixer like Anevia did, or track down a girdle of opposite gender. Or just cast alter self a lot. But maybe, since her power as shaman is related to being rivethun, using such magic would strip her of her magical power.

I'm reminded of a line in The Magic Goes Away about a magician named Clubfoot who, as you might guess, had a clubfoot. He had powerful enough magic to fix it. But doing so would have cost him a large fraction of his power.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Crystal Frasier wrote:
mechaPoet wrote:
TanithT wrote:
Tuatara stuff

Dear New Zealand,

Look, I realize you were super isolated for, what, millions of years? But did you just not have predators? It just seems like you have produced a lot of animals that are, to be frank, not very smart. I mean, I guess it works when there's no reason to be smart, but still.

Love, mechaPoet.

P.S. I am very much looking forward to the kakapo familiar option. Don't fail me on this, Paizo. It will break my heart if you do.

New Zealand did in fact have an apex predator. It was a freaking dinosaur.

A freaking dinosaur that was hunted into extinction for tasting good (by Maori, not Europeans.) Apparently the only thing more dangerous than being a foe of humanity is being the dinner of humanity.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

5 people marked this as a favorite.

Kakapo are awesome. They totally walk like tiny little dinosaurs. "Imma T-Rex! Rawr!"

And then there's the Kea, which is what happens when evolution decides to make a scary parrot. (It's still not that scary.)

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Scribbling Rambler wrote:
So there was an error in the logo reigon??

>.<

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

4 people marked this as a favorite.

My intent was not to derail the thread into a discussion of the girdle of opposite gender. Just to point out that an involuntary change of gender in art does not necessarily indicate that an iconic is transgender any more than art of that iconic being stabbed indicates that they are dead.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Ashiel wrote:
There are a lot of people who are spiritual, and religious, but ignore the aspects of their religion that they don't like or don't agree with (usually for good reasons). For better or worse, that's how religion works. On the downside it creates splinter-sects and conflict between the faithful, on the upside, it discourages stagnation and leads to new ideas and hopefully a better society.

I think the real world is different from a Pathfinder world in that in the Pathfinder world the Gods objectively exist and can be contacted via magic, and can express their displeasure by stripping clerics of their powers.

Let put it this way: A paladin who worships Asmodeus is using one or more of the following words wrong: 'paladin', 'worship', or 'Asmodeus'.

If he's cherrypicking his beliefs, such as ignoring the fact that Asmodeus is a cruel God who endorses cruelty, then he isn't really worshipping 'Asmodeus'. (This is the category that laypeople who misunderstand they god they worship fall into.) Edit: This is the inverse of "a rose by any other name". If it doesn't smell like a rose, you can call it a rose all you like, but that does't make it a rose.

If he's just paying lip service (as opposed to actually believing in the Asmodean message), then he isn't really 'worshipping'.

Otherwise, he isn't really a paladin: He's an antipaladin, a warpriest, an inqusitor, a militant cleric, a devout fighter, or something along those lines with a LN or LE alignment.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ashiel wrote:
What god you worship has no direct control over either of those things.

You're reversing cause and effect. If you are altruistic, respect the dignity of others, and protect innocent life, you should have no interest in worshipping an Evil deity.

A paladin living in Westcrown or Egorian might attend services at the Asmodean church. He might even consider Asmodeus a 'lesser evil' than other Evil gods like Urgathoa or Rovagug, since he can at least have an interest in Law. But that doesn't mean he thinks Asmodeus is worth venerating, or that the Church of Asmodeus is spreading a proper way to live.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Hayato Ken wrote:


From the novels i read so far, most main heroes were male. Time for a heroine too!

Pathfinder Tales stories with a female protagonist:

Plague of Shadows and Stalking the Beast focus around Elyanna. (Stalking the Beast also has a female gunslinger portrayed as a primary character.)

Blood of the City's protagonist is Luma, a female half-elf urban druid.

Called to Darkness's protagonist is Kagur, a female kellid barbarian.

Skinwalkers' protagonist is Jendara, a female ex-cleric.

Dark Tapestry (the Legacy of Fire journal) is about a female (half-?)elf druid.

Guilty Blood (the Carrion Crown Journal) also has a female lead.

Light of a Distant Star (the Shattered Star Journal) has a female lead.

The Treasure of Far Thallai (the Skull and Shackles Journal) has a female lead.

I might have missed a few.

I'm only including novels here where the driving character was female. We can get quite a few more when we realize that Pathfinder Tales books often follow the 'adventuring party' model, leading to strong female characters that, while maybe not the protagonist, are co-protagonist, or at least more than 'supporting'.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Zhayne wrote:

This.

I would also seriously doubt that 'talking to myself invoking the name of a metaphysical being several dimensions over' constitutes 'association'.

Just praying to an evil deity is not going to make a paladin fall. (I'm not sure why a paladin would in the first place, but whatever.) But you've merely described prayer, not 'worship'.

'Worship' implies things like thinking that the thing being worshiped is worthy of respect, and that the teachings thereof are something to be emulated.

Asmodeus is a god of tyranny. Of cruelty. Of treading on the less fortunate merely to remind them they are, in fact, less fortunate. These are not ideals that a paladin should venerate.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Or maybe they just felt it was time for a change, that more races should be added. Removing old choices at the same time as new choices are added makes sense: it keeps things from getting overcrowded and helps keep things fresh, and gets people to make different characters.

Cheliax

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Male Human (Chelaxian) Sor 3 HP: 16 AC: 16 T: 11 FF: 15 CMD: 11 Fort: +2(+4 vs. poison) Ref: +3 Will: +4 Per: +0

Resisting urge to just say "A diversion!"

"Just one of the Inheritor's whelps. They must be getting desperate, to pit the bastards of Belkzen against the Worldwound."

Bluff: 1d20 + 10 + 2 ⇒ (20) + 10 + 2 = 32Though, I'm not sure how much of that Lucius would consider a lie.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Unskilled labor is one sp per day, plus room and board.

But, like the real world, I'm not sure that would be the majority. Most 'laborers' have a trade, via a craft or profession skill, and use that.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Westphalian_Musketeer wrote:

GM says (to an evil cleric): "Is your skeleton still with you?"

GM means: "There is a high level paladin coming up, and you're not going to be able to bluff that the skeleton is just a remarkably thin human."

Always buy a hat of disguise for your undead/demonic minions.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.

I was 11 in 1996. Does that count?

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Since anydice seems to have gone kablooey trying to figure out the distribution for 3d6, assuming the racial +2 is allied to a highest or equally-highest score, time for some old-fashioned math.

To use cantrips, you need a score of 10. In order to do that, you need to roll a 10, or roll an 8 or 9, but have that be your highest score.

I'm rounding here, to make it easier on myself, but the result will be accurate to three significant figures.

62.5% of people roll a 10 or higher.

11.5% of people roll exactly a 9. A roll has a 25.9% chance of being an 8 or lower: the chance of all 5 other scores being 8 or lower is .116%. So .116% of those 11.5% get the +2 to Int. There's also a chance of having another 9: .741% of these people don't have any other scores above a 9. Subtracting out the ones that don't have anything else over an 8, leads us to .625% have one or more other nines, of these half (or less, since you could have three or more 9s, with each having an even chance) would get the +2. So we have .116% + .312% = .428% of 11.5% getting a 9 pulled up. That's an additional .049% of the original population getting at least first level spells.

9.72% of people roll exactly an 8. A roll has a 16.2% chance of being a 7 or lower. The chance of all other rolls being 7 or lower is .0111%. The chance of having an 8 (but not more) is .105%. As before, less than half of those would get the bonus. So we have .0111% + .0525% = .0636% of the 8 Ints being pulled up to cantrip level (with no other ability score above 8). Thats .0062% of the original population.

So our racial bonus has given .0551% of the population the ability to use cantrips. That's basically a rounding error on the original figure of 62.5%: Rounding UP at three significant figures merely raises it to 62.6%.

There is a larger impact at higher levels of magic, as a high score is more likely to be the highest score, but for getting in the door its hardly any help at all.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.
KtA wrote:
Azlant etc. probably had a higher proportion of spellcasters for some reason.

Azlanti got straight +2s, so the average Int score would be 12.5. A much greater proportion of Azlanti would be able to learn at least a few wizardry spells (83% at least able to learn cantrips, 74% at least first level spells), and I'm guessing a side effect of Aboleth breeding programs would be a greater number of active sorcerer bloodlines, meaning more people able to get use out of a 12.5 average Cha, too.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

The counting thing is vaguely related to being able to defeat a kappa by bowing to it, compelling it to return the bow and tipping the water out of the bowl on its head.

The fundamental idea being as powerful as these creatures may be, they can be beaten by anyone, as long as they remember the rules. It returns a sense of human control and mastery into tales about beings that exceed us.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.
137ben wrote:
Sounds like Paizo has another opportunity to profit by copy/pasting others' work.

What?

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

So I did some more detailed math, because I wasn't quite sure I was handling the racial bonus correctly: My average was correct, but that doesn't mean it was representative when rounded off (since you can't have a 10.833, either a 10 or less or an 11 or more.)

My assumption is that non-heroic NPCs are 3d6, rolled in order. Following that philosphy, I assumed the human racial bonus was randomly allocated to one of six score, rather than always the highest score or something like that. I could try that tomorrow.

The result was that 34% of the population cannot cast any Int-based spells. 12% can only learn cantrips. Another 12% will never make it past first-level spells. Likewise for second level spells, and then the chances start dropping off steeply.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.

All those second sons have to go somewhere.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Right, but why do those Pharasmites need to go to battle with knives instead of a more appropriate weapon?

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

8 people marked this as a favorite.
Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:


Patrick: "If all you have is a flamethrower, all your problems look like spiders."

"There are safer, more effective ways to kill a spider than using fire," Moore said. "Fire is not the method to use to kill a spider."


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Baaa

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ross Byers wrote:
In all seriousness, the average human Int score is 11.1666666666 (10.5 average, and that +2 racial bonus distributed evenly). 50% of people, no matter how hard they try, will never be able to master a spell more complicated than magic missile. Something like a third (those with an Int of <=9) can't even figure out how detect magic works.

Apparently I can't math. The average human Int score is 10.8333....

The rest of the point still stands.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

3 people marked this as a favorite.

In all seriousness, the average human Int score is 11.1666666666 (10.5 average, and that +2 racial bonus distributed evenly). 50% of people, no matter how hard they try, will never be able to master a spell more complicated than magic missile. Something like a third (those with an Int of <=9) can't even figure out how detect magic works.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

6 people marked this as a favorite.
BlackOuroboros wrote:

but arcane magic merely requires training and a desire to learn.

I could say the same thing about scientists and engineers in the real world.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

We're all out of those, but we do have a Vortex Manipulator, fresh off the wrist of a handsome time agent.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

This is spun off of some of the discussion of Pathfinder Unchained.

As written, planar binding has issues.

  • The reliance on magic circle (and dimensional anchor) creates a Spell Known tax on spontaneous casters, and creates problems for aligned casters.
  • It treats all outsiders the same, regardless of alignment or ethos: There is only a minimal difference between binding a demon and an angel.
  • 'Unreasonable', 'impossible', and 'cannot complete though its own action' are vague, leading to wide table variation, especially if the GM tries to use these clauses to reign in the spell
  • Even lesser planar binding is a 5th level spell, meaning that characters who want to make such deals don't actually 'turn on' until 9th or 10th level.
  • It has jagged cuttoffs determined by spell level, not caster level, making evaluating bound outsiders an exercise in system mastery and corner-cases.
  • And the big one, it is a poorly-bounded spell (HD is a poor indicator of potency) that gets bigger with every Bestiary, and as a result exhibits loopholes, like making wish into a 6th level spell if you're not in a hurry.

At the same time, it's easy to see why errata hasn't been issued - I have hard time imagining errata that would fit on the page, and address things like the wish loophole in a way that doesn't either arbitrarily limit some SLAs that are ok, or become an itemized list 'per monster'. And you'd still have the problem of a future book possibly breaking the spell.

In comparison, the summon monster (and summon nature's ally) spells use a curated list of monsters, checked for general power level and early access to spell-like abilities. The list doesn't get bigger with later monster books: instead new, different spells like eagle aerie, summon minor monster, or summon elder worm are necessary.

Likewise, Polymorph effects had similar problems in the 3.0 era. They were streamlined somewhat in 3.5, but was a monumentally flexible spell that got better and more flexible with every Monster Manual.

Pathfinder solved the problems with the polymorph spell by breaking it up like Ma Bell. It became a series of spells that granted access to specific forms, with clearly delineated powers. Beast shape i made simpler transformations like turning into a wolf possible at lower than 7th level, but eventually obsolesces like most spells (compared to 3.5 polymorph, which scaled smoothly up to 15th level). New monster books no longer inflated the powers of these spells unless specifically added and evaluated as a new spell. Individual powers could be evaluated on a better basis than 'how many HD does the critter have'. It was a much better paradigm for everyone but sorcerers, who now had to invest in more spells if they wanted to turn into many different shapes. I think that's fine: 'anyspells' should be limited for exactly that kind of reason, and it makes the 'shapeshifter sorcerer' invest in parallel spells in the same way that a 'fire sorcerer' or 'beguiler sorcerer' does. It promotes the ability to actually know what your spells do, instead of bringing the game to a halt to flip through 5 monster books in case there is one with <12 HD that would happen to solve the problems none of your other available spells can.

So, my proposal is this: break planar binding (and possibly planar ally) into a series of spells. Bind genie i could be lower-level and bind a janni, while bind genie iv (or whatever) could get an efreeti, and require 17th caster level to actually get a wish. Bind devil i could be limited to imps and lemures. You can mirror fantasy tropes and make it easier to bind demons/devils than angels, reducing the team red/team blue thing some alignment-based spells have now.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.
KtA wrote:
The big question is, why is the witch, with a patron, an arcane caster and not a divine one?
LazarX wrote:
Because the witch makes bargains in full consciousness and will, not in worshipful humility.

Also, one can imagine a witch's patron as being a source of knowledge, not power.

For some reason, I want to use a food analogy.

A spontaneous caster knows a few recipes by heart.
A spellbook user keeps a cookbook.
A witch doesn't have a cookbook, but has a master chef on speed-dial. (Accessing a patron via a familiar.)

A divine caster orders prepackaged meals. They don't have to shop for raw ingredients. They don't suffer spell failure from armor because microwaving a Healthy Choice meal, while still technically 'cooking/casting' is a lot simpler and harder to screw up than making food from scratch.

Divine spontaneous casters (oracles and inquisitors) I guess would be something like a vending machine: many copies of a few things.

Not all witch patrons (I'd dare to say most, in fact) can grant divine spells. Baba Yaga, for instance, doesn't sell a line of microwavable spells, but she'll teach you to do it yourself. Teach a man to fish, an all that.

Even when you look at a being that can be both a divine source and a witch patron, Abraxus or Norgorber, for instance, the witch is attending cooking classes, while the cleric buys frozen dinners because he's such a huge fan.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Lemmy wrote:
The difference in spells per day is pretty much insignificant.

That is a matter of opinion. Likewise, you're discounting the value of bloodline spells. Both in terms of getting access to spells not normally on the Wiz/Sor list, and in terms of adding spells known.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Since we're ragging on agile, I'll also point out its the kind of thing that makes a huge difference between characters that are played at first level and those that are created at a higher level.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

3 people marked this as a favorite.
TriOmegaZero wrote:
And then we go get ice cream.

Is that what the kids are calling it now?

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

10 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm still loving Hakon's death stare in the picture.

It says something like "I will compose a great epic about your death, and people will buy me many flagons of mead to tell it."

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Kudaku wrote:

I never really understood why if as you say the default LG paladin fights evil, he has to be lawful?

Mechanically the class heavily favors an anti-evil approach: He gets Aura of Good, Detect Evil, Smite Evil, Aura of Justice (group-wide Smite evil), Aura of faith (weapon treated as Good-aligned), Aura of Righteousness (DR 5 v Evil), and finally Holy champion, which is utterly Good-themed.

In relation there is a distinct lack of class features that focus on the Lawful aspect of the class. There's the code of conduct (which is... Well, let's call it controversial) and they can use Divine Bond to make their weapon Axiomatic. Near as I can tell that's pretty much it.

The way I interpret it is that a stock Paladin fights Evil, and takes an organized, knightly approach to doing so. They're Good first, Lawful second.

An NG or CG paladin would only require adjustments to the Code of Conduct (such as perhaps removing it, retaining only the 'evil act' language.)

Likewise, making an LE or NE antipaladin out of the antipaladin would not be difficult.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I disagree about Golarion gods.

Abadar is the God of Law, but that's law in the legal sense, not law in the alignment sense. He's no more the god of law (the alignment sense) than Irori is.

I'd also argue that Sarenrae could easily be the goddess of Good. And, of course, Iomedae is explicitly the Goddess of Paladins (even if not of Good and Law).

I think, though, an important thing to remember about making 'Paladins of other alignments' is that Paladins are defined by what they oppose as much as what they are. The default LG Paladin fights Evil. But an LG Paladin who fights Chaos would be different. On the other hand, making a CG paladin could be done without actually changing any class features, as long as they oppose Evil and not Law.

Should an LE (anti?)paladin fight Good or Chaos? Do we need a CE antipaladin who fights Law instead of Good?

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

11 people marked this as a favorite.
David Neilson wrote:
Hey, whats the over under on Lem?

He loses automatically, as he's "under the table" before the first round of drinks.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Aaron Scott 139 wrote:
Can we agree that, as a class, this one in particular should get instruments that also work as weapons? Lute axe, flute dagger, etc.

Instruments as weapons is incredibly silly. Mostly because they would break far, far too easily. The Fragile weapon quality wouldn't begin to cover it.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

33 people marked this as a favorite.

All I see here is Erik saying he wants to write a Ostog and Hakon novel for Pathfinder Tales.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I don't like that mechanic. Especially if your concern is people deliberately choosing a mismatched creature type in PFS because they get a perverse joy out of having a captive audience and being able to hide behind RAW. As you've written it there, you've given that deliberately disruptive player an incentive in the shape of a +5 bonus on a roll to bring the game to a halt arguing over if a specific act is LN, LG, or NG. Alignment has never been good with such narrow hypotheticals as specific acts. It does much better with intentions and patterns of behavior.

Maybe something better would be an ego-like mechanic? Wherein, due to the nature of the bond between summoner and eidolon, the eidolon is required to obey, but can throw a tantrum and vanish to it's home plane if you're asking something outrageous, by making an ego-style opposed check? Like a black blade refusing to share its powers for 24 hours.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Atomic Robo Tesla!

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

6 people marked this as a favorite.
Stark_ wrote:
First off, it's disigenuous to start at first level

Why? That's when the game starts.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

4 people marked this as a favorite.
DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:
my eidolon always obeys me even if I ask it to perform an act opposing its alignment.

Says who? If you've decided your eidolon is an angel, you can have it refuse to kill a prisoner. If you've decided it's a devil, you can have it balk at playing nice.

Just because the player controls it doesn't mean the character does if you want to play it that way. It doesn't need to have an ego score like an intelligent weapon or a charisma check like a bound outsider.

You really might want to check out the summoner section of Ultimate Magic. It's not perfect, but the Eidolon Models section has advice for how to approximate various types of outsiders using the evolution rules. Genies are included.

It would be nice to have evolutions that granted various outsider subtypes, though. Just because it would be kind of gratifying to actually write Outsider (Devil)[Evil, Lawful] on the eidolon's character sheet. Heck, those could be 0-point evolutions as long as they specify you still have to buy immunities/resistances or racial abilities separately.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Squeakmaan wrote:
Maybe their atoms vibrate on the proper frequency or something equally unknowable.

I look at it as Gods are as much an abstraction as an actual being, especially the ancient gods. Pharasma is the concept of death itself. You can't kill her any more than you can stop death. You cannot kill Erastil anymore than you can erase communities. You cannot get rid of Lamashtu without getting rid of all monsters. And so on. This is reflected in canon: when Lamashtu slew Curchanus, it changed the nature of the relationship between mortals and beasts.

Demigods are part abstraction, especially the assorted outsider paragons. For instance, Nocticula has a particular connection with lust, Abraxas with secrets, Mammon with greed, and so on. But they still have bodies that reside in a single location at a time, even if that body is an outsider (which isn't quite a real creature) that resides on an Outer Plane (which isn't quite a real place.)

Demigods can threaten Gods because they are god-like themselves. But they can be killed by (powerful) mortals because, fundamentally, they have a solid bit that you can put a sword through. Demigods sit on both sides of the fence, essentially.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.

What would the most metal party be?

Skald, (abyssal/infernal) bloodrager, slayer, warpriest of gorum?

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

d6's make sense. It's the most common style of die in many games, and it's easier to lay hands on large quantities of them. Large numbers of d8s I think are an artifact of the scaling rules, but with most one-handed weapons and many classes having a d8 hit die, I think most gamers have a good number of them in their collection.

I'd be less certain that I could lay hands on 10d4 all at once, though. (And larger numbers of smaller dice are less random: the curve is heavily weighted toward the average. 10d4 could be simplified to '25' with a very high level of accuracy. Rolling 40 (or 10) on 10d4 would happen once in a million times.)

For things like this, I find it is important to remember that the game is centered on small groups of medium-sized humanoid combatants, and the further away from that you get, the more of an approximation things are. The scaling tables exist so that you can get a number for an arbitrary weapon in the hands of a Rune Giant or Iron Collossus, and maybe handle a template or enlarging magic, for the five rounds such a monster will be alive.

And I'd love it if those different tables would be made consistent, so that remembering the right answer instead of looking it up would be easier. But I don't think they have to be perfectly consistent with the differences at normal sizes. Because the cases that stress the table are short-lived (colossal monsters) or deliberate corner cases (Giant template repeatedly, stacking Improved Natural Attack with Strong Jaw....)

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

13 people marked this as a favorite.
Fromper wrote:
But no, obviously I can't be Belkar. After all, I wear glasses, and he doesn't. It's the same reason you know Clark Kent can't be Superman.

And now I hope the staff gives you a custom avatar. Just the Belkar avatar, but with glasses drawn on.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.

How about this, changing the topic from Quick Study. A lot of the hostile spell effects adventurers encounter are actually spell-like abilities of monsters, rather than proper spells. Would those trigger Suffering Knowledge?

1 to 50 of 1,034 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.