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Raegos

Ravingdork's page

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 21,354 posts (22,559 including aliases). 2 reviews. 2 lists. 1 wishlist. 5 Pathfinder Society characters. 12 aliases.



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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I am currently playing a 3rd-level shabti psychic in the first Hell's Vengeance adventure module.

As the game goes on, I will be looking to make him into a horrifying, sadistic psychic interrogator and spy who excels at getting information out of the enemy (both before and after capture). I'm trying to decide which spells might best help me accomplish that and was hoping some of you more experienced players of psychic characters might be able to offer some suggestions.

So far, Solangus' detect thoughts ability has been amazing during interrogations, and his murderous command spell has been quite useful in turning the common people against the "violent rebel dogs who mean to do them harm." During combat, his min/maxed mind thrust has also proven quite effective in combat, and will be even better once I get the more powerful iterations of the spell and a recondite rod to further boost its damage potential.

What future spells* might you recommend for such a character concept? I am primarily looking for spells that aid in (enhanced) interrogation, spying, and a few combat spells that generally support having a menacing "don't mess with that guy" kind of reputation.

*:
It's probably worth noting that our GM has ruled that the concept of spell manifestations doesn't exist in her games, so my character can basically cast in public with impunity, often without observers being any the wiser.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I'm looking to try something new by building an interesting and effective investigator character. However, I've never made one before, don't know much about them, and don't really know where to start.

Can someone please tell me about some of the basic dos and don'ts of the class? Share some interesting build strategies or character concepts?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Can a samsaran psychic spellcaster use Mystic Past Life to poach spells from another psychic class?

If so, what might be some interesting or optimal mix and match combinations?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

If I have multiple equations for determining my Concentration modifier, do I keep them separate, or us the highest for everything?

For example, let's say I have spell-like abilities from a wisdom-based casting class, such as cleric. The concentration checks for those abilities would be:

Cleric caster level + Wisdom modifier

But what if I have a spell-like ability from an entirely different source, such as my race? A racial spell-like ability's concentration calculation might look something like this:

Character level + Charisma modifier

Say the former comes up to +16, and the latter is only +13, due to differences in ability scores.

Do I use the +16 and +13 for class spell-like abilities and racial spell-like abilities, respectively? Or do I just use the +16 for everything?

In short, is it possible to have multiple Concentration check modifiers on one character in the first place? Or do you just use the highest?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

What do you guys think of the following house rule? Could it present any balance issues?

All series of related spells with a roman numerals in their names (such as summon monster or summon nature's ally), as well as with any spells with "cure" in their names, may be undercast by spontaneous casters (but not by other casters).


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

My caligni chaokineticist has just enough gold to use her animate undead wild talent to make a 16 HD undead bodyguard. The problem is I don't know what beast would best suit her abilities.

Currently, I'm leaning towards a 16-headed hydra, but I'm all-too-aware of the inherent weaknesses of the hydra (slow speed, no flight, etc). It's also kind of big and not portable.

Does anyone know of any other ideas that might make for a good bodyguard, preferably something that will complement my character's abilities?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I'm looking for ways to incorporate and optimize the use of the flurry of blasts wild talent. At a glance, it doesn't seem all that great and I'm wondering if it's just me or if that actually is the case.

I'm not going for a specific build, just trying to make the power not seem totally useless. What combos/uses have been established with it that really seem to carry their weight? What can we brainstorm?

Flurry of Blasts:


Flurry of Blasts
Element universal; Type form infusion; Level 3; Burn 2
Prerequisite extended range
Associated Blasts any
Saving Throw none


Instead of a single kinetic blast, you shoot two kinetic blasts at targets within 120 feet that each deal damage as if your kineticist level were 1st (effects or abilities that increase your kinetic blast's damage don't apply). At 10th level, you can shoot three blasts with flurry of blasts; this increases to four blasts at 16th level and to five blasts at 20th level. If you are under the effect of haste or similar magic that increases your number of attacks in a full-attack action, the number of kinetic blasts in your flurry of blasts increases by 1.


No two targets can be more than 30 feet apart. You must assign the targets of all your blasts before rolling any of the attacks. Any blast beyond the first that hits the same target adds 1d6 points of damage; bonuses and penalties to damage don't apply. If you are using a substance infusion that requires a saving throw, a target attempts its save only once (even if it was hit multiple times), but it takes a penalty on the save equal to the number of times it was hit beyond the first. If you are using a substance infusion that requires a caster level check or combat maneuver check, you roll the check only once against each target, but you gain a bonus on the check equal to the number of times that target was hit beyond the first. If you are using the pushing substance infusion, the maximum distance of the push increases by 5 feet for each time the target was hit beyond the first.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Am I reading the kinetic invocation feat correctly? It seems to indicate that non-instantaneous, non-permanent spells have an indefinite duration, ending only when your burn is removed.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

If you are playing a character who is practically blind, such as an oracle with the blind curse, how do you get by in an adventuring party, both in and out of game?

I once had just such an oracle, and every time something dangerous beyond 60 feet appeared, I was wholly reliant on the party to alert me to the threat. If I was alone or if they failed to fill me in on what was going on, I would often find myself completely helpless, or close to it.

At one point, the other characters played a joke on my character by crying out "DRAGON! DRAGON IN THE SKY!" then laughing uproariously as my character freaked out and dove under a large log.

How do you keep such a character form being all but crippled in anything, but the close range, indoor encounters?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Does the minimus containment version of a binding spell prevent the target from taking actions?

I imagine some GMs might say yes, but I'm thinking the answer is, or at least should be, no.

There's nothing in the spell under that section (or elsewhere in the spell description) that says the target of minimus containment cannot still take actions, so I believe that they can (though they will still be trapped in the jar, which poses a host of other problems, such as not having line of effect to anything).

I intend to use the spell as a means of having a safe manner of carrying my true body around while using other spells, such as magic jar or possession.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

If a caster uses Cunning Caster to cast a spell, while in a position where some of the spell's components cannot be detected, does she still need to take the penalty for said component?

For example, normally you would take a -12 penalty for casting a spell with verbal, somatic, and material components. But what if the caster was hiding in a fog bank? Is the penalty now only a -4, since there is essentially no hope of anyone seeing the somatic and material components of the spell (and those no need to further conceal those aspects of the spell)?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

PLEASE LOOK AT THIS DIAGRAM CLOSELY BEFORE RESPONDING.

If my geokineticist uses kinetic cover, as shown, with the intent of giving himself total cover against his enemies, which of those enemies shown does he end up having total cover against?

I want to say 1, 2, 4, and 5, because kinetic cover is clear in its description: As a standard action, you can select one face of a square within 30 feet of you and move elemental matter to block that face, providing total cover from that direction.

However, my GM argues that my geokineticist would have only partial, or even no cover against all of the enemies, as shown.

If he is correct, then I fail to see how this ability, despite its description, would ever really be able to give someone total cover short of having two medium creatures back to back against the wall--which will pretty much never really happen.

So the question is simple: How much cover does kinetic cover really give? Does its description, "you get total cover from anyone from the chosen direction," being the more specific rule, trump those of the normal cover rules?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Am I right in my reading of this kineticist wild talent that there basically is no saving throw against it unless I hit the target with it a second time?

So it's blast 1, no save vs entangle; blast 2 save vs. getting rooted to the ground.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

By the rules, how is one supposed to adjudicate the following?


  • Throwing throwing axes at an enemy's non-magical shield with the intent of disabling/destroying it
  • Shooting an enemy's magical sword with the disintegrate spell
  • Shooting a foe's bow string to disable his bow
  • Spearing a spell component pouch off an enemy caster's hip


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The skeleton entry of the Bestiary says the following:

Perhaps the most dangerous variant skeleton, though, is the skeletal champion. This skeleton retains its intellect, and often any class levels it possessed in life. A skeletal champion cannot be created with animate deadthese potent undead only arise under rare conditions similar to those that cause the manifestation of ghosts or via rare and highly evil rituals.

Since the release of Occult Adventures, rituals are now a thing. Where's the ritual the ends in the creation of a skeletal champion? If one does not exist yet, what would/should it entail do you think?


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Take the Bladed Brush feat from Paths of Righteousness, for example. It requires the character to be a worshipper of Shelyn.

Why?

What is preventing my dextrous assassin from kidnapping a worshipper of Shelyn with this specific kind of training, and then forcing her to teach me the fighting style?

As written, that's impossible. Why?

It's fine to say that this fighting style is exclusive to a specific religion, but to hard code it as a prerequisite? Doesn't make logical sense to me why the above scenario should be totally impossible.

The same thing could be said of the druidic language. It makes sense that you can't start with it unless you are a druid, but why couldn't someone pick it up later without multiclassing into druid? The rules say druids fall for teaching others the language, so it must be possible (though extraordinary rare/unlikely), right?

What do you think? Should GMs take a hard stance on such things, or should a player be permitted to do these things in very specific circumstances? Should the game developers put more thought into what they consider "hard" prerequisites/restrictions?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Is there a feat or ability somewhere that lets you change your creature type/subtype to match that of the creature you're polymorphing into?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

For high speeds, blindsense, things of that nature, what are some of the best non-combat forms with beast shape IV?


20 people marked this as FAQ candidate. 3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

When changing shape via a polymorph spell or effect, do you retain your natural armor bonus? For example, If I cast baleful polymorph to turn a barbed devil into a rat, would his AC be 21 or 31?


2 people marked this as FAQ candidate.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I suspect this will be a simple question with a deceptively difficult answer.

Can you continue your full attack action after successfully initiating a grab attempt?

Most people understand that when you are the grappler, you can't normally take the full attack action AND maintain the grapple. However, the grab ability lets you initiate a grab as a free action and does not explicitly prohibit you from continuing on with your full attack action. In fact, I can't seem to find a rule that does so.

Is there anything in the rules preventing this?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The Villain Codex has a dozen neat gems within its pages, but this one in particular caught my eye.

Cunning is a no prerequisite feat that grants 1 skill rank per HD. It functions retroactively and moving forward, much like Toughness does.

It helped allow my 9th-level fighter to have 126 skill ranks. That's 14 maxed out skills! :D

Could this help other low skill classes? What's your favorite new rule from the VC?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Can I use create greater undead to make an army of incorporeal horrors if I only have access to a single corpse? Please explain your answer, sticking to the RAW if possible. Insofar as I can tell, there's absolutely nothing indicating you couldn't do this.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

With the advent of the Bestiaries and other official Pathfinder supplements, we now have undead creatures that are essentially animated eyes, hands, brains, skin, skeletons, etc.

I believe there is also a rule saying that someone who has been so animated can't be resurrected unless its undead counterpart has been destroyed first. I thought that animating a corpse as multiple undead might be a cool way to keep a nemesis from returning to life.

Just how many distinct undead creatures can we create from a single corpse? Let's brainstorm!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

What are some good rogue options for making someone flat-footed? I'm looking to take advantage of Sap Master.


1 person marked this as FAQ candidate.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The final revelation of the Heavens mystery says the following:

Should you die, you are reborn 3 days later in the form of a star child, who matures over the course of 7 days (treat as the reincarnate spell).

What is a star child? And where can I find stats for it?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Here's a fun mental exercise for all you savvy rules lawyers out there:

So there is a murder hole in the door (really just a small barred window) which is just large enough for me to stick my arm through it. I want to shoot a fireball through it, but the GM says I don't have line of effect to do so, per the rules from the Magic chapter of the Core rulebook. Apparently you need a square foot in order to qualify for line of effect.

I knew this already, but a fireball bead streaks out from one's pointing digit/appendage, right? So if my arm (or even my finger) will fit, then I can effectively shoot a fireball through the aperture (since it will basically be created on the other side of the barrier), no?

My GM says no, since the opening is not big enough to qualify for line of effect. According to him, even though I can fit my arm through it, my character's space is still technically on the wrong side of the barrier and so the rule still applies.

What do you guys think?


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I know a lot of us here on the boards rant and rave whenever the PDT releases what is perceived by many to be an ill-thought-out FAQ entry, but that doesn't mean we can't all still be grateful when they release some really good ones!

.
.
.

These were released just today:


Thank you PDT! I've seen these questions floating around the boards (and elsewhere) for YEARS now. It feels good to finally see them put to rest. A prime example of great FAQ making! I hope to see many more clarifications such as these in the future.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

As far as I'm aware, I have purchased every Pawn Box that has been released yet, as well as several adventure path pawn sets. In some cases, I even got duplicate boxes as well.

But now I have thousands and thousands of Pawns. Finding the right ones when prepping for an adventure (or for my characters) takes more time than setting up the adventure or making the character does!

Does anyone have any advice on how to organize these things so that I can not only find what I need when I need it, but more ably carry the pawns with me when out adventuring into town?

Any sorting tools or containers or tips and tricks to offer up? If possible, provide pics! :)

As for me, right now, I use the boxes they came in for the most part, though they rarely stay in the original box.

Massive wheeled chest - Holds all of my small and medium monsters
Bestiary I Box - Holds all of my large monsters
Bestiary II Box - Holds all of my bases and huge monsters
NPC Codex Box - Holds all of my generic NPCs (such as "pirate" or "scoundrel")
Inner Sea NPC Box - Holds all campaign specific pieces (such as "Red Mantis Assassin" or "Gray Maiden"), including iconic and named characters
Monster Codex Box - Contains all playable monster races (goblins, drow, fetchlings, etc.)

Except for the first box, which is just a huge mess pile of pawns, I try to keep them standing up in alphabetical order. Space is tight though in several boxes, and I can't even flip through them easily anymore without them springing out of the box from the tension sometimes. :(

I generally keep Adventure Path sets wrapped up until needed for the adventure path, after which time they get sorted into the above.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

If I get caught up in a mindscape (knowingly or unknowingly) and I drink potions, use wand/staff charges and scrolls while within the mindscape, are those charges still expended when I return to reality?

What if I lost a non-charged item within the mindscape, such as if my primary weapon was sundered, or tossed into an eternal abyss? Such items don't mysteriously break or disappear upon awaking do they?

So far the only rule I can find on the matter, is in regards to psychic duels:

Conditions gained during a psychic duel rarely carry over into the real world, but damage is dealt to the physical body of the duelist, so it's possible for combatants to die. Similarly, unlike all other effects that occur in the real world after a psychic duel begins, damaging and healing a duelist's physical body carry over to the psychic duel.

Does this mean that if hurt, I can enter into a mindscape, heal my party up to full using a charged item, then leave the mindscape thus getting all of my charges back, but keeping all of the healing benefits?


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Metamagic rods used to not increase spell level slot OR casting time. The second part no longer appears to be true with spontaneous casters. When were they errata'd? I can't believe something like that snuck past me!

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Ran into some difficulty trying to explain the rules to a newish player, and was hoping to get some advice on how best to proceed.

So far, it's gone something like this:

PC: What do you mean he can tell that I cast an illusion?

GM: He made a Spellcraft check to identify the manifestations created by the act of your spellcasting.

PC: Manifestations? What are you talking about?

GM: I'm referring to the visual phenomenon that begins to appear around you as you cast your spell. It's how other casters make use of Spellcraft to identify what it is you are casting--by observing your manifestations. What did you think casters observed when identifying others' spells?

PC: ...the spell components I guess.

GM: I'm afraid that's not the case.

PC: But there's no mention of manifestations anywhere in the rules! I've read the entire Core Rulebook per YOUR request and it doesn't say anything about manifestations!

GM: It's clearly shown in the artwork, and is mentioned in the official FAQ.

PC: But that clearly goes against several scenarios you've run in the past! Just last week you had an illusionist working against us with no mention of manifestations! *storms off*

Even after showing the player the relevant FAQ, he just alternated between asking questions I didn't really have answers for (about stealth casting, past precedents, etc.) and ranting about "unwritten rules," "crazy game developers," and "moving goals."

I'm not really sure what else to say or do to get him on board with the proper play methods. I'm worried I might lose him as a player over this. It's hard enough to generate interest in this game without having to deal with complicated rules changes--or whatever this is.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Reposting this in a dedicated thread so that it can get the attention it deserves. The original discussion (which got off-topic fast) can be found here.

Ravingdork wrote:

Had a couple of questions about my geokineticist come up in our game this evening, and was hoping you guys could help us out.

1) Can you deflect a kinetic blast with the Deflect Arrows feat?

2) How is the kinetic cover limit supposed to work? If you can create X walls using kinetic cover, what happens when you attempt to create X+1 walls? I thought the oldest wall simply collapsed and the new one appeared as normal (like many other magical effects with similar limitations), but the GM tonight seemed to think that nothing would happen if I attempted to create X+1 walls. The power would simply fail, and that I would have to go back through the dungeon and manually knock down a few walls in order to be able to use my wall-making powers again.

3) Does a kineticist summon their element out of thin air? Or do they draw it out of their surroundings? The GM seemed to think that I couldn't use my powers in areas where dirt, stone, and the like weren't readily available. Upon reading the class rules, it seems ambiguous. In some places, it mentions drawing power from the etheral plane, and in others it seems to refer to "gathering" or "moving" the existing matter.

4) Aside from Gather Power, is using one's kinetic powers generally noisy? The GM seemed to think that I could not use kinetic cover without making a lot of noise (since, according to him, rocks and the like would roll and clatter along the ground and gather up into the wall). In short, can I use my kinetic powers while using Stealth?

5) If a wall from kinetic cover can only support 5 pounds, why would enemies bother attacking it at all? Couldn't someone just lean on it, in order to knock it down?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I remember seeing expanded rules for monstrous cohorts, but I can't remember where I saw them? Does anyone know where it may have been?

I want to make a character with a cloaker bodyguard. :)


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

In D&D v3.5, a player could have his character cast wish to create a magical item. Doing so cost nothing more than some XP and the wish spell's material component cost, as shown below:

D&D 3.5's wish spell description:
Wish
Universal
Level:
Sor/Wiz 9
Components: V, XP
Casting Time: 1 standard action
Range: See text
Target, Effect, or Area: See text
Duration: See text
Saving Throw: See text
Spell Resistance: Yes

Wish is the mightiest spell a wizard or sorcerer can cast. By simply speaking aloud, you can alter reality to better suit you.

Even wish, however, has its limits.

A wish can produce any one of the following effects.


  • Duplicate any wizard or sorcerer spell of 8th level or lower, provided the spell is not of a school prohibited to you.
  • Duplicate any other spell of 6th level or lower, provided the spell is not of a school prohibited to you.
  • Duplicate any wizard or sorcerer spell of 7th level or lower even if it’s of a prohibited school.
  • Duplicate any other spell of 5th level or lower even if it’s of a prohibited school.
  • Undo the harmful effects of many other spells, such as geas/quest or insanity.
  • Create a nonmagical item of up to 25,000 gp in value.
  • Create a magic item, or add to the powers of an existing magic item.
  • Grant a creature a +1 inherent bonus to an ability score. Two to five wish spells cast in immediate succession can grant a creature a +2 to +5 inherent bonus to an ability score (two wishes for a +2 inherent bonus, three for a +3 inherent bonus, and so on). Inherent bonuses are instantaneous, so they cannot be dispelled. Note: An inherent bonus may not exceed +5 for a single ability score, and inherent bonuses to a particular ability score do not stack, so only the best one applies.
  • Remove injuries and afflictions. A single wish can aid one creature per caster level, and all subjects are cured of the same kind of affliction. For example, you could heal all the damage you and your companions have taken, or remove all poison effects from everyone in the party, but not do both with the same wish. A wish can never restore the experience point loss from casting a spell or the level or Constitution loss from being raised from the dead.
  • Revive the dead. A wish can bring a dead creature back to life by duplicating a resurrection spell. A wish can revive a dead creature whose body has been destroyed, but the task takes two wishes, one to recreate the body and another to infuse the body with life again. A wish cannot prevent a character who was brought back to life from losing an experience level.
  • Transport travelers. A wish can lift one creature per caster level from anywhere on any plane and place those creatures anywhere else on any plane regardless of local conditions. An unwilling target gets a Will save to negate the effect, and spell resistance (if any) applies.
  • Undo misfortune. A wish can undo a single recent event. The wish forces a reroll of any roll made within the last round (including your last turn). Reality reshapes itself to accommodate the new result. For example, a wish could undo an opponent’s successful save, a foe’s successful critical hit (either the attack roll or the critical roll), a friend’s failed save, and so on. The reroll, however, may be as bad as or worse than the original roll. An unwilling target gets a Will save to negate the effect, and spell resistance (if any) applies.

You may try to use a wish to produce greater effects than these, but doing so is dangerous. (The wish may pervert your intent into a literal but undesirable fulfillment or only a partial fulfillment.)

Duplicated spells allow saves and spell resistance as normal (but save DCs are for 9th-level spells).

Material Component
When a wish duplicates a spell with a material component that costs more than 10,000 gp, you must provide that component.

XP Cost
The minimum XP cost for casting wish is 5,000 XP. When a wish duplicates a spell that has an XP cost, you must pay 5,000 XP or that cost, whichever is more. When a wish creates or improves a magic item, you must pay twice the normal XP cost for crafting or improving the item, plus an additional 5,000 XP.

However, in Pathfinder, the option to create (or even to improve) a magic item was removed from the spell's list of standard options (as shown below) and no spell or option anywhere in the game can reduce a character's XP total.

Pathfinder's wish spell description:

WISH
School
universal; Level sorcerer/wizard 9
Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V, S, M (diamond worth 25,000 gp)
Range see text
Target, Effect, Area see text
Duration see text
Saving Throw none, see text; Spell Resistance yes

Wish is the mightiest spell a wizard or sorcerer can cast. By simply speaking aloud, you can alter reality to better suit you. Even wish, however, has its limits. A wish can produce any one of the following effects.


  • Duplicate any sorcerer/wizard spell of 8th level or lower, provided the spell does not belong to one of your opposition schools.
  • Duplicate any non-sorcerer/wizard spell of 7th level or lower, provided the spell does not belong to one of your opposition schools.
  • Duplicate any sorcerer/wizard spell of 7th level or lower, even if it belongs to one of your opposition schools.
  • Duplicate any non-sorcerer/wizard spell of 6th level or lower, even if it belongs to one of your opposition schools.
  • Undo the harmful effects of many other spells, such as geas/quest or insanity.
  • Grant a creature a +1 inherent bonus to an ability score. Two to five wish spells cast in immediate succession can grant a creature a +2 to +5 inherent bonus to an ability score (two wishes for a +2 inherent bonus, three wishes for a +3 inherent bonus, and so on). Inherent bonuses are instantaneous, so they cannot be dispelled. Note: An inherent bonus may not exceed +5 for a single ability score, and inherent bonuses to a particular ability score do not stack, so only the best one applies.
  • Remove injuries and afflictions. A single wish can aid one creature per caster level, and all subjects are cured of the same kind of affliction. For example, you could heal all the damage you and your companions have taken, or remove all poison effects from everyone in the party, but not do both with the same wish.
  • Revive the dead. A wish can bring a dead creature back to life by duplicating a resurrection spell. A wish can revive a dead creature whose body has been destroyed, but the task takes two wishes: one to recreate the body and another to infuse the body with life again. A wish cannot prevent a character who was brought back to life from gaining a permanent negative level.
  • Transport travelers. A wish can lift one creature per caster level from anywhere on any plane and place those creatures anywhere else on any plane regardless of local conditions. An unwilling target gets a Will save to negate the effect, and spell resistance (if any) applies.
  • Undo misfortune. A wish can undo a single recent event. The wish forces a reroll of any roll made within the last round (including your last turn). Reality reshapes itself to accommodate the new result. For example, a wish could undo an opponent's successful save, a foe's successful critical hit (either the attack roll or the critical roll), a friend's failed save, and so on. The reroll, however, may be as bad as or worse than the original roll. An unwilling target gets a Will save to negate the effect, and spell resistance (if any) applies.

You may try to use a wish to produce greater effects than these, but doing so is dangerous. (The wish may pervert your intent into a literal but undesirable fulfillment or only a partial fulfillment, at the GM's discretion.)

Duplicated spells allow saves and spell resistance as normal (but save DCs are for 9th-level spells).

When a wish duplicates a spell with a material component that costs more than 10,000 gp, you must provide that component (in addition to the 25,000 gp diamond component for this spell).

So how does one best adjudicate the spell in Pathdfinder when his player uses it to with for a magical item (or to improve an existing item)?


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

In a recent game I threw a powerful witch at my players. Said witch, knowing the PCs had access to see invisibility, used dust of disappearance prolifically during the battle (which allows invisibility, and specifically defeats see invisibility).

When the witch later cast a spell, my players demanded to know his exact position (that is, grid square), citing that the FAQ made it clear that the magical manifestations generated from spellcasting are easily observable by all. They further claimed that, per the rules for invisibility, light sources (such as the glowing runes of spellcasting sometimes portrayed in Paizo's art) could not be hidden by invisibility effects.

I denied them this knowledge, and instead allowed them to make Perception checks to try and pinpoint the caster's square by sound (as he made no attempt to conceal his voice). They were less than pleased, but the game moved on.

What does the RAW have to say about this? Can you actually locate spellcasters via their spellcasting while they are invisible? Does nothing short of a high, opaque wall and a deaf target keep others from realizing you are casting a spell?


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

After storm damage knocked a sizeable hole in the side of Harrigan's room, my players chased him out onto the ramparts below and ultimately trapped him inside of an icy prison spell. They then proceeded to ignore his plight as they fought off his remaining minions (four harpies and five smugglers). They then came back and taunted him by drawing pictures of raspberry faces, genitalia, and the like on the fogged ice as he slowly froze to death in front of them (including a rousing game of hang man--the word was "goodbye").

I strongly suspect it has since become their favorite save or die spell.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The four players in my Skull and Shackles game have run up quite a list of party treasure in their adventures. They took what they needed/wanted and threw the rest into a "group pot" to figure out later. They also made a point to pay the appropriate amount of plunder to their crews to keep them plump and happy as well.

Now, as we prepare for the final adventure module in the series, they've finally opted to sell the brunt of their plunder. After going through the two page list (12-point font, single-spaced, dual-columned, single side) they claimed four or five more items, and are selling off the rest.

According to my Excel Sheet, it comes to over 500,000gp!

Normally, that would seem about right for 13th-level characters, but they are more or less fully equipped already, and have no less than three fully functional bases of operation and a massive fleet of 30 ships--all fully crewed by loyal, happily paid (and equipped) pirates.

Taking that into account, it seems a bit much to throw on top. Are the PCs really supposed to be so wealthy at this point in the campaign?

I'm not against them being wealthy, or anything, but I'm beginning to hear whispers about the characters simply retiring somewhere far off with all that wealth and letting the Shackles fend for themselves against the Chelish invasion, or perhaps of using their item creation feats to double the effective wealth to over a million gold worth in magical items! That is a little unsettling for me (considering they're already cake-walking most everything).


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

This is a Mr. Meeseeks box.

My players summoned a rhino with a want to break down a door. The moment it appeared...

Player A: Hi! I'm Mr. Meeseeks! Look at me!

Player B: Mr. Meeseeks, can you break down that door?

Player A: Can do!

The rhino then promptly charged the door and died horrifically in a trap while the table devolved into uproarious laughter at the spontaneous joke.

My players have since then made it abundantly clear that they want to create a Mr. Meeseeks box. What's more, they more than have the funds and abilities to do it.

The question is this: What would be the best way to implement such a device in Pathfinder? I'm looking for brainstorm ideas.

My first thought was to make an at-will unseen servant summoning device, except the unseen servants are visible and are treated as having 14 in all ability scores (for the purposes of carrying things, manipulating objects, and making ability checks) and a +10 modifier on all skill checks (or perhaps scaling modifiers based on the level of the individual pushing the button).

There is no limit to how long a Mr. Meeseeks can be summoned for, however, they immediately disappear once they accomplish the singular task for which they were summoned. There is also a 1% cumulative chance per hour of existence (after the first) that a Mr. Meeseeks will become homicidal and attempt to kill its summoner (at which point it ceases to exist), gaining the stats and abilities of an unequipped savage mercenary with regeneration 5 (which nothing bypasses).

But as we all know, first thoughts often contain room for abuses. What do you think? Alternate ideas? Price suggestions?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Black tentacles does not directly target people, it indiscriminately attacks everyone in the area. Therefore the 50% targeting miss chance for blink does not apply. However, since a grapple check is considered an attack, the 50% miss chance for attack rolls likely still does.

What I want to know, is if a player character could use blink to escape a grapple once already grappled by the tentacles. I had a player attempt this, to which I said "no, that's beyond the power of the spell." The player then later tried to enter a vault by passing through the wall by casting blink. Again I said that, that was beyond the power of blink--that it was only combat spell that provided miss chance.

The player looked up the rules and proved me wrong on that point (a rare event), but I'm still left to wonder if you can slip out of the tentacles once grappled and, if so, how that should be adjudicated.

(In all my many years of roleplaying, I myself have never used blink, have never seen it used, and had at some point got it in my head that it was a rather overestimated spell that penalized you almost as much as your foes. Now that I've seen it in action, I am beginning to see why it is so popular.)


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Are corruption manifestations (Horror Adventures) considered to be Supernatural Abilities, Extraordinary Abilities, or what?


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

If monster A and B both have swallow whole, and A swallows B, can B bite and grab A while still grappled (essentially from the inside), then swallow A in turn? Assume that grab/grapple size limitations aren't a concern(there are some creatures that ignore that restriction; all you'd need is a pair of them to butt heads against one another).

As absurd as it sounds, I think it just might be legal. After all, you can turn an attacker's grapple against them, and if they begin their turn grappled by a creature with swallow whole, they get swallowed.


The Ambassador trait from Taldor, Echoes of Glory is a Religion trait, which means you need to follow a specific deity to take it, yes?

What religion do you need to be a part of in order to take it? It's perfect for my character, but I can't seem to find this limitation listed anywhere.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Are there any abilities, feats, or items that let you ignore the negative effects of drug consumption.

I'd very much like to be able to use aether and still be able to cast spells, for example.


1 person marked this as FAQ candidate.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

When suffering from the effects of aether, a spellcaster needs to make a caster-level check, yes?

The rules say "caster check" which isn't the correct term, and I want to make sure I'm understanding it correctly.

Also, if one fails the check, is the spell lost, or simply not cast?

I'm left to wonder why it isn't a Concentration check. A caster level check (assuming that's even what it meant to say) seems SO much harsher, even for high level casters.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Is it more or less impossible to have mad psychic spellcasters (that is, those that are unsound of mind)?

The psychic magic rules make it pretty clear that psychic spellcasters must be in control of their thoughts and emotions in order to cast most of their spells (or even use certain class abilities) which, by definition, isn't the case for the insane.

I'm aware that there are metamagic feats and spells without emotion components that can help bypass this, but not without severely limiting the character's abilities. Therefore, is it RAW-impossible for me, as a GM, to throw a "crazy psychic" at my players without really hampering his abilities?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The Vision and Light rules say the following:

See Table: Light Sources and Illumination for the radius that a light source illuminates and how long it lasts. The increased entry indicates an area outside the lit radius in which the light level is increased by one step (from darkness to dim light, for example).

Does the phrase "outside the lit radius" preclude the first radius?

In other words, does a torch's increased radius start 20 feet away from the torch, and extend another 40 feet, providing illumination in a 60-foot radius? Or do the the areas overlap, creating only a 40-foot radius of illumination?

I know there are tons of FAQs and articles and such out there, but they only seem to cover the interaction between overlapping areas of illumination (or lack there of).

If possible, please back up your answer with official sources.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Does anybody actually do it? That is, do you make note that you used "item X" at 2:00pm yesterday, and thus can't use it again until 2:00pm today?

Or is it more like this in practice:

Did you use it yet today? No? Than you can use it today.

Essentially having the item reset with rest, similar to some spellcasters' spellcasting abilities, rather than actually having to wait an actual 24 hours. It's just plain easier for everyone to track that way.

Why aren't all such items like this?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

What methods exist for getting spells known from another class' spell list?

In particular, I'm playing a drug addled psychic that would really appreciate being able to poach the alleviate addiction spell (from Black Markets) from the alchemist, cleric, druid, paladin, ranger, shaman, or witch spell list.

I could probably get it with the Sahir-Afiyun feat, but I'm already crazy feat starved.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Pawns, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Grappled creatures cannot move and take a –4 penalty to Dexterity. A grappled creature takes a –2 penalty on all attack rolls and combat maneuver checks, except those made to grapple or escape a grapple.

I think the intent of the rules is that you don't take a penalty to grapple YOUR GRAPPLER, or to escape YOUR GRAPPLER, but I feel like you should take the penalty when trying to grapple SOMEONE ELSE. Does anybody know if there is any support to this theory?

(This came up in our game because a monster got grappled by a black tentacles spell, and the monster wants to grapple a nearby PC in turn.)

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