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Sunlord Thalachos

Quintain's page

Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 434 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


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The question isn't specifically about the abilities of close range and spellstrike, but more in a general sense of having an ability of channeling a ray into a weapon attack, and then have it use touch attack AC.


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Imbicatus wrote:

You could use an unarmed strike as your weapon for spellstrike, and then add unarmed strike damage + spell damage +1d6 for corrosive granted by deliquescent gloves.

You would be attacking regular ac though, and cannot use the touch attack granted by the gloves.

If this is the case, how can Rogues sneak attack with deliquescent gloves?


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This is a multipart question that kind of depends on the answers to previous questions, so bear with me.

Are there any examples in non-3PP pathfinder that allow someone to channel a ray through a weapon?

Ok, it looks like the Magus through a combination of the Close Range Magus Arcana and the Spellstrike class feature can channel a ray through a weapon.

Second question: With the magus above, the spellstrike ability says that he *can* deliver the spell through any weapon wielded. etc etc etc.

Now, let's say that the magus wants to add his weapon damage to the attack per spellstrike -- can he use a magic item (say the Gloves of Deliquesence) to attack as a melee touch attack and the gloves be considered to be the "weapon wielded"?


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Look up Dreamscarred Press' Psionic's Augmented: Seventh Path supplement that just came out.


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Elbedor wrote:

... The action you perform is considered 'borrowed' from your next turn and you do not get to perform that action on your next turn."

...

Not exactly. In my ruling delayed actions are consumed from the current round only...and if you delay too long (as in once the round finishes), you start at the top of the next round you lose the action you delayed, and any action you take from this point forward is your action for the round.

The "problems and abuses" you refer to is systemic of any round by round turn based system. It really can't be avoided.

And to think of it, it's not really an abuse. In MMO terms, this is nothing more than "kiting".


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An easy fix to all of this nonsense would be to get rid of the readied action altogether and extend the definition of the delay action to include a "conditional delay" wherein you delay any actions you have available until the conditions you declare come to pass. Which would allow for the ability to interrupt another's action.

That way the whole idea of what type of action is used to perform what action is clear, and the round flows smoothly.


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Elbedor wrote:


Perhaps I was unclear, but your answers to 1b and 2b are not what I was asking. You are giving me the action, but I wanted to know what Action Economy is used to perform that action. Readied Attack Actions or Readied Standard Actions are both actions that require a Standard Action out of the Action Economy.

The Action Economy includes Full-Round, Standard, Move, Swift, Immediate, Free, and Not-an-action. So if you've spent your Standard to Ready a Move or a Swift and you've spent your Move to close, what are you spending when your Readied action activates? Some are insisting that Readying a Swift means spending your Swift. Others disagree.

I have a thought, but I'd like to hear others' first.

The RAW on this is extremely convoluted, but the breakdown is like this:

Lets say you take a move action, and then a standard action to ready a move action. Since making the preparations to move is an action in and of itself, this is not possible unless the timing of the condition happens after the start of the next round. So, if the conditions occur prematurely, you don't get to use your readied action, it's too early. It doesn't happen.

The swift action is different in that you are allows to "borrow from the future" with a swift action (aka immediate action).

Readying a standard action is an odd duck. This is essentially a reactive standard action that has the opportunity to interrupt. The "opportunity to interrupt" is what differentiates simple delaying from a readied standard action. '

This could have been re-written much clearer if someone were to work out the sequence of play that is allowed when it comes to delying, readying with all the different action types, but they didn't. Why that is it's hard to say...bad legacy rules from the 3.5 system.


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Raw support is the definitions of swift and immediate actions. But it's all over the place.

Quote:


Using an immediate action on your turn is the same as using a swift action and counts as your swift action for that turn.
Quote:


You cannot use another immediate action or a swift action until after your next turn if you have used an immediate action when it is not currently your turn (effectively, using an immediate action before your turn is equivalent to using your swift action for the coming turn).

Swift is used on your turn. An immediate action is used outside your turn and consumes the swift of your next turn.

So, essentially, a swift and immediate actions are only differentiated by when you use them and their restriction to only be used one time per round.

Note that using a swift during your normal turn does not prevent you from using an immediate after your normal turn is done (see my previous statements), but instead prevents the use of a swift on your next turn.

If the condition that you specify when you ready your swift action doesn't come to pass, then you simply lose the opportunity to use that specific immediate action -- and you regain the ability to use a swift on your next turn.


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Elbedor:

To answer your questions --
1a: A standard action to ready an attack, and a move action to close (if he doesn't get in range of his opponent or his opponent doesn't get close enough on his opponent's turn, he loses the attack).

1b: A readied attack action (from 1a).

2a: A standard action to ready a standard action (LOH) , and a move action
2b: a readied standard action (from 2a).


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Quote:


#2 I'm more partial to see it this way as we know specific rules can already change an action's Type (ex, Rapid Reload doesn't allow you to perform a Move action with a Free action, it changes the Move action of loading to a Free action). Plus if Readying a Swift counts as your Standard AND your Swift, then Readying a Standard must count as your Standard AND another Standard....which just gets messy.

Actually, the only reason that readying a swift counts as your standard and your next rounds swift is due to the 'immediate action consumes your swift action for the next round rule'.

No such rule exists for standard actions.

I would posit an alternative: If you do not use your swift action during your turn when you are performing a "ready swift" standard action, then I would say that you simply postpone your current round's swift action and then you can use next turn's swift action normally.

The answer I gave was given due to the premise that the current round's swift action had already been used, and they were readying a swift as well to be used once their turn is done.

So, if you do NOT use your swift and you ready it for use after your turn, normal action rules apply. Swift action doesn't change to immediate, it is just held until the readied condition comes into play.

If you DO use your swift action and then ready a swift, you can do so, but it changes to an immediate action and you cannot use a swift action next round per the immediate action rules.


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So, to put it succinctly, a swift action outside your turn consumes the swift action for your next turn, regardless of whether it is a readied swift action or a "declared" immediate action.


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The way I read this is the "reverse outside a turn" that you are talking about:

You cannot use another immediate action or a swift action until after your next turn if you have used an immediate action when it is not currently your turn (effectively, using an immediate action before your turn is equivalent to using your swift action for the coming turn). You also cannot use an immediate action if you are flat-footed.


1 person marked this as FAQ candidate.
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Swift Actions:

A swift action consumes a very small amount of time, but represents a larger expenditure of effort than a free action. You can perform one swift action per turn without affecting your ability to perform other actions. In that regard, a swift action is like a free action. You can, however, perform only one single swift action per turn, regardless of what other actions you take. You can take a swift action anytime you would normally be allowed to take a free action. Swift actions usually involve spellcasting, activating a feat, or the activation of magic items.

Ready:

The ready action lets you prepare to take an action later, after your turn is over but before your next one has begun. Readying is a standard action. It does not provoke an attack of opportunity (though the action that you ready might do so).

Readying an Action: You can ready a standard action, a move action, a swift action, or a free action. To do so, specify the action you will take and the conditions under which you will take it. Then, anytime before your next action, you may take the readied action in response to that condition. The action occurs just before the action that triggers it. If the triggered action is part of another character's activities, you interrupt the other character. Assuming he is still capable of doing so, he continues his actions once you complete your readied action. Your initiative result changes. For the rest of the encounter, your initiative result is the count on which you took the readied action, and you act immediately ahead of the character whose action triggered your readied action.

You can take a 5-foot step as part of your readied action, but only if you don't otherwise move any distance during the round.

The key text insofar as the readying of a swift action is this: "The ready action lets you prepare to take an action later, after your turn is over but before your next one has begun."

The practical effect of readying a swift action is to use it as an immediate action, as you will be performing said action outside of y our normal turn.

The same consequences apply.

It takes the standard action of your turn to ready the swift action so that you can use it outside of your own turn later on. But it doesn't change the fact that it is a swift action -- it simply allows it to be used outside of your normal turn.

To answer a bit clearer, you can in the course of your actions, take a swift action, and then a standard action to ready a swift action, which would allow you to take that swift action after your turn is over, which would make it a immediate action. As a result, on your next turn, you would not be able to take a swift action (per the normal immediate/swift action rules).


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Seranov wrote:
I have no idea how you could possibly read "it deals damage based on the size of the weapon that fired it" as anything but "it deals the damage it normally would at that size, even though the actual bolt/arrow/bullet shrinks."

Because the part "even though the actual bolt/arrow/bullet shrinks". Isn't in the rule, and the part of the rule that you are stressing is parenthetical.

However, I can see where you are getting your interpretation. The parenthesis does seem to separate thrown and projectile weapons.

Personally, I'd defer to the DSP developers (they post here sometimes), but I don't see anything specifically wrong with how you are interpreting it.

It does oddly seem to put thrown weapons at a disadvantage, though. That seems a bit nonsensical.


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As far as expansion is concerned, it does work like enlarge. If you expand the size of the weapon and projectile, and the projectile leaves the power's effect, it reduces in sizes just like enlarge.

However, if you carry around appropriately sized projectiles for your expansioned crossbow, that is a whole different story.

I believe this was an errata, or DSP when they wrote the power were unaware of the enlarge projectile returning to normal FAQ that Pathfinder put into place.

Expansion from Ultimate Psionics:

Quote:

...Any affected item that leaves your possession

(including a projectile or thrown weapon) instantly returns
to its normal size.

Hell, Samasboy1 even quoted it..but only bolded the part he wanted to see.


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While the mundane physical size increase with powerful build works and gravity bow works, expansion with ranged weapons does not work. Once the projectile is shot, it returns back to it's normal sizes.

So, at best, you'll get 2 sizes increases on your medium heavy crossbow.


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Yes, it is still treated as your active creature type on the single shot upon which you are making at that time. Any after that, no.


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Quote:


Now, I am dead set on taking this archetype but what I really want to know is if I *must* manifest Disrupting Strikes at 10th level just to contribute to the party?

Must? No. A single disrupt pattern per round is quite sufficient.

Disrupt Pattern plus Exploding Pattern (Insight), Bleed Pattern (Insight) with Improved Disruption, One Pattern, Bracers of Disruption and Psionic Focus with the correct type gives you 7d6 + 14 + Int mod damage per round and on top of that, you get 3 points of bleed damage to everyone in an aoe around your target. Branding pattern adds to this further.

With Hide in Plain sight and a really good stealth score, you can snipe in combat using disrupt pattern all by it's lonesome.

Don't underestimate Craft Trap and it's uses too.

The only archetype for the cryptic that is a "damage dealer" is the brutal disruptor. The Cryptic as a class is a debuffer and skill monkey.

To optimize properly, max out intelligence and dexterity, focus on stealth and debuffing opponents.

Reserve Disrupting Strikes for times you need to do a lot of damage in order to survive.


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Challenging psionics characters is no different than challenging a gish or straight caster type character. It will all depend on what they have selected for powers.

You must always remember the golden rule of Psionics: The number of power points a character can spend on a power is equal to or less than his manifester level for that specific power. This is an absolute rule that cannot be broken.

There are ways of artificially increasing your manifester level, but those are feat/class specific.

Moreover, psionic powers are more resistable due to the power's DC being based on the level of the power, which is not increased when it is augmented. (Feats can modify this).

It is also more prone to dispels for the same reason. A inertial armor power that is augmented to provide +10 to AC at really high level still gets dispelled as a level 1 power, regardless of the manifester level. (There are currently no feats that modify this aspect of psionic powers).


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Right, it's entirely interpretable is my take...which is kind of why I was wanting a FAQ.

Thanks for the assist.


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Quote:


The question is, if I can use magic to create a red shirt, why can't I use magic to create a blue shirt.

Because you need red shirts to make the storm troopers effective in combat.


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Corrik wrote:

I would say that is more difficult. You would have to have a specific counter-agent for each thing. That means you have to identify exactly how each disease works and a specific method for countering them. Certainly it makes sound scientific sense. It just doesn't make a lot of magical sense. Why spend all of the time and effort make a bunch of unique agents? Just make one that heals X amount of Dex damage. You now how one thing which is useful for all other disease which deal Dex damage. Certainly the harmful disease just deals Dex damage, mechanically speaking.

The why is human nature. Perhaps the resident alchemist doens't like the fact that only the divine casters have a monopoly on cure disease and remove poison and wants to muscle in on their territory and is looking for a way to do it. For poisons, once you have the venom, you can concoct a anti-venom. The same applies to disese (virii).

It would be a nice way to say "See, you don't have to pay the temple of <insert annoyingly prosletyzing deity's church here>, you can pay me as well, and I won't judge you for your bad behavior!

Corrik wrote:


No it isn't, it's merely difficult to obtain and/or is needed to accomplish a thing. I suggest you look that up again. Might want to double check the ridiculous things spells let you do as well. Given enough time and resource, there are practically no limits. The limits that are there, are so high that they are typically more of a problem then the players getting the thing.

The game already does not maintain a mechanical balance, so that cry doesn't count for much. Also, having a counter to something does not unbalance. Point of fact, it actually gives you balance....

My gaming philosophy is pretty much the same...anything that is available to NPCs should be available to PCs and vice versa.


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Blake: a quick search on "soft cover" seems to indicate you are in the minority on this particular rule interpretation.


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Quote:


Strictly by RAW, "Cover" is a game term. Therefore the AoO question applies to "Cover", but not to "Partial Cover" or "Soft Cover" which are different terms. It's irrelevant to "Total Cover" because you cannot affect a target with Total Cover at all. So a prone, or even standing, ally providing soft/partial cover won't prevent an AoO.

I can see where you get your interpretation of the "cover" != soft cover or partial cover.

Do you have any supporting evidence to this interpretation (FAQ reference would be perfect).

Note: from what it looks to me, the same AC modifier for "cover" (+4) is the same for "soft cover", which would indicate that soft cover does indeed prevent attacks of opportunity, given they are otherwise equivalent.

As an example:

Cover (normal) provides the benefits of A, B, C and D (+4 to AC, No AoO, +2 Relfex, Can use Stealth).

Soft cover is written in a way that excludes specific benefits that are provided by normal cover: no bonus to reflex and no stealth. It specifically includes the +4 to AC (likely to differentiate it from partial cover), but makes no reference to attacks of opportunity.

So, if "cover" is an umbrella term and soft cover is a sub-category therein, then soft cover should inherit the traits of cover unless specific exceptions/modifications are noted. No mention of attacks of opportunity therefore imply that even with soft cover (and as well partial cover) prevent attacks of opportunity.

I think a FAQ is in order, given the ambiguity.


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With this idea in mind, I would say that you could create the equivalent of a counter-agent or anti-venom to whatever pathogen or venom exists to counter it's effects, but not bolster a character beyond their normal abilities, unless you wanted to make "magical steriods" which would give a alchemical bonus to ability scores or some-such type effect.


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Given the rule:

Quote:


Cover and Attacks of Opportunity: You can't execute an attack of opportunity against an opponent with cover relative to you.

Does the term "with cover" apply to all forms of cover of all gradients, partial, improved, total, soft and hard cover?

So that even someone prone in between two enemies provides enough cover to prevent attacks of opportunity?

What happens if both enemies are of equal distance? (essentially flanking the prone man in the middle).

It looks like equal distance = random on which one is "closer".


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Imbicatus wrote:
However, Phalanx Formation has much the same effect as IPS and apples to reach weapons.

Correct, but only when the middle-man is an ally. If the middle-man is an enemy, the middle-man still provides partial cover according to what I'm reading so far.


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DM_Blake wrote:

It's fully answered if you remember this rule:

SRD, Combat, Cover wrote:
When making a melee attack against a target that isn't adjacent to you (such as with a reach weapon), use the rules for determining cover from ranged attacks.
As you said, the low cover rule seems to imply ranged attacks, and now you know the same rule applies to reach attacks. Problem solved.

Ok, granted.

Given the above rule, by extension, does this mean that ranged weapon feats also apply to reach melee weapons when cover is involved, such as improved precise shot ignoring soft cover?

I would think not, given the prerequisites of the ranged weapon feat tree.


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I knew about those two particular rules..which pretty much leaves it up to GM fiat (which will involve table variation).

The low obstacle rule doesn't really seem applicable to someone that is prone in between two combatants...say using reach weapons to attack each other. It seems to imply ranged weapon attacks.

The scenario is that you have two combatants trying to hit each other (in melee with reach) and the guy in between them is prone.

So, beyond these two rules, which leaves the question unanswered in a satisfactory way.. there is nothing?


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Why or why not?

Does a man-in-the-middle that is prone provide soft cover to combatants on either side of him?


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A suggestion as to what qualifies as observable stimulus is that which you can perceive even with your worst Perception check possible.

So, Gwen, if the guy who is hiding behind the curtain's Stealth skill cannot possibly beat your worst Perception check roll, then that is an "observable stimulus".

The same guideline applies to the hidden door, etc.


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Mark,

Thanks for the clarification on the sequence of events.

Do you forsee an improvement to sniping that does allow for a full attack sequence at any point that doesn't rely on invisibility?


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Quote:


Full-attacking from Stealth means you step out of cover (or pop your head up, or lean out, or whatever) and fire multiple attacks. The first one benefits from the fact that your Stealth doesn't break until after you make that one attack. After that, you are visible and every enemy on the battlefield is looking at you - yes, they see you (if they don't it's because of something else not applicable to this discussion, like you're invisible or they're blind). Once they see you, sure, you could 5'-step into cover or concealment and try a Stealth check, but everybody knows you just stepped behind that tree and now, even though they can no longer see you, they're all taking their turns moving toward that tree to surround you and hack you to pieces.

See, that is the thing, if you have Signature Skil (Stealth) at 15+ ranks, this isn't true. You are in stealth through your entire attack routine, according to how I understand the ability.

I'm simply a full attack then a 5' step back into stealth.

Show me where this isn't effectively the same thing.


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DM_Blake,

As I read it, I agree. However, as steath is a "part of movement", could you not re-stealth (provided the conditions exist) by making a 5' step at the end of your full attack? Or use your swift action if that swift action allows for movement?


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Specifically, with the upper ranks of stealth which allow for multiple attacks per round while being under the effect of stealth, can you re-stealth in order to remain hidden after making the attacks for next round?


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VMC Dreamscarred's Vitalist with Cleric/Inquisitor and you are a God of Healers.


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if you are talking:

Spoiler:
Merge Forms (Su): At 16th level, as a full-round action, a summoner can touch his eidolon and the two can merge forms. This transformation includes all of the summoner's gear. While merged in this way, the summoner is protected from harm and cannot be the target of spells or effects. All effects and spells currently targeting the summoner are suspended until the summoner emerges from the eidolon (although durations continue to expire).

The summoner can cast spells while inside the eidolon by taking control of the eidolon for the duration of the casting. Any material components used for these spells are taken from the summoner's gear, even though they are otherwise inaccessible. The summoner can direct all of the eidolon's actions while merged, can perceive through its senses, and can speak through its voice.

The summoner can use this ability for a number of rounds per day equal to his summoner level. He can end this effect at any time as a swift action. The summoner emerges in a square adjacent to the eidolon if able. If the eidolon is returned to its home plane while the summoner is merged with it, the summoner is immediately ejected, taking 4d6 points of damage, and is stunned for 1 round.

I would say that they are incomptible, due to the "all the summoner's gear" clause subsuming the astral suit which acts as a psyhoactive skin or armor when in effect.


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Ok, tell me how someone using the english language will be able to communicate that the damage die for the weapon increases by one step without using those words and not covering the "language" you quoted above.

Go.

Ok, now that that useless effort is over, perhaps they should simply say any and all increases to the weapons die type is covered by this rule and leave out any references to size to avoid confusion.

Maybe?

Could be clearer.

Quote:


They do say "effective size increases" which means the size didn't increase but the damage die did. At least to me it does. This language covers things like this evolution die increase.

I agree...but if that does, why the superfluous reference to increases in size? Why not just use all increases or decreases to die type of the weapon and leave it at that?


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Zhangar wrote:

...

Fabricate wrote:
You convert material of one sort into a product that is of the same material. Creatures or magic items cannot be created or transmuted by the fabricate spell.

First off, fabricate fails outright because trying to make tech items follows the same rules as making magic items. Making a laser gun with fabricate is beyond the scope of the spell.

Assuming the wizard actually has technologist and the other appropriate feats...

Well, think of how many different types of materials go into just making a cell phone.

A wizard trying to build a modern item without a proper lab might be casting fabricate dozens of times just to try get all of the components together. And then be left cursing, because your final product is both metal and plastic, and fabricate is going to go nope at trying to combine the two.

Huh.

Wizards putting dwarf smiths out of business with fabricate is a non-issue, because most armor is actually too complicated (i.e., has leather and cloth components) for a fabricate spell to handle.

Hell, a spear is actually too complicated for fabricate to handle!

I don't think people here are wanting fabricate the manufacture the end item, but allow for the refinement of the component parts for later assembly.


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With the retraining rules, you can use variant multiclassing at pretty much any point in your career.


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Because damage dice increasing doesn't necessarily have to be related to physical size increase or virtual size increases. It could easily be related to say a materials change, or sharpness or any other number of different factors that vary the damage dice of a weapon.

Unless the FAQ was not nerfing just damage dice increases via size or effective size, but all damage dice changes in general.

Which needs to be spelled out, as there is no way to divine intent from the text which seems to say something is a effective size increase regardless of any reference to size at all (such as Improved Damage evolution).

They need to be clearer.


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I think Raving has a point, in the evolution, there is no reference to size increases:

Spoiler:
Improved Damage (Ex): One of the eidolon's natural attacks is particularly deadly. Select one natural attack form and increase the damage die type by one step. This evolution can be selected more than once. Its effects do not stack. Each time an eidolon selects this evolution, it applies to a different natural attack.

It just says "deadlier". Not much different, imo, than a longsword is deadlier than a shortsword.


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Ashiel wrote:
Kind of failing to see your argument for fabricate not working.

Well, there is no reason why fabricate could not work, from a "technical" point of view.

If you had the knowledge of what you wanted to create as well as the knowledge of how to create the component parts, which they themselves are on par with magical items, you'd be able to do it.

Everyone seems to gloss over it when talking technology, but the reason that Moore's law works is due to the sheer number of minds involved in the advancement of technology. We don't have just one person working the "problem".

We have millions of minds out there all working in concert/competition in order to improve this or bring out the next thing that.

Conceptually, given the medieval based game environment, you could potentially have a single dude with the fabricate doing nothing else that may be able to create a pew pew laser or force shield, but it would never be able to be reproduced by others in order for the uneducated public to use it...society (in pathfinder) despite (or maybe because of) the ubiquitousness of arcane magic has not advanced far enough to achieve this.

The same can be said that divine healing magic has a retrograde effect on mundane medicinal advancement.

After all, why learn medicine when you have a cure-all cleric in the closest city ...or you can just buy a wand of cure-light wounds if the peasants pool their money.


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kestral287 wrote:

... Crafting has not reached mass production, so it can not reach mass production?

That's um. Very poor logic.

Three hundred years ago: Humans have not flown, so they cannot fly.

Today: I could book a flight at the nearest airport and be in the air before midnight rolls around.

The poor logic is your strawman. I never said it cannot. I said it has not.

It is, however, one of the pre-requisites to spreading technology to the point where it can advance as fast as it has in the last decade or so.

Only through mass production has technology become common to the point it is mundane today what was unheard of less than a half dozen generations ago.

If you don't have mass production, technological devices are nothing more than magical ones through other means.


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Technology exists as it does (being ubiquitious in the real world because of the invention of mass production.

Crafting has not reached the level of mass production, it is still done by smiths in single unit batches. Therefore, it will never reach the level of technological saturation that exists in the real world...they will always be singular items, just like magic items.


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One change that I noticed (and I have the subscription) is that Improved unarmed strike for the Unchained Monk is very specific (and the list is limited) on which limbs are used with unarmed strikes.

This has the consequence of limiting it's interaction with natural attacks so that natural attacks will necessarily prevent the use of unarmed strikes with common limbs similar to manufactured weapons.

Or at least that is how I interpret things. Getting the input of the designer on this item would clarify things.

Also, flurry is tied to the ki pool (I suppose to balance out the increased BAB at higher levels).

This kind of balances out with the far strike monk needing to use Ki for his ranged unarmed strikes, and not being able to flurry with melee attacks.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

If you are a cleric and your casting stat is wisdom, and you don't mind 3PP products, you can pick up telepathy by multi-classing into Vitalist and you'll have telepathy to a number of creatures equal to your casting stat or vitalist level/2 (a single feat will allow you to count your cleric levels in that mix: expansive collective).

Done.

Collective + Collective Healing + Spirit of Many + Telepathy

1) You can channel negative energy into a single undead next to you to apply to other undead in your collective) -- if you heal with negative energy, you can cast it on yourself.

2) Spirit of Many strips the "mind affecting" component of the 3rd level telepathy ability so that undead can be affected.

3) The telepathy ability at 3rd level allows for unlimited communications.

With your collective, you'll also be the best healer ever (undead or otherwise), bar none.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I know that melee can change (via a couple of feats) their primary damage dealing stat (dex to damage vs strength), but I was wondering is there any method for a wizard (int caster) to change thier primary casting stat from INT to say WIS or CHA? I'm aware of a bloodline for sorcerers that can do this, but I'm looking for a more...mundane method for Int to Wis conversion or have a Cleric use INT instead of Wisdom for casting.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
bookrat wrote:

The zergs are famous for the "Zerg rush," where lots and lots of low power creatures attack quickly and all at once. Let's amplify this:

What would be some good tactics for your standard 4-5 person party to face hundreds or thousands of zerglings at once?

Cleave, Great Cleave, Cleaving Finish, Greater Cleaving Finish, Reach, and Fortuitous enchantment -- the one that gives an extra AoO 1x per round, with the with Combat Reflexes and a significantly buffed dexterity. Add dwarf with Cleave Through, Goblin Cleaver -- liberally add size increases.

Or rangers with snap shot, improved snap shot, etc, with zerg as their favored enemies, with bows of endless ammunition.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Skylancer: great suggestion. I'll check that out.

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