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Ouachitonian's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 706 posts (2,426 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 18 aliases.


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JetSetRadio wrote:

I meant space stations with population. I am not personally going to do research on it because I don't think it's a problem. Best example I can think of is the Death Star and it has under the 2.1million that Absalom has soo...

The thing you have to look at is what it takes to run a ship that could house that many people. I think people who really get this concept are people who work in construction or engineering. Not saying you can't understand it's just people who are in those fields have to think about it on a daily basis.

The Death Star was a rather different animal, though. It was a military vessel that used up a large portion of its volume on a planet-killing superweapon. Strip that thing out, dump the space spent on housing legions of stormtroopers, thousands of turbolasers, thousands of fighters, shuttles, ground combat vehicles, the hyperdrives, etc, and you could fit a hundred million more people in there no problem. The thing’s 75 Miles in diameter, for goodness sake. The superlaser’s focusing dish alone has a diameter greater than Absalom Station. It doesn’t have a complement in the tens of millions because it was meant to support a superweapon, not a civilian population.


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JetSetRadio wrote:
Ouachitonian wrote:
JetSetRadio wrote:
Azih wrote:

But I would say that a great city that is the center of the galaxy's culture should be bigger than a Earth city that fills the same role for something as small as a planet's continent or country.

I go back to Tokyo. Absalom Station *should* be bigger than Tokyo at the very least.

You keep saying Tokyo but Tokyo and it is too big to be a space station. Think about how many 36 million actually is. It's a lot. I think New York City which 8.5 Million would be better for a station.
How do you figure “too big to be a space station”? Absalom Station is absolutely tiny compared to stations or even ships in many other sci-fi settings.
Can anybody give us a list of other space stations or colony's to compare? I am not familiar with other sci-fi settings.

This image is helpful for that. Granted, it's missing some of the most massive vessels, like the Death Stars, but it'really nice nonetheless. For reference, Absalom station is around 8000 meters in diameter.


It can be kinda useful for a Stalwart Defender: once you take the Bulwark power, and enemy trying to bluff you or use acrobatics to move through your threatened area add your ACP to the DC of the roll. With a tower shield and masterwork fullplate, that’s an extra 15 on the DC. Throw in a reach weapon and you can get really good at tanking and plugging narrow aisles. Good luck doing much damage, though.


The Pact Worlds could probably call upon the services of a portion of the Hellknights as well.


JetSetRadio wrote:
Azih wrote:

But I would say that a great city that is the center of the galaxy's culture should be bigger than a Earth city that fills the same role for something as small as a planet's continent or country.

I go back to Tokyo. Absalom Station *should* be bigger than Tokyo at the very least.

You keep saying Tokyo but Tokyo and it is too big to be a space station. Think about how many 36 million actually is. It's a lot. I think New York City which 8.5 Million would be better for a station.

How do you figure “too big to be a space station”? Absalom Station is absolutely tiny compared to stations or even ships in many other sci-fi settings.


Sven Olaffson wrote:

Crunch in profile. Almost done. Scaled Fist Unchained Monk of the Mantis / Winter Oracle.

I was thinking Scaled Fist/Draconic Sorcerer(into Dragon Disciple) myself.


Can Aasimar or Tieflings roll on the variant ability chart?


There are so many good combos bouncing around in my head, but I’m struggling to see what would fit best with the flavor for this AP. Hmm.


I'm very interested. I'll look at the PG and examine some concepts.


Darksol the Painbringer wrote:
Ouachitonian wrote:
There’s literally nothing in the Paladin Code about anyone besides the Paladin being beholden to it. It’s absurd for the Paladin to try to make the rest of the party live up to his code. As absurd as it would be for a Druid to demand the Paladin ditch his metal armor.

You're missing the point entirely if that's all you come away with from my post.

The point is that the Paladin code doesn't simply mean that the Paladin doesn't do that stuff, it also means that the Paladin doesn't condone that stuff being done by others, either. Especially by his party members. There are clauses in the Paladin code that imply this heavily. If the Wizard wanted to fireball a bunch of undead inside a building, risking burning down said building (that contain innocents, I might add), and getting in trouble with the law, the Paladin is still held accountable for being involved with that individual in the eyes of both his God and the city.

The Druid conduct only requires that they revere nature, and that they don't wear the equipment. That's very different from "You cannot associate with bad people or people who perform XYZ actions," and is far less restricting, as well as far more ambiguous in certain situations.

95% of the Paladin code is also about them personally. They must be lawful good, they must respect legitimate authority, they must act with honor, they must help those in need, they must punish those who harm or threaten innocents. The only thing in the code about others is that Paladins avoid "working with evil characters or with anyone who consistently offends her moral code", and even that has a major exception. There's actually nothing about doing collateral damage (much less just "risking" it) in the Paladin's code at all. If "risks collateral damage" is something that you think consistently offends the Paladin's moral code, I don't know what to tell you. Sometimes, to punish those who harm or threaten innocents (which is in the code), you're going to have to take a chance that you might unintentionally damage something beyond the evil-doer. Sometimes arrows miss. Sometimes actions have unforeseen consequences. Accidentally taking the chance of harming something beyond the intended target is something all adventuring parties do. All of them.


Darksol the Painbringer wrote:
wraithstrike wrote:
Ventnor wrote:

So, there's a paladin thread again. No surprise, but it got me thinking.

One thing I've heard people saying is that a Paladin's powers are counterbalanced by the RP aspects of their code of conduct. Shouldn't that also be true of Clerics, who receive arguably greater divine powers that Paladins do?

Should Good Clerics, for example, need to follow the custom Paladin codes printed in several player companion supplements (and Evil clerics, likewise, need to follow custom Antipaladin codes)? And should there be more codes for the other deities that a cleric can follow.

Should a cleric's code of conduct (mentioned in the Ex-Cleric section of the class) be as detailed as a Paladin's, in other words.

Paladin powers are not countered by the code. It's just flavor that has impact on the rules. Most players who play good characters dont even break the paladin code so its not like a lot of extra work unless you have a "gotcha" GM.

Edit: No, clerics don't need a code. If codes are there to limit power then all full casters would need a code, but they're not.

I agree that it wasn't written as a counter, but I disagree that it doesn't complicate the game, or that it's merely "flavor text."

There are several spells (no, they aren't [Evil] spells) and options we can't take simply because our Paladin PC would fall for condoning the act of using such spells. For example, our Wizard can't use Fire spells indoors because it would burn stuff down and he'd be held accountable for the things we destroy. Similarly, we can't execute detained enemies, even if they could pose a problem later down the road that may end up making things worse because "it's not right." To say that the code doesn't pose some sort of problem or conflict in-game that requires ingenuity to overcome is just outright false.

That being said, they might as well not further give Clerics codes for two reasons. The first is for legacy purposes; only Paladins and Druids have a "code of...

There’s literally nothing in the Paladin Code about anyone besides the Paladin being beholden to it. It’s absurd for the Paladin to try to make the rest of the party live up to his code. As absurd as it would be for a Druid to demand the Paladin ditch his metal armor.


Hell's Rebels and Wrath of the Righteous are the ones that come to mind for me.


That would make a lot of sense. It isn't the tradition, unfortunately.


Ryan Freire wrote:
Ouachitonian wrote:
Rajnish Umbra, Shadow Caller wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
that's a cavalier and a warpriest not the same thing in the slightest, it would be like saying some one who wants to play a fighter should play a wizard instead which is just plain dumb

What is it that you want from a paladin that you can't get from those two classes?

The only thing I can think of would be 4th grade casting, in which case there's probably a ranger archetype for it.

Things a Paladin gets that a Warpriest doesn't

Full BAB
d10 hit die
Certain Paladin-exclusive spells
Aura of Good
At Will Detect Evil
Smite Evil
Divine Grace
Aura of Courage
Divine Health
Mercies
Celestial Mount
Aura of Justice
Aura of Faith
Aura of Righteousness
Holy Champion

Note: I'm using vanilla, no-archetype classes for comparison. I'm aware of the Champion of the Faith Warpriest, who gets inferior versions Detect Evil and Smite Evil (but still lacks all the rest).

Neither class is really that good of a substitute for a paladin, except in very limited areas.

When people make this argument about warpriest it becomes pretty obvious its more about cool powers than any real rp reason.

I'm just answering the question. Really, I think that the Warpriest gets cooler powers, what with Sacred Weapon, swift-action casting, 6 levels of spellcasting, etc. Those are a lot more useful, in my experience, than some of the stuff the paladin gets. But there's a big RP gulf between "martially inclined priest" and "holy warrior". Which side of that gulf I want to be on, more than anything mechanical, determines which class I choose.


Rajnish Umbra, Shadow Caller wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
that's a cavalier and a warpriest not the same thing in the slightest, it would be like saying some one who wants to play a fighter should play a wizard instead which is just plain dumb

What is it that you want from a paladin that you can't get from those two classes?

The only thing I can think of would be 4th grade casting, in which case there's probably a ranger archetype for it.

Things a Paladin gets that a Cavalier doesn't:

4 level spellcasting
Good Will save
Various class skills
Aura of Good
Detect Evil
Smite Evil
Divine Grace
Lay on Hands
Aura of Courage
Divine Health
Mercies
Channel Positive Energy
Weapon bond/Celestial template on mount
Aura of Justice
Aura of Faith
Aura of Righteousness
Holy Champion

Things a Paladin gets that a Warpriest doesn't:
Full BAB
d10 hit die
Certain Paladin-exclusive spells
Aura of Good
At Will Detect Evil
Smite Evil
Divine Grace
Aura of Courage
Divine Health
Mercies
Celestial Mount
Aura of Justice
Aura of Faith
Aura of Righteousness
Holy Champion

Note: I'm using vanilla, no-archetype classes for comparison. I'm aware of the Champion of the Faith Warpriest, who gets inferior versions Detect Evil and Smite Evil (but still lacks all the rest).

Neither class is really that good of a substitute for a paladin, except in very limited areas.


Are talking specifically unarmed strikes, or fighting without weapons generally? If the latter, Druid should definitely get consideration. Potentially also the new Shifter, but I haven't seen it yet.


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Yeah, I'd probably make two parties out of that. Whether or not they're good parties depends more on player chemistry, I'd say.


They do, but we can't use it for copyright reasons.


Rhedyn wrote:

Players pick and define their alignment. No other RAW interpretation is consistent when it comes to alignment.

The paladin's code on the other hand can be argued to be broken by any action because of vague requirements like "act with honor"..."and so forth" and how the paladin can forced to break their code with compulsion spells per atonement spell.

The GM is well within her rights to consider breathing dishonorable. Because it can be in certain societies and from certain perspectives. For example, an underwater race of sea people could consider breathing surface air similar to how Dragon Age dwarves considered walking on the surface. A great dishonor from a society with legitimate authority. The Paladin's code is objective not subjective. The GM can easily rule that the paladin is bound by all concepts of honor and therefore auto falls.

She doesn't have to rule it that way but your class features are at the mercy of her whims. And you have no right to complain because you decided to play a class with broken mechanics.

As a player, whenever a paladin wants to join the party, I implore the GM to make up their own code of conduct because the code is not playable as written and will only cause future problems. This tends to always be changed to acting with intent of good or basically an alignment requirement. Which means the player can do whatever they want.

Thus I tend to see Paladins as muchkins who couldn't be bothered to just play a Warpriest. Because they need houserules to function, and no GM I play with has ever pulled their class features. It doesn't help that one Guy in one of my groups only plays paladins and wizards and mysteriously rolls high all the time.

Technically true, but that GM is a douchebag.

I still don’t get the “just use a warpriest” argument. First off, it depends on a GM allowing the ACG, which not all do (and is certainly more frequent than disallowing something from the Core Rulebook, in my experience). The Warpriest is also a very different class, and pretty inferior at doing Paladin things. I mean, sure, it’s better at spellcasting, but who plays a martial class for the casting?


Ravingdork wrote:
I imagine it was the dragons who started the first banks, and probably still run them today.

Vampires, on the other hand, started the first blood banks. Why kill people for their blood and risk a torch-wielding mob when you can con people into giving it to you for free?


Darksol the Painbringer wrote:

Yes, I hate Paladins, because it creates a situation of letting players run amok when the rules shouldn't let them versus putting your foot down and being called a badwrongfun GM for it. No matter what happens in the above situation, somebody at the table is getting hurt for it, and that's not something I ever want to foster at my table, and Paladins with their purposefully ambiguous code is just an avenue for such behavior to occur.

Even discussing it with my players beforehand won't necessarily solve the problem; it might just end up creating the problem before the game even begins, which I suppose is kind of better, but is by no means a cureall to the real root of the problem.

Stuff like this thread cropping up at my table more than it should is the reason why I ban Paladin PCs at my table: Too much headache for something that shouldn't have it, at a place where headaches are the last thing that should be occurring, which is my gaming table. The funny part is that Antipaladins are still allowed because they aren't anywhere near as disruptive to a table as Paladins are, which is ironic considering that Antipaladins are supposed to be polar opposites of Paladins...

So before people say I'm badwrongfun for banning a class, consider the above, and perhaps you'll find it not a silly solution to just nuke the problem option from orbit. Paizo does it all the time, and people still love them for it. I trust people will have the same attitude if I use a similar approach to the problem child that is a Paladin.

Seems like banning paladins could be just as disruptive if you have someone who really wants to play a paladin. I mean, I can see it for certain games; S&S and HV both seem like games where a paladin would be a wildly inappropriate choice, but I can’t imagine a blanket ban of a core class sitting well with a lot of people.


ThomasBowman wrote:
Amaltopek wrote:
baggageboy wrote:
Gold plated starships, just cause

Gold is too soft to work well as starship plating. It'll look incredibly pockmarked after just a couple of days in normal space, and who knows what it'll look like after a week in the Drift.

Infusing gold in space-grade paint is much better-looking and more practical.

Dragons are very old and I think traditional, I think its horde would still tend to be coins of platinum, gold, silver, and copper, lots of jewels, and art objects plus some magic items. Dragons use this treasure horde in part to attack a mate. A smart dragon will also have some investments, but it will have a large inventory of precious metals in its horde as easily spendable emergency cash. I think it will sell some of it for credit sticks if I wants to make a few purchases. Metallic dragons live a long time and can build a tremendous precious metal horde simply from investments and businesses it owns. I think law abiding dragons will pay their taxes, but they will tend to reside where taxes are low so they can build the largest treasure hordes. Sometimes a dragon's lair will be its starship. Dragon starships will have wide corridors and cavernous rooms, so the dragon can easily move about in its natural form. The controls will also be very large, so that a dragon can manipulate they with its foreclaws. Dragons will probably have access to spells which allow them to survive in space rather than rely on a spacesuit for dragons. That is my thinking.

They throw coins at each other to get in the mood?


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Rhedyn wrote:
All paladin problems can be avoided by playing a Warpriest.

And all Druid problems can be avoided by playing a Ranger. But that’s no help to people that want to play Druids.


Who cares if you fellow travelers break your code? They aren't paladins, and can't be expected to follow your code in the first place. There's nothing in the code that says you have to make others follow the code, it's something for you to follow. There is, however, provision in the code allowing you to associate with flat-out evil people in certain limited circumstances, so I'd expect a CN Rogue or Barbarian, or N druid, to be even less of an issue.


Does it? There's nothing in the code about minding other people's business. If a paladin knows some of his associates have moral compasses a bit more crooked than his, then there should be plenty of occasions where he knows that he's better off not knowing. Of course, if he knows they're full-on diabolists, then "I didn't ask what they were summoning". doesn't really cut it. Unless you're the protagonist of Hellknight, apparently.


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I don't think the Paladin's code is as restrictive as a lot of folks think it is.

Core Rulebook wrote:


Code of Conduct: A paladin must be of lawful good alignment and loses all class features except proficiencies if she ever willingly commits an evil act.

Additionally, a paladin's code requires that she respect legitimate authority, act with honor (not lying, not cheating, not using poison, and so forth), help those in need (provided they do not use the help for evil or chaotic ends), and punish those who harm or threaten innocents.

Associates: While she may adventure with good or neutral allies, a paladin avoids working with evil characters or with anyone who consistently offends her moral code. Under exceptional circumstances, a paladin can ally with evil associates, but only to defeat what she believes to be a greater evil. A paladin should seek an atonement spell periodically during such an unusual alliance, and should end the alliance immediately should she feel it is doing more harm than good. A paladin may accept only henchmen, followers, or cohorts who are lawful good.

Nothing in here says anything about not associating with chaotic allies, except perhaps a very broad reading of "anyone who consistently offends her moral code." Even then, if a paladin can deal with evil associates to defeat a greater evil, he can probably handle a CN Rogue, though it might occasionally cause him to need to cast atonement. I think a well-played paladin knows when to stop asking questions. What is that the Rogue's putting on his blade? Not my business. When the inquisitor says he's going to interrogate the evil cultist, it's probably a good time to go out for lunch, and I certainly don't want to quiz him on details of what he's going to do. A paladin's code is mostly a personal standard, not something that the paladin is obligated to foist on the entire party.


Amaltopek wrote:
Rahod wrote:
Wait...Adult dragons who have Spaceships? I wonder what they would look like, and how big they would be?

Big enough that unless the dragon in question knew enough magic to shapeshift into a humanoid-sized form (and probably roughly human-shaped, if only for convenience in dealing with humanoids), it would require special facilities simply to embark and disembark. Getting a dragon into space is not for the timid or the cheapskate. Not only do you have to carry around a whopping great dragon, but you also need her food, the attendants needed to prepare it, sanitary facilities (dragons probably value cleanliness, after all their ancestors spent a lot of time in quarters that were very cramped for creatures their size, but still a creature that eats four or five cows at a sitting and washes it down with three barrels of beer or the equivalent is going to have waste to deal with), a crew to fly the ship (unless the ship is a REAL custom job and the Dragon can fly it herself, in which case it would be utterly unmanageable by anyone else), and so forth. The dragon will also be traveling with whatever entourage it sees fit. I'd say a Large ship would be ideal if dragon and dragon-tenders are going to be at all comfortable.

There are places like Absalom Station where dragons simply cannot go -- at least not in their natural forms -- which means they have to rely on agents to work on their behalf there. Since space itself is one of the places where a dragon is at her most vulnerable, it's a significant event when a dragon's ship shows up in orbit. Like in the ancient days of lost Golarion, the day a dragon comes to your world is a day you will never forget as long as you live. Even if that turns out to only be about a quarter of an hour or so....

Have you seen the pictures of Absalom station? I bet dragons love flying around in the main dome. Sure, maybe it’s hard to get to, but if your ship can get close enough to dock, even the shortest-ranger teleportation spells should let you jump straight in.


I have a feeling that a lot of modern dragon hoards are tied up in stocks and bonds generating interest. Possibly quite a lot of interest, if the dragon himself is doing the investing. Millenia of experience playing the stock market probably comes in handy. Of course, they’d have some tied up in precious metals too; hedge against inflation and all that.

Nitpick: there’s a difference between “hoard” and “horde”, y’all. Adventurers might want to find a dragon’s hoard. Adventurers would probably run in terror from a dragon horde.


My house has been having router issues for a few days, so I haven’t been able to do much reading, I may not get anything done in time. Don’t wait up for me, but hopefully we can get this resolved soon.


DM Ragnarok wrote:

@Ouachitonian- Wayland the Smith

Mythology more commonly identifies Wayland the Smith by his birth name, Volund. The youngest of three sons born to a Finnish king and an unidentified woman, Volund and his brothers Slagfinn and Egil were spirited away from Finland in early childhood and grew up unaware of their true parentage. That ignorance remains today. None of the three sons ever even learned the names of their parents, and while they were clearly Scions from an early age, no God or Goddess of the Aesir has ever come forward to claim them as offspring. For his own part, Volund has always suspected that his true father was either Hephaestus or the Forge God’s own Scion, Daedalus. Like Hephaestus, Volund was crippled for most of his life. Like Daedalus, Volund escaped a cruel captivity through the use of homemade wings.

Despite the mystery of their parentage, Volund and his brothers all bore signs of divinity. Each of the brothers was at one point married to a valkyrie until the three brides were recalled to Valhalla. Slagfinn and Egil left on an epic search for their missing brides, leaving Volund behind in case they should return. While Slagfinn disappeared from history, Egil became one of the World’s foremost archers, laying the foundation for the story of William Tell. In the meantime, Volund was captured by the evil King Nidung, who had Volund’s hamstrings severed and then imprisoned him on an island. By this point, Volund had already established himself as one of the preeminent smiths in the World, and Nidung wanted Volund to fashion magical wonders for himself and his family.

Eventually, with Egil’s help, Volund fashioned a set of wings and escaped his imprisonment after impregnating Nidung’s daughter with a Scion of his own. After leaving Nidung’s court, Volund made his way to the domain of the realm of the dwarf king Alfrig. Changing his name to Wayland to conceal his recent history, the Scion amazed the dwarves with his mastery of the smith, and he gained many friends and allies among them....

I’ve only read through Hero so far, which book is that from? I know of Weyland from RL myth, of course, but since he wasn’t one of the Aesir presented in Hero, I didn’t think about him for this.


Here’s another who was thinking Heimdall or Tyr, lol. It’s goin bad there’s no Norse equivalent of Hephaestus available. I’ve always liked the “lame smith” trope.


Congratulations all!


I could see something similar to the Dothraki tradition in ASOIAF, where a defeated warrior cuts his hair: an enemy leaving defeated dwarves alive but shaving them (or dwarves shaving themselves to show their dishonor, etc).


I’m interested, though I’ll also need access to the books.


What parameters do we use for this character? Rolled stats or point buy? What classes are allowed? What races? Starting gold? Probably going to need that kind of stuff to make a character.


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I’m playing a Barbarian (Mad Dog) in a Giantslayer game that’s great fun. Eventually I’m planning on going into the Mammoth Rider prestige class and riding around on my huge wooly rhinoceros. It’s great fun.

Some of my favorite non-casters are actually the Paladin archetypes that give up spellcasting, like the Stonelord, Warrior of the Holy Light, and Tempered Champion, but I’m not sure you’re counting those, since they come from a casting class.


Shadowtail24 wrote:

** spoiler omitted **

Spoiler:

I used Herolab, I guess it doesn't split out background skills on the printout. Interesting. I'll go in and fix that.

Will he want vengeance? Ah, what an interesting question. Reynard certainly despises the Thrunes, and wouldn't turn down revenge if an opportunity presents itself, but he's primarily motivated to help others achieve freedom as well. He'd be happy to make a quiet living as a small town alchemist in a free Cheliax. But when he hits Level 8, begins taking Master Chymist levels, and develops a split personality, his alter ego will be much more interested in avenging himself on those responsible for his family's humiliation...


Can we take AP campaign traits? It seems like there's some from Hell's Rebels (especially) that would be highly thematic.

I'm vacillating between a Warpriest or Inquisitor of Milani (possibly going Sentinel or Rose Warden) or an Alchemist of Nethys(going Master Chymist). Decisions, deciosions...


I'll throw out some rolls, see if anything jumps out at me.

Spoiler:

4d6 ⇒ (5, 2, 6, 4) = 17-2=15
4d6 ⇒ (1, 4, 6, 6) = 17-1=16
4d6 ⇒ (6, 6, 2, 5) = 19-2=17
4d6 ⇒ (3, 4, 1, 3) = 11-1=10
4d6 ⇒ (5, 2, 2, 4) = 13-2=11
4d6 ⇒ (1, 4, 2, 6) = 13-1=12

4d6 ⇒ (1, 5, 6, 1) = 13-1=12
4d6 ⇒ (4, 5, 6, 1) = 16-1=15
4d6 ⇒ (6, 5, 4, 2) = 17-2=15
4d6 ⇒ (4, 6, 6, 1) = 17-1=16
4d6 ⇒ (4, 5, 4, 1) = 14-1=13
4d6 ⇒ (1, 6, 3, 4) = 14-1=13

20 + 1d6 ⇒ 20 + (6) = 26

So, 17, 16, 15, 12, 11, 10 or 16, 15, 15, 13, 13, 12, or 26 PB.


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Lord Fyre wrote:


But, we need sexy art (and miniatures) for female Lashunta.

Don't a lot of the female lashunta have beards these days?


Why not just play an Undine or some other race with a natural swim speed, etc?


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Tally one more who's getting logged out every few hours.


Goodness, that's a lot of games. Dot.


I think Great Whites and some related sharks are able to regulate their internal temperatures to a degree, though they don't maintain true homeostasis.


Any particular recommendations for Favored Enemies or Terrains?


Humans: like humans, mostly.

Vesk: like Desann from Jedi Outcast, but not nearly as cultured.

Androids: variable. Anything from C-3PO to Data to indistinguishable from a baseline human.

Lashunta: depends: gruff and dwarf-like (but not quite as low-pitched as real dwarves) for the hairy ones, higher pitched and more elf-like (but different, you understand?) for the pretty ones.

Shirren: lots of clicks and buzzes and stuff. Perhaps vaguely similar to a click language, perhaps similar to an organic R2-D2.

Kasatha: I like the suggestion of them sounding Protoss-like. That works.

Ysoki: like Rattrap from Beast Wars.

For reference, I tend to think of dwarves as sounding somewhere between Old Norse, Yiddish, and Scottish, uniformly lower than humans; even their women sing tenor. Elves I tend to think of as sounding somewhere between an Irish or Welsh accent and Greek, and uniformly higher in pitch than humans; even their dudes sing alto.


I'm interested. My first thought is a skinwalker, either an Ulfen who was shipwrecked separately or a native Arcadian. Something nature-themed, either a Ranger or Barbarian probably. Are skinwalkers allowed? They aren't listed as a playable race in the old thread.

Alternatively, I keep wanting to play a soulknife, but most games don't allow Dreamscarred Psionics, this would be a good chance to jump on that.


Ragathiel, as the son of a demigoddess of the Plane of Fire (and himself having grown up there), would probably have some pull with Ifrits.


Likewise


Hithesius wrote:

The Veskarium attempts to provide its citizens with a high standard of living, regardless of species. However, it does so through the lens that the Vesk are inherently superior to the species they have conquered. There is no actual contradiction here; you can offer the people you conquered good things while still denying them access to even better things. And for a society that wishes to think itself honorable while still holding to a tenet of innate superiority, this is reasonable, and implied in Damoritosh's description. The inferiority of those who have been conquered is no reason to mistreat them. You've conquered them. They've submitted. If they stay in line and know their place, take care of them and keep them productive.

The Veskarium's government is probably leaning Lawful Neutral at best, and perhaps more likely Lawful Evil given their patron god. But I think that here it is the evil of an autocracy that enforces its rule through strict stratification and heavy-handed punishment rather than the evil of outright slavery. Of course, slavery is still conceivable in such a system. I think it would be somewhat at odds with the reasoning and stances given, but there isn't enough information to concretely rule one way or the other.

Conquering them, replacing their gods and culture with your own, basically is slavery. Maybe worse, in some ways.

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