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Asar

Obirandiath's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 162 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'll add my thoughts without reading all of the previous posts. Sorry if there is some redundancy here.
One of the best roleplayers I've ever gamed with would develop a character based on a single strong trait. Everything that character did was determined by how someone with that trait would act in any particular situation. The characters were memorable and consistent. For instance, one character was "real mad." They guy was always angry to some extent, from merely grumbling to all out attacks. Another character was always happy, even when the situation sucked. You get the idea.
Another method to develop a character is to use the method many writers use, that of goal-motivation-conflict, or GMC. The goal is what the character wants, the motivation being why he wants it and the conflict being the obstacle in his way. Every character in a story has a GMC, both internal and external. For game purposes the external GMC will largely be dictated by the GM and the adventure. Internal GMC is something most GMs are happy to work with you on, especially if you're using APs and have traits to back it up.
You can also try characterization through the "job interview" method. Look up some common job interview questions on the internet and answer them in the manner that the character would. Keep the list handy and review it before each session.
All of these ideas are how to chreate a character, but not necessarily how to roleplay one. Roleplaying is largely a matter of style. Some groups prefer that players speak in character all the time, while others never do. The groups I play in generally speak in character occasionally, mostly for humor. Each group and individual will have a comfort level. Just find yours.
I agree with the poster who said that it is often best to state what your character says or does out of character. After all, as much as I would like to have a 20 Charisma, I'm not nearly such a smooth operator. A character with a 20 Cha will say things far more convincingly and appropriately than I ever could. The same goes for a charcter with a very high Intelligence or Wisdom score. I may be smarter than your pet rock, but I don't measure up to the knowledge of a Wizard with 12 ranks in Spellcraft and three other Knowledge skills. This same example can be applied to very low ability scores as well. Not many people are that gimped as to have a 7 Cha. Tell the GM the message you want to get across and let the die rolls determine how well you did it. Of course, that's just my view. I've played with others who allow 1st level 10 Int and 10 Cha characters to know and act in ways far beyond the characters ability simply because the player could speak well and think up things to say quickly. You'll have to determine what works best for you and your group.

Scarab Sages

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I'm not sure a penalty is in order here. Asmodeus is a lawful being, and putting the group before the individual fits his ethos. Further, the evil dieties definitely want people to know that their followers get power. Go ahead, brag about the spells and other benfits you get. Spread the word. That's the real attraction to worshipping an evil diety, after all. You sell your soul into eternal damnation so that you can do things like turn invisible and smite anyone you like with the evil power granted by Asmodeus. Perhaps the player should have said, "I don't need this. The might of Asmodeus flows through me! His power can easily duplicate that of a simple magic potion. Let Lorastine use it instead. He is bereft of such gifts. Besides, it would make achieving my goals, and Asmodeus' glory, that much harder if he was caught." Regardless of the wording, I think evil dieties have thick skins and expect that some of their followers don't like what they have to do. That's all right, as long as they obey and do it anyway.

Scarab Sages

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If you're open to other race options, I point people towards human Sorcerers with the Arcane bloodline. You get an extra spell each level for being human, and Arcane adds even more spells to your list. The big drawback to playing a Sorcerer is limited spells known, but a human Arcane Sorcerer has more spells known than any other spontaneous caster.

I've used the Shaitan bloodline since it fit with my character's backstory and enjoyed it. You can choose a bolldline in a similar manner. The Fey, Deep Earth or Abyssal bloodlines go well with drow thematically. A few others - Aberrant, Accursed, Oni, Rakshasa, Shadow - can also mesh very well with a drow character. Of course, you needn't feel limited in your bloodline choice, but if you enjoy creating a solid backstory and theme for your character there are options available.

Scarab Sages

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Even though Mark beat me to it, I was going to say that you get what benefits are spelled out in the description of the feature. I won't bother spelling them out again. They're all cool abilities, but unless you have a really, really long campaign (think Dennis McKiernan) the anti-aging ability will be of little help, and of of virtually no help in adventuring encounters.

However, if you're looking to get into the mindset of the character, the fact that he does not age will likely have a significant impact on his perception of the world. If you write in first person, the character's thoughts will likely become less like a regular human as time goes on. At first, there would be no change. After a couple of decades adventuring companions are seen as acquaintances rather than lifelong friends. Depending on the character's alignment, companions could eventually be seen in a light similar to children or pets, or even expendable resourses. The emotional disconnect will grow as time goes on, and the character could have difficulty relating to anyone who is not also immortal. Of course, the character could also see mortals as his charges and helping them grow as his duty.

Writing in third person will make these things less obvious, perhaps impossible to discern, since someone with decades to practice blending in is unlikely to be discovered. In any case, the character's view of the world and how to solve problems should gradually take a long-term view. This could even be longer than a lifetime, depending on the circumstances. Patience should become a noticeable trait. Even someone with a low intelligence will likely have learned a thing or two after a century or so and be difficult to deceive or surprise in normal circumstances. Those who were already brilliant will be even more so. Referencing the Highlander show, you will remember how Duncan had encountered virtually every situation at some point in his past. So, when the same situation rolls around again, he learns from his mistakes and performs flawlessly.

Though this is difficult to mimic in game terms, you can have the character prepare for just about anything. Have the best and most diverse equipment and alchemy available. Carry a few one-shot magic items that are highly situational. Make stashes of money and magic at various locations around the world. Remember to help people and go back to them when you need a return favor. All of this will foster the aura of wisdom, preparedness and experience that an immortal should learn over time.

Scarab Sages

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The test of the Starstone has not been detailed yet. I was just reading a post by the developers discussing it. They said the test will definitely be an adventure in the future, but only after the epic-level rules have been redone (which they referred to as "mythic" instead of epic). My advice is to move on to another campaign and wait for the mythic rules to come out. Then you can switch back to those characters you love so much and continue, eventually challenging the Starstone. Or you can just make up the test yourself...

Scarab Sages

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There was a thread about this very topic not long ago. I believe one of the developers chimed in and stated that the Spellstrike feature does not alter spell mechanics in any way. If the spell description says you get a +3 to hit, then you get that bonus when using Spellstrike.

For the sake of full disclosure, I did not think that the +3 bonus from Shocking Grasp should apply. I was clearly overruled, and apparently it does.

Scarab Sages

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The two most important things you said are "isn't really having any fun" and "bored out of his mind." You don't really need to say any of the rest.

If the group is not having fun, you need to insist on a change. Wanting to play the game in a normal-magic world is certainly reasonable. If the GM wants to deviate from that, it should be with the agreement of the players beforehand. And even after the campaign starts, should the group find that the majority of players are not having fun, then the campaign should be abandoned or modified significantly.

If that GM can't handle normal magic levels in his campaign world, then he should step aside as GM until he is experienced enough to do so. Perhaps run only published modules for a while. Always remember Rule 0: We're all in this together. It is not a dictatorship run by the GM. The players have equal say in how the game runs and a good GM will be able to provide such a game.

Before the next game session, talk to the GM. Tell him you're not having any fun because you can't use your character's abilities and you don't like having low access to magic. Insist that the campaign be changed or else start over with a new one, rolling new characters. Maybe you should roll new - magic using - characters anyway.

There are plenty of game tables that have what you're looking for. Don't waste your time at one that doesn't.

Scarab Sages

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Unless the party is evil, I would advise against charging the other players. There is generally a common understanding that characters will provide whatever they can for the other members of the party at no charge. There are two things you should consider:

The magic item crafting rules are generally made so that players cannot profit from them. That's why items sell for 50% and also cost 50% of the list price to create. Old/unneeded item + item creation feat = new item of same value. I realize this is not perfect, since coins and raw treasure can be added to item creation at double value, but still. The intent is that players don't make money -- we're supposed to be adventurers (or rulers, as the case may be) but not merchants. By charging the other players, you are making a profit from item creation. Even if it's a smaller profit than the rules say is possible, it can be considered exploiting a loophole.

Second, Kingmaker allows for lots of time and money, the resources needed to craft items. If you treat your fellow players like this now, things may well be reversed in the next campaign. When Kingmaker is over and you move on to the next adventure path, it could be a different player who has the item creation feats. I'll bet dollars to doughnuts that there will be less time and less money to craft in any other campaign. Therefore, your money will be more precious and the crafters time will be much more limited. Those conditions make it more reasonable to charge for crafting services. And, since you have already stuck it to the rest of the group when you had plenty of time and money, they will feel completely justified in sticking it to you when they have less time to craft and need even your limited funds.

The bottom line: my advice is to be a team player and craft for no profit.

Scarab Sages

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If you're willing to accept a -6 to your Str, Dex and Con, you can gain a +3 to your Int, Wis and Cha by advancing the character to venerable age. Then, you can cast the Greater Age Resistance spell once a day to remove the ability score reductions from age while keeping the increases. Doing that, you can end up with a 38 Cha. Otherwise, I think you have the bases covered.

EDIT: I forgot about the lich transformation, which also adds +2 to your Int, Wis and Cha. If the GM allows that, you could hit a 40 Cha.

Scarab Sages

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Although I think the extra damage would likely be clear to the paladin, a truly undefinable foe may not be within the realm of the character's experience. Thus, determining exactly how badly the enemy was wounded may not be possible. As Wraithstrike said, as long as the extra damage was applied if it was supposed to be, I would be satisfied.

However, I'd add that if your (the GM) policy up to this point has been to allow the players to know exactly what damage is being inflicted, then suddenly changing that policy in the middle of an encounter is not the best move. If you really want to move away from the numbers to a less defined, story-like game, that's fine. But you should probably tell your players first, preferrably at the beginning of the session. It is certainly within your perrogative to run the game that way if you like. Changing gears without warning and at a crucial moment seems arbitrary.

I'd advise you to use that same method (no numbers, just description) all the time, if you plan to use it at all. You asked if it is in good taste to hide some information from the players. To that I say, it is if that has been your policy all along. You should be as consistent as possible. Consistency is key to fairness, and nobody has fun in an unfair game.

And as to the player who posted originally, please try to give the full story in an unbiased manner when you post to the messageboards looking for advice. None of us can really offer any help or an informed opinion without all the facts. Now, you should probably go and try to make friends with your GM again.


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