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Dispel Magic, and Prayer are also 3rd level. If you don’t have a cleric in the party both these spells are useful especially prayer. Prayer may not seem like much of a spell, but it is actually very useful.


I agree with Secret Wizard the unchained monk fixed all the problems with monks. Adding this on top of it gets insane. Having a 26 or higher stats is not that hard at high levels this would allow you to have +16 to hit and damage on all your attacks. As a monk you are already getting more attacks than any other martial class this puts it over the top.


Iron will is never a useless feat. Keep in mind that the unchained monk now has a poor will save. While a monk will have a high enough WIS to offset some of this, it is still a poor save. The original monk could pretty much ignore any spell that allowed a will save. The unchained monk now has a will save about the same as a wizard.

Personally I would never allow this in a campaign I am running. Getting two Stats that add to both hit and damage is way too powerful. Even using WIS in place of STR is probably too much.


I have to agree that a sanctified slayer would work extremely well as an assassin. With spells like disguise self, invisibility and undetectable alignment you will be incredibly good at infiltration and stealth. Getting both bane and sneak attack is going to help in combat. And at higher levels you even get a couple of rouge talents.

Take the Heresy Inquisition and you can dump CHA and still have a good bluff and intimidate. This also allows you to roll twice for diplomacy, bluff and stealth and take the better result a number of times equal to you WIS modifier. You will also be incredibly hard to fool. You have the ability to detect alignments, and lies and a sense motive that no one will be able to match. If you can take the feat signature skill for sense motive you will eventually be able to read minds after spending only a single round.


The problem is not his choice of class or archetype. Archeologist bards can be quite competent in combat. Depending on his build he could be anywhere from average to extremely competent in combat. I have seen a dervish dancing archeologist that was one quite deadly. All it took was weapon finesse, dervish dance, archeologist luck and heroism. Heroism is an extremely useful long lasting buff that will actually be just as useful out of combat as it will be in. Even if he is going to avoid combat this is one spell he should pick up.

One thing that would work is for him to play the reluctant hero. Make sure his build has at least basic competency in combat and just have him be reluctant to fight. This way no one will expect him to do anything in combat but when he is really needed he can come through for the party. Think of B.A Baracus in the A Team movie. He spent half the movie preaching that violence was wrong and how he would not fight, but in the end he came through.


Having the ability to use a ton of different weapons is not that good if you already have access to a good melee weapon. Most characters don’t use a lot of different weapons. Usually you have one melee and a ranged weapon. Inquisitors already get most of the decent ranged weapons, and as a half orc he gets a couple of good two handed weapons.

Flurry of Blows is only an one extra attack and you take a penalty to hit. Since both the monk and the inquisitor are ¾ BAB class you don’t get a +1 BAB until third level. This means that your single extra attack is at a penalty of -3. The only time this is going to be beneficial is you are facing a lot of low level threats. Any level appropriate monster will probably have a high enough AC where the extra penalty to hit is not worth it.

Let’s compare the 5th level inquisitor vs the 1st level monk/4th level inquisitor. Since we are comparing this build assume an 18 STR and no other abilities except class features. The pure inquisitor uses a falchion and is +9 to hit and deals 2d4+6 (+2d6 for bane). This is an average of 18 points of damage. The monk/inquisitor gets two attacks at +6 and deals 1d6+4 points of damage for an average damage of 7.5 each or 15 points of damage if both hit. The pure inquisitor is a lot more likely to hit and also has triple the critical hit threat range. This is also without judgements since at this level both are about the same. The pure inquisitor has a better chance to hit and deals a lot more damage.

This is also for PFS which if I remember correctly does not allow magical knack. Even if it does magical knack only helps with duration and other level dependent variables. The inquisitor gets slower access to spells than a cleric. This means that delaying gaining your higher level spells even more. A single level dip means you don’t get your second level spells until 5th level and know less spells than a full inquisitor. By this time the cleric is getting his 3rd level spells.


Instead of stealing/eating the soul you could have a creature looking to corrupt the soul. A vampire attacking pregnant women but leaving them alive so their children are born as Dhampir instead of human. He then abandons the child to his fate. Have the children be born with obvious vampire traits like fangs and then let the paladins figure out what to do.

You could also use a demon instead of a vampire and have the child be a tiefling or even a half fiend.


Inquisitors actually get Good abilities at every level. Starting at 2nd you get WIS to Initiative, Detect Alignment, and track. 3rd level you get a boost in your judgments and your first teamwork feat, 4th level brings an extra judgement per day and second level spells. 5th level brings bane discern lies and a boost in your judgments. 6th is mostly a boost in judgements, but at this level you get access to alignment property of judgement of smiting, and another teamwork feat. 7th level gives you a third judgement and access to 3rd level spells. 8th level you get to use two judgements at the same time. 9th level gives you your 3rd teamwork feat, and a boost to your judgments. 10th level gives you access to your 4th level spells and 4 judgements per day. 11th level gives stalwart. 12th level you gain greater bane.

Since PFS stops at 12 levels a dip of a single level costs you greater bane. You also lose a caster level which means you buffs don’t last as long. You are also losing out on your favored class bonus. Since the character in question is a half orc he can take either the human or half orc favored bonus. This means he loses +1 to intimidate and +1/2 to monster lore, or an extra spell known.

Bane is going to do more than any dip will ever do so delaying that should be avoid. Which means you don’t take the dip until at least 6th level, by that time why bother.


The following is what I would recommend for STATS. STR 18, DEX 12, CON 14, INT 12, WIS 14, CHA 7. Take heavy armor proficiency at 1st like Secret Wizard suggested. Since this is for PFS you won’t get higher than 4th level spells so a 14 WIS is fine. Take Heresy inquisition to get WIS for bluff and intimidate and ignore diplomacy.

Use a Falchion instead of a great sword. Use half orc favored class bonus for +1/2 to intimidate and monster lore. Remember that bane is multiplied on a critical hit.

For traits pick up fates favored. This will boost all your saves and works great with divine favor. For your second trait choose armor expert to reduce your ACP by -1.

Avoid spells that target others and concentrate on spells that affect you. Your WIS is a little low so anything that allows a save will be easy to resist.

Even though you are going melee carry a longbow to use as a backup. Most of your abilities work equally well on ranged or melee, so don’t limit yourself to one or the other.


First don’t go multiclass with an inquisitor. You have too many level dependent abilities to waste a level of fighter. Inquisitors get proficiency with the favored weapon of their deity. Also as a half orc you get proficiency with great axe and falchion. Power attack is not that important at first level so just pick it up at 3rd level.

Inquisitors get a domain or inquisition, but don’t get domain spells. This means you don’t get mirror image. You may want to consider an inquisition instead of a domain. Conversion and heresy are both decent inquisitions that allow you to use WIS for bluff, and intimidate (Also diplomacy for conversion). This would allow you to dump CHA and still be the party face. Hersey is probably a bit better because you can reroll bluff, diplomacy and stealth rolls a few of times per day.

Inquisitors really come online around 5th level when they get bane. Avoid dumping INT because you will want to be able to identify monsters so you can choose the right type for bane. The half orc alternative FCB is a good for this as well as intimidate. If you pick up improved monster lore a single point investment in each relevant knowledge will be the same as if you maxed out the skill.


The inquisitor is definitely worth taking a look at. The description of a class is mostly fluff and can and should be altered to fit the character. Other than alignment restrictions and following the general teachings of their deity inquisitors have very little hard coded into the class. In fact they actually have more freedom to use questionable methods than any another divine character. This does not mean that they have to use those methods, simply that they have the option to use them.

Basically an inquisitor is the agent for the deity that gets things done. How he accomplish his goal is strictly up to him and his deity. This does not mean they are all scary treacherous bastards, although they can be. I can see inquisitors of Cayden Cailean as a happy go lucky type that goes all out against slavery. You could also have an inquisitor or Abadar run as a judge making sure merchants are honest. A inquisitor of Pharasma could be a undead hunter specializing in finding hidden undead.


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What your players are looking for is the challenge of overcoming difficult opponents. They are looking type of game that will be remembered and talked about for years. Many people who make optimized characters do so because they want to be real hero. A real hero is someone who takes on things so tough that people are in awe. Without a suitable villain the hero is just some guy with interesting abilities. By going easy on them you are actually denying them the chance to be a hero.

You don’t actually have to kill the characters but there should always be a chance they can be killed. The real trick is to get them almost to the point of death. The closer you come to that the more heroic the game will seem. Think of movies like lethal weapon where the hero is beaten and bloody but still manages to win in the end. After the fight he may be barely able to stand, or even have to be taken away in an ambulance.

Since the characters are using good tactics you should be doing the same. Don’t put them up against weak mindless opponents. This is your chance to pull out all the things that you thought were too powerful and use them. Chances are their tactics are going to be better than yours anyways because they have 5 heads to your one.

Once understand your players actually want a greater challenge it becomes easier.


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Do the cats have to be real? If not you could go for an oracle with the haunted curse and be haunted by a horde of imaginary cats. You spend a lot of time talking to your cats that are not there. No one can be sure if you are crazy or not because of the weird thing going on around you. Some of your spells could actually be the cats doing your bidding. Mage hand in particular would work well for this and it is one of your bonus spells.

Use your feats or some other method to get a cat familiar. Variant multicasting would work well but I am not sure it is legal for PFS.


Can you use Variant Multiclassing? If so you gain improved unarmed strike and a monks unarmed damage at your character level -2 at 3rd level. I realize you don’t want to multiclass, but variant multiclassing is just trading feats for class abilities of another class. You don’t lose any class abilities from your main class.


Its in the magic section under schools.

While under the effects of a polymorph spell, you lose all extraordinary and supernatural abilities that depend on your original form (such as keen senses, scent, and darkvision), as well as any natural attacks and movement types possessed by your original form. You also lose any class features that depend upon form, but those that allow you to add features (such as sorcerers that can grow claws) still function. While most of these should be obvious, the GM is the final arbiter of what abilities depend on form and are lost when a new form is assumed. Your new form might restore a number of these abilities if they are possessed by the new form.


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noble peasant wrote:
Well I wouldn't say only eastern martial arts are lethal but I see what your saying and I even mentioned I'm sure there's decent reasoning for it. It always kind of bothered me though and I'm trying to make a character right now who would greatly appreciate the option to choose improved unarmed strike instead of a martial weapon for the swashbuckler archetype.

I specifically stated the martial arts training did not have to be an eastern style. It could be boxing, savate, kampfringen, prankration or any of the other martial arts from around the world. Asia is not the only region to develop unarmed combat.

All characters get at least one feat at first level. If you are human you get two and fighters get an extra bonus combat feat. There is absolutely no reason you cannot start out with improved unarmed strike even at first level. Too many people b!*@@ and complain because they don’t get everything for free and have to spend their starting feats on developing their character. That is why you get feats in the first place.


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Not every weapon does lethal damage. Anyone even a small child can punch someone, but not everyone can kill with or break bones with their bare hands. That is the difference between a normal unarmed strike and an improved unarmed strike.

Several weapons are able to be used differently depending on your training. The bastard sword is a perfect example. You can wield it two handed as a martial weapon, but if you have the feat exotic weapon proficiency you can wield it one handed.

The feat improved unarmed strike represents someone with training in a martial art. That does not necessarily mean a eastern martial art. It could be boxing or any number of ancient world martial arts.


Peet wrote:
Kalindlara wrote:

I would raise it for certain types, possibly depending on geography.

So the average Ulfen wouldn't know devils' common weakness, but a Chelaxian would... and for fey, vice versa. By contrast, pretty much nobody would have common knowledge of qlippoth weaknesses.

This is a GM call, but is actually in the fine print of the Knowledge skill rules:

PRD wrote:
In general, the DC of such a check equals 10 + the monster's CR. For common monsters, such as goblins, the DC of this check equals 5 + the monster's CR. For particularly rare monsters, such as the tarrasque, the DC of this check equals 15 + the monster's CR, or more.

Obviously it is up the the GM as to when to apply these modifiers, but I don't think you should be stingy.

Even though Lycanthropes and Fae don't actually exist, it was common folklore long before mass media existed that they were vulnerable to silver and cold iron respectively (though cold iron had a different meaning). Thus it is reasonable to assume that ordinary folk will have some recipes for protecting themselves from the monsters that populate the area.

No but in Cheliax silver weapons may be illegal or at least regulated. The point is that areas that creature types are more common will know more about them. Also in areas where the creature type is common weapons of the type that affect them will also tend to be more common.


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While the game worlds do not have mass media they do have something else. In the game world creatures that can only be harmed by specific substances are not myths and stories they are hard cold facts. And while the game worlds don’t have T.V. and radio they do have bards, story tellers and other methods of communication. How much knowledge a particular character has is going to depend on where they came from and how much education they have. If you come from an area known for a particular type of creature then you will probably know something about them.

This does not mean that you will automatically know what affects a particular creature. The basic fact that some creatures are resistant or immune to normal weapons is basic knowledge. If your character for example comes from Mendev you probably know that to affect a demon you need cold iron. If your character comes from Cheliax you probably know that to affect devils require silver weapons. But without knowledge planes you are going to have a hard time figuring out if the creature you are fighting is a demon or a devil, or even some other type of creature. In fact without the knowledge skill you may tend to assume that anything you encounter is the type of creature you are most familiar with.


Running water is usually assumed to be naturally free flowing water. If all that was necessary for it to qualify as running water is movement than almost any container of water would do. I think it should be more difficult to kill a vampire than just dumping him in a pool and stirring the water a bit. To qualify as running water the water has to be one moving freely with no other outside source of movement. This prevents things like sprinklers and firehoses from counting as running water. Also to be counted as running water nothing can be stopping it from flowing naturally.

Since the spell is containing the water in a sphere it does not qualify as running water. The spell is also the source of the waters movement so that would also disqualify it.


While the rules do not cover this, I would have them roll opposed caster level checks modified by CHA. The highest total wins.


It is destroyed if the wielder uses it to murder an innocent person.


If you asked someone in the real world how to kill a werewolf most people would answer with you need a silver weapon. Likewise most people would be able to tell you that to kill a vampire you need to put a wooden stake in its heart. If most people in the real world know that you need special substances to affect creatures that do not actually exist, it would be logical to assume that in a world where they do exist people would also be aware of this.

When you identify a monster using the appropriate knowledge it is more a matter of recognition of the monster than anything else. Demon, devil, daemon and most other outsides have distinctly different abilities, but often look similar. Without memorizing characteristics how do you tell if the monster you are fighting is demon, devil, or maybe even some form of undead or even an evil fey. So when you make your knowledge planes roll you realize the evil winged woman is a succubus instead of Erinyes or some monstrous humanoid. At that point you realize you need cold iron or a good weapon to damage her.


A Zen Archer can use unarmed strikes just like a normal monk. They just can’t use it with flurry of blows. At your level you can use the bow instead of unarmed strikes for most things, but in some cases it may be better to use an unarmed strike. If you don’t have arrows capable of bypassing the DR of a creature using unarmed strikes may be a better alternative.

The same is also true with Ki Arrows. For the most part taking the extra attack is going to be the better choice. But there are times when the higher damage may be the better option. If you are not able to use a full attack action the extra attack is useless. Also if you are having trouble getting through a creatures DR then the extra damage may be the better option. Also if you have a Monk’s Robe your damage is treated as 5 levels higher which may change things significantly.

Many players forget about abilities they don’t use all the time. The thing you want to do is be aware of all your abilities in case you run into a situation where a normally weaker ability is actually better.


On the Other Hand wrote:
Mysterious Stranger wrote:
On the Other Hand wrote:
Mysterious Stranger wrote:
On the Other Hand wrote:
Let's put it in prospective. the CR 1 template Advanced gives +2 to Natural Armor and gives a +4 to all stats. So when compared to that, I find the Azlanti is kind of mild, especially when most people want Azlanti as a backdoor option for getting Advanced on a human.

What does that prove? The fact there are things out there that unbalance the game even worse is beside the point. They are also not allowed in my games. As I said I would not allow the +2 bonus to all stats unless I was running a game where all the characters got that. As I stated it is about fairness not the power level. Players are given a framework to build their characters and should expect to keep the character within that framework.

The alternative human racial trait Versatile Human trades out the extra feat and skill points. That is available for players to use. This is also the reason why trading out the human bonus feat is not good enough. I give a generous point buy to my players so they can simply use the points to purchase stats based on the concept.

Which is valid but as someone above has mentioned the Assimar can trade out a 1/day Light spell to gain an additional +2 to a useful stat giving them +2 to over half their ability scores.

So if someone at your table did that, and the rest where playing humans. What would you do to balance it?

My table does not use Point Buys, we roll dice. 4d6, Reroll 1s as we did in 3.5 where we all started. It is just tradition at our tables.
A Azlanti is a good way to equalize the party if someone rolls really poorly.

We once had someone roll nothing below a 15 and in that same party was someone who rolled two 9s, giving them a +2 boost would have helped them balance out. So I think there is both a mechanical use for that as well as RP purposes for it without just saying shut it down.

That option was from an older 3.5
...

That is not from the Advanced Race Guide. I have the book and it is not listed. I think it is from an older supplement in any case it is not something I use. It is also something on a chart you are supposed to roll for.

For the most part my rule is, if it says ask your GM then I will probably turn it down. Any standard option from a Pathfinder hard back book I own (Which is most of them) is considered fair game. I want my player to be able to build what they want, but at the same time I want to have a framework so when I create adventures I know what to work with.


On the Other Hand wrote:
Mysterious Stranger wrote:
On the Other Hand wrote:
Let's put it in prospective. the CR 1 template Advanced gives +2 to Natural Armor and gives a +4 to all stats. So when compared to that, I find the Azlanti is kind of mild, especially when most people want Azlanti as a backdoor option for getting Advanced on a human.

What does that prove? The fact there are things out there that unbalance the game even worse is beside the point. They are also not allowed in my games. As I said I would not allow the +2 bonus to all stats unless I was running a game where all the characters got that. As I stated it is about fairness not the power level. Players are given a framework to build their characters and should expect to keep the character within that framework.

The alternative human racial trait Versatile Human trades out the extra feat and skill points. That is available for players to use. This is also the reason why trading out the human bonus feat is not good enough. I give a generous point buy to my players so they can simply use the points to purchase stats based on the concept.

Which is valid but as someone above has mentioned the Assimar can trade out a 1/day Light spell to gain an additional +2 to a useful stat giving them +2 to over half their ability scores.

So if someone at your table did that, and the rest where playing humans. What would you do to balance it?

My table does not use Point Buys, we roll dice. 4d6, Reroll 1s as we did in 3.5 where we all started. It is just tradition at our tables.
A Azlanti is a good way to equalize the party if someone rolls really poorly.

We once had someone roll nothing below a 15 and in that same party was someone who rolled two 9s, giving them a +2 boost would have helped them balance out. So I think there is both a mechanical use for that as well as RP purposes for it without just saying shut it down.

That option was from an older 3.5 book so I don’t use that option. I let my players use any normal race and use any Pathfinder option, but no 3.5 or third party options. The reason I use a point buy instead of rolling is to avoid exactly that situation. I let my players know what the campaign rules are and what is allowed. If someone wants to do something different and I am willing to run it I will discuss it with the group and if that is what we decide to play then that is declared before the campaign is started.

If it is something that does not affect the game mechanic than the players are free to do what they want. So if someone wants to say they are a pureblood Azlanti or even the child of a god no problem. They will get no extra benefit from it though.


On the Other Hand wrote:
Let's put it in prospective. the CR 1 template Advanced gives +2 to Natural Armor and gives a +4 to all stats. So when compared to that, I find the Azlanti is kind of mild, especially when most people want Azlanti as a backdoor option for getting Advanced on a human.

What does that prove? The fact there are things out there that unbalance the game even worse is beside the point. They are also not allowed in my games. As I said I would not allow the +2 bonus to all stats unless I was running a game where all the characters got that. As I stated it is about fairness not the power level. Players are given a framework to build their characters and should expect to keep the character within that framework.

The alternative human racial trait Versatile Human trades out the extra feat and skill points. That is available for players to use. This is also the reason why trading out the human bonus feat is not good enough. I give a generous point buy to my players so they can simply use the points to purchase stats based on the concept.


On the Other Hand wrote:
Then stranger how do you run humans I mean that bonus feat is powerful? What do you make them play half elf and just have them say they are human?

I allow any legal race except maybe noble drow. I did not say everything had to be perfectly even, just that anything completely out of balance would not be allowed. If someone wants to play a pureblooded Azlanti they play a standard human. I also use a 25 point buy for all characters so the PC’s are already substantially above normal. Having a character start with 19, 16, 16, 14, 14, and 10 for stats is a little much. That is equivalent to a 43 point buy. A character with 18, 14, 14, 14, 10, 10 or maybe 18, 14, 13, 13, 12, 12 is a lot better.

Humans are already one of the most powerful races. Giving them an option for +2 to every stat is going to mean no one bother playing anything else. The whole point of a background story is not to make your character more powerful, but rather to give him some individuality and uniqueness.


I use hero lab and it does not stack even in hero labs. It actually gives a validation error when you equip more than one suit of armor. What it does stack with is a Celestial shield.


Even if the +2 bonus on every stat was not overpowering, which it is. That is not the point; the point is that it is not fair to the other players. As a GM you are not supposed to be playing favorites. When a player creates his character he should be limited to the same rules and restrictions that all other players live by.

Besides there is no in game way to tell the difference between a character who used his point buy to boost all stats vs. one that gets a racial bonus on all stats. Without doing the math can you tell if a character with STR 12, DEX 14, CON 14, INT, 12, WIS 11, CHA 18 is getting the +2 per stat? Since a player is free to choose physical characteristics like eye and hair color there is no way to tell the difference between a character who is getting +2 per stat and any other character.

If you want to play a pureblood Azlanti because it fits your concept great. Just don't expect the +2 bonus per stat.


Choose a school of magic you already have Spell Focus in. The bonus to save DCs provided by Spell Focus and Greater Spell Focus for that school increases by 1. You get +4 because the mythic feat works on both feats. The base feats say the bonus stack so you get +2 from each.


If a Player wants to be a pureblood Azlanti for a background story that is fine. I would not however allow the +2 to all stats. When I run I use a 25 point buy because I like powerful heroes. Just take the normal human race and use the points to buy at least a 12 in every stat. Or at the least don’t buy down any stats. When one player is significantly more powerful than the rest the game becomes a lot less fun.


What class is your character? If one of them is a class skill and the other is not it would probably be best to invest in that one. If both are class skills you can invest in both. You don’t have to max out a skill for it to be useful. Many skills have fixed difficulty for tasks associated with the skill. Having large numbers does not really do much after you can reliably make the DC of the task is not that important.

Even skills that use opposed rolls can still be useful at lower levels. Even if your stealth is not high enough to sneak past the high perception rolls there are a lot of creatures that don’t have that high of a perception roll. So you only managed to avoid a couple of patrols, but that is still better than having to deal with all of them.

Also magic items that boost those abilities are cheap so a small investment of points and some gold will provide decent returns. Shadow armor is only 3,750 gp in addition to the normal cost of magic armor. Boots of elvenkind are only 2,500 gp. Both of these give +5 to their respective skills. So assuming both skills are class skills an investment of 6,250 gp will get you at least a +9 in both skills assuming you only spend a single skill point. For a low level character those are probably too costly but anything above mid-level should easily be able to afford it.


I have to agree that an inquisitor would work very well. Your group is low on skills with only the hunter and maybe the witch having decent amount of skills. By 13th level you have most of the important inquisitor abilities including greater bane. More importantly at this level you have enough uses of those abilities to be able to use them multiple times. Go for a human to get the extra spells and skill points.

If you really want to get crazy take both signature skill and skill focus on sense motive. Assuming you max out sense motive and have a 18 WIS this will give you a +32 on sense motive. This will mean you can read a creatures thoughts by making a sense motive check at +12 (that is after the -20) against an opposed bluff roll.


All familiars have special abilities (or impart abilities to their masters) depending on the master's combined level in classes that grant familiars, as shown on the table below. The abilities are cumulative.

This would indicate the sorcerer would not count towards improved familiar.


Your party has several weaknesses that can be used against them. . All characters are divine casters so you lack any arcane magic. The spells your characters have tend to be self-buffing instead of damaging. Your group also seems to be heavily focused on combat, especially melee.

You don’t have to use just flying creatures to exploit their lack of ranged combat. Archers on a wall or firing through windows will also work. Even starting the combat at a distance will give the edge to the enemy. A group of <insert humanoid> with long bows at 100’ away will mean they will take several rounds to get within attacking range.

Swarms are another thing your group will have trouble with. Since no one really has any area of affect spells they will be hard pressed to deal with any kind of swarm. You can also use large number of lower level creatures against them. This will more than likely cause them to use up some of their limited resources, or the challenge will be more difficult.

The paladin probably has heavy armor so even with armor and shield training his ACP is going to be high. While the monk/inquisitor will not have problems with obstacles the paladin will have major problems with them. Also until he hits 7th level his armor is going to be slowing him down. Unless the paladin is putting a lot of ranks to swim, and climb he will have difficulty with these skills. Stealth is also something he will have a problem with. If a situation requires stealth the other characters will be limited by his ability, or have to leave him behind.


Since Pathfinder deities don’t have stats they cannot really be killed except by plot devices. This was an intentional design of the game. What it really comes down to if you want the players to be able to kill a god they can, if not they cannot. The most common plot device is an artifact level weapon that is capable of killing a deity. Stormbringer is probably the best example of this.

You could also have a specific time where deities can be killed. In the Dresden files major powers can be killed on Halloween. Maybe there is a conjunction that takes place every 1,000 years that allows a deity to be killed.

Killing an avatar of a deity is a completely different story.


Depends on how competent you want to be, and how optimized the rest of your party is. Assuming the same level of system mastery and optimization you will never be able to match a full martial class. It also depends on what you mean by a melee sorcerer. If you want a sorcerer that is not helpless in a melee fight that is probably achievable. If on the other hand you want a sorcerer who is going to make the raging barbarian look weak, that is going to be difficult.


There is a feat that allows your levels with inquisitor to count as cleric levels for channeling energy. A single level dip into cleric and this feat would allow you to channel energy and use both your inquisitor and cleric levels. Personally I would not bother. Most inquisitors don’t put much into CHA, and many of them actually use it as a dump stat. As an inquisitor you are already pretty M.A.D. so having to put points into CHA is going to weaken your character.

I would probably stick with a base inquisitor instead of one of the archetypes. You may want to look into taking favored judgement, and favored spell with undead as the favored target.


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Try this website. http://www.easydamus.com/character.html


Sounds like an inquisitor to me. Bane and judgements give you the right tools no matter what kind of monster you are dealing with. Being able to detect alignments will help identifying outsiders and undead. Having all the relevant knowledge skills and a bonus to them also helps. You have all the investigative skills on your class skill list, and get bonuses with several.

Inquisitors are the best class at discovering things that others don’t want them to find out. As long as you choose the right deity your selection of weapons is nearly as good as a martial class. You can adjust your abilities to target whatever you are dealing with. A paladin will be better at combat vs undead and evil outsiders, but not that good vs any other kind of monster. The paladin also lacks most of the needed skills. A ranger will be good against his favored enemy and has some of the skills, but is lacking many of the needed skills.


What type of maze? Is there something in the middle of the maze, or is it a passageway to somewhere else? Also who built the maze? Without further information it’s difficult to give any advice.


Any ability score below 3 is in the subhuman range. With a CHA score of 1 you are completely lacking in any kind of empathy and the ability to communicate in a meaningful way. Think of the most severe case of autism and then increase it by a multiple of 10. You not only can’t communicate, with others but have no interest in doing so. You can react to physical stimuli but that is about all. Even if you’re other mental stats are normal you still can’t communicate, or interact with others. This is the same thing as having a STR of 1, and a normal DEX. A character with a STR of 1 can barely lift his own limbs, much less move under his own power.


The closest thing I can think of would be a shadow dancer and see if you GM will let the summon shadow be a dog.


Since the first talent only gives you the first combat feat list it is pretty clear that you can’t choose a feat from the second feat list. The second time you choose the feat it opens up the second list, and the third time it opens up the third list. It also clearly states that level requirements to choose the feat a second and third time.

So the first time you pick up the talent you gain a feat from the first list of your chosen combat style. Once you have at least 6 levels of slayer you can choose the talent again and pick from either the first or second list of combat feats. At 10 levels or above of slayer you can pick the talent a third time gaining any feat from any of the lists of the combat style.

The again means you have to have the talent before picking it a second time.


Cleanse is a decent spell not so much for healing HP, but for condition removal. It not only removes a bunch of conditions all at once, it also acts as break enchantment on a single affect. It’s basically a mini heal but with less HP, that can remove transmutation and curses.

Commune is also a good spell but is more useful during downtime. It’s like playing 20 questions with a deity except not as many questions. If the party is stumped and in a safe location it is can be useful to get information.

Major Curse is a good for severely weakening an opponent that has a poor will save. The permanent -4 on all attack rolls, saves and skill checks is probably the strongest.

Hallow is great for using on your base of operation. The ability to have secondary spell that last a full year affecting only those that share your faith is very good. Add death ward and you will have a sanctuary that undead will really have problems with.

Spell Immunity Communal is great for protecting against a known threat. It works great to protect the party from spell cast by the party. If you have a sorcerer that uses fireball cast this on the party before a battle and the party can ignore his spells.

True Seeing is another good spell. It’s use is pretty obvious but a new player may forget about it.


A bard would probably be a better face than the paladin. He gets all the social skills, plus a lot of detection skills and the skill points to actually use them. Play a human or half human for the extra spells. Bards get illusion and enchantments spells so you can focus on them. You only really need a few illusion spells to be effective. Bards also get early access to a couple of spells namely heroism as a second level spell.

A bard also has some decent weapons so can contribute to combat by actually fighting. If you have a decent DEX you can go the archer route. You don’t have to go full all out archer just enough to be useful when not doing something else. If you went archeologist you would also fill the role of the “Thief”. This would also allow you to use wands of cure light wounds to act as a backup healer.


James Risner wrote:
Mysterious Stranger wrote:
My problem with the FAQ is that it is that it lacks consistency.

The interesting thing about this FAQ, is that it seems to only have strong opinions.

I like it because it seems consistent and to make sense to me. It might be because I've always interpreted stacking archetypes in a way consistent with this FAQ.

Do you also remove class skills from fallen clerics and paladins? As I said my problem is not with the ruling of the FAQ, but the way it is worded. To say that class skills are class features part of the time, but are not class features at other times is not consistent.

Mark already stated that the FAQ only applies to archetypes, so a paladin does not lose his class skills when he falls. That flat out means that class skills are, and are not class skills depending on what you are talking about.


kestral287 wrote:
Just pointing out that Chaotic Lawful is not a legal alignment.

That is probably why it is listed under personality instead of alignment.


Even with the 20 STR YOU BAB is not going to be high enough to actually perform combat maneuvers. Counting on spells to buff your combat ability is not going to work to well. You will spend several rounds casting spells to get ready for combat, and by the time you are ready the combat will be over. You also don’t have the HP to be up close and personal with any significant threat.

You may want to consider a bloodrager instead of sorcerer. They get many of the spells you want and have much better combat ability. Take the Abyssal bloodline for free enlarge person while raging.

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