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Axebeak

MMCJawa's page

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 5,662 posts. 1 review. No lists. 1 wishlist.


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What is and isn't 3pp is probably best reserved for a non product thread.

That said, Pathfinder has existed for long enough that you can get a pretty good sense of what stuff may someday show up and what stuff will never show up. Although I LIKE the fairy court trope, it's not something that is likely to be developed or show up in a Paizo product, since it does conflict with the current Eldest set up that the company is going with for the campaign setting. Looking for 3pp material that covers that is going to be more productive than hoping it shows up and being disappointed when it doesn't.


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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:

+1 the missing Mikaze. I hope he and his orphanage for orcs, half-orcs, and tieflings (and their imaginary friends) are doing well in a mostly-safe forgotten corner of Golarion.

Also, big thanks to Paul and everyone else who goes out of their way to keep making this site a welcoming place to visit, especially during the holiday Chaos.

Here here! Early holidays wishes to both current and past Paizo forum goers!


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I admit I hate the layout of the core rulebook. The text is so dense as written it's a major pain to find anything, not helped by sometimes poor organization of material. I shouldn't HAVE TO USE the online PRD to find things, but it often feels like that is the most efficient option, even with the book spread out in front of me.


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The first half was for me: Oh...is this Mission Impossible 5? (or 6 or whatever number they are on)

Personally if they are going to build a Universal Monster universe, would rather it be closer in setting to Penny Dreadful than this.


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Ranishe wrote:
swoosh wrote:
Quote:
Complexity for complexity's sake is not a good thing
It isn't, but you not liking something doesn't necessarily make it complexity for complexity's sake either (it's also an ironic statement given that you follow this with a needlessly complex and convoluted rant).

My communication is impeccable thank you!

Still, do we need both Gory Finish & Killing Flourish? Do we need both Bullseye Shot & Pinpoint Targetting? Do we need a Paladin class at all when a specifically built cleric would do? Do we need a magus if multiclassing well supported a hybrid wizard / fighter? Do we need versatile training when the fighter could have simply been given extra skill points (or with the new cunning feat from the villain codex), or the concept of trading weapon / armor training reworked so as to not have a specific list of specialty feats they related to? Do combat styles as a whole need to exist as their own feat subset? (the answer to some of these may be "yes," but none to me at the moment).

At the very least, one must acknowledge that Pathfinder is more complex than it needs to be, in part because of how it's developed (that is, expansions released over time. Some books like to impart new systems or concepts, and those systems / concepts don't always meld with the existing rules very well). New editions have the advantage of being able to restructure all the good ideas (and remove the bad) that have been proposed over the years of development.

The "simplified" version of DnD exists in the form of 5E. I think it would be an incredibly bad idea for Paizo to move in that direction, since that niche is already occupied, and I would argue that many folks complaining about that complexity have already invested in 5E. As for things getting spread out...that is basically destined to happen with a complex system you support with expansions. As others have said..no one forces you to wade through every single book to construct a character


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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Adjule wrote:

Why does a 2nd Edition of Pathfinder NEED to be radically different? Paizo doesn't need to change it up so much that it invalidates all the old material (like what WotC). It doesn't need to be a completely brand new game with a new edition.

If you're going to throw away the old magic system in favor of new and/or re-build classes and mechanics to that level, you're pretty much chucking every bestiary and adventure ever written and having to redo from scratch.

There's not much more than cosmetic changes that can be made without making a successor edition incompatible with the first.. for the same reason you couldn't play AD+D modules with Third Edition without massive rework.

A weird response given that Adjule never once suggests tossing out the magic system, nor the degree he would tinker with classes.

As long as you don't go outside the current power level range, you could very easily modify classes without hurting compatibility with other books. The fact that Pathfinder has steadily added new classes over the years, as well as the existence of things like the unchained Rogue, is proof positive they can do so.


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also a couple in Wrath of the Righteous, one of which is a cleric of Shelyn IIRC.


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Also now...if any future starfinder players wonder "what is a Lashunta?" GM's can just say: "Mantis from Guardians of the Galaxy"


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Rosgakori wrote:

"YOU MUST BE SO EMBARRASSED!"

God this movie is gonna rock.

Drax is truly a national treasure...


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PossibleCabbage wrote:

I don't think "Vancian Magic is weird and obscure" is the problem so much as "it's arguably a causal factor as to why casters can be so wildly unbalanced compared to the entire rest of the game" (not just other classes, but how they can easily bypass basically any challenge posed to them by the world short of a caster of equal power.)

If bring magic down to earth, as it were, it really shouldn't matter what system of magic you're using.

The problem is that magic in Pathfinder is unbalanced, and that it's unbalanced to a degree that sometimes hurts the game, not that it's based on something from a collection of short stories published in 1954. Plenty of games have magic, fairly few of them have magic that's as unbalanced as this one does.

The rift is between people who like it this way, and people who don't.

A lot of the issues with magic isn't solely due to it being Vancian, it's mostly in how some of the legacy magic-using specialist classes are designed, and individual spells. You can fix those concerns while leaving Vancian magic in place, and with minimal overall changes to the game.


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Well...a cleaned Core Rulebook with a redesigned layout and a few minor tweaks to the rules wouldn't be too bad, especially if it was similar enough to the current version that you wouldn't need to buy new books.

Realistically...with Starfinder coming out, I would expect such a book until Starfinder itself is decently fleshed out. At that point, between popular unchained rules, well received mechanics from other hardcovers, and whatever they do with Starfinder, the developers would have a pretty good idea of what a Pathfinder 2.0 looks like.


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Cole Deschain wrote:
What's your favorite extinct marine mammal?

Probably the giant fossil walrus Pontolis, which was the size of a elephant seal but has a long skull more typical of what you would see in a leopard seal. A scary combination.


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Aberzombie wrote:

Hate to say it, but.....the writers are really f$#!ing this up.

** spoiler omitted **

I've got Arrow and Legends set to record, but I'm not sure I'll even bother to watch them.....

You kind of have been stating something like this on most episodes. Maybe...if you don't like the show much, you should maybe tune out? I hate-watched Gotham for almost two years before finally pulling the plug, and I am so glad I did.


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
Why does phylogeny matter? I see the more esoteric type biologists arguing over it all the time but... why?

Evolution is the backbone of biology. To reference a well known quote: "Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution"

To understand how things evolve...you need to know what they are related to and what the common ancestors of groups were. This means that you need to know the the evolutionary tree for a group (the phylogeny) before you can figure out anything.

A good example are snakes. There is a lot of debate over how and where snakes evolved. Everyone agrees they are lizards, but what lizards are most closely related to them, and how fossil snakes fit into the picture, influences how we think snakes got all their features that make them "snaky". If you think the oldest snakes are all terrestrial burrowing animals, than snake limb reduction and other features were probably a consequence of adaptation to living underground. If you think they are close relative to the ancestors of mosasaurs, this would suggest that the common ancestor of snakes was aquatic, and that limb loss is related to convergence on an eel-like form. Phylogenies provide us with ways of testing these ideas.

In my own work, I have used phylogenies to determine where fur seals and sea lions evolved and how they spread through the world oceans, how seals simplified their teeth and lost the ability to chew, and how the ability to echolocate evolved alongside the ability the hear at high frequencies. I can't really imagine any of my studies as being possible without the use of some sort of phylogeny at some stage of the research.


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KarlBob wrote:

Great thread! Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us.

What are your thoughts about the ReptileEvolution.com controversy?

David Peters is an utter crank and doesn't know the first thing about evolutionary trees or how to construct and interpret them. I actually have been recently checking his blog because in the last few weeks he has started adding whales to his large reptile tree and has been reporting amazing (read = crazy) results, like dolphins and baleen whales not being related, or that dolphins are related to tenrecs.

As an example, a recent blog post had him post the idea that a group of very early baleen bearing whales were actually toothed whales. This idea was based solely on the fact he didn't know what modern whale jaws looked like and basically didn't realize what side was "up" and was "down" in a fossil specimen, so he misinterpreted the jaws badly. This is what happens when you don't actually look at specimens or bother to learn anything about the biology of organisms, but still somehow think you can not only state radical new ideas of their evolutionary relationships, but in the same breath dismiss the work of every other biologist and paleontologist in the field.


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Slasher movies are (usually) my go to "background noise/images while doing other things" choice.


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Obligatory word of warning that Wikipedia can be useful, but articles on relatively "popular subjects" often attract edits that are more based on pop "knowledge" or speculation than fact. See that notation about Cain being the "father" of goblins as an example.

Also, If I recall from the top of my head, the the celtic languages are a derivative of the ancient proto Indo-European language. It's not so much that Celts influenced the Indus valley civilizations, as the other way around.

Ancient household gods may have been the source of goblin legends, and that of other household spirits. but it's like a giant game of telephone...a thousands of years of reinterpretations and cultural changes have resulted in entities fairly distinct from there proto-origins. The "classic fairy goblin" is a pretty late invention, something that was later redefined and expanded upon to form the "Tolkien" goblin that pops up in DnD and modern fantasy books.


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It made good background entertainment while cooking, but I got to say this just mostly has me stoked for the new episodes coming next year. Between having seen most episodes many many times and the uh...at time dated humor...I am really looking forward to seeing what the new episodes will be like.


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UnArcaneElection wrote:

Just had a thought: Is anything at least in principle capable of reef building using silica (or silicate minerals) instead of calcium carbonate? Closest thing I can think of to this are stromatolites.

During parts of the Mesozoic at least, the dominant reef builders were sponges that relied upon silicon to build their skeleton. There are still a few species left of those groups, but they are rare and limited to deep water. They are not successful today because diatoms (a type of microscopic algae plankton) also use silicon to build shells, and basically "steal" all the silicon in the water column at shallow levels, leaving not enough for the sponges.

Anthropogenic climate change is probably not going to impact diatoms enough to remove them as competitors and allow sponges to take over shallow water reef building.


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Wrath wrote:

Corals can colonnise further south (Southern Hemisphere), or further north (northern hemishere).

You may find their distribution changes, but extinction won't happen most likely. There's plenty of shallow ocean around the edge of continents that allows them to get light and the right temperatures.

We'll see some loss of diversity though. Further from the equator, the less light intensity. The symbiotic algae in Corals need that light and the corals need the algae. So some of the more light sensitive species may vanish I reckon.

The thing I worry about is less temperature, but the lysocline and overall more acidic oceans. The lysocline is a depth in the water at which carbonate is dissolved faster than it can precipitate, due to the PH of the water. Basically anything that builds a shell beneath the lysocline has to spend a lot of energy into producing a shell, to make up for the constant dissolution.

Currently the Lysocline is at something like 4,200 meters beneath the ocean surface. However during the PETM it rose as high as 500 meters. The PETM is a popular period in the earth history to study because it's a period of rapid global warming associated with a major spike in CO2. THe more CO2 that is pumped into the ocean, the more acidic the ocean gets. Reef building corals have pretty specific environmental tolerances and it wouldn't take much shift in ocean acidity to cause a die off.

I am not saying that the Lysocline will be so shallow it will exist at the surface, but a sudden shoaling of this line would indicate overall an increased acidity in the oceans. That's going to play havoc with a lot of ecological communities, and corals already have to do deal with algal blooms from agricultural run off and changes in the community structure from overfishing.


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Among those two options, Golarion. Because it's inclusivity is tailored towards our world.

Ebberon has a more nuanced worldview, and I approve of generally a more "gray" moral setting, where good and evil is present in all the races and the true nature of gods is more ambigous. I do ultimately prefer this approach in contrast to the more old school DnD approach that Golarion usually tends to follow, where entire races can be almost entirely evil and there is zero ambiguity often on whether a god or faction is evil. However, given that goblins and orcs are not "real", a more nuanced portrayal of them can't be seen as actually progressive in the same sense in how Paizo tries portrays race, gender, and sexuality in their products.


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Hama wrote:
Greylurker wrote:

Nobody else laughing at the referance to the Vigilante her cousin used to work with. All costumes and gadgets.

I think that is the 2nd wink towards Batman we've had this season.

You think they are setting us up for a Batgirl team up.

When was the first?

Gotham was name checked in the first episode of the season.

Now we just need Fox's Gotham to be canceled so the batman characters can show up on Supergirl. I'd love to see Nightwing pop up on the show as a reoccurring character.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
MMCJawa wrote:
As for why Us and not them, as the dominant species? My guess is humans possessed some sort of mental quirk, not necessarily greater intelligence or curiosity, but some feature that allowed us to become more adaptive and out compete other hominids.
I recently read a hyopothesis that H. sapiens' early domestication of dogs (from wolves) could easily have allowed them to outcompete other hominids -- they come to raid your caves at night and you have early warning; you raid theirs and have a lot of fangs backing you up.

Maybe...although you could argue that employing domestic animals in such a manner shows a certain ability to exploit novelty that maybe was lacking in our relatives.


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Patrick Curtin wrote:
Here's a question. I came across some folks dissecting a harbor seal last night. They were removing large masses of worms from the seal's interior. I think they said they were lungworms? Have you ever heard of them? I was curious since there seemed to be an awful lot of them getting pulled out of the poor little feller, like huge tangled masses of white worms. Is this common?

not uncommon. Most wild animals have pretty large parasite loads, which mostly don't seem to impact them to much. I haven't done many whale dissections so I haven't seen this as much as other people have, but I know porpoise facial sinuses are usually loaded with worms. So yeah..."fun" stuff to deal with if you deal with a lot of recently dead marine mammals (another perk of working with fossil!)


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Kryzbyn wrote:
What are some common misconceptions about sea life (like sharks having to stay in motion)?

Something I constantly deal in my line of work is the idea that dolphins are magical special creatures that are saints in cetacean form. I even had a former labmate who believed that dolphins come from another mystical plane of existence.

Dolphins are animals...much like any intelligent and social animal they engage in tons of behaviors that really are not very "nice". Including infanticide and killing porpoises for the lolz.

Also something that bothers my colleague. People calling manatees fat. They actually have very little blubber, which is why they are so vulnerable to sudden cold spells in Florida. They look "fat" because they have large guts to process plant vegetation and also super thick bones, which act as ballast.


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UnArcaneElection wrote:

I have heard often about the bad health effects of spilled oil (and more recently oil dispersants) on birds and marine life, but what about the health effects on people? Like for instance, what if you were one of the workers trying to help clean up the Deepwater Horizon or similar spill, and you fell overboard into the (oil and possibly dispersant contaminated) water? And possibly ended up ingesting and/or inhaling a bit of it before you could get out or be pulled out? The mainstream news media don't seem to have said anything about this during recent spills.

Edit #1: But I did find this. So at least one scientific/medical article has appeared on the subject (and presumably more -- too late right now for me to do a major Google and/or PubMed search).

Edit #2: Unfortunately the above article doesn't address specific route of exposure (vapor inhalation vs skin contact/immersion/ingestion/etc.).

Well oil and other chemical spills are nasty for all life. It's just that humans can read a MSDS and know how to handle it safely, something a seal or pelican can't benefit from. I wouldn't jump into an oil slick naked to save a penguin or something, but I think most rescue volunteers generally have the training and equipment to minimize their own health risks


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Tacticslion wrote:
Many questions

Two super powers: Shapeshifting, just because it basically is so overall useful. And teleporting, because it would seriously reduce the amount of money I spend per year visiting my parents and museum collections/birding

Gestalt Superhero: lets go with Dr. Doom and Aquaman. I mean Doom is already a gestalt of Sorceror and super scientist, so why not throw talking with dolphins on top of that.

I'd probably take either the CW DCverse or the MCU. But I would prefer to be in this world, where I wouldn't have other superfolk to compete with or worry about.

Probably Druid..maybe with a few levels of wizard. I tend to get along better with critters than people and getting a animal buddy is appealing to someone stuck in a tiny studio apartment. I'd probably go elf if I had a chance because I never hear about elves worrying about losing a few pounds

Hierophant...so I could work toward becoming a god MUAHAHAHA

Monster? no clue probably a dragon of some sort?

NPC? Quinn maybe? he seems pretty kickass

Setting: They all kind of suck to live in honestly. Too many evil gods/demons/despots/monsters. I guess as a high level mythic character...lets go with Deep Tolguth, because dinosaurs are awesome. Or Numeria because android are also awesome


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
More and more evidence indicates that as late as 50k years ago there may have been as many as 4 Homo species (H. sapiens, H. neandertalensis, H. denisova (?), and H. floresiensis), do you think interbreeding among species is the main reason our species came out on top? And there's even evidence of another unknown species showing up in genetics of some of Oceania's peoples, and there is also evidence Homo erectus stayed around as late as 75k years ago in some places. To me this is one of the greatest paleontological puzzles existing, and it actually keeps me up at night thinking about it. So what's your take on it?

I think Interbreeding with other hominids was a byproduct of us being so successful, not the reason for. There may have been civil interactions that resulted in the occasional pairing, or adoption of infants and refugees from one species to another, but too many interactions between cultures of uneven technology levels in our more recent history doesn't make me optimistic that past interbreeding was of entirely a romantic nature.

As for why Us and not them, as the dominant species? My guess is humans possessed some sort of mental quirk, not necessarily greater intelligence or curiosity, but some feature that allowed us to become more adaptive and out compete other hominids. We may have also benefited, in at least some cases, from being better suited to a warmer climate and not dealing with historical legacies tied to be adapted to ice age Europe or a small tropical island.


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Rednal wrote:
What do you think is the coolest method of communication that aquatic life uses?

Cephalopods do some pretty cool stuff with rapid color changes.


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I know you don't want blended, but if you prefer kitchen sink settings that is kind of what you want, since I don't see most of those options being mutually exclusive. I would expect big galactic empires AND lawless regions of space, for instance.

That said I want LOTS AND LOTS OF RACES. Mos Eisley Cantina effect in overdrive. so that is one "non-blended" answer I can provide.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I've heard a lot of theories, but what's your take on the position and function of the tusks of the Deinotherium line of elephant relatives?

I've always been partial to the idea it used its tusk to pull down branches and such while feeding. I am not sure that has been rigorously tested yet, and I can't find any recent papers on google scholar suggesting new work has been done. So uh...let's go with that idea?


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Tarondor wrote:
Aren't all paleontologists vertebrates?

well on this planet certainly...


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GreyWolfLord wrote:

I have read that there is a minor alternate theory of evolution that does not include apes in the human line directly, but more that we evolved ore directly from mammals in the sea (and as such I suppose apes would be the side line, like Neanderthals to homo sapiens were) and as such are far closer related to dolphins than many of the more popular current evolutionary models state.

I've never heard the full theory of it however (as it's a minor theory, most of evolutionary science I've heard discusses either the Leakey theory or the other theories of different areas of Africa in regards to Ape to Human evolution).

I'd be interested in that in far more detail (as I said, my knowledge of it is very sketchy as no one really discusses out of acadamea and why some individuals (from what I understand, a very small minority) lean towards it rather than the major theories of the ape and man relationship.

What you are talking about is the "Aquatic Ape Hypothesis", which is indeed a pretty fringe idea that posits that the ancestors of humans evolved from some early ape or Australopithecus ancestor that entered the sea, somewhere on the coast of Africa. This idea puts forward that a lot of the "unique" features we see in modern humans are in fact adaptations to living in water. It doesn't suggest any close relationship with dolphins or whales (which are more closely related to cows than primates).

I admit to having a certain nostalgia for the idea. It's an imaginative scenario that I have played with in fiction, but one in which I don't believe has any actual credence. It's mostly a so so story.

Most of the proposed evidence can be equally and more parsimoniously explained by other hypotheses, or just doesn't hold up, either the traits in question not being particularly similar to what we see in aquatic animals or just being general features we see in tons of critters, aquatic or land.

For instance a frequently cited bit of evidence is the fact that humans lack fur, something that is also absent in whales and sea cows. Hence we lost fur to streamline our bodies! However, hair is actually still retained by many mammals with aquatic adaptations, such as seals and otters. It would be very unlikely that fur would be something loss...if anything we would probably be hairier in order to retain heat while lounging in water, a huge problem for most mammals. And although humans do have subcutaneous fat, it's nowhere near similar to the blubber in whales and seals, and is insufficient to compensate. A more parsimonious interpretation of hair loss is that it evolved with sweating, which functions better with bare skin and direct evaporation than with fur.

Most of the evidence basically comes out like the above. It's an interesting idea but one in which there really is no merit.


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captain yesterday wrote:
Do you watch Spongebob.

Nope...I haven't seen a single episode.


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Cole Deschain wrote:

Since form follows function, what's the friggin' deal with the long-necked plesiosaurs?

It's not a shape we've seen crop up since, to my knowledge.

The most recent idea I have heard is that the extreme long neck in some plesiosaurs to sneak up on schools of fish.

Basically...the small head is interpreted as a "relatively" small fish to a school, and they avoid dispersing or otherwise evading the plesiosaur. The plesiosaur is thus able to follow behind/above/below the school of fish, and raise or lower it's neck into fish school for lunch with little disturbance to it's food source.

That long neck morphology is indeed really unique to Plesiosaurs. Nothing like it is seen in mammals, and the only other comparable animal that may have done something similar is the weird reptile Tanystropheus.


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Cole Deschain wrote:
What's the current accepted timeline for the mammalian "return" to the sea?

Whales and sea cows separately evolved around 55 million years ago, although whales probably have hung around mostly in freshwater environments until 48 or so. We can infer the type of environment a fossil critter was swimming around in by looking at the stable isotopes preserved in tooth enamel. Ambulocetus, the famous "walking whale", had oxygen values typical of what we would see in something spending time in the ocean, while the more terrestrial and wolf-like Pakicetus has oxygen values indicating freshwater.

Oddly enough sea cows have the opposite pattern. They seem to have started off grazing in seagrass beds, and only later entered freshwater habitats, like today's manatees.

The oldest known marine seals are about 25 million years old, so quite a bit younger. They probably also started off in freshwater environments. Sadly we are still rather uncertain of the very early history, due to how similar the earliest seals were to the ancestors of bears and weasels, there close relatives.


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Hey folks,

For those who haven't pieced it together, my profession and field of study is vertebrate paleontology. In particular my research focus is on the evolution of marine mammals and how they adapted to a life in water. That latter background also has given me quite a bit of background in living marine mammal biology.

Paleontology is cool and I like to think other people agree with me, or at least us nerdy folks who would spend time on a gaming forum. I also think outreach is important and anything I can do to spread knowledge about extinct critters of all kinds and living marine mammals I think is a good thing.

So feel free to ask my any question you might have on paleontology, dinosaurs, whales, museums, how science works, etc. Or just random silly questions if you want!


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Vance in general is awesome. His material is some of the best I have read in my attempt to digest the classics of fantasy.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Rysky wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
But they'll spit on you for laughs.

;_;

I thought that was just camels...

Nope. Alpacas, llamas, vicunas, and camels are all closely related but their temperaments do differ. I used to work for Heifer International and we had a ranch which show cased some of the types of animals that could be donated to poor farmers around the world. The camels spit and slobbered all over you and the llamas would spit for no apparent reason. We learned that all members of the camel family would do this.

Camelidae have to take their vengeance upon man in some fashion, for the end Pleistocene extinctions.


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I don't have it on hand, but when earth was visited in the Baba Yaga AP the trench fighters working with Rasputin were I think level 6 or something.

So a trained well prepared military force would probably not start at level one, but may have a CR range of 5-10.


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Pan wrote:
MMCJawa wrote:
I really really really want one, so I hope a lot more are released before Xmas
My buyer will let me know when Target gets more, but be ready to pounce they are not making a lot more of these this season.

It's actually on my the list of things I asked my parents to get me for Christmas, so I might not have a whole lot of control in that...


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Kalindlara wrote:
And so much of it is endlessly dissected, especially obvious off-the-cuff responses. :(

Yeah there were a few posters over the last year who drilled down on the minutae or seemed to enjoy pointing out some sentence in some random product that seemed to contradict some earlier statement of James or question his creative control. I don't know if its a RAW mentality creeping into how some folks view the setting or what.

Pathfinder lore is now at probably hundreds of thousand pages...it's impossible to keep track of every little bit and one shouldn't have to. You don't like something or need some little detail? Just ignore it and go with your own intuition.

Anyway the end of that thread was the "perfect" cap to an overall crappy week.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hi James,

I understand and respect your decision to back out of this thread and hope things improve to the point that someday you feel like you can come back. Best wishes regardless!

I almost feel like this marks a new age for Paizo. James was the last long time staff member to regularly post (outside the product pages at least). It sucks that certain posters, intentionally or unintentionally, have to ruin it for everyone else.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Demons because they fill more roles and can be used in far more different kinds of stories, including evil cults, summoned wizard minions, otherworldly invasions, or left over guardians of lost cities or tombs.

Dragons feel like they should be final bosses or at least high ranking minions, and just feel a bit cheap if not used as such.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

whoops wrong thread...please delete


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

apparently he plans on keeping the part that allows young adults to stay under their parent's policies longer, and the part preventing denial of coverage due to "pre-existing conditions"


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

For the most part I don't thing you can expect any heavily settled region on the surface of the material plane to be cool with worship of the Outer Gods/Great Old Ones, at least at present. Darklands of course would be an exception given the number of abberations, as well as some of the distant worlds. The only above ground exceptions might be Geb, which seems would be down with Mordiggian, and I can kind of see some greater tolerance in Nex, if only for research regions.


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Actually...I kind of hope they shoot for a Guardians of the Galaxy tone. That always seemed very "DnD-ish"

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