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LazarX's page

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber. FullStarFullStarFullStar Pathfinder Society GM. 26,423 posts (26,828 including aliases). 1 review. 1 list. No wishlists. 12 Pathfinder Society characters. 11 aliases.


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Grand Lodge

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One of my favorite Babylon Five stories was "Passing through Gethesemene", a driving tale about the limits of forgiveness, especially with the way it ended.

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Demoyn wrote:


On top of that, you're still not giving respect to the fact that a typical party needs to be able to trick the paladin so they can accomplish goals without being hindered by his paladin code. That ALONE is reason to dump wisdom into the dirt.

I'm sorry but building your Paladins to be easily misled is just somehow wrong. Dumping wisdom does mean tanking your will save as well. BTW, as a DM, "leading the Paladin" out of the room is a gambit I take very strict controls with.

Grand Lodge

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Would a Junon Cannon be a bit much to ask for?

Grand Lodge ***

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None. I'm humble enough to acknowledge that I don't have the developed skills of the people who design the game and run the campaign. Nor will I jettison a class someone else likes that was designed from these people, because of my problems with it.

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James Jacobs wrote:
Graeme Lewis wrote:
Does Geb have any idea where Nex is, or if he's still alive? I'm well aware that the answer to "Is Nex alive or dead?" is going to be some variation of "Yes", but I'm curious as to whether Geb knows where his ancient nemesis is or what he's up to.
He has theories, but he doesn't know for sure.

According to Mystic Realms, he killed himself over the uncertainty. Now that's what I call an anxiety attack.

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Lincoln Hills wrote:

If you're not happy with being Level 20 and having 10 mythic tiers, what on Golarion gives you the impression that there is a numeric level number at which you will be content? Nobody's stopping you from continuing to have adventures at Level 20. In fact, getting to enjoy that capstone ability for a good long time would be a nice change!

I'm sorry. I really shouldn't pick fights on stuff like this. But really, the only ones who can answer your question are design staff, and the best you can hope for is 'No' or 'Wait and see'. My money's on #1, by the way.

I'm actually with you on this. I don't see the logic, nor necessity behind infinite character advancement. I might be up for an E20 type system, but the gaining of feats should occur at increasingly distant intervals.

Grand Lodge

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Robert Carter 58 wrote:
Thor Odinson's return is already inherently in the storyline- I can tell that without reading a line. He has become UNworthy to wield Mjolnir. Ergo, to regain his power, he must become worthy again. Which will definitely happen in due course.

I remember an independent comic called The Sword of Thor. In norse mythology Thor used to wield a sword. When he got Mjolnir, he wouldn't keep an inferior weapon around so as the story goes, he tossed it off the Bifrost bridge.

In modern times a professor and his assistant dig up the sword but it's too heavy to lift. Loki appears, and the sudden realization of his theories proves too much for the professor who dies of a heart attack. Loki tells the student that he is needed to prevent Ragnarok, as Thor has become arrogant and careless, and Asgard needs a backup when the big guy is fated to fall.He gives the young man a potion which increases his strength so that he can effortlessly lift the Sword. Loki takes him to Asgard where he meets Thor's daughter... and things go south from there.

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What I'd like to know in order to understand this better is what does this system seek to change? The difference between high and lower level characters? Make them more fragile? or simply introduce more mechanics into combats so they take longer to run?

The real problem I have, is that you haven't addressed recovery and all of the other mechanics linked to hit points such as healing spells, poison, non-lethal damage, etc.

Grand Lodge

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Ashiel wrote:
They better try really hard, because it's damn difficult to find a theme that I can't fluff psionics right into quick, fast, and in a hurry. Especially considering psionics is far closer to real life occultism in its depictions than vancian magic ever was. I've studied various traditions of magic to better understand different cultures and in a few cases to understand some friends of a different religion than my own more clearly (as some religious beliefs incorporate willful influence on the world). I can say in good faith that none of the methods that I have read about look like Vancian magic.

I've watched some Diannic and Gardnerian rituals. They look a lot more like Vancian magic than some kind of power you spend spell points on and spam like a bloody video game. I've played psionics from 1st edition through 3.5, Psionics has always felt like video game magic to me. Energy Ray... spend 3 pts. Fire the ray again spend another 3 pts... Overchannel spend 6 pts.... you can't get more of a video game feel than you do with psionics. Psionic Blast... spend 20 psionic attack points. Mind, I could put aside the video game feel and get on with the business of roleplaying the character behind it, but it took effort to do so in 3.5 and was nearly bloody impossible in old AD+D First.

I'm not wedded to Vancian magic, my favorite form is from Ars Magica, which is a basically a cast your arts and form to achieve a needed success level, and whether or not you had to fatigue yourself to do so, or more dangerously whether or not you botched. Because magic was hard and potentially dangerous work. If there is ANYthing that gives the feel of traditional magic, it was Ars Magica.

Grand Lodge

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Set wrote:
Zalman wrote:
I miss not feeling guilty whenever I refer to spells by preceding the name of the spell with the wizard who created it. Some of the spells just sound awkward without it as well -- could the name Transformation for a spell be any more generic and undescriptive?

The Kingdoms of Kalamar game had alternate names for those spells, based on famous arcanists from their own setting, which was a kind of cool and thematic way of handling that.

So the 'Otto' spells were named after Azsul, a dwarven wizard from the earliest days.

.

I miss the displacer beast and mind flayer, of the 'closed' beasties, but some of the others, I don't miss at all. :)

For myself I'm much happier that Paizo is giving us new stuff that WOTC never would have thought up on their own.

Grand Lodge

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JoeJ wrote:

Being a god is the quality of being able to be yourself to such an extent that your passions correspond with the forces of the universe, so that those who look upon you know this without hearing your name spoken... One rules through one's ruling passion. Those who look upon gods then say, without even knowing their names, "He is Fire. She is Dance. He is Destruction. She is Love." - Roger Zelazny, Lord of Light

If I remember that passage correctly, Sam rejects those labels for all but one exception. "I look at you, Yama, and I see Death."

Grand Lodge

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bigrig107 wrote:

What are the ways to get treated like undead in PFS?

What kind of treatment do you want? Do you want to suck blood, get healed by inflict spells, or just be chased by mobs of angry villagers wielding torches and pitchforks?

Grand Lodge

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Zhayne wrote:
Redfire wrote:
I don't really get why aboleths are OGL while illithids aren't.
Simply put, WotC decided they wanted illithids to be all theirs, probably because aboleths are nowhere near as popular to use.

They licensed Paradigm Press to do one Mindflayer book. Unveiled Masters: the Essential Guide to Mind Flayers, part of the Races of Legend series. It's worth digging up.

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Thod wrote:

Here is one nobody has mentioned yet:

Cancel if the GM feels the group isn't up to it and it is a sure TPK and as such will be neither fun for the GM nor the players

I've done it once myself - albeit preferred to run a different scenario instead. I've also seen it being done once by a different GM who just wasn't comfortable running with the players (characters) signed up.

Edit: Thinking about it - this might only happen high tier

I MIGHT discourage a group from running a scenario in such a situation, but if they wish to go through with it, I won't stop them. I've seen enough examples of improbable groups succeeding and sure fire success going down for the count that I won't contravene a players right to risk their characters. "Risk" as one noted leader said "is our business."

Grand Lodge

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Tacticslion wrote:
DominusMegadeus wrote:

Are gods willing to prevent murderhobos, but not able? Then they are not omnipotent. Are they able, but not willing? Then they are malevolent. Are they both able and willing? Then whence cometh murderhobos? Are they neither able nor willing? Then why call them gods?

These are the things that haunt our age.

1) Some are willing - some fully, some to a limited extent, and some support or encourage instead (and are malevolent)

2) Some are able, but only to a limited extent (at least partially due to other gods' interference)
3) They are "gods" because of their nature (regardless of their nature pre-ascension), hence "god" becomes a term different than that which we are oft used to utilizing in Western society. Also they are worshipped and generate actual divine spells in faithful worshippers (instead of just faking it). Also field hosts of celestials and/or fiends and/or "other". Also, they can squash you like a bug.

Wow. Polytheism+Game Rules makes deep-seated theosophical argumentation easy.

(Nice post, though.) :)

When people say "god" many westerners are expecting a being with the same kind of omnipotence and omniscience accorded to the Abrahamic diety, when what you actually have are a group of super powered, yet extremely flawed and limited beings like those from Greek mythology.

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What makes a god in Pathfinder is a being defined solely by story elements, not mechanics.

Iomedae is a good example. While she may have been a Paladin in life, what she is now is so far beyond that mortal existence, there literally are no mechanics to cover that.

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Odraude wrote:

Actually, Paizo has psionics in their setting and has said that if they use them, it would have Vancian mechanics in line with Arcane and Divine. And JJ is a huge fan of psionics, so I think it'd be not a matter of "if" but a matter of "when".

.

What JJ is a "fan of" is something he calls psychic magic. Which from the reading of his posts is something far different than the comic book power style of D+D psionics. Different enough that by his statements, psychic magic and traditional SRD psionics could live side by side.

The other thing is that there is no announced development schedule for this material so I wouldn't hold any campaign plans waiting for it to come out.

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I don't see the issue with closed content. Want to use it? Then buy the book and do whatever adaptation needed to make it work. PFS players may be SOL, but you don't have to be at home.

There's no law that requires that the material has to have the pathfinder seal of approval for private home use.

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The "better summoner" is the person who's prepared index cards for everything he's going to summon. (or using an app like Summoner) so that when his turn comes up he's not looking up Bestiary entries to figure out what he's going to put on the field and what to do with it.

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I don't "pick" on people with low stats. But I don't let them slide either. You're running a 5 str wizard or an 8 str Magus? Fine. I will however be checking your encumbrance with a fine tooth comb and remember, coins have weight.

Similarly, if you're struggling for a hint with your character I may call for Int and Wisdom checks as appropriate. If you dump con, remember that besides your lowered hit points, you've got a lowered death threshold as well. I remember someone who made a monk with 7 con. At his first (and last) outing, he wound up from full to dead with one hit.

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thejeff wrote:


Which is pretty much the same argument everyone else on that side in this thread has made. I'm still looking for someone to agree that government should be able to mandate such care, but not if a company has religious objections.

You'll find five of them in the Supreme Court.

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Baxcel wrote:
you took some of the easiest chr to make out of the game.. an replaced it with something much harder for new people... removing an element of the game as well.. starting i know personally i weighted my options an found as a new player the aasimars were the easiest to start with even without the blood of angels books... it gives a good base to start with the chr..

I really fail to see how any race could be "easier" than Human. With Humans there aren't any complicated spell like abilities to manage, you don't have to worry about certain buff spells not working on them, they get a bonus feat, and they get to place their plus 2 anywhere they want.

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Blazej wrote:

When Compton mentioned in the blog about people trying power running and making 10 characters before the rule change I thought that was a bit ridiculous. "Who would get so married to a race to make it so that every character option they play has be that race?"

I take it you missed the poster upthread who said that Aasimar characters are the only ones he's ever played. (presumably he did not start PFS until they became freely available), and when the option to make new ones is gone, he's done when he finishes playing his current stable.

Fact is the SLA's now counting for all sorts of pre-reqs that they would not have been considered a couple of years ago, has made planetouched the new munchkin toy. And some of them are pouting in the corner now.

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Playing and GM styles aren't really something that should be folded into this topic.

Table etiquette should really be not much more than a small superset of the basic civil etiquette you were hopefully taught before your parents let you leave the house unsupervised.

If you don't have that as a foundation, than much of this discussion is moot.

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Artemis Moonstar wrote:
[This too, is something that really should be addressed... Mainly, how many high fantasy literature that is not based off of D&D material, have it's main characters decked out head to toe with magic weapons? I do a LOT of fantasy reading, and I can tell ya, magic items in the vast majority of literature are actual items of wonder, not something you can pick up at Ye Olde Magick Shoppe. Thus, they only get a few. There is no "Big Six" in books...

This off quoted comparison suffers from a major part of self imposed blindness. The major function of most of the "Big Six" is to modify die rolls, to hit, skill rolls, saving rolls and the like. Literary characters don't need to make any die rolls, their success and failures are determined by author fiat.

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FanaticRat wrote:
Rynjin wrote:

A lot of the Mythic stuff isn't particularly Mythic to begin with. If I were an optimist I'd say this is a good thing because it might mean some Mythic options could be allowed for other classes.

But since Arcanist seems to be Paizo's pet class, I doubt it. It gets to be Sorcerer+ and Mythic abilities on top, with a hug and a kiss from daddy every night after her bedtime story and hot cocoa.

Don't forget, a lot of mythic abilities are just modified class abilities or feat chains you can already get. See sniper's riposte, blowback, mythic weapon finesse... The usual difference is either how permanent it is or whether or not you want to shell out money for it.

Or how quick you can get it off. The mythic version doesn't require the readying of an action... that's a BIG deal.

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Kydeem de'Morcaine wrote:


I have heard that DSP has a very close working relationship with Paizo. I doubt they would want to ruin that by making an obviously directly competing replacement for the core material.

I don't see any evidence of that. Paizo after all has used material from at least one third party company, (either Necromancer, Green Ronin, or Frog Games) in at least one scenario. (and gave them credit.) They haven't to date, used ANYTHING from Dreamscarred that I'm aware of. A couple of folks from Paizo have said nice things about the Dreamscarred material, but that's it.

The main reason is that it would go against their main selling strategy... selling psionics to an established market... Paizo's D+D 3.5 refugees, they built their whole business about selling to Pathfinder players. Building a core system would mean having to take on Paizo directly, and they're not really geared to take that kind of risky business move. Not because of any "ill feelings" it might generate from Paizo, because they're not likely to succeed in launching whole hog like that.

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Haladir wrote:
I wrote:

I've been negatively inclined toward psionics in fantasy since 1st-edition AD&D. I felt that the flavor doesn't mesh well in the fantasy stories I wanted to tell in my Dungeons and Dragons games. I've also had some major problems with having a completely different game mechanic system that did more-or-less exactly what magic already did.

TSR/WotC continued the flavor mis-match and system dichotomy for psionics in both AD&D 2e and in D&D 3.x.

The 3.x psionics system (including DSP's updaiting of it for the PFRPG) are very well thought-out, and balanced systems. However, I just don't see the point of introducing another full game mechanic system that's pretty much equivalent to magic. Consequently, even though it's a fine system, I don't use it.

There is "psychic magic" in my game, to represent things like ESP, telepathy, psychokinesis, object reading, pain suppression, etc. It's essentially a sorcerer bloodline/archetype.

Setting aside game mechanics, another big thing that turns me off about the 3.x / DSP psionics system is what the various psionic character classes are named. The names just seem way too "game-y" for my taste, and are very much out of tune with those of the traditional character classes.

"Rogue," "bard," "wizard," "ranger," "alchemist," "druid," "ninja," "paladin," "sorcerer," "witch," "cavalier," and the rest are all real-world words with long histories in legend and/or literature. The classes reflect, more-or-less, what the words mean in plain English.

The psionic classes have names that don't mean anything outside of the context of the game: "psion," "soulknife," "vitalist," etc. If I referred to a non-gamer about a "wizard" they'd know what I was talking about. If I mentioned a "soulknife..." well, not so much. Heck, even the term "psionics" has far more traction within the role-playing gaming world than as a general term.

Better names for the classes, with ties to what the names actually mean in a literary, mythological, or socio-historical...

+1 to the above. Mention the traditional classes, and you evoke long standing images and tropes. Merlin, Roland, Samson, Spartacus, Robin Hood, Medea, and the like. Think of the word psionics, and it's hard to find anything older than comic books, and pulp science fiction, or worse you loop to New Age crystal fetishes.

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Odraude wrote:
So in doing some world building, I'm trying to think of a good reason why the gods and goddesses of the setting wouldn't interfere with the universe. I'm looking for something else besides a pact of non-interference or an overdeity that prevents them from interfering. Some reason why an evil god doesn't destroy good worlds, or a good god doesn't smite evil themselves. Any suggestions?

The usual reasons are.

1. lack of ability.. Gods may be powerful, but not necessarily THAT powerful. This is particularly true in worlds where mere mortals can aspire to godhood. Note that in Golarion's history, TWO gods sacrificed themselves to try to prevent the destruction that the Starstone wrought on the world and they still weren't successful.

2. A form of MAD agreement. Any god that tromps too far on the chessboard may well find himself facing retribution from a coalition of other gods that will band together from shared paranoia if no other reason.

3. Gentlemen (Gentlewoman's agreement), a mutually agreed pact.... or even a game.

The important thing to note is that you aren't obligated to explain ANY of the above to your players. Gods being what they are, are pretty much above interrogation by player characters, even their own clerics, who especially are supposed to take things on faith. In the Book of Job, God makes a side bet with Satan, but doesn't bother to explain or justify His reasons why.

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Duncan7291 wrote:

Could someone educate me as to why Mystic Theurge prestige class is worth the hype? What are the benefits of this class, drawbacks and examples of mechanically solid builds?

Information much appreciated.

One... there isn't any hype. If anything it's more the reverse. What some people "hype" are the tricks of building SAD Mystic Theurges out of Sorcerer/Oracle combinations at the cost of later entry and spell level progression.

Two... What it boils down to is that if your goal is to be a dominant arcane or divine caster, this is NOT the class for you. On the other hand, you can be an extremely flexible and equipped support caster with the sheer volume and depth of very valuable party boosting spells. as well as the built in ability to use any scroll, wand, or staff in the game, save for those dedicated to hobby casters you don't give a damm about.

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Drogon wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Fromper wrote:
I think it's assumed that probably half or more of PCs are field commissions. I can't see many of the weirdo PC ideas at my tables (including many of my own) sitting still for 3 years of schooling.
I'd be surprised if the total number of PCs who identified themselves as anything other than being field commissioned exceeded the finger count of Thomas Covenant.

Erm...I have 11 who would...

Also, there's a thread out there with more.

Now if you subtract those who took the instruction option for the feat that it qualifies for and still have more than a dozen.... count me surprised.

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Fromper wrote:
I think it's assumed that probably half or more of PCs are field commissions. I can't see many of the weirdo PC ideas at my tables (including many of my own) sitting still for 3 years of schooling.

I'd be surprised if the total number of PCs who identified themselves as anything other than being field commissioned exceeded the finger count of Thomas Covenant.

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Thomas Long 175 wrote:
Marroar Gellantara wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
If you are acting X alignment moreso than others, yes, your alignment is expected to eventually shift.

There are suggestions for this, but no actual mechanics for doing so.

These aren't even guidelines like CR or WBL, just suggestions of how to apply rule-0. Actions changing alignment has no rules, therefore it is not a rule. It's just a throwback to AD&D where half the mechanics explicit-ally told the player "the GM will figure out the specifics for his narrative".

Let's try examples. Let's say I am a LG fighter but I broke the law by lying to medieval Nazis, saying I didn't know where the innocents they wanted to murder were when I did. Even if the GM decides that I am CG now, that doesn't prevent me from still role-playing a LG character. It's just the GM trying to tell me how to role-play.

Once again, paizo disagrees with you because it is most definitely a thing in PFS and that does not employ rule 0.

Which is a non-issue since I can trust Paizo not to publish scenarios which put PC Paladins in a fail or fail situation. You don't even have Scarzoni, Andoran, or Chelaxian faction missions to worry about any more.

IF a PFS Paladin falls, it's due to either a lousy GM or more likely, a willful Player.

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Ashiel wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Lord Twig wrote:
There are real life humans that are willing to let people die for an afterlife there is no proof of. There are people that use innocents as human shields to protect their weapons. There was a lady in Africa that refused to lie to save her own life and possibly the lives of her husband and children. Thankfully she was saved by external powers.
And in D&D/PF, those people are not good. There's a reason most people in the world are neutral. It takes being able to put others before yourself, your needs, your interests, to be good. If a Paladin is going to put his code before the safety of others, then the Paladin will not be a Paladin for very long.
By that logic, he's not going to be a Paladin for long no matter which road he chooses.

Now you're getting it Lazar, now you're getting it. That's the problem. See, in 3.5, the Paladin's code itself allowed you to make exceptions. You could follow the spirit of the Paladin code, and if something conflicted between your alignment needs, the paladin code, or the paladin code itself, you could bend a little to do what was needed. You were a paragon of goodness, but not stupidly so.

Pathfinder took out the clause about "grossly violating the code of conduct" as a thing that makes you fall, and just made it "violating the code". Before, Paladins fell for intentionally doing evil, but had some wiggle room on the code. So yes, if the Paladin needed to lie to save the life of someone, he could do that, though he wouldn't typically lie. If the Paladin needed to cheat at dice to have a tortured slave released from a crimelord's possession, the Paladin could do that, even though the Paladin would never cheat for her own benefit. If the Paladin had to choose between her code and doing what was right, the code could be bent.

Gods save us from Fundamental Literalists whether they be Christian, Islamic, or Game Book Nerd Fanatics! There seems to be some high exalted standard that DM's are supposed to interpret rules as if they were old style textile machines that were operated by punch cards. I know that there are DM's out there who believe it's their sacred mission to put Paladins or other code characters in fail or fail situations, and there are players who think that it's incumbent on such characters to be put into those boxes. And this is why I'm very leery of allowing either strangers to play them, nor would I play a Paladin under a Home Game GM that I've never met before. (PFS is a different story.)

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My first suspect is whichever character was being played by Tim Curry.

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The Black Bard wrote:
It's true that some arcane magic (wizardry) can be accomplished with "just" training and a desire to learn.

It's as "true" as you define it on your game world. In the NPC codex for example there's a rogue who's got great stats for being a wizard but has been frustruated by multiple failed attempts to become one.

So maybe just having an Int above 9 isn't enough? Maybe as in Ars Magica, you need a "Gift" to have the capability of casting any form of magic. And in some cases this Gift erupts spontaneously in the cases of Sorcerers and Oracles. Maybe wizards go through many candidates before finding an apprentice who can actually learn to cast spells? Whatever limits the arcane and divine populations of your world will be a major defining aspect of what kind of world it is.

That's the difference between magic and technology. Anyone can flip a light switch, or pick up a telephone and assuming nothing is broken, it will work the same way all the time, even if the user isn't an electrician or network specialist. But Joe fighter can shout the command word to Nezzy's wand of lightning until his mouth is hoarse and he won't get a single spark.

Magic is more of an art than it is tech. You either have the talent for it, or you don't.

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Haladir wrote:
I've been negatively inclined toward psionics in fantasy since 1st-edition AD&D.

Gary Gygax called it "The biggest mistake I ever made.", in reference to the original psionic rules in the DMG.

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DragoDorn wrote:
This should help to get my "Star Ocean" campaign rolling along.

I still want the model for that starship. Most beautiful spacecraft I've ever seen.

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doc the grey wrote:

Now I know this is a stupid question but seriously what would a character with 20 levels in commoner be in a pathfinder world? Like I can figure out what an expert, warrior, or aristocrat could be theoretically be if they went 20 levels in their NPC class but for the life of me I cannot fathom what that looks like for a commoner. Is he like a peasant king, the penultimate farmer, what is he?

If anyone has any ideas let them fly I'm kind of interested to see what people come up with.

It simply wouldn't happen period. Anyone earning that kind of exp would gravitate towards an adventuring class. The only reason Paizo extended the table past level 3 was for uniformity's sake.

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Salarain wrote:

Out of these which is the most effective class for PFS?

Magus?
Divine Hunter (Paladin)?
Ranger? (with a companion which one be better)
Druid? (with a companion which one be better)

And then which of these two races would benefit better?

Aasimars / Tiefling

You're looking to "win" in PFS?

Pick the character that sings to you. Because you will be more motivated to do better with it than someone's idea of an "IWin" model. PFS isn't the type of campaign where you must munchkin to play, at least not yet.

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K177Y C47 wrote:
Except that when RAW is law... then the Paladin's Code become an issue. House-ruling and such are fine, but by RAW the Paladin can barely exist without falling. Oh and god forbid the party have to go to a place like Cheliax... they would fall pretty much upon entering the city...

A campaign where RAW is law... is a campaign run by a GM that's at best mediocre, and at worst, truly an exemplar of Lawful Stupid.

And as I've said before, complicated classes like Paladins are best not played under either.

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RDM42 wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Justin Sane wrote:
I'm playing a Paladin. He's not The Paragon, so... Am I doing anything wrong?

Depends... are you breaking the Paladin code? If the answer is yes, you have a problem.

The point here that was trying to be made is that the Anti-Paladin has more freedom within his code than his lawful good opposite.

And that is surprising by the very nature of what an anti paladin is?

Good not getting to play by the same rule book that evil does and cheat is one of the oldest story maxims in the book.

Evil cheats. That's its nature. It does whatever unscrupulous or immoral thing it has to do to in order to win.

But as a result the Anti-Paladin winds up being more party friendly than the Paladin.

I do think that Paladins can work, but it requires the right party, the right player, and the right DM. You need that trifecta that other classes don't need as much.

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Justin Sane wrote:
I'm playing a Paladin. He's not The Paragon, so... Am I doing anything wrong?

Depends... are you breaking the Paladin code? If the answer is yes, you have a problem.

The point here that was trying to be made is that the Anti-Paladin has more freedom within his code than his lawful good opposite.

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Durngrun Stonebreaker wrote:
Crisischild wrote:
Durngrun Stonebreaker wrote:
Crisischild wrote:

I don't really see the problem. It's a few specific products, they still cover all other forms of female birth control. Also the birth control not covered generally costs less in-store than the co-pay for many of the forms that are covered.

Why is this a world ending issue? Do I not understand because I'm a sexist racist patriaricle capitalist pig?

Not keeping up to date?

That's pretty f@$*ed up. I still think it's kind of silly to expect your employer to pay for your birth control (my main issue being my premium goes up to cover the additional costs to the insurance provider, I'm paying more than ten times what I used to), but it's pretty messed up to cover all forms of male birth control, including Viagra, and then say you don't have to cover ANY forms of birth control for women.

This whole health care thing is nonsense. It would be simple to enact a system where no one ever had to worry about medical costs or food or a place to live. But there are senators that NEED that Ferrari benefits package more than homeless people need houses.

Still, as far as these insurance issues go, women not getting birth control isn't the biggest problem.

Your employer is not paying for birth control! They might be paying for your health insurance which covers birth control.

If you go to the hospital, and a doctor prescribes you medicine, which your insurance covers, should you need your boss's approval?

Better yet, this ruling allows for a company run by Christian Scientists (a true oxymoron) who disapprove just about every kind of medical procedure, to run a company and essentially do an almost total end run around the requirement for insurance.

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Jeff Merola wrote:
Honestly disappointed that they're removing Aasimar and Tiefling as legal options for new players.

All I can say after seeing the flood of generic aasimars and tieflings created solely for the mechanical benefits of outsider immunities, is that it's about time.

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Harad Navar wrote:
If a single member is voicing an unspoken opinion held by a percentage of the company as a whole, and that opinion is contrary to that of Leadership, what then? What is Leadership's responsibility to self assess when they are no longer represent the majority opinion of the company?

So to get it clear, we're not talking about punishing a person for an action, but for expressing a thought?

Thomas Payne would have words with you.

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“Joe as the light glowing from my eyes and the Headpiece of Frinn indicates, I am now nearly omnipotent.”

“Oh, Yamara! That’s terrible! And it struck you at such a low level of experience..

“I need your help, old friend-“

“Of course! It must e such a burden- We can perform a divination to determine the proper penance and quest to restore you to your normal—“

“Don’t be a sap Joe. I need our business finesse. I’m a demi-goddess now—How do I get clerics, temples, reliquaries? Y’know, the Good Stuff!”

“Yamara… let’s discuss greed." *face in hands*

—The Goddess Yamara and Joe.

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Marcus Robert Hosler wrote:
Thelemic_Noun wrote:
Sorcerers really need a major power boost. I'd personally use the 3.5 Favored Soul Spells Known table (level 20: 9/6/6/6/6/6/6/6/5/4) and something like a final total of 7 or 8 spells per day of each level as a baseline.

I don't know if sorcerers need a buff.

Let's not even talk about fighter, rogue, monk, but are sorcerers underpowered compared to magi, summoners, inquisitors, slayers, brawlers, druids, clerics, oracles, wizards, gunslingers, paladins, shamans, bloodragers, skaalds, hunters, cavaliers, and rangers?

If sorcerers are so underpowered compared to arcanist that they need a buff, sorcerer might not be the problem.

Standards are in the eye of the beholder. Many may feel that the sorcerer or wizard needs a buff because they are falling short of totally dominating play as these players feel they should. (I'm not one of them.)

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88. "My dog ate the quest object."

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