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LazarX's page

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber. FullStarFullStarFullStarFullStar Pathfinder Society GM. 35,714 posts (36,157 including aliases). 1 review. 1 list. No wishlists. 22 Pathfinder Society characters. 16 aliases.


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Grand Lodge ****

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Xellrael wrote:

I recently played a scenario which granted a permanent negative boon for failing a saving throw. My eidolon failed. The GM asked me to post here to find out if the negative boon actually stays with the eidolon.

I believe that an eidolon shouldn't be able to receive a negative boon because an eidolon shouldn't be able to receive a positive boon. There is too much room for abuse by effectively doubling some of the best boons. That is just my opinion, of course.

Please point me to any official rulings that you know of.

Thanks!

It's not the eidolon that's receiving a boon.. It's the Summoner who's been inflicted with a permanent modification on one of his class features. And yes, that's legit.

Grand Lodge

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Ghray wrote:

So I had a very interesting D&D session the other day. I host a game that has players currently in the Numeria campaign setting, but their original world is one of my own making called Verda. The main is an artifically intelligent robot called Scion who built a huge army of machines to conquer Verda in Numeria. Currently, Scion is using a small, temporary portal to pass between both worlds but is building a massive portal to link Verda and Numeria, so it bring its full army over.

The leaders of Verda has learned of Scions intentions thanks to the players and most are bringing their army to stop the construction of the portal. The players however have found a quick and dirty way of destroying the portal: essentially nuking it. There is a crystal, when overloaded, will detonate like a small nuclear warhead. (and yes, they know how it works due to other Numerian characters explaining it).

This is the delimma: the machine army is located inside a city of nearly 100 thousand lives. If they nuke it, virtuallu everyone dies, but the army and portal are stopped. If they dont, then the players need to find a way to stop Scion amd his army on Verda.

My players took 20 minutes, bouncing in and out character, decideding what action to take. Destroy an entire city for certain, killing 100 thousand people, or finding another way. They choose finding another way, but what would you do?

Some folks might get a kick out of playing Torchwood D20. If that was the kind of game I wanted, then I wouldn't allow a 3rd option.

But since that's not the kind of story I'm interested in. Nor am I interested in setting up some twisted idea of morality defined by Hobson's Choice. That means Heroes do what heroes do... and that is finding a third option that does not involve mass murder.

Grand Lodge

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My Self wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Boomerang Nebula wrote:
LazarX wrote:
darth_borehd wrote:

There is an argument that Pathfinder magic is just science with different rules.

Magic has elements of whim and arbitrariness which pretty much moves it out of the set laws of science.
Actually it makes it similar to quantum physics and chemistry.
Quantum Physics still has bounds defined by mathematics It's what makes doing science in it possible. Magic in literature and legend isn't bound by math or logic.
Except that in Pathfinder, it is bound by logic. Perhaps a different logic, but there's logic somewhere.

The logic that Pathfinder uses is story based, not mathmatic, and frequently not consistent. Some of the legacy stuff such as the material components of lightning bolt and fireball are simply humor pieces carried over from AD+D. And some of it is symbolic.

The most important difference is that what magic does can't be produced on an assembly line by rote-trained labor with no magical talent. And much of the most mighty forms of magic can't be repeated at all. Pathfinder magic isn't bound by what players are allowed to in the rulebooks. There are magical effects that PC's can never duplicate. You can't make for instance a factory that produces Starstones on demand.

But more importantly, Magic produces answers without giving progression on questions to ask. Magic is and endall to development, rather than something that spurs an innovator to a further path of improvement.

Grand Lodge ****

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ComicViolence wrote:
Thanks guys. ... also I don't know how to use a Spoiler Tag :-(

When ever you post take a look at the bottom of that window... There's that helpful "How to format your text" with the Show button next to it. It's got all the power tricks to posting you'll ever need.

Grand Lodge

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Kirth Gersen wrote:

So far in this thread, food allergies are the only actual danger that's been presented. The rest as been hyperbole, hand-wringing, and outright fantasy (dissolving tomatoes decimating our food supply, for example). So, of all these other deadly dangers we should be cognizant of, please be so good as to enumerate a few of them.

You'll find me to be easy to convince by presenting actual evidence, but not at all by calling names and hurling accusations.

If food allergies were the only concern. (they're not has shown previously), that would be enough. Food Allergies can KILL.

Grand Lodge

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SmiloDan wrote:

Um. Maybe you should study some basic anthropology. Modern humans have been around for tens of thousands of years. It also takes a lot of intelligence to survive in pre-agrarian societies.

What you are proposing is borderline racist. Just a kindly warning.

Neolithic man was smart enough to make beer.

From what we can tell the true tipping point was not an enlargement of brain size. (Neanderthal man's was larger than those of modern Humans), but the sudden explosive development of language.

Grand Lodge

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GM_Beernorg wrote:
Well, if they can sell Moby Dick as an action/adventure movie, then anything is possible I guess (am I the only one horrified by the turning of a literary classic into a mindless man vs. nature informed action flick?)

Considering that it was a well acted high production flick, you may not be the only one, but you're definitely in a minority.

Grand Lodge

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We have a roleplaying game whose elements include politics. They include religion. Religion was a hot enough topic in the game way back when, that TSR came up with the "bright" idea of appeasing the fundamentalists by coming up with godless clerics, in an idiot move to appease the parents who were going ape s@!~ on their precious child playing a Cleric of Apollo/Bahamut/Pelor. As well as taking out the two "D" classfications of devils and demons.

Paizo is making a further political statement by opening up characters outside of the so-called white "cis" norms. So politics is not avoidable. The discussion, which on the whole I think was rather productive on the long term about trans and lgbt characters in Golarion is an example of this. And I don't think that Paizo as a company is going to walk away from that topic.

On the whole I think the heated religion and political discussions here are a good thing. But there isn't a sword in anyone's back forcing them to click on the thread titles if they don't want to swim in the pool. But wanting to close the pool for others is rather selfish, I think.

And from what I've seen, the involvement of Paizo's staff in moderation hasn't slowed down the monthly deluge of new product.

Grand Lodge

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Kirth Gersen wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Everything else being equal, the rice would certainly help, but it's not a panacea.
Is that a viable standard? GMOs are bad and evil and should be banned because, even though they certainly help, they're not a panacea? Because that's exactly what a number of people in the thread seem to be saying.

No it's a caution that because you've applied a topical treatment to one symptom of a problem, that there is a danger for mistaking it as a long term or comprehensive solution.

One example is Marijuana. It can be an important element in pain relief caused by the side effects of certain treatments. That doesn't eliminate the problems that careless use can cause.

Grand Lodge

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Krensky wrote:
Yes, by all means, let's celebrate violent, destructive, futile acts by people opposed to advancing technology because it imperils their interests.

Nice way to ignore the fact that these were people defending their livelihoods in an age without safety nets for folks that were soon to be put on the not-working list.

I'm pretty sure that if you were told that your job was going to be taken away, and you didn't have things like unemployment insurance or any other piece of the modern social safety net, you'd be as the Brits would say... "somewhat annoyed".

Yes, the Luddites acts are worth celebrating, because everything that Labor ever got from management, it wasn't from just asking politely. It involved struggle, and frequently, blood.

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thejeff wrote:
LazarX wrote:
And if you understood WHY and WHO the Luddites actually were, you'll see that I don't count the name as the insult you intended it to be.

Yeah, basically the Luddites saw the problem correctly, but didn't have a good solution.

By definition, they really couldn't have a good solution. That as you note, would be a matter of externally imposed reforms, which as one might observe were fought against tooth and nail by the corporate magnates.

Pretty much all the Luddites could do was prove that they weren't going to be quietly swept under the rug without a fight.

And frequently when progress is made by the labor movement, it starts with hopeless battles like these.

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Krensky wrote:
LazarX wrote:
CBDunkerson wrote:


Yes, companies are using GMO technology to increase profits... e.g. making pesticide resistant plants rather than plants which have inherent insecticide properties. However, that doesn't change the fact that GMO could be used to develop these improvements. Ergo, protests should be aimed at corporate misbehavior, not a potentially beneficial technology.

I could use a chain saw for a haircut, that doesn't mean that it's the appropriate or safe tool for the job. I don't have enough of the background to say whether GMO's have a possible benefit. But quite frankly, the issue is with the GMO's as they exist now, and how they are implemented NOW. If these things can be some super panacea, than why hasn't Monsanto done so, of if they can't or won't, why hasn't some compeititor undercut Monsanto by DOING so?
Anti-science catastrophizing by luddites who don't know what they're commenting on but, God bless them, they're going to keep raising a ruckus because of their feels.

No, I don't claim to be an expert on GMO's, but a lot of people who DO have the scientific credentials, are raising questions and issues that are not being answered by Monsanto. And given the similar history that we've had with the tobacco companies, who like Exxon, DID know the truth but hid it anyway, you may forgive my well-earned skepticism about Monsanto's benevolence, and my reluctance to blindly trust their products.

And if you understood WHY and WHO the Luddites actually were, you'll see that I don't count the name as the insult you intended it to be.

Grand Lodge

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Reebo Kesh wrote:
Next February I'm moving to the U.S.

Did they warn you about the ebola?

But you need to be more specific about your questions. Such as what kind of work you're looking for. And your preferred environment. And yes, generally the better places are going to be rather painful in rents.

I live in the Hudson County, NJ area, one walk and a Path ride to the City.

Grand Lodge

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CBDunkerson wrote:


Yes, companies are using GMO technology to increase profits... e.g. making pesticide resistant plants rather than plants which have inherent insecticide properties. However, that doesn't change the fact that GMO could be used to develop these improvements. Ergo, protests should be aimed at corporate misbehavior, not a potentially beneficial technology.

I could use a chain saw for a haircut, that doesn't mean that it's the appropriate or safe tool for the job. I don't have enough of the background to say whether GMO's have a possible benefit. But quite frankly, the issue is with the GMO's as they exist now, and how they are implemented NOW. If these things can be some super panacea, than why hasn't Monsanto done so, of if they can't or won't, why hasn't some compeititor undercut Monsanto by DOING so?

Grand Lodge

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Todd Stewart wrote:
GMO technology allows us to better serve public health, reduce food waste, increase crop yield per acre, use less fossil fuels, reduce pesticide runoff, reduce herbicide runoff, reduce bacterial contamination of food, and increase crop efficiency. Somehow this is bad, "not natural", or a giant conspiracy between corporations and scientists to poison people, just like vaccines and chemtrails

I've also heard the same sort of claims from scientists that were hired by the tobacco industry about cigarettes. The increase in crop yield is questionable compared to sustainable non-GMO techniques.

The main purpose of marketing GMO seeds to farmers is to encourage increased use of herbicides, also coincidentally enough, marketed by Monsanto. So what we have are increasing levels of toxicity in our food. This has led to an increase in food allergies, including some very toxic ones in some cases.

Also in the same way that over use of antibiotics is leading to resistant super bacteria, the increased use of herbicides because of GMO plants will lead to herbicide reistant weeds as well.

Reducing Food Waste? Perhaps you missed John Oliver's excellent video on the subject. Food waste hasn't been reduced, it's continuing to skyrocket.

The reason GMO's are considered bad is that the only positive effect that they seem to generate is increased profit for companies like Monsanto. Profits that come at the cost of a lot of collateral harm to farms, the environment, and the consumers.

Grand Lodge

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Keep in mind that insanity as represented in the game is meant as a condition to be applied to a wargaming combat scenarion, not meant as simulation, any more than the game's economic systems are supposed to model real life or historical economies.

The basic rules of the game are about combat and effects such as insanity/confusion etc., which apply to a wargaming figure to change it's ability to wage combat. THAT'S ALL. It's not about roleplaying insanity, which when it does happen in the game will generally refer to a story condition which frequently will not map to a spell or class effect.

Grand Lodge

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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Ancient Egyptian medical science is nothing to sneeze at.

Unless you're allergic to mummys.

Grand Lodge

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Rosita the Riveter wrote:
Is anyone here even defending the position that Greenpeace is good? Last I checked, they weren't even all that popular outside some of the more... science skeptic circles.

WTH does "good" and "evil" have to do with real political issues? I support Greeenpeace because of the issues they advocate and the activities they pursue. I've participated in successful lawsuits against Exxon because they were polluting streams in New Jersey.

Leave the trite debates of "good" and "evil" for Paladin fail threads, if you're looking to talk about substantive issues.

Grand Lodge

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If your sole interest is mechanical crunch.... you have very little reason to get this book. There are some items and feats, but you'll feel that you overpaid for them, and they're all very setting specific.

If you enjoy good reads and have an interest in how races fit into the setting.... it's a must read.

Note that I did not use the rightly-despised term, fluff, in the above text.

Grand Lodge

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Kayote wrote:
As a GM I have to make choices that some of the players don't like. This current one is not allowing the stamina system into my game and dealing with the player that is fighting me 100% of the way.

If you have a player like that, don't argue rules with him.... tell him to....

1. GM his own game and he can make his own decisions about what rules to use.

2. Or shut up, behave, or go home.

Democracy is not a system for running a game. One has to be an autocrat, a benevolent one, perhaps, but one nonetheless.

Grand Lodge

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Jericho21 wrote:
So when you get your bonus spells per day, at 16-17 for example you get a extra 2 and 3rd level spell which at level one you wouldn't get can you still cast them? I remember reading something about you can cast any spell that's caster level is lower than or equal to your spell ability modifier, but I cant find that right now. Any help is appreciated.

You can't find the rule because it does not exist.

Your spells per day chart determines what you can cast. In order for bonus spells to count, you must have at least a Zero in the level on the chart.

Grand Lodge

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James Jacobs wrote:
Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
What is with this neo-Luddite attitude you see among "counter-culture" artists and the like, basically shouting "Wake up, sheeple! Smartphones are preventing us from making awkward small-talk with total strangers on our daily commute and fat people are everywhere! The future of mankind is at stake here!"?
Fear of technology. It's always been here, and tends to settle in the older one gets, because the advance of technology is generally faster than the average person's ability to keep up with said advance.

It should be noted that the Luddites didn't fear technology as much as the very correct fear that advances were going to take their jobs away.

There was a time after all when the word computer referred to a person whose job it was to tabulate numbers.

Grand Lodge ****

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Ascalaphus wrote:
Tssk. Go ahead. Blame Razmir.

Cosmo is Razmir's fault.... Or is it the other way around?

Grand Lodge ****

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noble peasant wrote:
Aside from the few exceptions, like oracle and Druid and what not, why can't I be an inquisitor or cleric without a deity?

Because the rules of the setting and the campaign say so. That's pretty much the discussion ender as no possible messageboard thread is going to give them the compelling reason to change it.

A major setting reason: Razmir. If clerics could operate without having a god connection, there would be no problem with Razmir having clerics despite the fact that he's a fake.. After all there is no lack of people truly believing he's a god.

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Torbyne wrote:


I would never run a god so humble as that. unless it was a god of humility maybe...

I had a Cleric of Humility once. Every time he cast commune to ask his god a question, he'd always get the same answer back.

"I'm not qualified to answer."

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Hama wrote:
As long as Berman and Braga are no longer any factors, we might get a half-decent Star Trek show. I mean I LOVE Enterprise. It was horribly written but the actors pulled a maximum they could with what they were given.

Enterprise had the same problem as Voyager. The folks running the show couldn't keep faith with the central premise. Instead of a ship faced with the problems of being located far from resupply and having to scavange to make repairs, Voyager became TNG:Delta Quadrant. Enterprise suffered some mis steps with with plot direction and rushing to lampshade the future. It also innovated too much for the Trekkies. The thing is after shows that were running amuck with Klingon love, it was the first time that Trek actually took some real indepth look at the Federation Races, especially the other members of the Founding Quartet, the Vulcans, Andorians, and the Tellarites. OMG, Tellarites that were something other than the caricatures we saw at "Journey to Babel"!

Enterprise had it's issues, but it's worse ones were the Trekkies who gave it a bum rap. And I'll never forgive the person who thought it was a brilliant idea to turn the last episode into a Riker holodeck fantasy.

By the way, if you ever meet Johnathan Frakes and want to stay on his good side, don't bring up that episode.

Grand Lodge

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havoc xiii wrote:
Just started Knights of Sidonia. I'm enjoying it so far I just have a feeling it's going to end up being a rocks fall everyone dies kinda series. Judging by the current death rate I'm probably right.

It's a tad more complicated than that. Keep watching... it's worth the trip. I believe Netflix still has both series on tap.

Grand Lodge

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Black Moria wrote:

Reading the item description, my interpretation is that once the item is attuned, it allows one use of 10 minutes duration once activated.

To reuse, it must be attuned again, so - 10 minutes attuning, 10 minutes usage. No limitation on usage per day per se, just the DM and/or players patience for having the attuning process disrupting the adventuring day.

The passage that speaks of attumement also includes the phrase "at the start of the day". That pretty much says one attunement per day.. period.

Grand Lodge

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Imbicatus wrote:

A claymore is going to be a greatsword in game terms. It's too large and not balanced for one handed use.

But so what? Pathfinder is not anywhere near accurate on weapon descriptions or mechanics. Crossbows are far more deadly in RL than they are in game. Properly fitted and strapped Heavy armor does not slow your movement or impact your ability to do acrobatics.

Don't look to the weapon tables for historical accuracy.

What he said. Also keep in mind that the same name will frequently be applied weapons of varying length.

Also keep in mind that this isn't a simulation game, this is a game descended from miniatures war-gaming when character speed used to be measured in inches on a mat board. Which is why First Edition speeds on characters and monsters were listed as inches.


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blackbloodtroll wrote:


Or... did Norse Mythology steal from the Hobbit Movies?

I might have had something to do with that. Bit of an accident really. I was actually aiming for the Toledo Ren Faire in 1989, I didn't realize they were real Vikings.

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Hama wrote:
Marc Radle wrote:
Not sure Steve Jobs should be on that list ...

Of course he should be. He was a terrible person and stole more than half of the "revolutionary innovations" from his competitors, or worse, friends. He was terrible to his employees, often screaming at them and driving them to tears.

Oh but hey he was successful.

Steve Jobs was the engine that drove the disparate parts of Apple. Everything said of the above is true, but that does not change the fact that he was more than just a very successful evangelistic salesman. He had the vision and he knew how to hire the right people to bring that vision to reality. He turned his failures into fodder for the reinvention of a dying Apple. And he had the drive and the determination to make all those "wrong" choices which made Apple the most valuable company on the planet today. He revolutionised 5 industries... that's not a trivial accomplishment.

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Chris Mortika wrote:


2) I am fascinated by Kara's mortal persona being clumsy and mild-mannered. Clark does that, because Clark is trying to disguise himself, to appear the opposite of Superman. But Kara isn't trying to keep a secret identity. She just wants to live like a normal person. I understand that means "Don't go around throwing dumpsters over buildings." But why does that include glasses? Why the lack of self-confidence?

Every hear of "Left Hand Syndrome"? Many parents have a superstitious fear of left-handed children seeing left-handedness as a sign of the Devil, so they go to extreme lengths to force right-handedness including binding the left arm into immobility. The children wind up having all sorts of neurotic issues as a result of it.

Linda has a major case of this because she has been forcibly repressing her Kryptonian aspects. (So in certain ways maybe Clark was being genuinely clumsy because of his own efforts.)

Note of course that I should have said Her Cousin, since Clark, Superman, and several other proper nouns and noun combos are banned from the show because of IP issues. Which is the real reason why we have a black character named JAMES Olson.

If I remember correctly Hank Henshaw is the super villain who becomes the Cyborg Superman in the Reign of the Supermen.

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NBDM wrote:
AM I wrong for wanting to kill this player? If not how can I counter and shut an oracle down for good? If I am wrong, how can I fix it? hes already been told that thanks to he min/maxing one campaign was ended early and that hes making it difficult to DM. Every one knows this is my first time DMing for a "successful" campaign..

You're not wrong for wanting to do it, but you're majorly wrong to give into that impulse.

Either you and this player should resolve this out of game, or you remove him from the group.

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Icy Turbo wrote:

More of a curious question then anything else, but how many of you utilize or are in games with Houserules?

Having played various incarnations since 1980, I would say that there is no such thing as a game that doesn't use house rules. Even Paizo does for it's Network Campaign, it's houserules can fill a small book.

House ruling is neccessary because the game needs to be fitted to each group and campaign, and to make things work, DMs tweak the system to varying degrees.

It's neccessary.... and a virtue.

Anyone who says they don't use houserules is either unaware, lying, or a GM who hasn't learned his art.

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Caineach wrote:
Paladin of Baha-who? wrote:
By the way, three miles island did not have a meltdown.
Not only did it not have a meltdown, the nuclear safety industry considers it a success story. The safety measures detected an error and kicked in appropriately.

Half the fuel had melted... while it did not do a China syndrome, it did pool at the bottom of the containment vessel. The B&W reactors had had a simmilar failure which did not go catastrophic because the plant was running at 9 percent capacity instead of 97 percent.

It's also worth noting that the cleanup from the accident ran from 1979-1993... 14 years and 1 billion dollars.

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BigDTBone wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Caineach wrote:
this still doesn't fix the energy storage problems, the cost problems, peak load problems, inclement weather problems, production problems, materials problems.

The New Jersey model is a perfect example of how solar power can be used RIGHT NOW to give us more breathing space to address the longer term issues.

In Morris County homeowners who use solar don't have to worry about battery storage or those other issues. Their solar panels feed directly into the grid which helps lower fossil fuel use during peak periods. The homeowners get energy credits which pay for their own utility use.

The lesson is that we don't have to make a total wrenching switchover which we're not ready for in present logistics, but we do have technology that can stretch our supply of fossil use.

If we can get this much use of solar power in New Jersey, there are states that are suited to get a lot more.

Unfortunately it isn't working that way other places. In Texas if you add electrical augmentation technology to your home you have to get your home re-metered. One meter for "up" and one for "down." The electrical company will default the system to be 100% of your power draw comes from the grid and 100% of your generation goes up. (Rather than just sell excess and drawing when needed.) Then they only pay you wholesale for the power you put on the grid but charge you retail to bring it right back into your house. On top of that, the entire process requires transferring to a digital "smart" meter which are widely reported to grossly over meter the power you draw.

This puts many people who spent $10s of thousands on electrical augmentation for their home in the awkward position of having HIGHER electric bills than before the process.

New Jersey points out what's technologically feasible. Now if State Governments want to cave in to the Koch brothers and kill renewable energy however it shows up, then that's a matter of replacing your state representatives.

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Gorbacz wrote:
You guys and gals might want to break your usual "we don't errata books we don't reprint" rule for this one, because that's one devil that won't ever return to his bottle voluntarily.

It doesn't matter what the Paizo staff do. There will always be someone posting one of these threads...because they can.

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Crystal Frasier wrote:
I deeply regret ever writing this trait -_-

No need to... PFS will never allow nonsense such as Asmodean Paladins, and DMs that are willing to tolerate such dissonance are already doing so long before this trait was written.

This thread is nothing more than sound, fury, and wind.

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Wei Ji the Learner wrote:


Citizen Anklebiter,

Please forgive me the intrusion to your thread. I admittedly have not had the time to peruse the volumes that have been put forth thus far, but the concept of social-ism is intriguing.

What is the practical limit of social-ism? Is it the willingness of an individual to participate in the process, or the government to enforce participation?

At what point does the liberty of the individual become subsumed to the 'Greater Good'?

How do you envision socialism in the years ahead emerging as a positive force versus the sometimes checkered past that it has?

Thank you for your time in advance...

1. You don't get a choice in participating in a process. Your parents made that choice for you by choosing to give birth and raise you in whatever country you are born and live in. The question then is not whether you get to participate in a process, but what process you will participate in. (given that going the Mountain Man route is limited not only by skill set, but the availability of decent mountains) It would be useful to google the term "social contract".

2. The terms "liberty" and "Greater good" are in the main, more hyperbole than substance. Unless you're Tarzan in deepest Victorian Africa, you can not exist outside of a supporting society. The question is better rephrased as what are the rights and obligations of societies and the individuals that comprise them.

3. Socialism IS a positive force in the countries which practice it. Especially the form known as Democratic Socialism. The countries of Western Europe for example that practise it enjoy greater life expectancies, better education, and mental health. The time frame is not years ahead, but NOW. Not that like Democracy, just including Socialist in it's name does not make a country socialist. Congo, the Soviet Union, and various other countries that put the words "Democratic" "Socalist" or "Democratic-Socialist" are numerous examples of it.

4. Extra bonus answer. If you are an American, YOU ARE LIVING IN A SOCIALIST COUNTRY. The US is far more socialist than it cares to admit especially compared to the pre-Roosevelt era. We have a social net, we have labor laws and occupation safety regulations. We have Social Security and welfare. We have environmental regulations... These are all part of a gradual socialist change that has been taking place since the 1930's.

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Kirth Gersen wrote:

Just wanted to point out that (a) nuclear plants do not "blow up" -- although one did melt down, which is an entirely distinct thing; (b) Chernobyl was the direct result of a known design flaw that was corrected in U.S. reactors and not Soviet ones.

No... nuke plants do not blow up. That is correct. What they do, is make large areas of land uninhabitable for a time scale longer than the existence of any country now on the planet. And we still do not have a long term solution for the waste... which is pretty damm long lived in and of itself.

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CBDunkerson wrote:
Matthew Morris wrote:
Factor in 18+ years of no significant temp change from the satalite data, Antartic ice hitting record highs, and the general attempts to silence people who disagree with the global warming fear mongers... I feel pretty safe.

The satellite data you refer to has consistently proven to contain significant errors... and measures less than 2% of global warming in any case. Global warming has continued unabated the past 18+ years.

Antarctic ice is at record LOWS. Antarctic sea ice has hit highs in recent years, but that tiny increase in no way offsets the massive loss of ice overall worldwide.

I haven't seen attempts to silence 'people who disagree' so much as people who lie.

The highs of Antarctic Sea Ice are a direct result from the highly accelerated calving of Antarctic land ice.

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Imbicatus wrote:
Robyn LA VC - Retired wrote:

Traveller (any but the burps edition)

Champions hero RPG
Why the GURPS hate? It's very similar to Champions as a point-buy system, but with a simpler resolution system and less calculated stats. I like the system much more than Champions, although I'll admit that Champions does supers better.

Maybe its not so much a GURPS hate, but a preference for playing Traveller by using the Traveller system.

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CBDunkerson wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
She went on to explain that ALL towns and cities in the U.S. had a streetcar/trolley system, not just San Francisco. That was hard for me to believe, so I looked it up.

...and yet continued to believe it?

Most major cities yes... all cities, not even close. Towns, almost none.

Even places like Paterson had them... but then again Paterson was an industrial town from it's founding. The Jersey Ave Bus Depot still has places where the old trolley tracks stick through. Newark still has it's trolley, now upgraded to a light rail system.

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The purpose of the special boons is to boost convention attendance.

Making them generally available would kind of defeat that.

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Given that abortion is a hotly contested topic between Pro and Anti-Choice in real life, it's best something not dwelling upon in game.

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Rynjin wrote:

And so is "appeal to tradition", which is the entire point of playing devil's advocate (pointing out flaws in the argument).

For the record, I don't actually think the phrase is problematic in itself, but saying it's okay BECAUSE it's classic isn't a good argument.

Actually I encourage the use of aliens and creatures like Orcs calling Humans Pink skins and other derogatory names. It puts Humans doing that to each other in the perspective that needs to be shown.

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Insain Dragoon wrote:

Player rolls a 38, not very good at roleplaying but wanted his character to be a suave dude.

DM realizes this and realizes that sometimes players don't play this game to solve esoteric social puzzles. DM being a good guy combines the player's roll with the character's alignment and attitude to decide how the character would likely say things.

Asks player if it's ok for the roll to represent "X and Y and Z"

There's a big difference between a player who makes an effort and is not very good at roleplay and someone who refuses to even try.

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