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Laurefindel's page

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Most movies are better than their sequels. The question isn't whether the sequel is better, but whether it is good enough to be remembered and appreciated for a movie in its own.

Evil Dead and Army of Darkness are so different that it is hard to judge one against the other. As a farce and a satire, Army of Darkness is one of the best in its category IMO


Ultradan wrote:
The sequel to John Carpenter's The Thing (which, funny enough, is also called The Thing), is actually a prequel, which shows what happenned at the norvegian arctic camp before the events of the first film. It actually leads to the helicopter (chasing the dog) scene...

I didn't know that existed!


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I know I'm not in majority, but I really Love Chronicles of Riddick, which is kind of a sequel.

Empire Strikes Back. Most sequels reuse the same music or variations of. The musical themes of Star Wars really come into their own in Empire, a rare feat in any sequel.

Shrek II. One of the only sequel that really holds to its original IMO (along with Aliens)

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Temple of Doom is a good sequel, but Last Crusade is magnificent.

oh, and Army of Darkness, if we can consider it a sequel to Evil Dead.


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Toy Story II, and III for that matter

Back to the Future II and III aren't quite as good as I, but they are really good sequels nonetheless

Aliens of course. It has been stated, but it's worth repeating.


New Update!

- Small corrections all around to conform to Paizo’s formating and descriptions.
- Redirect Blow now specifies melee attacks
- Removed monetary dime of the Charity taboo. Drawback has been revised to R-P consequences in the lines of Anonymity and Exile.
- Removed bonus to damage from Inspiring Presence to conform with Cavalier’s Banner ability.
- Inner Strength conditions of Oath or Protection and Oath of Quest have been swapped.
- Enduring Faith renamed as Spells.

This adds to last week's update:

- Taboos are revised to give a uniform benefit.
- Clarification changes to Mobile Sentinel and Redirect Blow
- Removed bonus to AC from Zealous Smite

As always, comments are welcome.

Abilities are more or less where I want them to be, but please let be know if you spot any incoherence, ambiguity, things that are not legit, grammatical and syntax errors etc.

thanks!

'findel


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Beastmaster is not broken, at least not in a "vacuum". Its abilities work well as a set of abilities and as an extension of the character.

But coming from 3.5 - or even observing how summoned creatures work - the animal seems rather devoid of a life of its own, which I would say "feels" wrong rather than being broken.

I would have been happier with a concentration mechanics, whereas the beastmaster "casts" its beast into action and then requires concentration to keep it active.


Ciaran Barnes wrote:
I think that for anonymity, some kind of bonus vs being recognized would be fitting.

yes

Ciaran Barnes wrote:
Why did you choose to include throwing axe?

Meant to say handaxe. The weapon I had in mind was "hatchet" but fail to see handaxe. Brainfart


Oath of Protection clarifications:

Mobile Sentinel (Ex): Upon reaching 8th level, whenever an opponent moves within 10 feet of him, a protector knight-errant may take a 5-foot step as an immediate action to move within that opponent's threatened area. This movement does not provoke attacks of opportunity. If the knight-errant takes this step, he must subtract 5 feet from his movement and cannot take a 5-foot step during his next turn. If the protector knight-errant intercepts a charge this way, he becomes the new target of the attack.

The protector knight-errant can use this ability once per round.

Redirect Blow (Ex): At 15th level when one of his adjacent allies is attacked, a protector knight-errant may use an attack of opportunity to redirect the attack upon himself. This ability must be declared before the attack roll is made. The redirected attack is made against the knight-errant’s AC and defences, even if the knight-errant is out of the attacker’s reach. The knight-errant loses any cover or concealment bonuses he may have against the redirected attack. Attacks that do not use an attack roll cannot be redirected this way.


Revised Taboos. Comments are welcome.

Anonymity (Ex): The knight-errant severs himself from the person he once was by abandoning his name, title and coat of arms. A knight-errant selecting this taboo will not accept any title or rank within the nobility, church and military, nor will he accept gifts of land and positions of leadership. Wishing to remain humble and anonymous, the knight-errant avoids that his exploits be told or sung.

This self-denial makes the knight-errant hard to read via magical means, granting a +1 insight bonus on saving throws made to resist spells and effects reading the thoughts, aura or determining the location of the knight-errant. This bonus increases by +1 for every four levels the knight-errant possesses.

Asceticism (Ex): The knight-errant swears off all pleasures of the flesh. A knight-errant selecting this taboo will decline all but the most bland, staple food, drink only milk or water and refuse to adopt more than a modest lifestyle. Sexual and intimate contacts are also taboo to the knight-errant, but platonic relationships are acceptable.

This contemplation teaches mental resilience granting a +1 insight bonus on saving throws made to resist charm and compulsion spells and effects. This bonus increases by +1 for every four levels the knight-errant possesses.

Charity (Ex): The knight-errant will not refuse any requests for aid or alms. A knight-errant selecting this taboo must give at least 25% of his personal wealth to charity and spend half his time between adventures helping people in various ways.

In doing so, the knight-errant learns to see conflict from every perspective, gaining a +1 bonus on Diplomacy and Sense Motive skill checks. This bonus increases by +1 for every four levels the knight-errant possesses.

Exile (Ex): The knight-errant leaves his past behind – literally – by leaving his homeland and living the nomadic life of a wanderer. A knight-errant selecting this taboo will never settle down, establish a family, join any local organization or form any kind of ties to a place, region or kingdom.

In his wanderings, the knight-errant learns from many cultures. The Linguistics and Knowledge-Geography become class skills for the knight-errant. In addition, all linguistics and knowledge-geography checks are made with a +1 bonus. This bonus increases by +1 for every four levels the knight-errant possesses.

Forsworn Armour (Ex): The knight-errant has forsworn the use of leather vests, hauberks of mail and suits of plated armors. A knight-errant selecting this taboo refuses to wear armor of any sort (including bracers of armor), but may use shields and other similar protective accessories (such as helms, gauntlets and rings of protections).

This has given him insights he would not have had otherwise. When unarmored and unencumbered, the knight-errant adds his Wisdom bonus (if any) to his AC and his CMD. This bonus increases by +1 for every four levels the knight-errant possesses.

Forsworn Mount (Ex): The knight-errant has sworn to go without mount, cart or carriage. A knight-errant selecting this taboo refuses to mount any type of animal or creature, and climb aboard any type of land vehicle.

This strengthens the knight-errant’s determination and endurance, granting a +1 morale bonus on Fortitude saving throws made to resist the effects of fatigue, exhaustion and drowsiness, and to resist receiving nonlethal damage from forced march, severe weather and high altitude. This bonus increases by +1 for every four levels the knight-errant possesses.

Forsworn Weapons (Ex): The knight-errant has forsworn the use of any martial and exotic weapons, vowing to use only simplistic tools to defend himself and attacks his foes. The following list constitutes the only weapons allowed to a knight-errant selecting this taboo: dagger, club, throwing axe, quarterstaff, and sling, in addition to unarmed strikes and any improvised weapons he may come across.

This narrow focus gives the knight-errant new insight on combat. Whenever he is using a non-magical version of these weapons, the knight-errant gains a +1 enhancement bonus on weapon attack rolls as if it were of masterwork quality. At 4th level, this bonus applies to both attack and damage rolls. The bonus to damage and attack rolls increases by +1 for every four levels the knight-errant has attained after level 4th.

Upon acquiring this taboo, a knight-errant may re-train any weapon-specific feat he possesses to match a weapon he allows himself to use.

[edit]
I'm considering reducing the requirement of the charity taboo. 25% can result in a lot of gp at higher levels.

some bonuses don't have a type. Need to address that.


Ciaran Barnes wrote:
We can imagine what noble blades and knightly weapons are, but identifying them mechanically is more difficult with a complete list.

I'm ok with defining a (arbitrary) list of prohibited weapons (or a list of allowed weapons), but the bless vs no alignment is a good point.

Masterwork and +1 per four levels is a great idea; all other revised taboos use the (something) +1 per four levels attained formula.


Thanks everyone for the comments. All are being addressed, especially for clarity.

The Forsworn Weapons taboo is giving me a bit of trouble. The first version is a clarified and updated version of the v3 knight-errant. It looks a bit powerful. The second option is closer to the original design from Dabbler's draft of the class.

Quote:

Forsworn Weapons (Ex): The knight-errant has forsworn the use of any martial and exotic weapons, vowing to use only simplistic tools to defend himself and attacks his foes. The following list constitutes the only weapons allowed to the knight-errant: dagger, club, hatchet, quarterstaff, scythe, and sling, in addition to any improvised weapons he may come across.

This narrow focus gives the knight-errant new insight on combat. Whenever he is using a mundane, unenchanted version of these weapons, the knight-errant gains a +1 enhancement bonus on weapon attack and damage rolls. This bonus increases to +2 at 8th level, and increase further by another by +1 for every four levels thereafter.

Upon acquiring this taboo, a knight-errant may re-train any weapon-specific feat he possesses to match a weapon he allows himself to use.

Quote:

Forsworn Weapons (Sp): The knight-errant has forsworn the use of weapons traditionally associated with nobility and chivalry, using instead those employed by common soldiers. Thus the use of noble blades” (longsword, bastard sword, greatsword, rapier, scimitar and falchion) and other knightly weapons (light and heavy mace, straight and composite longbow and the lance) are all taboos of the knight-errant.

This denial gives the knight-errant a new sense of righteousness. Once per day, the knight-errant can cast bless weapon on one his own weapon as a spell-like ability. For the purpose of this ability, his caster level is equal to his knight-errant levels.

Upon acquiring this taboo, a knight-errant may re-train any weapon-specific feat he possesses to match a weapon he allows himself to use.


ryric wrote:
Laurefindel wrote:

In Frodo's Footsteps...

The DM has the players evolve in his favourite literary universe in the wake of the the book's main protagonists (...)
I've had some arguments with a friend of mine about this. A campaign set in a known fictional world can work. It can even work while other characters in the setting do things - even more important things (...) The key was not to make the players feel like they were rewatching the films through their character's eyes, but instead like they were starring in their own spin-off.

Indeed, when you make the story about the PCs, everything can work to great effect - even the worst of the game styles described above (most of which are bad because the game isn't focus around the PCs in the first place)

Star Wars seems to have been a fertile ground for what you describe (especially before episode I, II, III and the Clone Wars series). In a classic D6 Star Wars game, I had my players start aboard the Tantive IV as it was boarded by Darth Vader and Imperial troops, followed by our own escape-from-death-star session while the tractor beams were disabled by Obi-Wan. The point of game being that the players knew what would happen; it was about figuring out how their characters would make it through.


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Dire Elf wrote:
Laurefindel would probably think my sheets look dull, but I want to be able to find information on it easily.

Dull but clear trumps pretty but unusable.

But I do expect more than just clear from RPG companies with established graphic design departments.


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What grids my gears is when you have to defend the premise of your thread. For example...

Thread: Need Advice with Potatoes

OP: I've got these potatoes. Should I boil and mash them, or cut them and fry them in oil?

Answer #1: Why are you using potatoes; carrots are so much better anyway.

Answer #2: Raw keeps potatoes abstract, and that's the way it should be.

Answer #3: You're playing in a game with DRAGONS and MAGIC! Why are you bothering with potatoes!

... and then you spend your energy defending the premise of potatoes, knowing that you'll never get even close to know whether to mash or fry them.

:(

[edit] Oh crud, I just notice there are four pages of posts I haven't read. This probably came up before...


Variant of In Frodo's Footstep - No You Can't Play Jedi

The DM has the PCs evolve in his favourite literary universe, except that the player can't play anything close to what the universe is known for, visit known places and meet known characters. Just like Star Wars, but no Jedi. And no Spaceships. And no Empire or Rebels. And no Wookies or Rodians. And robots aren't called droids around here. But otherwise its just like Star Wars!

Solution: Just admit to yourself that you are not playing Star Wars, and hope for the best...


In Frodo's Footsteps...
The DM has the players evolve in his favourite literary universe in the wake of the the book's main protagonists. Obviously, the players can never meet the book's protagonists, because "it didn't happened in the book". Their actions can never outshine those of the book's protagonists, otherwise the book would have been about the players and not the protagonists. PCs' actions can't change anything that will happen to the book's protagonists either, affect the outcome of the story or meet anyone that the protagonists will eventually meet cause that could alter the story as written in the book. In all other respect the game is just like the book, swears the DM, except that the players know that the real story happens offstage and that their story is doomed to be secondary.

Solution: Roll with it or rebel. Either the DM does it well and the PCs don't feel cheated, or try to derail the game as mush as possible and watch the DM's struggle to keep his precious story intact!


Ciaran Barnes wrote:
I am not usre how to feel about Zeal. Uses per day and +level to damage is much like Smite Evil

smite, challenge and zeal all have identical uses per day and (base) +damage.

smite has +CHA to attack and to AC
challenge has +1 plus +1/4 levels to something else, based on order
zeal has +CHA to something else based, on oath

smite is against 1 opponent until dead or paladin rests
challenge is against 1 opponent until dead or combat ends
zeal is against any opponents until duration (CHA rounds) ends

smite is restricted to Evil but bypasses DR
challenge has -2 AC againt opponents other than challengee
zeal has no restriction other than short duration - perhaps there a problem here?

Smite has extra damage against evil dragon, fiend or undead. Challenge has none of that, but some class features are order-specific. Oath of Retribution recreates smite for 1 type of ennemy.

This is how things are - I'm open to all suggestions!


Original version had zeal based on cavalier challenge, then got changed. Somehow things got a bit messy there. A rewrite in in order.

[edit] Thing aren't that far of. Zeal has more targets but has limited duration. CHA bonus is stronger than +1 plus +1/4 levels at low level but +1 plus +1/4 levels is better at high level unless your CHA is very high (and also doesn't make your charatcer as MAD).

+1 plus +1/4 levels comes back in many instances; that could be worked into a uniformed progression. Constistency is usually a good thing.

On the other hand, I like that the class is based on CHA because the knight-errant, being an ex-paladin, is likely to have high-ish CHA.


Arrius wrote:
You shouldn't keep uploading several versions as separate threads.

I'm torn about this since we can't edit OP. Now I'm simply repeating what users did in the past.

Link to google doc is the way to go, but I didn't create one in the last thread.


I'm importing this from a previous thread

Ciaran Barnes wrote:

My favorite thing about this is the wonderful blend of crunch and fluff inherent to the oath and taboo class features. A hard thing to accomplish.

However, I'm seeing a -bit- of a problem with violations of the taboos. Some of them are violated mechanically, some through role-playing. In some groups, this is a non-issue. For the benefit of other groups, I recommend expanding the description of some of the taboos to include one or to examples of how a violation happens.

For example, how does one violate anonymity? By adopting a new name and gain renown? By going back to his homeland and taking advantage of the rights and privileges of being born to a rich family? Sounds easy to never violate - except in a backstory-heavy campaign.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, the "forsworn" taboos have clear mechanical means of violating them. No roleplaying necessary.

Forsworn weapons needs a fix or two. First, it would be easier and more clear to say that he can cast greater magic weapons once per day as a spell-like ability, instead of as a cleric. Also, feats such as weapon focus and improved critical do not affect weapon groups - they affect specific weapons.

I would expand forsworn mount a bit. In all my years of gaming I have never had to make a check for a forced march. Perhaps it could be change to a +4 bonus to Constitution checks made to avoid becoming fatigued or exhausted. Still not something that will come up a lot, but broader in scope and more likely to come up at all.

I realize now that I need to review taboos.

I think it's ok that some taboos have a mechanical impact while other are about roleplay. Even those related to roleplay can have an impact too, preventing the character from gaining ranks in the military or using contacts made with his past identity. The key, I believe, is to clarify things a bit further. As a whole I'm satisfied with the options provided; their impact need clarification.

Spell-like ability is indeed favorable to "cast like a cleric". As for weapon focus, the idea was to make a group out of the group of weapons and grant weapon group focus etc. It's clumsy; back to the drawing board for that one...


Ciaran Barnes wrote:

However, I'm seeing a -bit- of a problem with violations of the taboos. Some of them are violated mechically, some through role-playing.

For example, how does one violate anonymity? By adopting a new name and gain reknown? By going back to his homeland and taking advantage of the rights and privaledges of being born to a rich family? Sounds easy to never violate - except in a backstory-heavy campaign.

On the opposite end of the spectum, the "forsword" taboos have clear mechanical means of violating them. No roleplaying neccessary.

Forsworn weapons needs a fix or two (...)

Solid points all around. I've imported your message here


Issac Daneil wrote:
My only concern was that the taboo of asceticism gave him immunity to Charm rather quick for a class (lvl 1)

Yes, the taboos and their benefits/flaws are the most shaky part of the class at the moment.

I was considering having a uniform progression, which could be indicated in the class chart (not unlike the Monk's AC bonus) to determine bonuses granted by taboos.

That's if taboos should have a benefit at all; they could work only as less strict version of the paladin's code or cavalier's order edicts.


KenderKin wrote:
How about also open to those turning from evil.

You mean evil baddies converting to the good side? Interesting. The class wasn't created with that in mind, but that could work. Another oath tailored for that perhaps?


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Here's the updated version.

Feel free to report mistakes, and your comments are welcome.

I started a new thread here for the 3rd draft, but for the sake of those who dotted this one, here it is in full:

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The Knight-Errant
The paladin’s code is a hard one to withhold. It demands no less than a lifetime of absolute dedication and doesn’t allows for the slightest excess of conduct. Those who manage to live by this code are remarkable heroes indeed, but not all succeed. Those who fail to live-up to these standards lose their honor, the confidence of their order, the favors of their gods and their faith in themselves. When a paladin falls, the very foundations of their soul shatter. Some quest for atonement, some others retire in disgrace. A few even give-in to their heart’s dark desires and forever turn to evil…

Then there are those who refuse to yield despite their tarnished honor. Picking up their fallen weapons, they do not abandon their allies, their faith and their cause. These are the knights-errant, paladins no more but great heroes still.

Role: The Knight-errant is a warrior first and foremost. He is both defensively and offensively strong, buoyed by the strength of his convictions. Ex-paladins are the most likely candidate to multiclass as knights-errant as special advantages are granted to them when taking levels in this class. However, this class is also apt to fit other classes (or character concepts) with a defined alignment, code of conduct, order or any other requirement of honor that was broken or somehow violated. Hence it may also include ex-cavaliers, ex-clerics, ex-monks and others. It is also possible for a character to start as a knight-errant from 1st level if this class fits the character’s concept.

Alignment: Knights-errant are often Lawful for the requirements of fidelity make it hard for non-lawful characters to embrace this class. That does not preclude such however, and the class faces no alignment restriction.
Hit Die: d10
Class Skills: Craft (Int), Climb (Str), Diplomacy (Cha), Handle Animal (Cha), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (nobility), Knowledge (religion), Profession (Wis), Ride (Dex), Sense Motive (Wis), Survival and Swim (Str).
Skill ranks at each level: 2 + Int bonus.
BAB: good
Fort: good
Ref: poor
Will: good
Spells: none

level 1: Acceptance of fate, oath, taboo, zeal 1/day
level 2: Oath ability
level 3: Inner strength
level 4: zeal 2/day
level 5: Bonus feat
level 6: Inner strength
level 7: zeal 3/day
level 8: Oath ability
level 9: Inner strength
level 10: zeal 4/day
level 11: Bonus feat
level 12: Inner strength
level 13: zeal 5/day
level 14: Inspiring presence
level 15: Oath ability
level 16: zeal 6/day
level 17: Bonus feat
level 18: intimidating presence
level 19: zeal 7/day
level 20: Redemption

Class Features
All of the following are class features for the Knight-Errant class.

Weapon and Armour Proficiency: The knight-errant is proficient with all simple and martial weapons, with all types of armor (heavy, medium, and light), and with shields (except tower shields).

Acceptance of Fate (Ex): Once he has accepted his failure, the fallen paladin trades in all his ex-paladin levels for knight-errant levels on a 1-to-1 basis. Unlike the swift and traumatic transformation of the antipaladin, the passage form ex-paladin to knight-errant is a slow process taking weeks, sometimes months to occur.

Paladins choosing to become knights-errant cannot regain lost paladin abilities via an atonement spell, nor can they exchange ex-paladin levels for antipaladin levels; the knight-errant has relented any former glory to atone or bargain for darker powers. It is in the acceptance of his fate that the knight-errant finds the strength to carry on.

Oath (Ex): Upon taking his first level in this class, the knight-errant swears the oath that will guide his actions for the rest of his adventuring days. Unlike the paladin’s strict code of conduct, the knight-errant’s oath is a broad directive without specific edicts, granting the knight-errant a number of special abilities.

Taboo (Ex): With each oath comes a taboo; a self-imposed condition that the knight-errant undertakes to remember and respect his oath. At first level, the knight-errant must select one of the following taboos. If the knight-errant violates his taboo in any way, he loses all benefits of his oath for 24 hours.

Anonymity (Su): The knight-errant removes his coat of arms, changes his appearance and abandons his former name to sever himself from the person he once was. Leaving his past behind, the knight-errant seeks redemption without fame or distinction. This self-denial makes the knight-errant hard to read via magical means. The effect of this taboo is identical to an amulet of mind shielding.

Asceticism (Su): The knight-errant swears off all pleasures of the flesh such as fine food, alcohol and lovers. This contemplation teaches mental resilience. The knight-errant is immune to sleep and charm spells.

Charity (Su): The knight-errant will not refuse any requests for aid or alms. He must divest himself of any wealth not immediately needed, giving it to those that do. The knight-errant must give 25% of his personal wealth or downtime between adventures. In doing so, the knight-errant keeps his conscience strong and clean, gaining one extra daily use of his inner strength ability.

Exile (Ex): The knight-errant leaves his past behind – literally – by leaving his homeland and living the life of a vagabond, never to settle permanently in any country or organization. In his wanderings, the knight-errant learns from many cultures, gaining the ability to communicate with any humanoid creature. However, the accent and mannerism of the knight-errant always betrays him as a foreigner.

Forsworn Weapons (Su): The knight-errant has forsworn the use of any martial and exotic weapons, instead vowing to use only simplistic tools to defend himself and attacks his foes. The following list constitutes the only weapons allowed to the knight-errant: club, hatchet, quarterstaff, dagger and sling, in addition to any improvised weapons he may come across. This narrow focus allows the knight errant to channel his inner self, gaining the ability to cast greater magic weapon on his own weapons once per day as a cleric of his level.

In addition, the knight-errant treats all these weapons as a single group for the purpose of weapon specific feats such as weapon focus or improved critical. Upon acquiring this taboo, a knight-errant automatically re-trains any weapon related feat to fit this group of weapons.

Forsworn Armour (Ex): The knight-errant has forsworn the use of armor of any sort (but may still use shields and other protective magic items). This has given him insights he would not have had otherwise. When unarmored and unencumbered, the knight-errant adds his Wisdom bonus (if any) to his AC and his CMD. In addition, a knight-errant gains a +1 bonus to AC and CMD at 4th level. This bonus increases by 1 for every four knight-errant levels thereafter, up to a maximum of +5 at 20th level.

Forsworn Mount (Ex): The knight-errant has sworn to go without mount, cart or carriage. This has improved the knight-errant’s stride and endurance. Add +10 feet to the knight-errant base speed. In addition, the knight-errant is gains a +4 morale bonus on Fortitude saving throws when performing a forced march.

Zeal (Ex): Once per day, a knight-errant can declare that he is fighting for the fulfillment of his oath. Bolstered by his convictions, the knight-errant’s melee attacks deal extra damage equal to his level. This ability remains in effect for a number of rounds equal to the knight-errant’s Charisma modifier and affect all attacks against any number of opponents until the duration expires. The knight-errant can use this ability once per day at 1st level, plus one additional time per day for every three levels beyond 1st, to a maximum of seven times per day at 19th level.

The knight-errant gains additional benefits with this ability based on his sworn oath, as indicated below.

Inner Strength (Su): Starting at 3rd level, the knight-errant can draw on his reserves of inner strength to shrug off a condition that weakens his abilities. The knight-errant can remove one condition at 3rd level as specified by his oath, plus one additional condition every three levels beyond 3rd, to a maximum of four specific conditions at 12th level. The knight-errant can use this ability a number of times per day equal to his Charisma modifier (minimum 1).

Oath Ability (Ex or Su): Upon reaching 2nd, 8th and 15th level, the knight-errant gains new abilities based on the oath that he has vowed.

Bonus Feat (Ex): At 6th level, and at every six levels thereafter, a knight-errant gains a bonus feat in addition to those gained from normal advancement. These bonus feats must be selected from those listed as combat feats. The knight-errant must meet the prerequisites of these bonus feats.

Inspiring Presence (Ex): Upon reaching 14th level, the knight-errant has proven that one can fall and rise again, inspiring his friends’ to greatness. As long as the knight-errant is conscious and visible, all allies within 60 feet receive a +2 morale bonus on saving throws against fear. In addition, allies within 60 feet receive a +2 morale bonus on attack and damage rolls made as part of a charge.

Intimidating Presence (Ex): Upon reaching 18th level, the knight-errant’s inspiring presence improves further, striking doubt and fear in his foes. Following a charge led by the knight-errant, all enemies within 60 feet receive a -2 penalty on all attack rolls until the knight-errant’s next round. This ability is a fear effect.

Redemption (Su): At 20th level, the knight-errant has finally redeemed his past actions and may seek atonement for his fall from grace. While the knight-errant cannot regain his paladin levels this way, he may ignore his taboo’s limitations while conserving its benefits. Reunited with his patron deity, the knight-errant gains DR 10/evil and immunity to all compulsion spells and effects.


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KNIGHT-ERRANT OATHS
The following oaths represent the most common sworn vows by knights-errant.

OATH OF PROTECTION
Upon taking this oath, the knight-errant swears to protect the innocents, the weak and those who are in distress. This oath is popular among paladins who fell by choosing between two evils, usually to the detriment of friends or innocents who lost their lives in the process. The knight-errant may not have lived up the code as a paladin, but never again will he let down his friends and those who count on his sword and shield for protection.

Oath of Protection:

Zeal (Ex): A protector knight-errant is stalwart in his defense. Whenever a protector knight-errant declares his zeal, he receives a bonus to his armor class equal to his Charisma modifier in addition to the bonus to damage granted by this ability.

Inner Strength (Su): The protector knight-errant can rely on his reserves of strength to stay alert and ready to protect his friends and wards. When using this ability, the knight-errant automatically recovers from the sickened condition.


    At 6th level, the protector knight-errant can also cure the diseased condition.
    At 9th level, the protector knight-errant can also cure the nauseated condition.
    At 12th level, the protector knight-errant can also cure the blinded and deafened conditions.

Oath Abilities: A knight-errant who pledge to the oath of protection gains the following abilities as he increases in levels.

Zealous Shielding (Ex): Starting from 2nd level, a protector knight-errant may extend its bonus to armor class provided by its zeal ability to an adjacent ally. Upon reaching 11th level, the knight-errant may protect two adjacent allies this way. This bonus last for as long as the knight-errant’s zeal ability is in effect.

Mobile Sentinel (Ex): Upon reaching 8th level, a protector knight-errant may take a 5-foot step to intercept an opponent moving toward an ally. This may put the knight-errant in a position to make an attack of opportunity or intercept the straight line between a charging foe and its target. When a protector knight-errant intercepts a charge this way, he becomes the new target of the attack.
The protector knight-errant can use this ability once per round.

Redirect Blow (Ex): At 15th level, a protector knight-errant can make an attack of opportunity to redirect upon himself a blow aimed at an adjacent target. The protector knight-errant thus becomes the new target of the attack and may receive damage. This ability must be declared before the attack roll is made. The attack is made against the knight-errant’s AC and defenses, even if the creature could not normally reach or attack the knight-errant. The knight-errant loses any cover or concealment bonuses when redirecting the attack. Attacks that do not use an attack roll cannot be redirected this way.

OATH OF QUEST
Upon taking this oath, the knight-errant swears to undertake a quest for some cause, ideal, item, or person. Regardless of the object of the quest, it is a representation of an idyllic concept that can never truly be achieved, even if the quest starts with a realistic goal. This oath is popular among ex-paladins whose fall was caused by their own pride or other personal flaw. Through these quests, the knight-errant hopes to regain much of his former glory and purity.

Oath of Quest:

Zeal (Ex): A questing knight-errant is both focused and strong willed. Whenever a knight-errant declares his zeal, he receives a bonus to all his saving throws equal to his Charisma bonus in addition to the bonus to damage granted by this ability.

Inner Strength (Su): The questing knight-errant can focus on the object of his quest to gather inner strength when he feels weakened. When using this ability, the knight-errant automatically recovers from the fatigued condition.


    At 6th level, the questing knight-errant can also cure the dazed condition.
    At 9th level, the questing knight-errant can also cure the exhausted condition.
    At 12th level, the questing knight-errant can also cure the stunned condition.

Oath Abilities: A knight-errant who pledge to this oath gains the following abilities as he increases in level.

Healing (Su): At 2nd level, the knight-errant can surrounded himself with a healing light, gaining fast healing 1 whenever he declares his zeal. This causes the knight-errant to heal 1 point of damage each round as long as he is alive and his zeal ability is in effect. The amount of healing increases by 1 point for every three knight-errant levels he possesses.

Divine Bond (Sp): Upon reaching 8th level, the questing knight-errant reunites with his bonded weapon or mount during one of its quests (or forms a bond if he had never made one before). This ability is otherwise identical to the 5th level paladin’s ability of the same name. The exact figures of this ability are calculated retroactively from 5th level.

Purity of Body: Upon reaching 15th level, the knight-errant gains immunity to all diseases (including supernatural and magical diseases) and poisons of all kind.

OATH OF RETRIBUTION
Upon taking this oath, the knight-errant swears to take revenge on those he deems responsible for his fall. This oath is frequently taken by ex-paladins who lost their paladinhood through the manipulations and treacheries of others. Knights-errant who swear this oath are often driven by a slow-burning bitterness, allowing them to track down these individuals, foiling their plans, and confronting their emissaries. As with the oath of quest, this oath usually evolves into a perpetual fight against similar deceitful organizations and societies, long after the initial perpetrators have been brought down by the knight-errant.

Oath of Retribution:

Zeal (Ex): An avenger knight-errant is determined to bring his enemies down. Whenever a knight-errant declares his zeal, he receives a bonus to his attack rolls equal to his Charisma modifier in addition to the bonus to damage granted by this ability.

Inner Strength (Su): The avenger knight-errant can rely on his resolve to overcome moments of weakness. When using this ability, the knight-errant automatically recovers from the shaken condition.


    At 6th level, the avenger knight-errant can also cure the staggered condition.
    At 9th level, the avenger knight-errant can also cure the frightened condition.
    At 12th level, the avenger knight-errant can also cure the paralysed condition.

Oath Abilities:[/i] A knight-errant who pledge to this oath gains the following abilities as he increases in level.

[b]Sworn Enemy (Ex): From 2nd level, the knight-errant declares a specific group of people or creatures as his sworn enemy in accordance to the subjects of his oath. This is a much narrower category than a ranger’s favored enemy. Possible sworn enemies include nationalities, ethnicities, groups, tribes and organizations within a given subtype of humanoid creatures (evil human cultists for example). Possible sworn enemies also include evil outsiders, evil dragons and undead. Against these enemies, the avenger knight-errant gains a +2 bonus on Bluff, Knowledge, Perception, Sense Motive, and Survival checks against the selected group. Likewise, he gets a +2 bonus on weapon attack and damage rolls against them. An avenger knight-errant may make Knowledge skill checks untrained when attempting to identify these creatures.

Zealous Smite (Ex): Upon reaching 8th level, the avenger knight-errant’s zeal ability improves when targeted against his sworn enemy. When the knight-errant declares his zeal against such creature, the bonus to damage on the first successful attack increases to 2 points of damage per level the knight-errant possesses and automatically bypasses any DR the creature might possess. In addition, while zealous smite is in effect, the knight-errant gains a deflection bonus equal to his Charisma modifier (if any) to his AC against attacks made by the target(s) of the zealous smite.

Grim Determination (Ex): Upon reaching 15th level, the avenger knight-errant becomes so focused and determined that he becomes immune to all mind-affecting spells as long as his zeal ability is in effect.

OATH OF PIETY
Upon taking this oath, the knight-errant swears to withhold the tenets of his faith above any other cause. The knight-errant’s may have lost its honor, but he has not forsaken his god, goddess or celestial patron. This oath is popular amongst ex-paladin who felt torn between their code and their religious doctrines, knowing that unhampered faith will allow them to succeed where they have failed before. Many such knights-errant multiclass as clerics or inquisitors.

Oath of Piety:

Zeal (Ex): Stalwart in his faith, a pious knight-errant knows that his soul is well guarded. Whenever a knight-errant declares his zeal, he becomes immune to charm and fear spells and effects for as long as the ability is in effect.

Inner Strength (Su): The pious knight-errant can channel the might of his god or goddess to help himself. Firm in his religious belief, the pious knight-errant can cure three conditions at 3rd level, and three more every three levels thereafter.

    At 3rd level, the pious knight-errant can cure the fatigued, shaken, and sickened conditions.
    At 6th level, the pious knight-errant can also cure the dazed, diseased and staggered conditions.
    At 9th level, the pious knight-errant can also cure the exhausted, frightened and nauseated conditions.
    At 12th level, the pious knight-errant can also cure the blinded/deafened, paralyzed and stunned conditions.

Oath Abilities: A knight-errant who pledge to this oath gains the following abilities as he increases in level.

Enduring Faith (Su): From 2nd level, a pious knight-errant gains the ability to cast orisons (0-level spells) from the cleric spell list. A pious knight-errant can prepare three orisons per day. These spells are cast like any other spell, but they are not expended when cast and may be used again

At 4th level, the pious knight-errant’s divine magic improves further, gaining the ability to cast spells like a paladin of its level.
A pious knight-errant must choose and prepare his spells in advance.
To prepare or cast a spell, a pious knight-errant must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a pious knight-errant’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the pious knight-errant’s Charisma modifier.

Like other spellcasters, a pious knight-errant can cast only a certain number of spells of each spell level per day. His base daily spell allotment is identical to that of a paladin. In addition, he receives bonus spells per day if he has a high Charisma score (see Table: Ability Modifiers and Bonus Spells). When Table: Paladin indicates that the paladin gets 0 spells per day of a given spell level, the pious knight-errant gains only the bonus spells he would be entitled to based on his Charisma score for that spell level.

A pious knight-errant must spend 1 hour each day in quiet prayer and meditation to regain his daily allotment of spells. A pious knight-errant may prepare and cast any spell on the paladin spell list, provided that he can cast spells of that level, but he must choose which spells to prepare during his daily meditation.

At 4th level and higher, the pious knight-errant’s caster level is equal to his pious knight-errant level – 3.

Channel Positive Energy (Su): When a pious knight-errant reaches 8th level, he gains the supernatural ability to channel positive energy like a cleric. A knight-errant can use this ability a number of times per day equal to his charisma modifier and uses his knight-errant level as his effective cleric level when channeling positive energy. This is a Charisma-based ability.

Inspire Inner Strength (Su): Upon reaching 15th level, the pious knight-errant can whisper inspiring words of determination to an afflicted ally. This ability allows the pious knight-errant to use his inner strength ability on an ally within 5 feet as a standard action.


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The Knight-Errant
The paladin’s code is a hard one to withhold. It demands no less than a lifetime of absolute dedication and doesn’t allows for the slightest excess of conduct. Those who manage to live by this code are remarkable heroes indeed, but not all succeed. Those who fail to live-up to these standards lose their honor, the confidence of their order, the favors of their gods and their faith in themselves. When a paladin falls, the very foundations of their soul shatter. Some quest for atonement, some others retire in disgrace. A few even give-in to their heart’s dark desires and forever turn to evil…

Then there are those who refuse to yield despite their tarnished honor. Picking up their fallen weapons, they do not abandon their allies, their faith and their cause. These are the knights-errant, paladins no more but great heroes still.

Role: The Knight-errant is a warrior first and foremost. He is both defensively and offensively strong, buoyed by the strength of his convictions. Ex-paladins are the most likely candidate to multiclass as knights-errant as special advantages are granted to them when taking levels in this class. However, this class is also apt to fit other classes (or character concepts) with a defined alignment, code of conduct, order or any other requirement of honor that was broken or somehow violated. Hence it may also include ex-cavaliers, ex-clerics, ex-monks and others. It is also possible for a character to start as a knight-errant from 1st level if this class fits the character’s concept.

Alignment: Knights-errant are often Lawful for the requirements of fidelity make it hard for non-lawful characters to embrace this class. That does not preclude such however, and the class faces no alignment restriction.

Hit Die: d10

Class Skills: Craft (Int), Climb (Str), Diplomacy (Cha), Handle Animal (Cha), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (nobility), Knowledge (religion), Profession (Wis), Ride (Dex), Sense Motive (Wis), Survival and Swim (Str).

Skill ranks at each level: 2 + Int bonus.

BAB: good
Fort: good
Ref: poor
Will: good

Spells: none

level 1: Acceptance of fate, oath, taboo, zeal 1/day
level 2: Oath ability
level 3: Inner strength
level 4: zeal 2/day
level 5: Bonus feat
level 6: Inner strength
level 7: zeal 3/day
level 8: Oath ability
level 9: Inner strength
level 10: zeal 4/day
level 11: Bonus feat
level 12: Inner strength
level 13: zeal 5/day
level 14: Inspiring presence
level 15: Oath ability
level 16: zeal 6/day
level 17: Bonus feat
level 18: intimidating presence
level 19: zeal 7/day
level 20: Redemption

Class Features
All of the following are class features for the Knight-Errant class.

Weapon and Armour Proficiency: The knight-errant is proficient with all simple and martial weapons, with all types of armor (heavy, medium, and light), and with shields (except tower shields).

Acceptance of Fate (Ex): Once he has accepted his failure, the fallen paladin trades in all his ex-paladin levels for knight-errant levels on a 1-to-1 basis. Unlike the swift and traumatic transformation of the antipaladin, the passage form ex-paladin to knight-errant is a slow process taking weeks, sometimes months to occur.

Paladins choosing to become knights-errant cannot regain lost paladin abilities via an atonement spell, nor can they exchange ex-paladin levels for antipaladin levels; the knight-errant has relented any former glory to atone or bargain for darker powers. It is in the acceptance of his fate that the knight-errant finds the strength to carry on.

Oath (Ex): Upon taking his first level in this class, the knight-errant swears the oath that will guide his actions for the rest of his adventuring days. Unlike the paladin’s strict code of conduct, the knight-errant’s oath is a broad directive without specific edicts, granting the knight-errant a number of special abilities.

Taboo (Ex): With each oath comes a taboo; a self-imposed condition that the knight-errant undertakes to remember and respect his oath. At first level, the knight-errant must select one of the following taboos. If the knight-errant violates his taboo in any way, he loses all benefits of his oath for 24 hours.

Anonymity (Su): The knight-errant removes his coat of arms, changes his appearance and abandons his former name to sever himself from the person he once was. Leaving his past behind, the knight-errant seeks redemption without fame or distinction. This self-denial makes the knight-errant hard to read via magical means. The effect of this taboo is identical to an amulet of mind shielding.

Asceticism (Su): The knight-errant swears off all pleasures of the flesh such as fine food, alcohol and lovers. This contemplation teaches mental resilience. The knight-errant is immune to sleep and charm spells.

Charity (Su): The knight-errant will not refuse any requests for aid or alms. He must divest himself of any wealth not immediately needed, giving it to those that do. The knight-errant must give 25% of his personal wealth or downtime between adventures. In doing so, the knight-errant keeps his conscience strong and clean, gaining one extra daily use of his inner strength ability.

Exile (Ex): The knight-errant leaves his past behind – literally – by leaving his homeland and living the life of a vagabond, never to settle permanently in any country or organization. In his wanderings, the knight-errant learns from many cultures, gaining the ability to communicate with any humanoid creature. However, the accent and mannerism of the knight-errant always betrays him as a foreigner.

Forsworn Weapons (Su): The knight-errant has forsworn the use of any martial and exotic weapons, instead vowing to use only simplistic tools to defend himself and attacks his foes. The following list constitutes the only weapons allowed to the knight-errant: club, hatchet, quarterstaff, dagger and sling, in addition to any improvised weapons he may come across. This narrow focus allows the knight errant to channel his inner self, gaining the ability to cast greater magic weapon on his own weapons once per day as a cleric of his level.

In addition, the knight-errant treats all these weapons as a single group for the purpose of weapon specific feats such as weapon focus or improved critical. Upon acquiring this taboo, a knight-errant automatically re-trains any weapon related feat to fit this group of weapons.

Forsworn Armour (Ex): The knight-errant has forsworn the use of armor of any sort (but may still use shields and other protective magic items). This has given him insights he would not have had otherwise. When unarmored and unencumbered, the knight-errant adds his Wisdom bonus (if any) to his AC and his CMD. In addition, a knight-errant gains a +1 bonus to AC and CMD at 4th level. This bonus increases by 1 for every four knight-errant levels thereafter, up to a maximum of +5 at 20th level.

Forsworn Mount (Ex): The knight-errant has sworn to go without mount, cart or carriage. This has improved the knight-errant’s stride and endurance. Add +10 feet to the knight-errant base speed. In addition, the knight-errant is gains a +4 morale bonus on Fortitude saving throws when performing a forced march.

Zeal (Ex): Once per day, a knight-errant can declare that he is fighting for the fulfillment of his oath. Bolstered by his convictions, the knight-errant’s melee attacks deal extra damage equal to his level. This ability remains in effect for a number of rounds equal to the knight-errant’s Charisma modifier and affect all attacks against any number of opponents until the duration expires. The knight-errant can use this ability once per day at 1st level, plus one additional time per day for every three levels beyond 1st, to a maximum of seven times per day at 19th level.

The knight-errant gains additional benefits with this ability based on his sworn oath, as indicated below.

Inner Strength (Su): Starting at 3rd level, the knight-errant can draw on his reserves of inner strength to shrug off a condition that weakens his abilities. The knight-errant can remove one condition at 3rd level as specified by his oath, plus one additional condition every three levels beyond 3rd, to a maximum of four specific conditions at 12th level. The knight-errant can use this ability a number of times per day equal to his Charisma modifier (minimum 1).

Oath Ability (Ex or Su): Upon reaching 2nd, 8th and 15th level, the knight-errant gains new abilities based on the oath that he has vowed.

Bonus Feat (Ex): At 6th level, and at every six levels thereafter, a knight-errant gains a bonus feat in addition to those gained from normal advancement. These bonus feats must be selected from those listed as combat feats. The knight-errant must meet the prerequisites of these bonus feats.

Inspiring Presence (Ex): Upon reaching 14th level, the knight-errant has proven that one can fall and rise again, inspiring his friends’ to greatness. As long as the knight-errant is conscious and visible, all allies within 60 feet receive a +2 morale bonus on saving throws against fear. In addition, allies within 60 feet receive a +2 morale bonus on attack and damage rolls made as part of a charge.

Intimidating Presence (Ex): Upon reaching 18th level, the knight-errant’s inspiring presence improves further, striking doubt and fear in his foes. Following a charge led by the knight-errant, all enemies within 60 feet receive a -2 penalty on all attack rolls until the knight-errant’s next round. This ability is a fear effect.

Redemption (Su): At 20th level, the knight-errant has finally redeemed his past actions and may seek atonement for his fall from grace. While the knight-errant cannot regain his paladin levels this way, he may ignore his taboo’s limitations while conserving its benefits. Reunited with his patron deity, the knight-errant gains DR 10/evil and immunity to all compulsion spells and effects.


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THE KNIGHT-ERRANT V3.0
The knight-errant is a 20-level alternate base class allowing a fallen paladin character to exchange her ex-paladin level for knight-errant levels on a 1-to-1 basis. While similar to the 3e D&D’s blackguard and the Pathfinder RPG’s antipaladin in this regard, the knight-errant is not meant to create a villain; this class attempts to create a tragic hero with a troubled soul on a life-long quest for redemption, serenity or peace.

This class assumes that the gaming group is comfortable with the idea that a paladin may fall and still progress as a player character of comparable strength . This class was created with the purpose of offering a middle ground between complete atonement, and total abandon to the forces of evil.

Credits go to Dabbler for the original design of the class. The original idea of this class was discussed in this thread.

Since there will probably be some minor alterations, the link to the most up-to-date google doc is here.

enjoy!

'findel


Ascalaphus wrote:
There's a few language errors, but conceptually this is a very cool class.

Indeed, English isn't my first language. I have a final draft somewhere that is a bit better. I'll look into it this afternoon.

'findel

(also, dotting my own thread. what happened to all my older dots?)


1 person marked this as a favorite.

*munch!*
well hello there post monster, have seen you in a while!

MMCJawa wrote:

As a fan of the Horror genre, I find Alien to be the best film of the genre. It may seem predictable now, but really it invented a lot of the horror tropes we see commonly in genre films, especially the "haunted house in space" trope, as well as reinventing horror aesthetics and monster design.

I tend to think Aliens is not only over-rated but would have probably worked better as a unrelated movie. It was "lets make a vietnam war movie in space!". I don't think its a bad movie, but well...as I said over-rated.

Agree on the first part, but I truly believe that Aliens was just as influential for the sci-fi thriller genre as Alien was to space horror. So many tropes take their origin in Aliens, and I'd say its one of the success of the Halo series (replace Ripley with Masterchief and you have the UNSC, down to ship aesthetics and Apone/Johnson sergeant).

I give as much credits to Aliens as I do to Alien - and by that I mean that I consider both movies as masterworks of their own (sub)genre.


My personal pet peeve: character sheets often look as bland as an income tax form :(

A character sheet doesn't have to drain 50% of your printer's cartridge to look better; a bit more graphic design in that department would be appreciated (by me at any case)


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Alien Resurrection was actually quite popular in my circle of friends, probably because it felt so much like a RPG party of player characters. Where Aliens felt like a troop of Imperial Guards from the Warhammer 40 000 setting, Alien Resurrection was Space Hulk meets Necromunda (this movie actually inspired a Necromunda RPG campaign now that I'm thinking of it. fun times!)

The feel of Alien Resurrection was different for sure, but so was Alien 3 compared to Aliens, which itself had a different feel from Alien, so it didn't bother us much.


Kthulhu wrote:
Ever read the Dark Horse comics? This is exactly the way they went. They killed off Ripley instead of Hicks & Newt (although Ripley later turned out to be alive after all). And some of those stories were not only better than Alien 3 and Resurrection, they were better than Aliens as well.

!

Ok, you got me interested.

To the comic-book store!


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Dragon78 wrote:
In fact if they at least left Newt alive then we could have a new trilogy with a different main character.

This!

Newt as the new (adult) protagonist backed-up by "uncle" Hicks would have been the perfect way to update the franchise without straying far from the previous Alien lore.


Kobold Cleaver wrote:

Hardcover on the way.

Boxed set.

Sweet!

I've been eyeballing this game for a long while now, if only for the beauty of the object itself. I guess that's the occasion I was waiting for.


Hello everyone,

Life took its toll and put me in hiatus for a little while. Funny, I though it would give me more time to design and playtest Journey, but it had the opposite effect.

In the meantime I've been playing some 5e edition D&D and I must admit it has exceeded my expectations. It hasn't change much of my own designs; on the contrary, it has crystallized my definition of what I like and dislike in a RPG. Among which ;

some kind of bounded accuracy allows a better transition from level to level.

"goodies" can be acquired through class features; universal character level abilities are not required for you to feel that your character is evolving.

Symmetry between attacks, spells and abilities, saves and skills untaps a great potential.

A simple and universal mechanics to deal with bonuses and penalties is liberating. It has drawbacks, but the ease of play wins in this case.

Hit points as a measure of physical exhaustion/strain rather than bleeding injuries can work well with fantasy.

I'd like actual injuries to happen sporadically with a mechanical/detrimental effect.

I'd like more granularity in the way abilities are developed.

I'd like less all-or-nothing crippling effects and more short/long or bad/worse effects.

I'd like game-outside-combat to have a bit more "meat".

In reality this isn't anything new. Many games had this before the d20 OGL took over, but I have a clearer idea of my goals than before.

Anyhow, all this to say that the project hasn't been dropped but that I'm reviewing Journey RPG with a newer, more critical eye. I'll keep posting things as they come.

'findel


137ben wrote:
It took this thread more than a month to be revived. Obviously, this thread is not using D&D 5e healing, or it would have recovered more quickly:P

No, these forums are using the gritty reality variant rule :)


thejeff wrote:
(...) maybe (hits) are not actually broken bones?

I like to see hit points as a renewable bank of "readyness" or stamina buffer, with damage representing tiring parries and taxing dodges. PCs don't get injured before they reach 0 hp.

However, the action of regaining hp is, and has always been, referred to as "healing", suggested that there is wounds to heal in the first place. Some people are also bothered that a "hit" doesn't produce a connecting hit (if damage = tiring parries). In either case, regardless of the severity of those wounds, the fact that they heal that much without magic or medicine over a period of 30 minutes is stretching verisimilitude even for D&D's standards. Thus reliance on healing kit.

It's apparently stated somewhere in the DMG that up to half its hp, a PC doesn't show much signs of battle and that from half hp, more serious cuts and bruises start to appear. That's where the "healing from below half hp requires healing kit" comes from.


Freehold DM wrote:
I didn't know the werewolf comic was available as a separate comic. if possible, I would have him sign my ancient, falling apart copy.

It was detached, recycled from one of my friend's water damaged book IIRC.


Diffan wrote:
lastknightleft wrote:
(...) As for the non-magical healing funny story. When I read the PHB I came up with a house rule and my players agreed with it. You can use HD recovery during a short rest as long as you use one charge from a healers kit per character healing.(...)
If I'm not mistaken that was the way it originally was in the Playtest, that if you wanted to spend your Hit Die, you needed a Healer's Kit to do so. Now it just helps stabilize people. Though I'm not entirely sure what this houserule is supposed to do or represent?

The fact that broken bones don't heal overnight without some kind of explanation, I guess.

I've heard of people allowing HD healing during short rest up to half the character's hp, but requires magical healing or healing kit when below 1/2 hp.


One of my idols and major inspiration of my life as an artist (along with Brian Froud).

DiTerlizzi would shape what I expect art to be in a RPG (incidentally, I was also drawn to Pathfinder for the coherency and consistency of their art).

I've boxed all of my 2ed AD&D stuff except for Planescape Monster Compendium I and II, the Planewalker's handbook, the Factol's Manifesto and Uncaged: Face of Sigil which I consider works of art. I wish I still had the comic that went along the first WoD's Werewolf: The Apocalypse. I managed to lose the one that came with Hellbound too, gaahhhh.


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I'm digging 5th edition with the same kind of enthusiasm I had discovering 2e AD&D some 20 years ago, which is saying much. That's a pleasant surprise since the playtests left me rather cool about the whole D&D next thing.

In no order, these are the things i like best:

I can learn and teach the game easily to any type of crowd, be it veteran players or my 7 years-old kids. Even the Beginner's Box wasn't that straightforward (although I still think this was a turning point in RPG history and I will always love Paizo for that).

Choices and options are meaningful both in themselves and in relations to each others. One of my main criticism of 3.5 was that it takes a significant level of game mastery to see how relevant a +1 to hit is compared to a +2 damage or a +1 to one kind of save etc, and the only reason why the Beginner's Box will never be completely kid friendly.

5th edition is easily customizable, and houserules are less likely to crash the game like the house of card that late 3.5 was. Judgement on the fly, rule twists affecting a single scene, plug-and-play subsystems work better here than in any other iteration of D&D since the "advanced" series.

Low level threats can be used much longer into the game thanks to bounded accuracy. I had my doubts at first (especially concerning skills), but now I'm a convert.

Things are loose enough yet the guidelines are precise enough to play the game in the style/genre/ambiance that works for your group. Heck, even sword-and-sorcery and low-magic can work with minimal adjustments.

Settings are less threatened to fall in the Tippyverse paradigm thanks to a better iteration, scaling and distribution of spells. Magic is still a bit too flashy and many spells are still too "out there" for me, but the urge to find a low(er) magic setting is much diminished by 5th ed default magic.

Pathfinder art and layout is still best, but 5th edition is pretty darn good. I especially like that fact that items can be visualized with an illustration or a evocative description. My biggest complaint: when will RPGs publish a character sheet that doesn't feel like a fraggin' tax form?

So anyhow, there are more but these are the main elements that work for me.

So come-on Paizo, impress me with Pathfinder Unleashed!


TL;DR: Best game for the book-feel of Middle earth and I can recommend it enough, but its far from a high fantasy D&D/Pathfinder game. If the latter is what your players expect, they will be left unsatisfied.

Longer version: Its an excellent game. It's mechanically diverse enough without being too game-y, and is exactly what a low-magic game should be; magic and fantasy are there, you can't ignore them but it is subtle and thematic.

As other have said, it's the game that respects the feel and tone of Tolkien's work best so far, and by far. But I do say Tolkien's, but not necessarily Peter Jackson's take on Middle Earth.

That's where some players may be disappointed; if you are expecting to play a back-flipping, shield-boarding ninja-elf like Legolas, this isn't the game for you.

If on the contrary you can enjoy a long-winded literary style where armor being a liability just as much as an asset, long voyages being draining, exhausting and an important part of the campaign and resources being scarce and precious (no pun intended), then you will enjoy this game very much.

Also, the art is exquisite, coherent and quite fitting for the tone of the game.

It's worth mentioning that at the moment, the game covers regions that were not much involved in the war of the ring; so no Shire, no Mordor, no Rohan, no Gondor yet. The game covers areas more familiar with The Hobbit and is set in the aftermath of Bilbo's journey; The Anduin Vale, the Mirkwood forest, Dale and Esgaroth on the Long-Lake, the Lonely Mountain, and recently northern Eriador as well. While this sounds odd at first, it is ultimately very liberating to know that the actions of your heroes won't screw-up the upcoming events of Frodo's voyage to the Cracks of Doom.

[edit] or where you expecting more personal thoughts?

'findel


32. Purplesksin Goblin

The skin of these goblins is of a deep shade of purple due to their diet primarily consisting of vegepygmies. Their ears are also unusually long and must be trimmed monthly to avoid other goblins walking and tripping over them.

Purpleskin goblins have a +4 bonus to hide in areas primarily consisting of purple hues. In addition, Purpleskin goblins are immune to the violet effect of a prismatic ray or prismatic wall .


Continuing with the overview...

Heroic Races - the major lines and influences. Still playing with campaign-specific names, so here are the generic names.

Players must select an ethnicity and a subculture.

ELVES
Elves are Fey rather than humanoids. They can see in the dark as long as they are outside under starlight (even if the sky is covered). Elves are the race with the highest Agility.

Sea Elves: Graceful, noble and melancholic; inspired from the celtic Sidhe. They are the diminished nobility of the Fey people who chose to remain behind when the faerie world separated and departed. They live on islands in the west, the remnant of their coastal realms

Woodland Elves: Graceful but wild and warrior-like; inspired by the norse ljosalfar. They live in forested valleys of the northern fjords and are on friendly terms with the northerners and dwarves who live there.

DWARVES
Norse thematic. They are the masters of rune-magic and can see in the dark as long as a dim source of light gives some basic illumination. Dwarves are the race with highest Intuition.

Hill dwarves: Typical fantasy dwarves, living in clan-borrows under the northern hills. They are on friendly terms with northerner humans and woodland elves, but clans are prone to feud with each other.

Deep Dwarves: Live deep below the mountains; inspired from the norse svartalfar. They are the magical artisans of the world; most legendary items were made by them. They rarely venture to the surface of the world; when they do, they are likely to become adventuring heroes.

NORTHERNERS
One of the three human ethnic groups. They live by the fjords and hills of the north. Their religion depicting more humanlike gods and goddesses has supplanted the old faith in the north; priest heroes follow the northerner’s pantheon. Northerners are the race with highest Brawn and can learn the rune magic of the dwarves.

Northmen: The warrior-sailors of the north; inspired from the danes and Vikings (minus the raider and plunderer part). They are on friendly terms with dwarves and the hearthlanders of the northern marches, which they consider as 'cousins' to their own kin.

Hill Men: Shorter and swarthier than their northmen cousins, the hill men are said to have dark Fey blood, such as kobolds and goblins. They are good miners and can see in dim lights like their ancestors but to call them half-orc is a great insult.

WESTERNERS:
Another of the three human ethnic groups. Celtic-inspired people living along the western coast. Centuries ago, this people worshiped the elves as gods. Westerners are the race with the highest Presence and can learn the glamour magic of the elves.

Half-Elves: The “blessed” among westerners, typically composing the ruling class. They share some of their elven ancestors’ abilities and can see through illusions.

Men of the West: Superstitious people living among the ruins of the faerie kingdom. Many Fey still inhabits these lands and not all are benevolent, so they have developed ways to resist magic.

HEARTHLANDERS
Third human ethnic group. They are the inhabitants of the main lands between the inner sea and the northern hills. They are the most numerous but show the least national unity, with many small fiefdoms quarrelling among each other. Heartlanders are the race with the highest Acumen.

Men of Northern Marches: Cousins to the northlanders; inspired from the franks, anglo-saxon and other germanic tribes. They live in large towns and fortified burgs, each ruled by a house. These men and women make natural riders.

Men of Mixed Blood: Men and women living in the southern fiefs and along the warmer climates of the inner sea. Originally of the same stock as men of the northern marches, countless generation of marriage with nearby kingdoms made them into a people of their own. Many live in large city-states ruled by monarchy and influential members of the rising merchant class. Men of mixed blood are the most educated and cosmopolitan.


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as for alignment, I'd coin Dash as CG (doesn't think the rules apply to him. Uses powers against her sister in a "no powers!" zone/game/houserules, consciously pushes boundaries to see how far he can go before getting caught).

Where Dash is the Incredible who most likely to "go deep", violet is the one looking after the group. She isn't the kind of protector that becomes the target like Bob, she acts in shadows to strike at the most opportune moment, usually to thwart the plans of the bad guys in an unforeseen way. I hesitate between LG and NG, but I could see her developing into a LG character.


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Tacticslion wrote:
I mean, I guess I never put it in the same context as the others, because it was so blatant and heavy-handed throughout.

Yes, its an obvious trick, but a coherent trick with other characters nonetheless.

The whole movie is about transformation; its not a trick really, its (one of) the theme of the story.

Both Violet and Dash (and even Jack-Jack for that matter) change their view on things after their adventure.

At the beginning, Violet is shy in her outlook and relationship, but also in the way she handles change and her powers. It's about confidence of course, but she goes from "better be small, better be protected, better be overlooked" to "others will know I'm there and I will move forward to protect my family". That doesn't prevent her from being invisible, but her powers go from hiding to allowing her brother to run.

Dash goes from "I wish I could show the world how I'm the best" to "I'm good with fronting as close-second"

The movie shows Bob and Helen after they have been transformed. For Dash and Violet, it shows the transformation itself.


Before documents come, a bit of an overview:

Player characters in Journey RPG are called heroes. Their natural aptitudes are determined by their attributes (which many games call "stats" or "abilities").

Every hero possesses five attributes, each rated with a score ranging from 1 (poor) to 5 (very high). 2 is the baseline, but the game has attributes ranging between 0 (for negligible contribution) to 10 (for the strongest monsters). Attributes are used as modifiers to dice rolls with no differentiation between attribute score and its modifier.

Attributes don't go in the negative; in the worst case scenario, a hero simply doesn't have a bonus. The relatively short range between "average" and "very high" is meant to down play the concept of "dump stats".

Each attribute has its own saving throw. As a rule of thumb, skill checks and attack rolls are resisted, contested or opposed with a saving throw. Oftentimes, a hero is allowed to substitute a saving throw with a skill check, when appropriate.

Brawn: How big and strong the hero is. Brawn include the typical RPG stats of strength and toughness. Fortitude is the Brawn-derived saving throw, which serves to resist body-altering spells, poisons and physical manoeuvres such as grappling.

Agility: How quick and dextrous the hero is. Agility include the typical RPG stats of dexterity and quickness. Reflex is the Agility-derived saving throw, which serves to resist dodge-able spells like fireball, avoid falling or being surprised.

Acumen: How sharp and clever the hero is. Acumen includes the typical stats of intelligence and regulates the hero's knowledge and perception. Alertness is the Acumen-derived saving throw, which serves to resist being ambushed or sneaked upon.

Intuition: How in tune with the forces of nature and with its own instinct the hero is. Intuition includes the typical RPG stats of wisdom and empathy. Insight is the Intuition-derived saving throw, which serves to avoid being fooled, bluffed and disbelieve illusions.

Presence: Presence is force of character, representing strong will, stubbornness, wits, charming or inspiring personality or even frightful aura, depending on the character. Presence includes the typical stats of Charisma and other social attributes. Willpower is the Presence-derived saving throw, which serves to resist mind-affecting spells, temptation, fear and despair.


I’m getting close to unveil the whole character creation and combat chapters of Journey RPG. Actually, Journey RPG is a compendium of 5 books entitled Heroes, Adventure, Combat, Magic and Lore.

The Heroes Book is all about character creation and equipment.

The Adventure Book is about traveling (an important aspect of Journey RPG), exploring and spending downtime actions.

The Combat Book is, not surprisingly, about combat rules.

The Magic Book is about spells, rituals and the mechanical aspect of magic (including magic items and equipment).

The Lore Book is mainly about fluff, but it also includes the monster section as an appendix. The lore book is divided in five chapters, each tying with one of the Recite Lore skills that a character can learn:

Lore of the Land is a description of the setting in geography and demographics, tying with Recite (Area) Lore skill. It also fleshes out the five playable character races in more depth.

Lore of the Past is about the setting’s history and discusses the free people’s legends, superstitions, tying with the Recite Legend Lore skill.

Lore of the Divine is about the religions and gods of Journey RPG, runes, the “other world”, and is tying with the Recite Divine Lore skill.

Lore of the Arcane discusses the concepts behind magic, the history of magic, dark magic and necromancy, astronomy and astrology , other planes of existence, and tying with the Recite Arcane Lore skill.

Finally Lore of the Wild is about the Fey, the faerie world, gauntlet springs and ley lines, medicinal plants, and is tying with the Recite Nature Lore skill.


thejeff wrote:

(...) I said "Dragons fly because that's what dragons do." If they didn't fly and breath fire (or acid or whatever), they wouldn't be dragons. (Dragons are slightly tricky, since they're iconic, but varied. They'd be different dragons, at the very least.)

In a world of myth and legend, there is logic, but it's the logic of myth and legend, not of physics. If giants aren't huge they aren't giants. Things are what they are and they work as they need to to fill that role.

A four-limbed, horse sized, hydrogen filled "dragon", isn't really a Dragon. It doesn't fill the iconic role of dragon.

I can relate to that. I don't completely agree, but I could be comfortable in a game with this philosophy.


Ok, RPGs are not reality simulators. My bad

Nevertheless, if a poster asks "help me explain this", and your answer is "don't", you're not contributing to the thread and just shutting down people's opinion and denigrating their interests. This is rather frustrating...

thejeff wrote:
We're playing in a world of myth and legend. Let it work like a world of myth and legend.

That is a constructive answer however, expressing a vision of the game and not only saying "don't do it, it's badwrongfun". (although is the answer to dragon flight is magic, what happens to the dragon in an antimagic zone is, for me, a relevant question).

Personally, I find the argument that "dragons fly because magic", and magic exist "because dragons!" rather circular. Regardless of what the characters will ever know for sure, i believe that a world can work of an internal logic without losing it's "fantasy" tag.

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