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Wen Histani

KJL's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 37 posts (56 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 1 alias.


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Horrible thought.

Spoiler:
The Omega dying before it is killed is inconsistent with the rest of the film. Admittedly the Omega is different but if the death of the Omega allows it to throw its own consciousness back in time in the same way that the Alphas and Cage and Rita did (which would be consistent), then it would know how it died. The obvious requirement is then to prevent the events that led to its death. So Cage must not go onto that beach tomorrow morning. Or at least not go to Paris in the middle of the night. So the Omega relocates itself and ceases effective resistance while marshalling sufficient of its forces to defend or attack elsewhere. Cage isn't shanghied and he, Rita and J squad don't go to the Louvre. The Omega isn't killed. The Russians and Chinese push forward in the East, the USA, UK and Canada land in France unopposed, push forward carelessly thinking their enemy is finished, and then run into a massive ambush later and are wiped out?

This is consistent with what is shown in the film, allows for endless sequels if it does well, and has only taken me one showing and 2 1/2 days to think of so I'm sure someone else has thought of it before me.


Skeld wrote:
KJL wrote:
Why do spaceships in movies always have landing skids/pads instead of wheels? It would make them a right pain in the neck to move around on the ground or in a hangar.
Most of the movie spaceships I remember seeing could levitate and maneuver around like that.

True, but you have to power them up to do that. Helicopters can levitate but most of them have wheels because powering them up every time you want to move them is a bit inconvenient. Now, I grant you that anti-gravity usually doesn't have the downwash and fast-moving parts problems, but it would still be inconvenient, especially if you were doing maintenance on the drive. Battlestar Galactica often had rolling landings in combat but still had skids. So is it just that skids are cheaper and easier to model or is there some other reason?


Why do spaceships in movies always have landing skids/pads instead of wheels? It would make them a right pain in the neck to move around on the ground or in a hangar.


Given line of sight (the link in the second post gives the horizon distance for a given height) the optical limit of what you can resolve (based on a wavelength of 550nm and a pupil diameter of 5mm) would be about 0.13mm at 1m and would scale proportionately. This is the theoretical limit of optical resolution - in reality the object would probably need to be a bit bigger than that.

So, if a human is about 400mm wide under good conditions you could theoretically be able to resolve them at about 3,000,000 mm or 3km (2 miles). However, as a real life practical example, I can just about make out people silhouetted against the sky on a hilltop at 1.5km (about 1 mile). So, for heroes with brilliant eyesight, maybe 1.5 miles would be the limit to see a medium sized creature/object with sufficient contrast. How far you can make out hills, lakes, woods etc will depend on how big they are.


I'm British and as far as I'm concerned the revolution was a very long time ago (even by our standards :-) ). I'm enjoying the series a lot. I like having a British hero in an American show (even if he was a defector fighting the rest of us - we are usually on approximately the same side again these days) but one of the things particularly tickling me is that not once as far as I can recall has anyone corrected his pronunciation of "lieutenant". I suppose it's a minor irritation while a headless horseman is chopping people up but it's often the little things that rile people and it's nice to see Sleepy Hollow Sherrif's Dept. so tolerant of people's peculiarities.

I also liked the way he threw the pistol down after one shot. :-)


I saw the film last weekend, not having read the book, and enjoyed it a lot. I thought that the young actors were very good indeed, as were the special effects. Some have commented that that the actors are not as young as the characters but for those who have not read the book they are more than young enough to provoke moral disquiet over their use as soldiers and younger actors would be unlikely to have produced such nuanced performances.

This is clearly a film with moral messages but they are dealt with in a way that I found to mesh well with the story and was not jarring. Those that I took from it were:

Movie plot spoiler:

People behave differently towards enemies they perceive as people and those they perceive as unreal: In the final battle, Ender believes that he is fighting a simulation programmed by Mazer. Consequently, he ignores the non-hostile behaviour of the Formics, which he would clearly have paused to analyse and understand in "real life" because this is a tactical training scenario and the purpose of it is for him to defeat the enemy in battle, not to hold a peace conference.

People will tolerate losses in a game to achieve the "victory condition" that they would not tolerate in real life. When Alai protests that his dreadnoughts are being destroyed because Ender withdraws all the drones to shield the main weapon Ender replies "I don't care about the dreadnoughts!" but he does care when there are real lives at stake. This is skillfully built up throughout the film. This is, of course, precisely why Graff and the rest of the command tell Ender and his team that this is their final selection exercise. They want the battle fought in a specific way, resulting in the annihilation of the Formics. Ender and his team are happy to do that in a simulation but Ender, at least, would have tried to avoid that in real life. Also, to them, the entire fleet is expendable provided that victory condition is achieved. Ender will happily expend pixels but he would not have expended real people in that way.

The point at which I realised that the final exercise was actually real was only when Graff ordered the visual feed restored. The dawning horror on the faces of Ender and his team as they realised that what they had done had actually happened in reality and that they had just destroyed their own fleet, a planet and an entire species was an absolutely superb piece of acting.

The ending was quite good but frankly, given that Graff was willing (I was going to write "happy" but I don't think that is quite fair) to sacrifice both his fleet and the sanity of his command team to exterminate the Formics I can't see him letting Ender wander off into space with a Formic egg to start up the species all over again. I think he would have been more likely to grind it under his heel.

I would say this is well worth seeing. This is proving a good year for films that make you think.


el cuervo wrote:
So I'll be starting a RotRL campaign this weekend and I've seen a lot of talk about sin points in my search for hints, tips, tricks, and advice on how to run the adventure. Where do these come into play? I haven't read entirely through PF #1 yet but I haven't seen any mention of them thus far. I'd think if it's a system meant to be part of the adventure it would be mentioned early on in the text.

If you're asking where they are explained in a rules context, it's AP2, The Skinsaw Murders, page 19.


How about Day of the Triffids?


Lord Snow wrote:
re: Oswin in Asylum of the Daleks:
placing a human inside a Dalek shell is not supposed to make the human in a dalek (we could also see the Oswin had a human body), so what's up?

It's quite hard to respond to a thread like this because it is mostly about likes and dislikes rather than facts. However, I think that there is something that you have missed about Asylum of the Daleks. It doesn't invalidate your other points about the story but it may make this element make more sense.

Spoiler:
Oswin didn't have human body any more than her entire escape capsule (with oven) was inside that Dalek casing. She was fully converted into a Dalek and went mad because of it. She simply imagined that she still had a normal body and was still trapped in her (re-modelled to be more comfortable) escape capsule as a means of escaping from the horror of her true situation. The Doctor didn't see into her capsule when he looked into the Dalek eye. That was why she didn't leave with the Doctor, Amy and Rory; she could have but she couldn't face life as a Dalek so she stayed to die when the asylum was destroyed.

People choosing to die is an aspect of Steven Moffat stories that some people I know have problems with.


GM_Solspiral wrote:

"What do you think will stop me girl your pathetic faith?" -lucky7

(bonus points if you recognize the quote, hint the cross gets lit on fire)

Would that be "No, my stunning fashion sense." (Plus butane-propelled hair-spray delivered over said flaming cross)?


One of my characters recently: "I need an expendable creature!" (Immediately before being lightning-bolted in the back for about twice her hit-points).


IceniQueen wrote:

Saw this movie on Sunday. What a fun movie. Full of good laughs, action and fun make-up. The scenery was nice too.

You get lines like "The Curse of the hunger to eat crawling things. I hate that one"

I liked when Hansel just quietly moved the groupie six inches sideways. :-)


Rynjin wrote:

As for LotR: Because the eagles are not Gandalf's "friends" precisely. They owed him a favor. Enough of a favor to pull him down from a tower and fly him off to safety.

Not enough of a favor to fly into enemy territory overhead of a giant army who likely has bows sitting around waiting to be used, and the eye of the most evil creature that ever existed in their universe. And the Nazgul.

It's in the book somewhere. Not in Fellowship, it's in either Two Towers or Return of the King.

The reason an eagle went to Orthanc was not because Gandalf summoned him but because, before going to Orthanc, Gandalf asked Radagast to find out what evil beings were up to in the world and send news there. The eagle was doing Radagast a favour, not Gandalf (OK, the film departed from this).

"'How far can you bear me?' I said to Gwaihir.
"'Many leagues,' said he, 'but not to the ends of the earth. I was sent to bear tidings not burdens.'"

Gwaihir took Gandalf to Rohan where he borrowed Shadowfax and rode to Rivendell. No decision had been taken about the Ring when Gandalf escaped Orthanc. There were subsequently no eagles at the Council of Elrond and to reach the eagles a messenger would have had to cross the Misty Mountains.


Bill Dunn wrote:
My main disappointment was the amount of white and lucite on the ship without much of a nod to Trek's dark color palette. Bet the ship is all smudgy-dingey within 2 years of its 5 year mission...

See the article on self-cleaning materials and the futuristc desperado in the Journal of the Travellers' Aid Society at Steve Jackson Games.


yellowdingo wrote:

So a 'Strong' Character is one who:

  • can drag others out of trouble.
  • Doesn't need to be rescued from Adversity.
  • doesn't need emotional validation.
  • isn't so cut off from the rest of us that the distance is alienating to us.
  • isn't beyond our capacity to impose 'our needs' on the individual.

    So Strength has an aspect of Social Approval. An Acceptable limited Strength as opposed to an inhuman Strength. That frankly says more about our needs than the needs of the Character. It says we need to be able to exert some influence on the Character...because we cower in their shadow and are incapable of being what they are - able to walk off and leave the rest of us to perish.

    There is an aspect of that in a Male character named Artax in an old Scifi called 'Out of the Silence' by Erle Cox where Artax is so isolated by his intellect that he doesn't really need his own people so he is busily creating a new life form that will ride out the cataclysm that has come for their civilization - one that will evolve into Humans - or some future life form. He is 'God' - Alien and not in anyway requiring societal consent or validation of the People around him who scurry to save the remains of their civilization in 'Arks'.

  • Your original post only mentions strength but your heading mentions a "heroine". A character who walks off and leaves others to die when they could do something about it is not a hero or heroine. The audience for this type of lead character is probably quite small regardless of gender.


    What changes do you want to make and what software do you have?


    Freehold DM wrote:
    Andrew R wrote:
    Gorbacz wrote:
    meatrace wrote:
    I'm Irish. The kicking dogs of Europe.
    You Forgot About Poland!
    Im pole and irish, that has to be bonus points somewhere
    You gotta be kidding me. Wow.

    Actually being both Polish and Irish would be quite easy in Britain, especially England. There are significant Irish and Polish communities and since both have significant Catholic backgrounds they tend to mix at Catholic churches. Admittedly Polish communities sometimes have sufficient numbers to have their own chaplain and one or more Polish-language Masses each week but even then they mix with the rest of the parish on social occasions and major festivals and go to the same Catholic schools where those are available. So not really very much "wow" in my part of the world. I don't know where you are though.

    Wandered a bit off-topic - sorry.


    In "Hangman's Noose", 'The Mord Murders' is not a reference you want the press in the UK to notice (see The Moors Murders).


    nogoodscallywag wrote:

    Can a character, who is flying:

    Begin his turn falling his total allowed distance (he is 1000ft in the air) and then once he reaches the end of his fall distance then move his normal flying movement?

    If he falls 1000ft in a round, by the time he has fallen 1,000ft his round has ended so he would have no time left in which to move.


    Mok wrote:

    I'm gearing up to get a Kickstarter beginning soon that focuses on flight. One of the things I've been doing in downtime is popping in various movies that really capture a sense of flight,

    Any suggestions?

    For a first-person view, look at the opening sequences of Patriot Games and Red Riding Hood. Patriot Games in the cinema made me feel seriously air-sick, Red Riding Hood less so but noticeably. Also the plunge into the pit in Wrath of the Titans was vertigo-inducing.


    Thank you.


    What does it mean when, say, a rat does 1d3-4 damage? Obviously it doesn't heal you when it bites(!) but multiplying for a critical multiplies the modifier too so a confirmed critical would be 2d3-8 which is still negative so it doesn't seem to be just to allow damage on a critical. I'm confused...


    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    "Take that, you fiend!" (My rogue has taken a level of sorcerer that I haven't mentioned to the other players and has True Strike, so when she uses that I use the battle cry to tell the DM to adjust the AC that she has hit accordingly.)


    The first edition of Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay had a pad of character sheets that also included a booklet that included this and lots of other background detail generation. Mekton II has the same sort of thing in the main rulebook. I have both somewhere and wanted this last week but unfortunately can't find either of them:-(


    cranewings wrote:
    Most types of animals require many times their weight in food over the course of their lives; each pound of meat represents 7, 10 even 20 times the amount of resources as the weight equivalent grain. Cutting down on the amount of meat you eat to conserve resources is one of the most profound single things you can do to help the environment. Its on the level of recycling your garbage or getting rid of your car.

    There are a couple of points here. Meat is a more energy-intense food than grain so you need to eat less of it. Also, grass will grow in places that grain will not (or at least, in which it cannot be mechanically sown and harvested) so, depending upon how the animals are raised (and I know some are fed substantial amounts of grain), eating meat is not necessarily denying grain to feed people (although it may be). That said, there are still many good reasons to moderate one's meat intake and vegetarianism is a perfectly practical and reasonable choice.


    Ragadolf wrote:


    172) Sparks/flame on your finger to light that oil you poured that the monster is standing in.
    (WARNING! Does not work nearly so well when you are standing IN the oil WITH the monster!)
    ;P

    With my DM it would work MUCH better in those circumstances!


    Dragon78 wrote:
    So anyone actually see it?

    I saw it. I thought it was very good. Very funny. I liked the way Snow White escaped the wrath of the dwarfs by turning them into the heroes of the town. Really good Diplomacy roll there!


    Pyrrhic Victory wrote:

    as a history teacher I know that the difference between Scott and Welsh and Irish and English is a big deal and that Britain's legacy of Empire means that there are Indians and Asians as well not to mention Muslims...

    Muslims are not a racial group, they are a religious group. Muslims can be of any race/ethnicity.


    You might like to look at either Cold City or Hot War, both from Contested Ground (www.contestedground.co.uk). I haven't played either directly (although I am playing in an "En Garde" style pbem that uses the Hot War background). The games may work well for groups that are imaginative and like to guide the story with the GM but are less into the "acting" aspect of roleplaying as they give the player whose character has greatest success in a conflict (which may be social, intellectual or physical) the right to narrate the outcome and assign consequences (within limits set out in the rules).


    Carbon D. Metric wrote:
    Wider margins are more comfortable to read, and I am pretty sure that is the main motivation behind it. If they shrunk them much more everything would start to look cramped and wordcount per page would spike dramatically, which impacts the overall price of the book just as much as the number of pages within.

    Why does having more words on a page make the page more expensive to print?


    Alexander Kilcoyne wrote:
    I've read that only 1/3 of english people polledsaid they would even bother to watch it- as an english person still in an economic recession, it is ludicrous to have an additional bank holiday that costs the economy millions just for a wedding for a royal family that can easily afford to finance it themselves (and yet taxpayers money is wasted on advertising it)...

    Switch on the telly, see how many people are happy, and see whether that changes your mind.


    DM Wellard wrote:

    Millions of pounds worth of Taxpayers money wasted on pointless frippery for a Juniour officer and his shop girl bride..

    If I wasn't already a Republican today would have made me one.

    Power to the People...

    Yes, but millions of us have had a day off (and quite a few of the sourpusses who didn't want it have got overtime rates), got to watch a real wedding on telly (rather than a soap opera disaster), see not only the bride and groom and their families but hundreds of thousands of our fellow citizens looking really happy and had a really enjoyable time. Making people smile is a better use of my taxes than killing people - I prefer to keep that in the imagination in RPGs.

    As for being a republican, the next President to have a grandchild marry while s/he's in office won't give the US a day off to celebrate but there will still be a significant protection bill. If Britain becomes a republic the same will happen to us, and tourists won't come from the US, Canada and Australia and spend money here to watch the son of President Who? married to offset the bill a bit.

    And just why does a republican consider that a shop girl is worth less than any other citizen? Aren't republicans supposed to think that social class is unimportant (or am I missing some significance in the capital R?)?


    DM_Blake wrote:
    crmanriq wrote:
    It always seemed odd to me that unless you actively listen, you have no chance of hearing things in another room. Or the converse, that the DM says "everyone make a perception check" thereby alerting them to the fact that there is something that they should be trying to perceive.

    I definitely hear what you're saying.

    No, you certainly don't want to give the players no chance to observe something obvious, like noisy stuff going on in the next room, and you absolutely should give them a chance to make perception checks, or any other skill checks, whenever the situation calls for them.

    I also understand the concern that, as a DM, we don't want to say "OK, perception time" and then, if they roll poorly, suddenly they are all over the place, listening, searching, trying to figure out what they msised, when they should be continuing on like nothing happened (because as far as their characters know, nothing did happen).

    A game mechanic way of dealing with this, if the player/DM co-operation way doesn't work for you, is to have all the players make, say, ten D20 rolls and write them down on a piece of paper. As an appropriate passive test situation comes up, use the next number on the list for the check and add the appropriate character's modifier. You don't alert the players by calling for a roll or rolling yourself, the random element is maintained, and the players have still made their own rolls (which many prefer to do).


    Tenarian wrote:

    Same here, been waiting since Dec 11th for Fortress of the Stone Giants!

    I also have just received Sins of the Saviours yesterday, that only took 8 days to get to me, up to 39 now, and counting, for FotSG!

    Same for me I'm afraid. UK. Got 1, 2, 3 and 5 but not 4. Of course, that is the advantage of having the PDF as well - we don't totally lose out if the post goes kaput. Still, it's harder to read on screen and not as nice (even ignoring the extra expense) if you have to print it yourself. On the other hand, we can't really hold Paizo responsible for the post :-(


    DarkArt wrote:


    I re-read the adventure itself many times so I get a good handle of how to anticipate my player since she *always* happens to find the end-game scenario first in most dungeon-crawls. (The exception being Foxglove Manor, where she practically went in order as presented.) I need to be good at figuring out what happens when this happens.

    This sounds as if you have only one player? Does this make for a better-cordinated party, or do things go horribly wrong when there isn't an extra brain or three to spot things that one person overlooks?


    It helps if the DM gives the players enough information before the campaign starts to enable them to create something that fits. When we started our Forgotten Realms campaign our DM said our characters would be starting in Silverymoon but should not be from there. We had to do three characters each (which initially started in a previous campaign when we only had two players and now most of the other players love playing multiple characters anyway) so as a means of getting my characters together I had two travel to Waterdeep with their trades, set up in the yard of another tradesman for a while, then take on his daughter a apprentice and head off for Silverymoon where they were working (gnome illusionist locksmith, elf fighter bowyer/fletcher, human rogue apprentice locksmith) with a cart and a couple of tents that made up a travelling workshop. I even sketched out the apprentice's family and their home/workshop where the locksmith and bowyer had stayed and worked for a while.

    I thought I'd done quite well. DM didn't say anything was amiss although we only discussed it briefly at the beginning of the first session. Lo and behold, when the game started our first task was to escort someone back to Waterdeep. So, when we arrived, naturally my characters were going to stay back at the apprentice's parent's place and work from there around anything else that came up. No way, said the DM. All the other characters will be staying at the Yawning Portal so your characters are too. There has been one short notice job but nothing so far that cannot be handled by meeting friends in the evening for a chat and a drink so I still have no idea why my characters are there. It rather puts a player off, so do discuss these things BEFORE you start the first adventure.


    Vic Wertz wrote:
    Yasha0006 wrote:
    ...certain factors such as Inclination, Rotational Period, Albedo, and various others that would influence visibility, phase, etc.
    Don't forget one of the most important factors—the surface composition of each moon. (I want a moon covered in shiny reflector tape!)

    That would make it very dark for most of the time. Reflector tape is retro-reflective which means most of the light that hits it goes back in the same direction that it came from and very little goes in other directions.


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