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Erudite Owl

Jim Groves's page

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4. Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 1,762 posts (5,393 including aliases). 9 reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 14 aliases.


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Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

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mikeawmids wrote:
Jim Groves wrote:
mikeawmids wrote:
There are a rival group called the Amethyst Dragons listed in the necropolis...

That is an excellent plan Mike and a great use of the Dragons.

Really, I think that is awesome so long as the PCs have a way to proceed. Really there is no way to pull off that sort of extortion on the PCs, without the PCs having some sort of way to turn the tables.

If they do get stuck down there, the Pharasman clergy could always send someone like Ptemnib (from book 2) to help them get out, introducing the character earlier and giving the group a chance to bond before the events of 'Empty Graves'. They would later recognise the other group from their voices during the gathering at the Tooth and Hookah.

Also, regarding selling the sarcophagus - doesn't another group (the flickering four?) Do just that during the auction in book 2?

Not to be a wise guy, but I don't really get advance publication materials. I only just got my subscriber copy of #2 last night. :)

Edit: I did see a peek of #1, but after that I gotta buy them.

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

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Windspirit wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

That was not a mistake, that was quite intentional. I actually put a quite of bit of thought into it that minor bit. It is left deliberately unexplained. The rope was cut and the tomb was resealed. Who did it? That was left open-ended for the GM to answer. Seriously.

And as GM, you don't need to explain it to the players. Once upon a time someone got in this tomb, fell from a great height after their rope was cut. Then the tomb was sealed up behind them. There they died alone and in the dark.

Let me explain why that is in there—the bottom of shaft opens into the center of the ceiling of a ten foot tall room. Let's assume the PCs use their own good rope to descend. Hypothetically, if the PC's rope gets cut, how the heck do they do they get out? How do they even "climb" up to get back in the shaft? Magic would be an easy fix with something like spider climb but at that point the PCs are solidly 1st level. Most groups entire life line will be the rope that the used to climb down and may the gods help them if it gets cut. That's what I meant by "passive deathtrap". A reminder just how vulnerable "adventuring" can make you. Now, as GM, just hint at the idea that other groups are roaming the Necropolis. Not a comforting thought, is it? Any one could just come in after you and leave you stranded in the dark.

Now let me be clear. I don't think GMs should threaten the PCs with someone cutting their rope after they've descended. That's a jerk move. Or rather, if they play around with that tension the GM better have a plan have plan besides putting the PCs completely at someone's mercy. Its not fun to be screwed by GM in such a way you can't do anything about it. Not what I intended.

But it is meant to be chilling, yet subtle, in the implication.

I can readily see the rope being cut at 3 feet, however, instead of five. Mea culpa. :)

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

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Alexander Augunas wrote:
Tell'em about it, Jim. snicker

Occam's razor, dear boy. He saw Faiths of Corruption and became confused.

;)

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

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Wow.. the authors have been named on the preview.

I can admit to this book!

Champions of Corruption too!

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Tirisfal wrote:
Update: I may have to wait 'til later to read it; my cat has decided that she likes your book more than I do, Jim :)

This is an obviously intelligent and sophisticated feline. :)

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

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Thurston Hillman wrote:
Jim Groves wrote:
Thursty is awesome. A good friend and a great person to have to bounce ideas around.

I choose to acknowledge this message instead of the previous missive.

Of course, I also view it as an admission of defeat. Twas a good rivalry while it lasted. ;)

I deleted it while searching for a candlestick...

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

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Hillman the Maniacal wrote:
Except that Jim Groves guy, he's still my archenemy.

o_0

Dear Kyle Baird,

I regret to inform you that I must cease being your archenemy. A pressing (albeit minor) matter has come to my attention. I have enjoyed our rivalry and if circumstances permit, I would not be adverse to continuing it a future date.

In the interim, there is a matter of pest control which demands my attention. If I might make a recommendation? Larry Wilhelm is lacking an archenemy. Don't let Larry's easygoing demeanor deceive you. I've been told he's good in a knife fight.

Best always,

Jim Groves

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

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Mr. Gerbik wrote:

Oh yeah those swarms can get nasty, eh? Some scarabs, right, right? Yes!

Good idea for the trial runs. It can be hard for me to predict where the trouble will arise, but a trial run would certainly help.

Thanks again for the help, continuously amazed by the community here.

There's also a spell trap in the first dungeon that uses the summon swarm spell. The thing to bear in mind there is that summon swarm lasts 2 rounds without concentration. There is no one to concentrate on the spell, once triggered, so the swarm disappears after having 2 rounds to harass the party. That was a design trick I devised to give the PCs a taste of the thematic Egyptian swarm encounter without having it be super punitive. Otherwise swarms are murder on low level parties.

After 1st level, however, the gloves come off.

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After sleeping on it, I wanted to add one quick thing.

The word "trait" is one of those crazy sound alike words that confounds the rule system sometimes. After consideration, the OP is referring to an optional race ability. One in which you trade for drow immunities. I was starting to make the point about traits being a half-a-feat, and while there is some validity to that.. the same level of parity does not exist with a racial ability.

I wanted to call that out before someone else does and uses it as a means to try to dismiss my point out-of-hand. I think my logic holds notwithstanding.

When it comes right down to it, I believe the seducer alternate racial ability is a fair trade for drow immunities. It may not be the best suited for all drow characters, but that's why it is optional.

Let's talk about why I made that trade-off. Thematically, by exploiting the desires of others, you open yourself up to the same kind of temptation. The struggle then becomes for you to always maintain control while bending and breaking the will of others. Also, mechanically, offensive bonuses are usually considered more valuable than defensive ones. This combined with the ability to stack with the Spell Focus feats, I still maintain this is fine the way it is.

I think I have said all I could! Thank you! Good luck with and to the Design Team!

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

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Hi folks!

I am going to step out of the shadows and identify myself as the author of the trait and see if I can help!

First off, I'd like to say that I am a freelancer. I can speak to my reasons for the design and offer my opinion. Jason Bulmahn and Stephen Radney-McFarland are the governing authorities. If they decide to alter the trait, I will not be upset. Nor am I offended by anyone who questions the design and has asked for a FAQ. No hard feelings whatsoever. The freelancer and the Design Team are partners and any freelancer worth their salt should expect to have their design decisions questioned and even altered for the good of the game. We all continue to learn and grow with the game all the time.

That said, I've reviewed what I wrote and I stand by it. Now I'll answer some questions and explain my reasoning.


  • Misprint or editing mistake?—No, the trait as you read it is what was intended. There's been no unintentional error here.
  • This trait is probably too strong now without improvement—Traits are supposed to be half of one feat. I want you to bear in mind that there is no ability score requirement to take this trait. As you're considering the first sentence, I want you to compare it to the Spell Focus feat. This trait is actually doing everything a full bore feat allows you to do, except you're locked into applying it to the Enchantment school. Plus! You can also apply it to spell-like abilities. Plus! It stacks with Spell Focus and Greater Spell Focus. That's generous for a start. Okay, let's look at the second sentence now. Compare just the second sentence alone to the Minor Spell Expertise feat in the Advanced Players Guide. My point is simply, the first sentence is a very nice trait for any drow character and the second sentence is a decent trait for some drow characters. Together they really equal to more than half of a trait. I know there are other concerns but this trait is hardly under-powered as it is. Even if you don't consider these to be true "traits" but racial abilities, I think you get a fair value for drow immunities (particularly since its optional).
  • Wisdom Requirement versus Charisma—My intention was always to demonstrate and reward the Wisdom ability score as the aspect of understanding the nature of others. As exemplified by the Sense Motive skill. To know the mind of your object of seduction is to know their desires, their quirks, and their kinks. Those hidden things that thrill, excite, and lure one's sexual prey into the web of lust, dominance, and submission. To say it another way, to understand your target is an aspect of Wisdom. To interact with your target is an aspect of Charisma. This trait seeks to bridge those two concepts and permit them to work in concert with each other. And! I think I have made a compelling argument on why, even WITHOUT meeting the WIS 15 for the extra charm person daily SLA, you're still getting your bang for the buck out of this trait.
  • Let's set aside the obvious and look at the campaign setting—I'm about to make some generalized statements. I'm saying up front that they're generalizations, and not absolutes. Male drow favor arcane classes and their personalities tend towards aggressive, militant, and direct confrontation. Female drow are usually in higher positions of authority and they're more inclined towards manipulation, politics, and social intrigue. They also favor divine spellcasting classes. So the gender group that is predisposed towards social intrigue also favors divine spellcasting, which often relies on the Wisdom modifier. Oh! But clerics don't get charm person?!? Well, now those conniving, manipulative, dark beauties can access the spell as a spell-like ability. I call that eight ball in the corner pocket. This was not accident. Does that leave the bard out in the cold? Yes. But a drow bard that must rely on this trait in order to seduce someone may have other issues. Again, let me stress, there are some generalizations taken for granted in this approach. I'm perfectly cool with male drow clerics who like to seduce people. As a freelancer, however, I am required to do my research. These roles are not genetic, they're cultural and canonical (and general). Articles in Second Darkness and the Darklands campaign setting book led me to these conclusions.

Zhayne wrote:
They may have made it key off Wisdom because Drow get a Charisma bonus, which would make it very easy to reap the extra benefit.

Bingo.

All these factors stated, I think this racial trait is fair and working as intended. If anything it leans towards being too good, not too weak. My recommendation is to leave it alone.

As a footnote, even without a WIS 15 ability modifier, this is a fine trait for a drow bard.

Any humor was intended to be light-hearted and not disrespectful. I welcome further discussion, however it might not be productive if *I* say too much more. (Sometimes a freelancer has to learn when to just leave a topic alone). I respectfully leave the Design Team to make whatever decision they see fit.

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Mikaze wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:
No, but see: His last relationship ended tragically, and he's still in a lot of pain from that!
That's just going to encourage players even more!

WORKING AS INTENDED!

Just kidding!

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I look forward to updates on this book (cover, contents). I expect it to rock! :)

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Tangent101 wrote:
Yes, that water tomb was hilarious. I especially love the bit about potential floating objects if you manage to open a certain door while the water is up. ^^;;

I wanted to make it a proper dangerous trap rather than an environmental hazard which complicates combat.. But the Core Rules assign an automatic CR +5 to water traps like that, which blows the curve for a low level adventure. That is an issue where I'm not sure that I agree with the Core Rules, however, because the holding breath rules are fairly generous, if there is time and means to escape or deactivate the trap.

I love it anyway!

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I was inspired by a movie, so it is interesting that you said that. I was watching the Three Muskateers (2011) version with Milla Jovovich. There are some very cool traps in that movie, particularly in da Vinci's vault.

Now many people didn't care for the movie and there is a lot of anachronism, but if you set Dumas aside and just have fun with it, I found it quite entertaining.

I think your idea is great!

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Posting hesitantly... but I wanted to add a comment or two of encouragement as well. I also wanted to add a mental incentive for starting freelancers.

I started with Paizo writing feats and spells. I did my best and worked hard and worked my way up. I was compensated, but it is times like this that I kinda feel like I got a degree from the University of Paizo—through hands on experience.

It's a good reason to throw yourself at your assignments and do your best, because that experience is very valuable.

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Like Neil, I am biased. However, if I take the subject "Should we have fiction" out of the equation and just assume the fiction is here to stay...

I like this change! I flesh in a lot of detail that an AP cannot (due to word count, nothing more). I always have. If the fiction lends itself to doing that to an even greater degree—I'm all for it!

And I will be running Mummy's Mask and looking at the fiction. I definitely want to see this experiment run its course.

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Mikaze wrote:

O_O

omg are you people passing my slashfic around at work I'm telling Lisa!

Hate to tell ya, Mikaze, but you posted this on the Paizo forums.

Lisa owns this hot mess of forbidden bibliophilia. OWNS IT!

She can sell popcorn and DVDs if she wants. ;-D

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Gorbacz wrote:
I NEED TO GO TO PAIZOCON AND DRINK WITH MIKAZE UNTIL THERE WILL BE VISIONS.

Mikaze! I will be there and you will be summoned!

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

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macabre dragon wrote:
Downloaded today. Skimmed over it and it looks interesting. I like that it doesn't start in 'crisis mode'. Gives the party a chance to gel and be adventurers before becoming heroes. Also love the concept of the Ahkhat. Why has this never been thought of before? Any chance of who came up with this?

Oh! I'll take credit for the ahkhat in a hot second. I also did the guardian scroll (AGGRESSIVE PAPER).

I am told that the ahkhat raised some eyebrows internally, and I am grateful to Adam Daigle for championing it.

To be honest, I stopped thinking purely in terms of Pathfinder and started to think in terms of other RPGs. Then I stepped backwards and started the process of making it work in Pathfinder.

EDIT: I got excited and started bragging. :D

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mikeawmids wrote:
I feel like I'm sailing into the wind with this observation, but I was a little disappointed with this adventure.

Well Mike, I'm sorry to hear that. I would like to offer some of my perspective on why I think the adventure is structured the way it is. Perhaps after you sit with it a little while, maybe you'll feel differently. If not, I totally respect where you're coming from. I would also like to share this with anyone who may be debating on whether to get this or not.

I am not going to post what *I* think are spoilers.. but everyone has a slightly different opinion on what constitutes a spoiler, so I'm going to play it safe. Most people won't consider what I'm about to say as a spoiler...

Spoiler:
Mummy's Mask is set around three dungeon explorations. Between the NPCs and different adventuring groups and the gazetteer, I think we do a great job of providing the GMs the tools and means to expand and customize the adventure to taste. There are certain considerations that occurred to me while writing it.

  • The Half-Dead City follows a certain theme that you see in related media and folklore. Like the Boris Karloff and Brendan Fraser movies—where everything is okay until the tombs are disturbed, and then chaos and misfortune are unleashed upon the world until the demands of the past are satisfied. To a lesser extent, you see that in the legends of a curse that befalls real world explorers when they open the tombs and remove treasures. Compare this to other Adventure Paths. Many of them begin with a sequence of events that start well before the PCs actually become involved. In this case, the meta-plot is unfolding just as the PCs are introduced to the situation, so the timing of events is slightly different. The Half-Dead City really does set the stage for larger events with a grander scope, and that is not an accident but a deliberate decision.
  • The adventure also does not start in what I call "crisis mode". There is no unifying threat, goblin raid, or suddenly problem that makes the heroes stop being ordinary people (and let's be honest, even at first level, they've ceased being ordinary already) and rush to the rescue. The Half-Dead City gives agency to the players and PCs to say, "Hey, we're career adventurers. We're in this for riches, the knowledge, the glory, the magic, or whatever reason we can imagine. We made the decision on who we want to be. We aren't just carrying 50 feet of rope, torches, and bedrolls because we've got nothing better to do. We're adventurers!" The adventure also permits the PCs the license to form their own teams and work whatever background they like on how they met and got together as a team. Sometimes the only way to grant freedom is not to impose guidelines.
  • Finally, The Half-Dead City is very traditional and classic D&D. Tracing the game back to it's earliest days (and D&D and I go all the way back to 1979), PC adventuring companies weren't always so 'defensive' and 'reactionary'. Let me be very clear here, I love the idea of BBEGs and I think helping people and nations, and fighting evil is a fantastic story driver—a technique that Mummy's Mask DOES use in its overall story. However, once upon a time adventurers got together for other reasons than the necessity of a common threat. That's a component of an old fashioned and traditional fantasy RPG adventure. For all that some folks focus on flying pyramids, Mummy's Mask really has a lot of traditional elements to it. Something I hope is a nice break between Wrath of the Righteous and Iron Gods (disclaimer: I love those APs too!)

Hopefully this sheds a little light on why it was structured the way it is. Lastly, these comments represent only my views. Our Developer may have his own. :)

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Thank you thank you! Crystal's chapter will not disappoint either! We have an awesome line-up here!

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Mikaze wrote:
Stuff

WORKING AS INTENDED.

Pharasmin politics too. ;-)

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Wall painting monster and " Aggressive Paper" are mine. :)

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I know we've had a goodbye thread, but it just doesn't seem right not to say something on his last day. You know, like those awesome action/suspense movies where the detective catches the bad guy, or the bomb is diffused and the city is saved?

Then everybody rises to their feet and gives one final round of applause as he leaves the scene?

Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Sean K. Reynolds.

Applauds on Sean's way out.

PS: I respectfully ask for those who don't share the feeling to refrain from posting in this thread. Just this one time, please and with gratitude in advance?.

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Robert Brookes wrote:

I hereby begin the campaign for Jim's avatar to be changed to a potoo bird.

(Go ahead, google it. You can thank me later.)

HA!

Our definition of "thanks" might vary. ;-)

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necronus wrote:

Since the overwhelming response is now, "If you don't like it, just fix it or don't use it". I no longer find this productive.

I had genuine questions, that keep getting ignored or taken as insults. So, I apologize for bruising egos. I do not appreciate the glad-handing.

I wish you all the best, and just remember to enjoy the game.

No egos were bruised in the last 24 hours. We praise whoever we like.

Alright, let's look at this then.

necronus wrote:

I think at this point, it is very important we ask our selves some questions.

1) Who benefits from the haunt "encounter"
2) What purpose does the haunt serve in, (insert encounter/campaign name here)
3) When should the haunt be used, instead of something else
4) Where do haunts get placed
5) Why not use an undead, or story based encounter instead
6) How, when deciding to use the haunt, does the haunt add more value, instead of something else

1.) The GM benefits. They're able to introduce a hazard that is flavorful, thematic, challenging, and provides XP. Even if levels are granted subjectively, encounters are still required to be in place to justify raising the characters to another level. A haunt contributes to that. It is part of an XP budget that must be spent to construct an adventure. The players don't really benefit, except from the experience of dealing with a haunt (thrills, chills, suspense). That is where the GM can really help to improve the game with colorful narration. The author also needs to ensure the haunt is reasonably well constructed and how it works is clear.

2.) It introduces a supernatural event without the reliance on a creature. That is really important. It is also mechanics based, rather than relying on subjective GM narration. That is not a condemnation of rules-lite, narrative RPGs. Far from it. Pathfinder RPG, however, is not that type of game. Haunts provide an objective structure to introduce these supernatural hazards.

(Granted, a GM can sway thing events to their liking. That is a different conversation however).

3.)Honestly, word count plays a factor. Creatures, especially unique ones, absorb word count in adventure design. A haunt requires much less of the author's wordcount. Also, sometimes having multiple creatures, side by side and in every room and hallway, is redundant and boring design. It can be a simple matter of variety, while adhering to a supernatural theme.

Finally, many spell-like effects would make some creatures more powerful than they need to be. Haunts can be a little more flexible in that regard (still, even they have limits).

4.) This question is too subjective to provide a fair answer. I'm not trying to dodge it. I can't honestly describe where should a monster or a traditional trap should be placed either. That is a creative decision and a lot of factors go into making it. RPG authors are not just mechanics, there is some artistry in our work and this is part of it. I would look to the story for the best answer, and also the physical layout and spacing in relation to more traditional encounters.

5.) You might have used those elsewhere already. Again, nothing consumes wordcount more than creature encounters or roleplaying encounters. A good adventure requires a variety of different types of encounters to avoid redundancy. A haunt is another tool. I could turn this around and ask why an adventure is nothing but endless waves of monsters, or lacks combat encounters in favor of endless roleplaying scenes. Variety is the spice of adventure design.

5A.) Some encounters, like monsters with class levels receive a greater than normal treasure allocation. To compensate, other encounters must be introduced that don't grant treasure in order to balance the treasure budget. A haunt encounter works well for that.

6.) Again, this is a subjective question. I can tell that there are instances when you thought something else should have been used besides a haunt. You might be right. That's not sarcasm at all. If the topic concerns you, then there might something to what you're saying. I honor that. But in a general conversation, without specifics, who knows?

Necronus, you have conceded that haunts can be good tools in some instances. I concede that their use requires some thoughtful consideration and not every implementation in the Pathfinder line has been perfect. I hope we can respect each others views.

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I have to admit, I was only attracted to this thread because I saw Brandon posted in it. However after a quick read, I have to agree. Well said, MP. EDIT: and Pryllin

The implementation of haunts has been a new design space that freelancers have (and still are) learning to use effectively and with finesse.

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Samy wrote:
I don't expect it, but if my shipment processed by the 14th that would be awesome because it's my birthday and I'd love to spend my birthday reading through the first Paizo AP I've ever subbed.

I hope it happens Samy! And I hope you enjoy it!

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It would be inappropriate for me to review this, but I encourage others to do so. Offer details. If this is what you want a PG to be like, give your feedback in a review, so that it doesn't become lost on the message boards.

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I am going to re-iterate something I said early, because it was a throw-away line.

I don't know about a hardback AP, ever. I don't rule it out, but that is a decision that is weighed heavily with the financial side of the business.

So why I am posting?

Because I want to plant the seed of the idea that 2017 should have extra special APs to commemorate the occasion.

A major campaign event. I'm not talking about metaplot or Aroden- but something really cool like Nex or Aboleths. I have another cool idea I would love, but I don't want to jinx it.

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I would however expect some kick ass APs in 2017!

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MythicFox wrote:
Dragon78 wrote:

Is it june yet;)

I take it radiation is one of those new hazards?

Given the bit in the "Beyond the Campaign" bit of WotR #6 about the... ** spoiler omitted ** ...I'd say it's a very safe bet.

<grin>

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All I can say is that I do it sparingly. I did it my second to the last session in fact (different AP). The player somewhat gave me the nod 'okay'.

I think it depends on how you approach it. I have had GMs do a happy dance as they did it to a player, but I never do that. I don't actually like a lot of PC turnover in the story.

So why do it? The players expect the risks to be real and they don't like it when I pull punches. I struggled with it so much that I started using hero points so that I would never feel guilty.

But this player had used their hero points and it was time. Ultimately despite my reservations, I think it was good for the game. The stakes are both high and honest, and a lot of good roleplaying came out of the fallout.

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S'mon wrote:
My dream would be a really heavily political AP, Game of Thrones style, where the PCs started out as young nobles and have to deal with intrigue, *war*, revolution, treachery et al. I was disappointed at the lack of politics in Kingmaker, where it would have fit perfectly. For scope, I'd say bigger the better - how about setting it in Cheliax? :D It should be as open as possible, so that by the end the political situation may have changed drastically, probably with at least one new monarch on the throne. The civil war in GoT/ASoIAF is a good model - a bunch of NPC factions of varying levels of good/evil; PCs members of one relatively good-guy faction (the PCs need an incentive to stick together in this kind of game) initially just trying to survive, later on critical in shaping the destiny of the kingdom/world.

Sounds cool to me! Don't think that you're all alone with this wish.

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@ Snow Crash,

Your last post in this thread made me happy and I am pleased with the change of tenor in this thread.

EDIT: This post might sound condescending, so I want to clarify. As a community we focus on negative threads quite a bit, but we should also focus on the positive. I think Snow Crash is sincere. They joked in a manner that was very familiar with people they didn't know and it didn't come off well. Who hasn't done that at least once? Now this conversation has turned around despite an unfortunate subject line. This is worthy of being noted.

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BigDTBone wrote:
If you say something that is embarrassing to yourself the person you calls you on it didn't embarrass you. You embarrassed yourself. Likewise with being a jerk.

If that actually happened, Big D. There is no agreement on what actually transpired even though we have a written record of it. To really talk about this, we first have to come to some accord on what actually took place.

Let's be clear, that thread was not about the ice tomb hex. It was an accusation that staff refuse to help. That is an aggressive way to start a dialogue. Especially when they feel they do all they can with the time and resources they have.

Then to suggest that someone would withhold help to other people, because they were mad at someone else? What you may not be appreciating is that is a very harsh thing to suggest. Only a jerk would do that. So a question phrased like that is not going to get a good reaction from anyone. Because you're asking someone if they intend on being a jerk.

Can't you see that, Big D?

And just in case there is any doubt, this post is not written to be unpleasant. I'm just asking you to step outside the situation and think about how it sounds from the other side.

I'm going to step away now. I probably have contributed all that I can. My hope is that we can get past this accusation. Get the question answered, and put this whole thing behind us.

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Vivianne,

I read Question's thread and though you're not responsible for it, the thread was poisoned from the start with an accusatory tone.

Sean was explaining that the matter of a FAQ not being answered is not black and white and that he had a lot of demands on his time. You can choose to take that as a hostile statement directed towards you, or—you can interpret it as asking for empathy. You can dismiss me as biased, but I believe Sean was explaining himself as best he could as asking for perspective.

Your response was something akin to, "Not my problem." "What exactly does this have to do with me again?" It was pretty cold and distant.

Vivianne wrote:
Is the implication here that you'll refuse to respond to the at least sixty-something people who have asked for a response to this ice tomb hex issue because you don't like how one person is talking about it?

That's a really loaded question. Honestly, don't you think? Because it is a really terrible thing to suggest that anyone would do that. He's never going to say yes to that. And, it's kinda of insulting to have to answer "No" to it as well.

Let's exaggerate this, just to make it clearer. If someone asks me, "Does this imply that you're going to kick puppies because a puppy did his business on your lawn?" That's a trap question. Because it implies that I might enjoy hurting animals. Its kinda of insulting to be asked that in the first place.

But you're asking Sean, "Are you going to withhold the answer in order to be petty?"

Likewise that is insulting to Sean. It's HURTFUL.

And your response was to say you don't care.

Vivianne, I know you're upset about not getting the answer to your question. But this is not the way.

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Agreed with Jason.

A lot of us hang out here still, and we do our best to take care of you folks- because its good for business and we want you to buy our books in the future.

But it's hard when we start the conversation with a tone of accusation.

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Mike Welham wrote:
I missed out last year, so I'm going to try pretty darn hard to make it this year.

Hope you can Mike! It would be good to see you and personally congratulate you! I have not seen you since Dustpawn!

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Ross Byers wrote:
Also 'Publishing' is gone! Rumors! Panic!

No more books, Ross. We're fired. And Cheapy... Poor Cheapy. Now he'll never get that spleen transplant. It just won't be Christmas without him.

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My old pal Thursty has joined Team AP!

I look forward to his gruesome creations!

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For mysterious reasons known only to me, I feel pretty good about this one. ;)

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Todd Stewart wrote:
Jim Groves wrote:
Set wrote:
Nanatsusaya wrote:
Great Beyond <- We know a fair amount about great metropolises of the Great Beyond like Dis, but what about Axis? What should PCs encounter along the way if they journey to the Boneyard to petition Pharasma for something?

Axis deserves it's own book, eventually, as a planar metropolis along the lines of the City of Brass or Dis, but expanded beyond all of the above in the sense that it's not really just a big city on some other plane, but more like a plane unto itself that is just one big honkin' city.

More like the Plane of Gears, in the Midgard setting, it's not just a big city, it's a world/setting unto itself, that is covered with streets and buildings.

I would like see this book, plus have some more detailed rules about planar adventures. There are some but I think they're pretty threadbare.

Even if it's not feasible to do a book on each of the planes, I think it would awesome at some point in the future to see a hardcover book on planar adventures. Advice on ways to handle the planes in a campaign, dealing with various outsiders beyond combat, etc.

In that sort of book you could present multiple examples of locations to set as the focus of such a campaign: Axis, the City of Brass, Galisemni, and Shadow Absalom being the locations that first come to mind for me.

Such a book is up at the top of my list of 'Paizo Dream Products'. :)

Same here my friend! And you would be among my top people to contact about such a project!

Gushing aside, there is a steady stream of new and interesting outsiders created every year (along with aquatic creatures) but there's limited support on how to draw that together as a campaign. For any one from Paizo reading, that is not complaint. I realize that priorities have to be set. Rather, I see that as design space that is can be built upon in the future.

A lot of has been invested in Golarion and that setting is nowhere near exhausted but planar adventures is good platform for expansion.

(So is psychic magic, but I don't want to derail)

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Set wrote:
Nanatsusaya wrote:
Great Beyond <- We know a fair amount about great metropolises of the Great Beyond like Dis, but what about Axis? What should PCs encounter along the way if they journey to the Boneyard to petition Pharasma for something?

Axis deserves it's own book, eventually, as a planar metropolis along the lines of the City of Brass or Dis, but expanded beyond all of the above in the sense that it's not really just a big city on some other plane, but more like a plane unto itself that is just one big honkin' city.

More like the Plane of Gears, in the Midgard setting, it's not just a big city, it's a world/setting unto itself, that is covered with streets and buildings.

I would like see this book, plus have some more detailed rules about planar adventures. There are some but I think they're pretty threadbare.

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Set wrote:
Tacticslion wrote:

I liked my brain. It was nice. Now it's broken.

Why did you just break my brain, Cheapy?
Why?

Related: how?

Just hit reply to his post, and behold the deeper horror within the horror your eyes can see.

Oh, I didn't get it! Thanks Set! Well played, William, well played indeed.

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Taldor for a Taldane political AP!

(tons of great suggestions in this thread though)

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I don't want to step on Rob's toes, but I have to answer the question with a question? Why does any paladin involve themselves in any adventure that is not totally selfless and altruistic?

The fact that the authorities have opened these burial sites for exploration covers the legal aspect to it.

It a good few thousands of years since the original decimation of Wati. The dead in the Boneyard are judged and no longer require their grave goods to identify or comfort them.

A paladin might be seeking to learn about the past. They might be protecting scholars from traps and unwholesome threats while they do their work. They might be collecting treasure to re-purpose it to help the needy, hungry, and oppressed. Even equipment used to combat evil is a justifiable expense.

Sooner or later, Pharasma judges the dead. Even if takes a while. Then this mortal coil is no longer relevant in the Great Beyond.

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I wish Sean all the very best and it is commendable that he is willing to help Jodi achieve her hopes and dreams. I have known him for a few years now but that alone speaks to his character.

My thoughts also go the rest of the Paizo Staff. Sean *IS* their very good friend and he will be missed.

For those who never got the opportunity to work with him directly, he is a very kind man and an excellent teacher. If he ever spoke frankly, it is because that is necessary to instruct. The truth is he is a very good person who does his best to bring out the best in whoever he works with.

I'll miss his official role in this community but I look forward to his freelance contributions and 3PP offerings.

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Stay tuned.

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