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Kobold

Jiggy's page

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32, RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32. RPG Superstar 2013 Marathon Voter, 2014 Dedicated Voter, 2015 Dedicated Voter. FullStarFullStar Pathfinder Society GM. 18,468 posts (20,434 including aliases). 17 reviews. 4 lists. 1 wishlist. 13 Pathfinder Society characters. 16 aliases.


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Ultimately, having a "fantasy" setting just means there are things in the setting that go beyond reality. In a sense, the setting has two types of things in it: the mundane (that which is comparable to reality) and the fantastic (that which exceeds reality).

Now, different fantasy settings (which, remember, means "settings in which some things go beyond reality") will have different ways of determining how someone (or something) is allowed to exceed reality, to make the jump from being mundane to being fantastic.

In some settings, the necessary element to move from the mundane to the fantastic is simply magic. The Harry Potter universe is a perfect example: the fantasy setting is literally "reality plus magic". If you're a spellcaster (or magical creature), you're part of the fantasy story. If you're nonmagical, you're part of the mundane background; you're what the reader/viewer compares the magic to in order to see how much more fantastic it is than you are.

In other settings, a person could exceed reality and move from the category of "mundane" to the category of "fantastic" by any number of means: magic, training, enlightenment, divine parentage, and so forth. This type of setting is where you see people like Pecos Bill, who could lasso a tornado just by virtue of being a badass. Thus, his badassery was able to elevate him from "mundane" (realistic) to "fantastic" (beyond reality).

Both types of settings are fine. They tell different types of stories, and neither can really fill in for the other.

But there's an extra complication when you're talking about a game.

See, in a book or film or TV show, you can mix fantastic characters with mundane characters as you please, because you can carefully sculpt the action to have the result you want. In Avatar: the Last Airbender, the setting is of the first kind I described (only magic gets to exceed reality and be "fantastic"). However, the core group of protagonists includes both fantastic and mundane characters—there's even an episode about one of the mundane characters dealing with that gap. But since it's non-game fiction, the authors were able to create circumstances where the mundane characters could contribute meaningfully to the story through clever scripted use of circumstantial carefully-placed resources.

But in a fantasy game, that's a LOT harder to pull off. Even if you carefully sculpt situations where the muggle can help save Hogwarts, it will often feel hollow and contrived. Typically, it's no fun to have one player playing a fantasy hero and another player playing a mundane, non-fantastic character in the same game.

The ideal, then, is for every player character to be able to be "fantastic", to exceed reality. It doesn't matter which kind of setting you're using or what the requirement is for moving from mundane to fantastic; it just matters that each player has equal access to it. If exceeding reality requires a gift from the gods, then every player character should receive that gift. If exceeding reality requires being taught by a fantastic mentor, then every player character should have such a mentor. If exceeding reality requires access to magic, then every player character should have access to magic.

So again, it doesn't matter whether or not magic is the only way to go beyond reality and into fantasy. All that matters is that every player character gets to go there. The setting's definition of fantasy must be something within every player's reach.

And that's where the problem comes in: people who want a setting where X is required to exceed reality, but where not every player gets to have X. In the case of discussing Pathfinder, X is usually magic: people say that they want their fantasy to be defined as requiring magic in order to be fantastic (which is fine) but then fail to realize that some game options lack the very thing they defined as necessary for fantasy and are therefore by definition not fantasic!

The end result is this: if you want a setting where only magic can exceed reality, then fighters are not fantasy heroes, and you're just fooling yourself to say they are. If you want nonmagical characters to be capable of fantasy, then you have to allow nonmagical things to "go fantastic," to exceed reality. You've got to pick your direction and commit; trying to claim one setting while enforcing the mechanics of the other is why we keep having these arguments.

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"Even if he set his game in his own homebrew world, if he used things like ankhegs or otyughs that are open content but not public domain, he'd have to include the OGL as part of his story and would have to make part of his story open content."

~James Jacobs, >>Ask *James Jacobs* ALL your Questions Here!<<

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Charon's Little Helper wrote:

or less satirically -

"Generally real-world physics applies except where magical powers specifically break them." (not weighing in - I just figure that side should be spoken for with less snark)

That's not the case, though.

A dragon's flight is represented as nonmagical, but isn't actually doable by real-world physics with their wingspan and body size.

Kind of the same deal with giant bugs: represented as nonmagical, but not possible in reality.

Same goes for having 200HP, diving headfirst off a 500ft cliff into an antimagic zone, and getting up and walking away.

The list goes on and on and on. So no, the position is NOT "real-world physics apply until magic changes things". It truly is, as was said before, "real-world physics can only be ignored in certain places but not others, based entirely on what I'm used to/comfortable with".

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Ha! When I first looked at the blog, I saw the pic and immediately thought, "Hey, that makes me think of Liz and Chris." Turns out I was right!

Nice touch with the cookie pendants and the coffee/burrito/glitter/sunshine meters. :)

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Aelryinth wrote:
Jiggy wrote:

But since axes don't remind him of a type of entertainment he doesn't care for, they get a pass.

It's not about "I don't like it when characters can do X" (such as use improbably large weapons).

It's about "This particular mental image reminds me of something I don't like" (such as a certain type of large weapon setup reminding someone of anime).

It only looks inconsistent when using incorrect labels: label it as "I don't like using improbably large/heavy weapons/styles" and you get inconsistencies like swords being regarded differently than axes. Label it instead as "I don't like things that remind me of other things I don't like", and you see that a giant sword could remind a person of anime while an unlikely axe-wielding style isn't a prominent trope of any particular thing (other than D&D), so there's no conflict/contradiction.

Self-awareness: it benefits everyone. :)

Now, now, you're drawing incorrect assumptions again.

I happen to love anime, and I read a lot of manga. How could it remind me of those things if I didn't read them, mmmm? I currently follow half a dozen anime and at least a dozen manga.

It's just they are very different flavors from the Western style. And over the top cheesy, because that's the style.

Or as Ichigo's dad put it, "If we couldn't control our reitsu, all our released swords would be as big as skyscrapers!"

==Aelryinth

*ponders*

*considers previous posts*
*ponders some more*
Oh! I think I see the issue! This whole time, you've been using the film version of the term "cheesy" (meaning comically overdone, goofy, corny, etc), while the premise of the thread is the RPG version of cheese (being a consistently derogatory term to a manner of gameplay that is in some way objectionable, with varying benchmarks for qualification). That would certainly explain a lot. Yeah. Wow. Totally changes how I understand your previous posts. Cripes.

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But since axes don't remind him of a type of entertainment he doesn't care for, they get a pass.

It's not about "I don't like it when characters can do X" (such as use improbably large weapons).

It's about "This particular mental image reminds me of something I don't like" (such as a certain type of large weapon setup reminding someone of anime).

It only looks inconsistent when using incorrect labels: label it as "I don't like using improbably large/heavy weapons/styles" and you get inconsistencies like swords being regarded differently than axes. Label it instead as "I don't like things that remind me of other things I don't like", and you see that a giant sword could remind a person of anime while an unlikely axe-wielding style isn't a prominent trope of any particular thing (other than D&D), so there's no conflict/contradiction.

Self-awareness: it benefits everyone. :)

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Probably not a good idea to have rules text that says "as X type of action, perform Y type of action".

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White rice, shredded SteakUms, chopped brussels sprouts, all mixed together with a little salt and pepper.

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TriOmegaZero wrote:

'any time you make only one attack during your turn'?

:/

I'm guessing from that face that you see how insufficient that would be. And I agree.

:/

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Haladir wrote:
I know this is settled, but I'm curious about the line of thinking that led to this ruling.

I'm not Mark, but I seem to recall there having been a post from Jason Bulmahn back in the day, stating that the whole point of Vital Strike was to be a sort of "consolation prize" for when you already weren't going to be able to full-attack, like when you were staggered or in a surprise round or if you needed your move action for something.

I'd hazard a guess that the cleanest way to enact that was to tie it to the Attack action. How would you write it in order to meet its goal while also allowing it to work with things like Spring Attack? I don't know of a way that isn't super-wordy. :/

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captain yesterday wrote:

I've never understood card games :-)

Of any kind, well except maybe Go Fish and Uno :-)

Don't know why but my brain doesn't retain card game rules, except for the games above every time I play cards I have to relearn the rules all over again, its not a lot of fun :-)

You should play Fluxx; not because you won't have to re-learn the rules each time, but because everyone else WILL, so you won't be the odd one out. ;)

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Triune wrote:

So after reading a thread in which monkey grip was called cheese, it occurred to me that people seem to have lost the idea of what that word means. For those unfamiliar, monkey grip is a 3.x feat that allows you to use two handed weapons one handed, at a -2 penalty to accuracy. This reults in almost all cases in a dps loss, even before figuring in the feat opportunity cost, and is pretty much solely for flavor. Even in the face of that, it was called cheese.

It seems like any time there is an option that lets you do something you couldn't before, it's called cheesy. Guns, for example, hit touch ac, but a well built gunslinger is no match for a well built archer in terms of dpr, yet they're constantly banned and called cheese. Why is a new ability always cheese? Doesn't cheese mean game breaking, not game expanding?

Two answers, in my opinion:

1) For some, it's a matter of their (often unconscious) definition of "fantasy". To them, even if they don't realize it, a fantasy setting means "reality + magic". (Consider the Harry Potter universe, for example, where magic is literally the definition of the separation between the mundane and the fantastic.) For this group, crying "cheese" doesn't mean that it harms gameplay, it means that it breaks their aesthetic mold by doing something nonmagically that can't be done in reality (like wielding massive weapons in one hand).

2) For those who do mean "cheese" as an assessment of gameplay mechanics/balance, the source of your observation is the simple fact that most people are TERRIBLE at game design/development, and don't realize it. Think about it: wouldn't it make sense that the proportion of game-players who have valid opinions about game design would be similar to the proportion of computer-users who have valid opinions about programming methodology, or to the proportion of car-drivers who have valid opinions about mechanical engineering? In any given field, there's a (proportionally) small number of people who have done enough of the homework to have any idea what they're talking about, and then there's the 99%. So whenever somebody claims that something is (or isn't) cheese/OP/broken/etc, there's a pretty small chance that the speaker's assessment has any validity whatsoever. And yet, they declare their belief with all the conviction as if they were reciting the fundamentals of whatever field they ARE proficient in.

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Live Bait wrote:
knightnday wrote:
Because people love to throw around pejoratives against that which they don't like till they lose meaning -- see also minimaxing, power gamer, optimizer, munchkin and so on. Ask 10 gamers and you will likely get 12 definitions for any of them. Best advice is to take anything said after those terms with a grain of salt and a large dose of your own experience.
Not tequila and lime?

Depends: do tequila and lime constitute "your own experience"? ;)

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BennActive wrote:
The villains sometimes specifically ready an action to disrupt the druid while it casts. This is tactic my smarter archers employ when I GM and the caster is trivializing encounters.

Heck, for summon spells, you don't even need to ready an action. He'll be casting for the whole round, so the archer can just full-attack his ass and see exactly how many concentration checks he can make.

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Have you tried telling him that you're finding summons to be annoying, and asking if he would be willing to play something else (or even just not cast those spells)?

Friends talk to each other about preferences.

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Andostre wrote:
What makes combat good for PbP?

The fact that it doesn't assume a grid, and therefore isn't built to have mechanics/class features that rely on it. It treats the grid as an optional variant rather than a default assumption. As such, mapless combat is a real possibility for 5E, which in turn makes PbP combat easier (logistically).

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I have a good feeling about 5E. I joined a more-or-less weekly face-to-face game, and noticed that in 5 sessions we hadn't busted out a grid a single time, despite 1-3 combats per session. I've now started a 5E PbP, and the first combat was a breeze. I'm currently applying to be a player in another 5E game, which should provide another perspective.

That's where I'd recommend you start. There's a free "basic rules" PDF you can download to give it a trial run and see what you think.

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Okay, still not at home with my books, but I have some questions:

1) I'm guessing we're starting at 1st level, but I didn't see that spelled out anywhere, so just to confirm, is that correct?

2) Suppose that I end up with a medium-armor character who isn't offered medium armor in his starting package. (For instance, fighters are only offered light or heavy, despite being proficient in medium. Alternatively, maybe I make a light-armor character using the variant human to pick up medium armor proficiency.) In such a case, would it be acceptable to replace my starting armor with a medium option? (Obviously the specific armor would be whatever the default starter option is for medium-armor classes like (IIRC) ranger or cleric.)

3) Same as above, but with classes that have a 1st-level option that changes their proficiencies. For instance, if a cleric domain grants me heavy armor proficiency at 1st level, can I take whatever the starter form of heavy armor is instead of the cleric's default? What about with weapons?

4) Many of the backgrounds include a small bit of cash. Can that be spent on additional (cheap) gear, such as a healer's kit?

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Cripes, that's a short recruitment window. Well, I'm interested; I'll see if I can get a character together tonight. Here's my trinket roll, just in case this works out:

Trinket: 1d100 ⇒ 24

Dunno what it is, since my book's at home. Guess I'll have a surprise waiting for me!

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BigP4nda wrote:
What is wrong with these people

They have a stronger grasp of the game's mechanics—and those mechanics' impact on the gameplay experience—than you do? Probably something along those lines.

But really, that's not the important part. The important part is that I'd rather share a table with people who have differing ideas than to share a table with people who respond to differing ideas by assuming there must be something wrong with those people.

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Painlord wrote:
Jiggy wrote:
I think item 2.2 from the OP was my biggest issue.
Section 2.2 is a big section. What is happening? Is there no fix? What can we learn from?

I didn't have a proper understanding of scope/scale/level.

I originally planned for the PCs to basically be "tough civilians" who get caught up into bigger stuff and "have greatness thrust upon them", so I started them at 2nd level.

The big, overarching plot was something that would, eventually, require extremely high-level magic (possibly deific intervention) to resolve.

It did not occur to me at first that this meant I was trying to run a campaign that would span 16+ levels. :/

Additionally, an element of the campaign which I originally pictured myself relying on as an "action backbone" (retrieving fragments of an artifact) turns out to take waaaay more time than I accounted for.

Putting it all together, it means I'd written myself into a spot where levels 3 through probably 17ish would just be iteration after iteration of "find the next chunk of artifact" and trying to make each one feel different than the previous "find the next chunk of artifact".

I may someday reboot the campaign, narrowing the gap by raising the starting level and/or changing the nature of the goal to allow a lower-level resolution. But the campaign already in progress seemed, to me, unsalvageable.

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Update: My aforementioned PbP just finished their first combat. They were in a forest, but instead of mapping out where the trees were, I just said that ranged attacks had disadvantage and saves against AoEs had advantage (unless the point of origin is adjacent to the target). Went off without a hitch.

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Feros wrote:
but doesn't the note pad and pen lead to a goblinoid anachronism? Golarion goblins despise writing. So what is the pad and pen for?

What, did goblins used to be okay with writing a long time ago? Or they are in the future? What time-travely goblin lore have I missed out on?

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I recently ended my first-ever PbP game as GM. It had been running for 10 months, but I was starting to see issues between what I had planned, what had happened so far, where it was going, and how it would get there. It's like if you stand on a wheeled chair to reach a high shelf, then realize that you can feel the chair slowly creeping backwards under you. Technically everything's still fine, but it's only a matter of time before it all falls apart. I think item 2.2 from the OP was my biggest issue. Heed Painlord's advice!

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"Steak-ums" with diced green bell peppers and grated mozzarella.

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That goblin is adorable! It's a shame she's gonna die in flames.

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Rhedyn wrote:
So questions about the unchained rogue.

I don't have it myself, but here's some answers I've seen others post so far:

Quote:
Can it actually hit things?

Sounds like there's no baseline accuracy boost. There are debuffs you can apply when you get a Sneak Attack, which include possibly lowering the target's AC, thus making future attacks more accurate. But as I understand it, the Unchained Rogue is no more likely to hit a level-appropriate enemy on his first attack than the Core Rogue is.

Quote:
Is its damage consistent?

Starting at 3rd level, you get DEX to damage with one (and later more) type of weapon.

Quote:
Does it have any sort of survivability?

The aforementioned debuffs are also said to include things like lowering enemy attack values. I don't think I've heard anything about help with Fort/Will saves or AC or HP. Rogue Talents got juicier, so maybe there are useful options there?

Quote:
Can it do things with skills that a bard/slayer/investigator/wizard/ranger/ect couldn't? Are these things useful?

There's been mention of gaining unique uses of skills, but I don't know what they are.

Quote:

Could you see yourself playing it in a combat heavy campaign with difficult encounters in an optimized group? Because that is something all the other social skill heavy characters can do.

If yes, then how so?

That's a more subjective question, for you to answer for yourself.

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gamer-printer, nothing in Sense Motive says that being an impostor is the ONLY thing that will trigger the "something's wrong" of a DC 20 hunch. It's just an example. That's what "such as" means.

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WAAAIIIITTT!!!!

Crystal, you said that a pizza of chicken/bacon/tomatoes was about as LG as you can get.

But earlier in the thread (as I was just reminded by reading someone's reply to you) you said that an example of a CG topping would be chicken.

So a pizza on which at least one-third of the toppings is chaotic somehow manages to end up as a flagship of law?

Something doesn't add up.

*points interrogation light in Crystal's face*

I DEMAND ANSWERS!!!

;)

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DM_Blake wrote:
But if that imposter is making any effort at all to deceive you, and spending at least a round on his bluff check, then you are going to need to beat the opposed check.

I never said otherwise. I'm curious what your understanding of my post is.

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Lissa Guillet wrote:
I feel like we need a chart for aligned pizza toppings.

Indeed. Who'd have guessed that the epitome of Law and Good is embodied as the combination of chicken, bacon and tomatoes?

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Xavier319 wrote:

Okay, so maybe I'm missing something here, but the 'hunch' use of the sense motive skill, a DC 20 check to get...

Hunch: This use of the skill involves making a gut assessment of the social situation. You can get the feeling from another's behavior that something is wrong, such as when you're talking to an impostor. Alternatively, you can get the feeling that someone is trustworthy.

This seems amazingly powerful. Let's say a player is playing a spy type character, and encounters an enemy in their stronghold. The player has a massive bluff check, great disguise, and is all ready to go. The guard rolls a DC 20 check for sense motive, does he automatically detect them as an impostor or that they are untrustworthy? Does the player even get to roll any of his skills? Like I said, maybe I'm missing something here. Thanks for your feedback.

-Xavier

You are indeed missing something.

You seem to be under the impression that Sense Motive says it tells you if someone is an impostor.

It does not say that.

It says that you can get the feeling that something is wrong. It then lists an example of something that could trigger that feeling that something is wrong. It never says (or even implies) that you'll know whether it was that thing or a different thing that triggered your feeling that something was wrong.

So if you're talking to an impostor, a DC 20 check will give you the feeling that something's wrong. This will not reveal whether the thing that's wrong is that this is an impostor, or that she's hoping you don't ask where she's going right now, or that he's got the last pastry behind his back, or what.

You just know something's wrong, so maybe you investigate further.

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I kind of want to make a negative-channeling battle cleric with VMCMagus so I can Spellstrike with inflict X wounds...

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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
All characters, the BBEG included, were 9th level.

My apologies if this has already been covered, but... you planned a CR8 encounter for a CR9 party, which is literally the definition of "easy", and expected it to be dramatic? What?

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Okay, this pizza alignment thing has me intrigued. I'll eat most standard pizza toppings, but the particular pizza that it seems like I'm the only one to ever order would be chicken, bacon and tomatoes. What's the alignment for that?

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Pillbug Toenibbler wrote:
That's brilliant! (if a bit monotonous sounding.)

Hey, if you know what you like, why get something else? I ate pizza for every meal for the first semester of my sophomore year of college, and for every non-weekend meal for the second semester.

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*head asplode*

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...Then he remembers that he's got the biggest, nicest house in town (full casting with an infinite "spellbook", domain powers, and enough BAB/proficiencies/buffs to out-fight a fighter if he wants) and decides that his car doesn't really matter because he's still the guy that everybody else wants to be.

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Lorathorn wrote:
I'd love to hear more from those who go mapless.

I'm starting a 5E PbP soon, and hoping to go mapless as much as possible. Feel free to read along and see how it goes, or heck, you could even throw your hat in the ring and (if accepted) experience it firsthand.

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Irontruth wrote:
Jiggy wrote:

I joined a group with whom I've played 5 sessions at 3rd level. There's been 1-3 combats per session, and I haven't used a mini or seen a combat grid a single time. The only map used at all has been a rough sketch of a keep we tried to invade.

I don't know about their combat habits prior to this game.

For a second I was like "this sounds a lot like my group that just added a new player". Then I realized that you were that new player.

Hi, nice to meet you for the second time.

Oh! Your PM makes a lot more sense now that I've seen this post. You're the paladin, right?

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The real recruitment thread is up.

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D-Kal wrote:
Are you using any optional rules (such as feats)? Are there any off-limits races (such as drow)?

Full character creation parameters will come in the recruitment thread.

(Feats probably okay; no idea on the drow as I need to read up on them first.)

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Seems like there might be some potential here. I'll figure out some starting details and post a recruitment thread, probably in the next few days. (I'll link it here, too.)

Anyone can feel free to ask additional questions in the meantime, as well.

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"Mechanic X reminds me of real-world concept Y, therefore mechanic X can ONLY be used as an implementation of real-world concept Y."

That's pretty much the line of thinking you're embodying, Sandslice. You don't need to explain it; the people in this thread are quite familiar with it already because the rejection of that line of thinking is the whole premise of the thread.

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I joined a group with whom I've played 5 sessions at 3rd level. There's been 1-3 combats per session, and I haven't used a mini or seen a combat grid a single time. The only map used at all has been a rough sketch of a keep we tried to invade.

I don't know about their combat habits prior to this game.

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Thanks, but we're way past character creation now. :)

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Don't actually know what level it'd be starting at, but good to hear there's some interest. :)

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Snake Charmer wrote:

I like 5e. D-Kal puzzles me a little. I thought PHB was sort of the default chargen resource for 5e, but maybe I'm not paying close enough attention.

Since I'm free to ask questions, I'd like to know stuff like:
Where would the game start?
What can you tell me about the world?
Is there a town nearby? or anywhere at all?
Are we lost in the middle of the desert? Woods? Tropical archipelago?
Can I have my own ship?
Are there gods?
If so, who are they?

In short, I'd like to know enough to know if the game is likely to appeal to me. Otherwise, it's a bit like going on a blind date. But with swords.

Don't underestimate sworded blind dates. ;)

Anyway, the actual recruitment thread would have additional details, but I'll answer what I can at the moment:

It would probably start in a town, as the most likely initial plot hook (to get the PCs together) would be that the PCs were the ones to answer some sort of call to adventure. I haven't written that part yet; it's a bit of work to do without knowing if I'm likely to even get the campaign started. If I have a stroke of inspiration prior to starting the real recruitment thread, I'll post it here. It'll probably be something just enough to get the PCs interacting and exploring the world; by the time the first hook is resolved, there should in theory be at least one other thing the PCs want to go investigate together.

I can tell you the world will be generally medieval in nature, and start out European-esque, but who knows where those crazy PCs will end up wanting to go. :) I'll probably have some kind of global twist or quirk that gives the setting some distinctiveness in the background, but the details will be hammered out as they come up.

There will be towns in the setting. You will probably start in one. I'm not interested in a 100% wilderness survival campaign (though if the party decides to do some overland trekking, that could be a sub-theme for a while). If you're concerned about being starved for gear, don't be. The only way I'd do that is if the PCs steered the story in that direction, and even then it'd only last until the resolution of that plot thread.

Extreme climates (like deserts or tropics) are extra work for me so I won't start things there, but there's no telling where the PCs might end up. There will probably be some variety to the locales visited.

Ship ownership seems like less of a big deal than the ability to shoot lightning out your ass, so I wouldn't put it outside the realm of possibility, depending on where the story goes. You won't start out owning one, but if you accumulate enough money/favors...

Unfortunately, I'm not familiar with the D&D pantheon. As such, clerics will probably be able to select any domain that fits their own passions and identities. Religion in the setting will probably be left to vague references to "the gods" until such time as something more specific becomes relevant to a fun story. :)

I hope that answers your questions. Feel free to ask more! If nothing else, you'll help get my creative juices flowing. :)

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@D-Kal: Hey, never hurts to ask, right?

@Doomkitten: A little early for that, but I can say with some confidence it won't be rolled stats.

Grand Lodge RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32, RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

I'm pondering starting up a new PbP, and wanted to see how much interest there would be, before I start putting any real work into it. Here's the idea:

It would be D&D 5E, and characters would be PHB-only.

The campaign would be something of an experiment in open-ended storytelling, with a story arc not fully formed in advance. That is, you would encounter a plot hook or two, you would decide what you want to do, and I would sort of form the campaign around you. So I guess you could call that kind of "sandboxy".

The setting would be created/discovered together by players and GM as a joint narrative. Things not relevant to the story don't exist yet; existence of setting elements begins as said elements become relevant.

Monsters would all be custom-made (partly because I don't have the MM, partly because "[MONSTER] would be thematically appropriate here but is too weak/strong for the party" is lame).

No idea where this would end up. It'd be a shared spontaneous creation of a story and world, where I create things as you explore them.

Does that sound like something I could get a full four(ish) people to play? Let me know if you're interested, and feel free to ask any questions. :)

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