Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Zon-Kuthon

Jean-Paul Sartre, Intrnet Troll's page

458 posts. Alias of Doodlebug Anklebiter.


RSS

1 to 50 of 458 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

Jean Jaures: The Musical Interlude

Vive le Galt!!!

Online English translation for monolinguists like moi

Spoiler:
They were worn out at fifteen
They neared the end right from the start
It was December all the year round
What a life our grandparents had
Between absinthe and high mass!
They were old before being born
Bodies on a leash fifteen hours a day
Turned their faces ashen grey
Yes our Lordship, yes our good Master
Why did they kill Jaurès?
Why did they kill Jaurès?

If it can’t be said they were slaves
That’s no reason to claim they had a life
When you start up already defeated
It’s hard to get out of your patch
And yet hope flourished
In the dreams that came to the eyes
Of the few who refused
To grovel until old age
Yes our good Master, yes our Lordship
Why did they kill Jaurès?
Why did they kill Jaurès?

If, God forbid, they survived
It was to go off to the war
It was to snuff it in the war
Under orders from some swashbucklers
Who grudgingly demanded
That they go and gamble their stillborn youth
In the battlefield of horror
And they died in full terror
All destitute, yes, our good Master
With priests’ blessings, yes, our Lordship

Ask yourselves, you bright young things
Just long enough for a fleeting memory
Just long enough to let out a sigh
Why did they kill Jaurès?
Why did they kill Jaurès?


Sorry I have nothing better to offer than Russia Today, comrades, but...

From Ferguson to France, It's Right to Resist!

Only Workers Revolution Will Avenge Remi Fraisse!

Vive le Galt!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I don't mean to dissuade you. It wasn't terrible, it was just kind of blah. It was pretty much everything you've ever heard about it and not much more. Wordly attachments are bad. Do your duty. Be virtuous. Life is transient. Worldy attachments are bad. Now I'm going to go invade this country over here and take their people into slavery and concubinage. (It might not say that last part.)

Anyway, I mostly just posted to say "See Limey, me too!" and to tell the story about my Buddhist monk player's daughter. And to taunt the horseface.

Although, tomorrow morning, Kirth Gersen is going to hee hee! mightily when he sees us discussing The Republic.


I usually hesitate to comment on books I didn't much care for, but seeing as how it was written by a long, long dead stooge of the plutocracy:

I was very disappointed when I read Meditations. Happily, my edition was printed in 1945 as part of something called "The Classics Club" and it came with two highly enjoyable dialogues by Lucian of Samasota (yes, I only wrote this post to further bond with Comrade Longears), as well as an excerpt from Pater's Marius the Epicurean and an Apology by some Christian martyr named Justin who may or may not, I wouldn't know, have been a big horseface.

In other ancient Stoic news, my Buddhist monk player stopped playing with us a while back after his daughter was born. Not only is he a Buddhist monk, but his wife is a new-age hippie and they named her Aurelia. [Says it aloud]

Poor thing. Puberty's gonna be hell.


Blondie does Randy and the Rainbows

Ooohw-fa-fa!


Godot wrote:
As long as they remember to wait up for me, it's fine.

I flipped through that Existential Comics and I found you, Sam, Dungeon Mastering for Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky and a couple of mathematicians. Hee hee!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

You might as well argue about each other. We authors are on strike. You ain't gettin' another word out of us, pinksins!


More google results

Peregrinus Proteus?

Figures he comes from a work of Lucian's.


Simon Legrande wrote:
Jean-Paul Sartre, Intrnet Troll wrote:

"But it must be said that of the thinkers who refused a meaning to life none except Kirilov who belongs to literature, Peregrinos who is born of legend*, and Jules Lequier who belongs to hypothesis, admitted his logic to the point of refusing that life.

"*I have heard of an emulator of Peregrinos, a post-war writer who, after having finished his first book, committed suicide to attract attention to his work. Attention was in fact, attracted, but the book was judged no good."

Btw, Al stills owes me fifty bucks from that epic pub crawl we went on after Liberation. I think he went home with Simone that night...

[Curses in French]

I've seen references to this now in a number of places, but nobody seems to know what book it's from. I've only finished through the section on Don Juanism in The Myth and haven't seen any mention along these lines. Based on what I know of it, it seems more likely to be found in The Rebel.

Page seven in the Vintage edition, although no combination of "French writer suicide sell books" gets me any google results. Although, I suppose I am just assuming the suicidal writer was French. Also, I can't figure out who Peregrinos was.

Al was such a show-off.


"But it must be said that of the thinkers who refused a meaning to life none except Kirilov who belongs to literature, Peregrinos who is born of legend*, and Jules Lequier who belongs to hypothesis, admitted his logic to the point of refusing that life.

"*I have heard of an emulator of Peregrinos, a post-war writer who, after having finished his first book, committed suicide to attract attention to his work. Attention was in fact, attracted, but the book was judged no good."

Btw, Al stills owes me fifty bucks from that epic pub crawl we went on after Liberation. I think he went home with Simone that night...

[Curses in French]


Simon, have you started Myth of Sisyphus yet? If so, I forget, who was the dude who wrote his book and then killed himself as a publicity stunt in order to assure sales? And then his book wasn't any good?


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Zut alors, I ain't writing shiznit for you, pinkskins!

Authors strike!!!


Zeugma wrote:
But once you read the truly brilliant, such as by Albert Camus,

[Curses in French]


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Yeah, I don't owe you shiznit, pinkskins.


I watched Contempt again last night. Holy f+!~ing shiznit, and that's not because of Brigitte Bardot's bare bum in the opening scene. [Ooohw-fa-fa!]

You know, I think the Boston Phoenix ran articles on it every time it played at the Brattle or the Harvard Film Archives and I still waited 37 years before I saw it.

If you like pretentious French flicks, this one's for you!


Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

Which reminds me of another flick in French that I've got on my shelf waiting for a re-watch:

La battaglia di Algeri

Vive le Galt!

I forgot that this film includes a pleasing tribute to me.


Obligatory Musical Interludes:

Eyes Without a Face
Debaser


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I preferred Le salaire de la peur.


thejeff wrote:
a) I really don't remember the Satanism scare as being that big a deal on a personal/local level.

No stats or nothing, but I don't think that it was.

I met a guy during Occupy who was raised in some Southern evangelical church that spoke in tongues and all that. He told me that when he first came to New Hampshire, he did some missionary work and the consensus among his brethren was that New Englanders were the worst bunch of irreligious heretical apostates in the country. According to his brethren, we are "too practical."

The Black Goblin's mother excepted, of course.

EDIT: Of course, this is assuming you were raised in New England.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Limeylongears wrote:
My parents, while despairing at my taste in literature (Michael Moorcock, etc), were never bothered about it and didn't have a problem with D&D , either. My mother did make me throw my Black Sabbath albums away, though.

I lent a kid in my neighborhood a copy of the classic book Saga of Old City by Gary Gygax and his mother found it and threw it away! Later, I found his older brother had squirrelled it out of the trash and hidden it away with his porno mags.

Down with mothers!!!


My hetero life partner, The Black Goblin, played D&D in a middle school and had great fun until some busy-body demented Christian maniac intervened and made the school revoke the club's charter.

Worst part was, it was The Black Goblin's mother.

He's got subscriptions to every one of the game-material related subscriptions, so I think he's trying to make up for lost time.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Allegedly, Honore Balzac changed his name to Honore de Balzac because he got paid by the word.

I only kinda skimmed the last bunch, so I'm not really sure what's under contention, but the interplay of artistic genius and hackdom has provided a wondrous array of fabulous results in the world of literature, as every fan of sci-fi and fantasy novels should know.


Simon Legrande wrote:
Picked up The Myth of Sisyphus yesterday.

Tell that [French swearing] that I said [French swearing].


Vlad Koroboff wrote:


You do not need to tell ME that)
And it was funny)

Well, then, Ecrasez l'infame! (with various Frenchie punctuation marks)


:(


Did it tickle?


If you check out the What Books Are Your Reading Thread, you will note that the Balzac has spread.

[Shakes with fright]


BigDTBone wrote:
Jean-Paul Sartre, Intrnet Troll wrote:

I had a Spanish professor who used to mock English literature and would always refer to the Bard contemptuously as "Billy Shakespeare."

Personally, I prefer the sexy ones with spanking to the ones about dudes named, like, Chuck VII, or something.

Anyway, Moliere's better.

How does a Spanish teacher get to mock any literature? The only decent piece if literature ever written in Spanish is Don Quixote and that's it. All the prolific Mexican authors write in English, and I can't think of a decent author from Spain in the last 300 years.

Aside from the afore mentioned Mexican authors who write in English there are so many other great English authors (and I won't even count Shakespeare.) Milton, Chaucer, Bacon, Swift, Conrad, Twain, Hawthorne, Poe, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Hemingway, and that's literally if the top of my head.

But none of that matters because the best the literary world has to offer all come from Russia.

[Takes out red pencil and strikes out all the "if"s and replaces them with "of"s and "off"s]


I am not Doodlebug! I am his faux French avatar!

The real Doodlebug can't judge between Billy Shakespeare and Moliere, he's only read Tartuffe; and that was, like, two decades ago!

Anyway, Geraint, would you like to see my Balzac?


Madame Sissyl, would you like to look at my Balzac?


Balzac.

[Giggles some more]


Balzac.

[Giggles]


Non. I only ever learned to speak Spanish in the present tense. And then I forgot most of that.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I had a Spanish professor who used to mock English literature and would always refer to the Bard contemptuously as "Billy Shakespeare."

Personally, I prefer the sexy ones with spanking to the ones about dudes named, like, Chuck VII, or something.

Anyway, Moliere's better.


Non.


World Bank whistleblower exposes "Second Species" entrenched in world global elite, Vatican

In other news, I was interested in seeing Noah, too.


A Minute for Your Son


Jeepers Creepers: Semi-Star


11 French Travel Tips for Visiting America


Irontruth wrote:
For the gobbo

I appreciate the sentiment but there is no way I can favorite even a parody of that song.


You [redacted] hippie, Comrade Jeff.

Also,
God Is Love


Just Like Heaven


Didn't It Rain

Take Two


Didn't It Rain


I'm Going to Live the Life I Sing About In My Song

(Although, from what little I know about her, I'm not sure she did.)


I'm On My Way (Canaan Land)


Irontruth wrote:
Obligatory REM song

I am in high school, all of a sudden.

[Shudders]


How I Got Over


After some internet searching...

Kajehase wrote:
Tant-pis mon petit lutin.

1 to 50 of 458 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.