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James Sutter

James Sutter's page

Executive Editor. 2,448 posts (2,479 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 2 aliases.


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Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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thejeff wrote:
Kthulhu wrote:
Samy wrote:
Personally I don't think fiction should sanitize away all trigger issues. I think there should be tools in the toolbox provided also for those DMs and tables who want to deal with issue X or Y, just as long as the vast majority of the content presented is safe for all.

Couldn't agree more. If Paizo is going to try to wipe away anything that someone might find offensive, they might as well shut down now. It doesn't matter how blandly inoffensive you try to make something...there WILL be SOMEONE, SOMEWHERE who takes offense to it.

If you make it TOO blandly inoffensive, that someone will be me.

There's a very long way between "these days I'm firmly of the opinion that unless a story *must* involve rape, it probably shouldn't" and "wipe away anything that someone might find offensive". I don't think you need to worry.

Yeah, don't worry that we're going to go all care-bear. You know about the all-evil adventure path we just announced, right? :)

And there are definitely great, important stories out there that *require* triggering content in order to function. I just always take a hard look at such things these days, and ask myself, "Is this actually adding to the story, or is it just grimdark or—worse—intended to be titillating?" (Frankly, asking yourself "what function does this serve?" is a pretty good approach to ALL elements of a story, controversial or otherwise.)

But it's probably obvious by now that I like to shake the morality pinata and see what comes out. For instance, that's a lot of what THE REDEMPTION ENGINE is about for me: the question of consent with regard to alignment, and whether ends justify means. (And, you know, cool outsiders. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

ElyasRavenwood wrote:

I am reading Edgar Rise Burroughs Jon Carter of mars books at the moment.

Acturn reminds me of the Mars described in these books

That's not a coincidence. :) Akiton has always been our Pulp Mars analogue, and Castrovel our Pulp Venus (though we've admittedly try to add things to both that aren't particularly pulp inspired, just to mix things up).

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Gentleman Alligator wrote:
Please tell me this will somehow be recorded. I'd love to see this, but being broke and in Texas makes that difficult.

That's the plan!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Thanks so much for all the kind words about Distant Worlds! I'm really proud of that one. :) (And as for unleashing me more often—it's not so much a matter of leashing as having been focused on novels and comics, but I'm looking to dive back into another game book soon!)

Regarding gender issues in Distant Worlds: I apologize to anyone who felt put off by the book. A couple of notes:

*The lashunta were indeed based off a 30s pulp trope, at least where the art is concerned, though I attempted to subvert it somewhat by making them a powerful matriarchy focused primarily on scholarship. (They are most definitely *not* damsels in distress!)

*Yes, The Loving Place is rape-y, and it's a choice that I'm deeply conflicted about now. At the time, it was inspired by the fact that a lot of Giger-esque body horror has that "unnatural birth" element, which is inherently nonconsensual. In the years since I wrote the book, though, I've come to understand just how harmful/triggering any rape/nonconsenual elements can be for readers, and these days I'm firmly of the opinion that unless a story *must* involve rape, it probably shouldn't. So again, apologies to anyone blindsided by it, and I hope that you can skip over that paragraph and appreciate the rest of the book.

*There's not really a lot of space to devote to gender when you're detailing entire planets in a few pages, but outside of the pulp homage of the lashunta, I really tried to mess with conventional gender roles/sexuality/etc. If you want something a bit more interesting, I'd direct you toward the seven-gendered maraquoi on Marata (p. 42) or the genderless ukara battleflowers on Triaxus (p. 34).

Ultimately, all art needs to stand on its own, but I hope that adds some insight into my process!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Kevin Mack wrote:
Gorbacz wrote:

*sniff* Salim, Isiem, Zae, Keren, and Appleslayer, please make sure you all hang around.

Especially you, Appleslayer. You naughty little puppy, you.

Oh yeah that reminds me whatever happend to the novel with them in it that was being worked on?

You don't have to worry about any of them. Especially Appleslayer—our schedule is booked pretty far out, but his (and Zae/Keren's) book is already on it. ;)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Thanks for the comments everyone! This wasn't an easy decision for us to come to, but over the last year we've come to acknowledge that as the game grows and new opportunities develop, we really have to be strategic about where we spend our time and resources (rather than our traditional "everything all the time forever" approach :).

In answer to some specific questions:

*I can't talk yet about what Max is going to be writing, as it's still a few years out, but I'm *extremely* excited to have him on board. (I'll actually be playing Pathfinder with him and several other authors in a live audience-participation game at Gen Con—stay tuned for a post about it tomorrow!)

*In terms of what will take its place on the blog—unclear! We're shuffling some things around—as you've probably noticed, we've got a lot more posts than we used to—so I'm not sure how exactly Blogmistresses Chris and Liz will arrange things.

*We're planning to continue getting awesome illustrations of main characters from new novels to go along with sample chapters, so you should still expect to see some new community use art related to the fiction from time to time!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Keht Jelicho wrote:
I just got a copy of this, my first Pathfinder Tales novel actually, and I had been wondering if I should read other books in the line first or just dive in, but after going through this thread I am going to get started on it when I finish this post. That said when I got the book I remembered that I had heard that Pathfinder Tales books had boons/chronicles for Society play, and I found where those resources are for the earlier books, but not one for Lord of Runes. My question is will there be one for Lord of Runes later or are they being discontinued for some reason with the move to Tor?

We'll definitely keep doing the boons! Things are a little bonkers as we head into Gen Con, but it's absolutely on our list.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Dragnmoon wrote:
James Sutter wrote:
Khonger wrote:

I just saw Lord of Runes on audible. I'm excited to pick it up. I really love these stories.

Does this mean that all future Pathfinder Tales will be released in audiobook form?

Vic is correct! It's a bold new world!

Couple questions James.

What are the chances of getting the older novels on Audible?

Outlook good. Ask again later. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

xavier c wrote:
Do you think all of the outer planes should have there own hardcover book?

In a perfect world? Maybe! But for right now, I'd settle for a really rad hardcover addressing all of them. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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ulgulanoth wrote:
Axis does need more love, what of the plane do you want to explore the most?

Just all of it, honestly. Its markets, its inns, its factories, its churches, its factions, its fortresses—it's the city at the center of everything, and as folks have probably already noticed, the more bizarre and cosmopolitan a city is, the more I like it. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Alayern wrote:
James Sutter wrote:
I trust them all utterly, and they were great at pointing out my faults in a constructive manner!

Would you say you trust them all Sutterly?

Hey-oh! *buh-dum PSHT!*

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Good to know! I'll ping the tech team. Thanks!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Kendrosthenes wrote:

Sorry if you've already answered this question elsewhere. . .

If you could take your wife to have dinner with two current or past writers (any genre), who would they be and why? If you could pick a restaurant anywhere in the world for the dinner, where would you go?

Hmm... that's a toughy. For the writers... maybe Stephen King, just because he's seen it all, and my wife and I both love the Dark Tower series. John Green's a top contender as well, since we both like his stuff, and he seems like a cool guy. Dan Simmons is in there, too, and JK Rowling. Of course, it's also tempting to go with someone from ancient history, just to get a firsthand account of what life was like. (Or maybe some early scripture writers or founding fathers, just to get a few bones of contention hammered out.) But in general, I'm super fortunate in that I've actually already gotten to meet and hang out with some of my favorite authors!

As for where we'd go, I'd want to go to the greatest pizza parlor in the world... but I have no idea what or where that is, so I'd do a lot of research. Failing that... maybe Beth's diner in Seattle? I feel like eating a greasy 12-egg omelette together is a good bonding experience.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Alayern wrote:

I am just about to finish Death's Heretic (looooving it by the way) and I have a question about a significant moment in the book.

** spoiler omitted **

2. As Executive Editor, who do you trust to edit your books?

3. Why did you settle on Grippli for your avatar?

and lastly:

4. If you were a PF bard, would you have an archetype?

    4-A. How would you feel when you cast a spell?
** spoiler omitted **

Thank you! Really glad you're liking the book!

1.

Spoiler:
The chaos-junk was the result of the protean's chaotic presence interacting with the extreme lawfulness of that part of the Boneyard. The protean probably *could* have cleaned up after itself, but it didn't really have any incentive to—for it, completing the job in total secrecy would be booooriiiiing. :)

2. Death's Heretic was edited by Erik Mona and Christopher Paul Carey. The Redemption Engine was edited by Wes Schneider and Christopher Paul Carey. I trust them all utterly, and they were great at pointing out my faults in a constructive manner!

3. Because he's adorable and hilarious! I have a long history of updating my avatar any time a piece of art comes in that I can't stop laughing at.

4. Hmm... probably! I'm not sure which one off the top of my head, but it would definitely be one that was conducive to rock and roll. (Fun fact: the first article I ever tried to write for Dragon was a bunch of items for a bard to help you be a modern-day heavy metal musician--magical lute amplifiers and things--and the piece was so terrible that the editor did me a great service by not showing it to the rest of the staff. :)

4a. Personally, I think magic sounds *awesome*, and I'd be all about it, but I'm glad that the descriptions of Salim's magic worked for you—the dude's got issues.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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ulgulanoth wrote:
James, what part of the planes would you like to explore more in the pathfinder setting? And what plane do you think needs more print attention?

Most of the planes could use more love, but I'm specifically focused on the First World right now, and I'd *love* to do more with Axis. (The only reason I'm not saying "Heaven" as well is that I got a chance to dig into it and create some landmarks in The Redemption Engine. :)

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James Jacobs wrote:


At this point... I don't really need to push to make a big city book happen, frankly. If I can find the time and the energy and the inspiration, I would love to write it myself. Pushing to make it happen isn't the problem.

Yeah, there are actually several cities that are stuck in the "not enough time to write it!" box. Jacobs is the Sandpoint guy, I'm the Kaer Maga guy, it would be just silly to have anyone but Wes do Caliphas... the list goes on. But rest assured that we're all drooling over the prospects... once we get through the even more exciting projects we're all working on right now. ;)

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Flynn Greywalker wrote:


I love the Pathfinder Tales book Death's Heretic because it took a former leader in the Pure Legionnaires and turned him into a tool for a goddess, because he asked her to save his love.

Thank you!

Also, if you liked DH, I continued to dig into the morality of Salim's whole situation (and the questions of good, evil, and free will) in the sequel, The Redemption Engine. :D

/shameless plug

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Zaister wrote:
So, any chance for some new collected epubs from the web fiction? It's been quite a while.

We're actively working on it!

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Tectorman wrote:

I'm not understanding something. I get increasing the cost due to the financial need to break even/turn a profit. I have no problem with the cost of the novels going up while only giving the same amount of content. Heck, I probably wouldn't have noticed.

But why couldn't you have just kept it mass market paperback size at trade paperback costs? All my other books are mass market size, so this is a significant inconvenience for me. Those books were small, unobtrusive, able to fit in my cargo shorts pockets, and I'm sorry it never occurred to me before now that I needed to praise these qualities (note to self: send multiple e-mails to other favored novel lines to encourage them to leave well enough alone).

Next time, buy me dinner first.

I'm sorry the new size isn't working for you. We felt like increasing the cost and increasing the size go hand-in-hand—people are used to paying a certain amount for mass-market books and a higher amount for the larger print/higher print quality/etc. of trade paperbacks. While I really appreciate that you would have been willing to pay more for the mass-markets—it's the same content, after all!—our prediction was that people would respond poorly to paying significantly more for the exact same novel format, and that the trade paper format would be seen as added value by the majority. As with everything in publishing, it was a gamble, and whatever way we went, it was inevitable that some people would be disappointed.

I continue to hope we made the right decision, in part because I personally love the new, larger-format covers. :) But thanks for your input!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Khonger wrote:

I just saw Lord of Runes on audible. I'm excited to pick it up. I really love these stories.

Does this mean that all future Pathfinder Tales will be released in audiobook form?

Vic is correct! It's a bold new world!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Kendrosthenes wrote:
If you could be a "celestial body" (in let's say 24 hours), how would you look to the naked eye?

I see what you did there. :)

(I was Mars, complete with rover.)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Protoman wrote:
Also, not to be naggy or anything, but this was up maybe 3 hours before the next Paizo blog bumped it down from the main Paizo site? Maybe at least put it in Web Fiction tab for next while?

Thanks for letting us know! The web team will fix that.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Ross Byers wrote:

Nominally speaking, the Pathfinder timeline advances in real time (it was 4707 when it started publishing, it is 4715 now). But Paizo has stated that they don't want to canonize exactly when or in what order adventures happen, especially for ones that could significantly change the campaign setting.

For instance, the Guide to the Worldwound notes the fall of the Tower of Yath, which occurred in The Worldwound Gambit. But that tidbit doesn't change any adventures - it's just an easter egg to notice if you've read the book. Likewise, Stalking the Beast and Reign of Stars make reference to other Pathfinder Tales stories. But it doesn't affect their plots - they aren't sequels. Well, both of those actually are sequels. What I mean is they aren't sequels to the other works they reference.

And progressing the timeline via fiction is less damaging than via adventures. It's still an extra book to read, but at least a story has exactly one outcome. An adventure, or adventure path, can have wildly varying outcomes.

Which brings me to my point. I've been reading Lord of Runes. I haven't finished it yet, so this might not be a complete set of examples.

It occurs in Korvosa, mentioning the Blood Veil plague and Gray Maidens.

It has references to Thassilonian lore that imply the the Shattered Star AP and/or Rise of the Runelords AP have been completed. (More likely the former than latter, since the looting of Xin Shalast isn't mentioned.)

And I've just reached the part when Eando Kline shows up, which I think implies the Serpent's Skull AP occurred.

But the big one, because it actually changes the world, is it refers to the Mendevian Crusades as being over, which I have to assume relates to the conclusion of the Wrath of the Righteous AP. (I suppose this had to be addressed somewhat, since Kings of Chaos ties in to the destruction of Kenabres at the beginning of that AP.)

Is this just a consequence of being the fifth book in the Radovan and...

The general policy of not advancing the timeline continues to stand, but just as we make the occasional exception for adventures (like Shattered Star being a sort of sequel to Rise of the Runelords), we also make occasional exceptions for the novels.

For Radovan and Jeggare, we wanted to have King of Chaos be tied to Wrath of the Righteous, but of course that means that Lord of Runes then takes place after that AP (or at least after R&J's involvement in it). And to use a Gray Maiden, we needed to make a decision about Curse of the Crimson Throne, and so on.

Basically, in order to let Lord of Runes—the first Tor novel—play with a lot of established toys, we relaxed some guidelines. But on the whole, we still want our novels and APs to work no matter what order you read or play them in, so we're deliberately avoiding locking things down into a timeline whenever possible.

Hope that answers the question!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Kendrosthenes wrote:

In case you missed it, here's a link to James Sutter's recent (May 2015) AMA on Reddit:

http://www.reddit.com/r/Fantasy/comments/36ia81/im_james_l_suttercocreator_ of_pathfinder/?sort=confidence

James, great job answering all those questions. You rock!

Thank you! I've been super-buried in work recently, but I'll try to get back to this thread as well soon. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Jeremy Corff wrote:

I know one of the things that makes Setting books interesting to me are the story hooks given to various places and factions. I see something like the Valley of the Birthing Death (Land of the Linnorm Kings) or Skywatch (Brevoy - Inner Sea World Guide) and can't help but think of the stories hinted at in the description.

Do you as authors have moments like that with the setting, or do you prefer to do all your world building on your own?

All the time. "Where do they get to go?" is as important a question to me as "Who are my characters?" when I'm in the early stages of planning a book. For better or for worse, a lot of my plots start out as "What story could possibly take them to X, Y, *and* Z?" I'm sort of a glutton in that regard, and fleshing out favorite locations only briefly mentioned in the setting material is the best part of writing tie-in. :)

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StarMartyr365 wrote:
James Sutter wrote:
Kalindlara wrote:
James Sutter wrote:

Also, for folks doing the math at home, it's important to remember that back in the Dungeon and Dragon days, we were mostly pretty poor. I taught night classes and frequently ate out of dumpsters during my early Paizo tenure, and not just because it was cool and bohemian (though it kinda was).

Nowadays, ten years later, I pretty much *never* eat out of dumpsters, and instead of 6 roommates in a falling-apart flophouse I have 7 roommates in an actually pretty nice house. MOVING ON UP, BABY!

Which one was your, um, musical magnum opus written for? ^_^
All of them. Some things never change. :)

I could have used that song a couple of years ago. Then again, when I finally got them to do their !@#$ing dishes someone put an entire pan of au gratin potatoes in the dishwasher without scrapping the leftovers out. The dishwasher never worked right again and I ended up kicking them out a month or so later.

Good times.

SM

Oh god. I salute your survival of the beautiful trench warfare that is shared housing. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Dave Gross wrote:
If they had been anywhere near 50% ads, they never would have folded.

They never did fold, actually—the license wasn't renewed. The magazines were actually doing better than they had in a long time when WotC took them back in-house.

That said, yeah, 50% ads would have been *decadent*.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Kalindlara wrote:
James Sutter wrote:

Also, for folks doing the math at home, it's important to remember that back in the Dungeon and Dragon days, we were mostly pretty poor. I taught night classes and frequently ate out of dumpsters during my early Paizo tenure, and not just because it was cool and bohemian (though it kinda was).

Nowadays, ten years later, I pretty much *never* eat out of dumpsters, and instead of 6 roommates in a falling-apart flophouse I have 7 roommates in an actually pretty nice house. MOVING ON UP, BABY!

Which one was your, um, musical magnum opus written for? ^_^

All of them. Some things never change. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

7 people marked this as a favorite.

Also, for folks doing the math at home, it's important to remember that back in the Dungeon and Dragon days, we were mostly pretty poor. I taught night classes and frequently ate out of dumpsters during my early Paizo tenure, and not just because it was cool and bohemian (though it kinda was).

Nowadays, ten years later, I pretty much *never* eat out of dumpsters, and instead of 6 roommates in a falling-apart flophouse I have 7 roommates in an actually pretty nice house. MOVING ON UP, BABY!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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wakedown wrote:


Back when I could fork out $6.99 for a copy of Dungeon and get 100+ pages of pure (sans-ad)

Not to rain on the nostalgia, but we had ads in Dungeon. LOTS of ads. As many as we could get, really—it's how we subsidized an otherwise atrocious business model (meaning the magazine business model in general). And we'd spend hours trying to figure out how to fit them all in, because some folks would buy the right to be in specific places in the issue.

One of the exciting parts of starting Pathfinder was knowing that we'd never again have to stick an ad page in the middle of an adventure. :P

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Cover art is final but text treatment on it is not.

And for folks wondering, this is one of the best novels we've published in the line. And I'm not just saying that because Wes works here—he really busted his ass making this book the best it can be, and it shows. As editor, I'm really proud of it, and can't wait for everyone to get their Ustalav and vampire fix. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Jeremy Corff wrote:

Inspired by Winter Witch, but a question for everyone:

How do you deal with power creep?

Specifically, there is a tendency for characters in continuing series to grow in power (as they overcome the core conflict in each tale) to the point where it eventually becomes difficult to significantly challenge them. Especially in a shared setting series like Pathfinder Tales where real world threatening events are going to have repercussions that are outside of the scope of the novel line.

Very, very carefully. It's honestly one of the trickiest aspects of a series.

Of course, I get to send my character to the planes, where there's *always* someone more badass than him around the next corner. :)

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captain yesterday wrote:
But are you pro tribble?

I mean, they're basically space hamsters, right? It's pretty hard to be anti-space hamster, regardless of the imminent doom.

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Luthorne wrote:

Yeah, I was mostly wondering since they're described in Bestiary 4 as being aggressively expansionistic, have no patience for people moving into their area, and fiercely defending their territory, so I wasn't sure what their boundaries were...if they objected to anyone ever entering their territory, or if it was primarily those they felt offered a credible threat to their territory or holdings (such as someone planning to settle down there or do some hunting), and whether or not they would consider diplomacy and trade with others, or were purely focused on expansion and had no interest in dealing with those whose territory they would eventually be taking anyways, etc.

And yeah, I've certainly pondered the possibility of the formians having landed in lashunta territory via their usual asteroid trick, resulting in long, bitter war which could certainly lead to hatred on both sides and with the Colonies firmly in control of what may once have been lashunta territory...but there are certainly other possibilities, so I was curious!

The craziest one I pondered was that lashunta were the result of a group of formians that went rogue after falling in love with some of the elven population, their descendants becoming more humanoid-like as they bred with other elves before finally stabilizing with only vestiges of their former heritage in the form of antennae, a limited form of telepathy, and some degree of gender dimorphism...but I figured that one was pretty unlikely!

1) Any chances of a book set on Castrovel to give us more potential hints about what things are like over there? I love Distant Worlds and People of the Stars has a bit here and there, but they just whet my appetite...

Really, what I'd love is a big Campaign Setting book all about Castrovel, but somehow I doubt that's too likely anytime soon...and ones for Akiton, Triaxus, Verces...

2) What would be some books you'd recommend reading to get in the proper mindset for a Castrovel adventure?

3) Have you looked at the...

Ha! Yeah, while I generally don't present new canon on the boards, I will say for certain that the Lashunta are *not* the result of formian-elf interbreeding. :)

1) I'd love to do more on Castrovel, too! Too many books to write, too little time...

2) Pulp! Castrovel is the land of pulp—specifically pulp Venus—and ALMURIC is the book I'd most recommend (available from Planet Stories!), though I'm sure Erik would point you toward a dozen different authors.

3) I've indeed done some work on Occult Adventures! But since I don't want to steal anyone's thunder, I'll only say that you'll be seeing some discussion of how that book ties into Castrovel in a product pretty soon here. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Tor is explicitly anti-DRM. I don't know exactly what deals they have worked out with various retailers, but I know that if they can sell a book DRM-free through a channel, they do.

At the moment, it doesn't look like Tor is selling direct, at least as far as the Macmillan website is concerned—I think they prefer to cede that ground to the retailers.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

I think that the hardest game element to manage in the novel line—for me and probably most of the folks here—is the magic system. It's hard to have to think through every implication and make sure that, even if it's not in the story, you know why your protagonist doesn't just cast Spell X and solve any given problem.

Probably one of the most pervasive specific issues is that of magical healing and resurrection, as folks have mentioned—it's hard to keep tensions high when there's a perception that anyone can be brought back from the dead for the price of a nice magic item. (There are, of course, plenty of good ways that issue can be skirted, and logistical reasons why being rich in Golarion doesn't make you functionally unkillable, but at the end of the day we're still working within a framework designed to let *players* bring characters back to life while trying to keep everyone else from doing the same thing.)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

rknop wrote:
What formats will the ebooks be available in?

I know that they'll be sold by:

Kindle
iBooks
B&N Nook
eBooks.com
Google Play
Kobo

I'm personally not super savvy about ebook formats, so I'm not sure how many of those have proprietary formats. I need to investigate and educate myself before I can answer further. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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We've said it before, but one thing about expanding the setting in small, bite-sized chunks rather than huge books covering whole continents is that you get to pour all your energy and creativity into really fleshing out a small section of the world. And then you do it again. And again. Over time, the patchwork becomes a whole, and that whole is WAY more interesting and flavorful because you as the author had the chance to recharge, to consider the interactions of previous installments, to see what people liked, etc. That's actually how we started out building Golarion, back when the Inner Sea was mostly just names on a map and brief paragraphs of info supplemented by gazetteers in the back of Pathfinder, and I think it's one of our artistic choices that I'm most proud of. Biting off too much at a time ends up with too little butter spread over too much bread.

So yeah, I'm really excited about this project, and hope that readers feel the same way. :)

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All I can add to what Mark said is that big things are coming, and soon. Please stand by. :)

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Orthos wrote:
If you could write any one story in Pathfinder/Golarion of your choosing, no restraints, no inhibitions, no limitations except those of the setting itself, what would it be?

My next one. I need to get a few projects out of the way first, but then I think it's high time to return to the First World... ;)

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Steve Geddes wrote:

As a general question to any author interested in answering it:

How many of the other PF Tales books do you read?
How much of the campaign setting stuff? Just the ones covering the area your novel is set in? The whole kit and kaboodle? Something else?

1) All of them, multiple times. :)

2) Once upon a time I got to read it all. Now I rarely get to take edit passes on the new setting books—there's just too much material given my other job responsibilities—but the other developers and editors are really good about bringing me those sections that touch on topics near and dear to my heart!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

John Kretzer wrote:

These question is for everyone....

So in your opinion who is the most powerful character in the PF tales Novels?

Do you guys avoid writing trilogies as a conscience decision or was it decided from the top? (personally I love the stand alone novels or ongoing series you guys seem to decide to go with)

What is your favorite part about writing in Golarion?

1) Shyka. Don't mess with the Eldest. :)

2) That's a decision Erik and I made for the line a long time ago—since we hope to one day have a ton of PF novels in print, we want to make sure that any book a reader picks up is a good entry point. It can also be really hard to get bookstores to stock all the books in a series, leading to a steep decline in readership.

3) Getting to steal toys from some of my favorite creative minds, and also getting to spend some time living in Golarion as a character rather than a top-down architect.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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I'm guessing this thread is going to be *very* popular with the Tales writers...

Oh, and I first came into contact with the Pathfinder setting when we all looked at each other and went "OH S%!+ OH S~*# THE MAGAZINE LICENSE DIDN'T GET RENEWED—WHAT ARE WE GOING TO PUBLISH?!" The rest is history. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Luthorne wrote:

1) Do you envision lashunta and elves as being fertile with each other as humans and elves are, or no? Not asking you to say definitively one way or the other, just curious as to what your off-the-cuff opinion would be.

2) Do you think formians are generally open to trade and other such so long as it happens on their terms, or do you think they're generally xenophobic about all other races? Could you see them allowing a trade or diplomatic envoy onto their land?

3) Why do formians hate lashunta so much? Did the lashunta used to be slaves ala Radio Man before winning their liberty and taking formian territory, which they view as unforgivable, or do some lashunta have the ability to disrupt telepathic communication which they view as a threat, or what? Or is it antennae envy? It's the antennae envy, isn't it.

1) Hmm... hadn't really thought about it. I suppose my answer is "probably not naturally, but all things are possible with magic."

2) I think they'd be somewhat open. The hatred of the Lashunta is a relic of past territorial disputes between the two races, not necessarily a generalized xenophobia.

3) See above!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
Tacticslion wrote:
Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
What IS it about fedoras that turns young men into misogynistic, delusional, self-obsessed whiny-butts?
Psst. Trilby. It's a trilby. Fedora is a different kind of hat. I don't know why people keep calling them Fedoras, when they are clearly not. I like my fedora, thank you very much, and it is not a trilby.
Okay, then. What is it about TRILBYS that turns young men into misogynistic, delusional, self-obsessed whiny-butts?

"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the style of their hats, but by the content of their character." — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

I have not! Thanks for the suggestions!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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DeciusNero wrote:


And no Casmeron? Or is that under the Vudra entry?

Oh, there's Casmaron in here. I can *personally* ensure that... ;)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Dragon78 wrote:

What/Who inspired the Sarcesians?

Primarily Dan Simmons' Ousters from the Hyperion novels. While he's not the only person to come up with similar designs for people living in hard vacuum, the Hyperion Cantos remains my favorite SF of all time, so I can't deny the influence. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

Dragon78 wrote:
I thought the Lashunta were inspired by the Cupians of the Radio Man series?

Them too! There was a lot of pulp getting blended for our red and green planets. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Kajehase wrote:

How many roads must a man walk down, before you can call him a man?

Have you heard the word is love?

Who put the bop in the bop-she-bop?

1) One, but it's rather long, and covered in angry badgers.

2) Yup.

3) Me, and I kinda need it back.

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