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James Sutter

James Sutter's page

Managing Editor. 2,357 posts (2,388 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 2 aliases.


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Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Just to shed some light on the decision, there are two main reasons Paizo partnered with Tor:

1) It's the largest science fiction and fantasy imprint in the world, publishing iconic SF&F books ranging from Wheel of Time to Ender's Game.

2) Tor and Paizo already had several personal friendships tying them together. (For instance, I'm pretty sure that our senior sales guy Pierce Watters and Tom Doherty, Tor's founder, have been friends for longer than I've been alive...)

Those two things combined made us a perfect fit, and I'm super excited to have been a part of making it happen!

As far as the Tor.com article goes, while I don't want to get into an in-depth discussion of that particular essay, I want to make a couple of general points:

1) Tor.com is an online magazine owned by the company, not a blog or company editorial, and the author of that essay was a freelancer, not Tor staff. They run lots of different articles from authors with different viewpoints.

2) Regardless of how people feel about that particular article, gaming culture *does* have a race problem. It's something Paizo staff have been saying for a long time, and is one of the reasons why we try to make our iconics and other key characters diverse in terms of ethnicity (and gender, and sexuality, and body type, and...). Again, I don't want to get into the specifics of that article's points or approach--they're his words, not mine--but the fact that Tor.com would publish something about the issue of race in gaming (which is really just a subset of race in science fiction and fantasy) is yet another reason for us to respect them.

In my mind, our industry is getting more inclusive, but it still has a long way to go. So as much as it may hurt sometimes to have someone tell me "You're not doing enough!", I try to remember that anger is usually a symptom of hurt, and that trying to make our hobby more inclusive isn't an attack on it—it's an attempt to help it grow and flourish. Because when more people feel welcome in this space, everyone wins.

Just my two cents.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Qstor wrote:

@James any chance of another Elaine Cunningham novel?

That depends entirely on a variety of factors, not the least of which is Elaine's schedule. But I'm certainly not opposed to the idea!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Aventhar wrote:


Hi James,

I think this partnership is great news! A couple of questions...

1. Any chance the existing titles will be reprinted in the new format?

2. Will this affect the digital copies currently included with the physical piazo.com subscription?

1) We're currently not planning to reprint the older books—those will remain in mass market, at least until they sell though. We *are*, however, working to get those into wider digital distribution (Kindle, etc.), and the new deal will help with that!

2) At the moment, we're not sure whether we'll continue to be able to give out free electronic copies with physical copy subscriptions—it's possible that people may have to buy one or the other. On the plus side, we *will* be offering a big 30% discount to make sure that the books remain roughly the same price folks are used to.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Sam's also got a new book just out called THE CITY STAINED RED that's getting really good reviews. It's very much an adventuring party sort of story, and part of what convinced me he'd be a good match for the line. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Dave Gross wrote:

While you don't need to have read any of the previous stories or novels before Lord of Runes, it might be fun to have the others fresh in mind. Wouldn't it be great if there were a Pathfinder Tales Book Club where a lot of readers could do that at the same time and compare notes?

Ah, but there is! :) They just started The Redemption Engine, and there's still time to get in on it:

Pathfinder Tales Book Club

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

JoelF847 wrote:
James, thanks for answering the mass market question, even if I don't like the answer. This might finally get me to switch to digital, but it also is likely to have me buy fewer new books in favor of older used books (obviously not an option for books that never have mass market versions).

I understand. And hey, there'll still be *26* mass market-sized Pathfinder Tales novels you can buy new at the old price—the ones we've already printed aren't changing! :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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For folks asking: This is indeed a switch to trade paperback for real, not a "trade and then mass market later" setup.

There are a number of reasons for this. Mostly, it's just the way the industry seems to be headed, and for good reason: mass markets have such a small profit margin that you have to sell a *ton* of them to make them financially feasible (the "mass" in "mass market"). And as more and more people switch to digital, the audience for "smallest and cheapest format possible" print books is getting rapidly smaller. So a lot of publishers are starting to move to a two-pronged strategy where digital is the cheap option, and higher-quality trade paperbacks cater to those who want something a bit more substantial. For my money, I really like them: They have more space for cover art. They have better paper stock. They last longer (especially important for libraries). They tend to have larger print and to be easier to read. And, perhaps most importantly, the higher price point allows publishers to keep printing books when it might not otherwise be feasible. :P

I understand why some people prefer mass market, but I hope that when you see the new books, you'll agree that they're things of beauty! And either way, if you're buying through Paizo, the new 30% discount means you'll be paying roughly the same price as before.

Thanks for hanging with us during this transition! I really think it's going to mean great things for the line.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Wicked Brew wrote:
Any chance we will see audiobook versions?

Nothing official yet, but chances look good. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Steve Geddes wrote:
Presuming things go well, does this change make it more likely we might eventually see monthly releases of novels? Does it have any impact on the other golarion fiction you produce?

At the moment, we're committed to sticking with our current every-other-month model. I never want to produce so many novels that the quality starts to suffer, or readers start getting overloaded and losing interest.

The Tor deal only applies to the novels, and won't really affect stuff like web fiction or the Pathfinder's Journal.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Yup! This is the real cover. Looking at this was the first time I really appreciated how beautiful the new trade paperback format is going to be. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Lord Snow wrote:

Does moving Pathfinder Tales to Tor have any impact on the line content-wise?

Will we see new authors, and how much control does Tor have on the content of the books?

I'm still the editor in charge of running the line and commissioning all the books, so all the content and quality of the stories will be the same as you're used to (or better, as I like to think I get better at my job all the time). Really, the big impact of the Tor transition has to do with business stuff like printing and distribution and finally getting our books on Kindle. You will certainly see some new authors—being partnered with Tor is prestigious, and I'm already starting to get emails from big names looking to play in the sandbox—but that's nothing new, as I've always been committed to assembling the best roster I can. Rest assured that your favorites of our current authors aren't going anywhere. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Ross Byers wrote:

What does the Tor announcement mean for Pathfinder Tales subscribers?

I assume I'll still be getting the books, but will I still be getting an ePub?

For that matter, when might we get more of the ePubbed Short Fiction?

As I noted above, most of what the Tor changeover means for subscribers is that your books will be bigger and prettier at close to the same cost. :) While the price is going up, we'll be giving folks a 30% discount to bring it down to roughly the amount you're used to paying. We probably will *not* be able to continue doing a free ePub with print copies—you'll have to choose whether you want print or ebooks—but at long last we'll be on the Kindle!

As for more short fiction ePubs: Those are sadly on the back burner as we run around getting all the other products squared away, but I'm hoping to have another massive batch in another few months.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Kajehase wrote:
So listening to a recent episode of Tor.com podcast Rocket Talk, I heard Justin Landon mention that Sam Sykes is writing a Pathfinder novel. Anything you can add to this?

Sam is indeed writing for us! He's just started in on the novel, and having read the first chapter, all I can say is that if you like Sam's other books, this one will be just as snarky and irreverent. :D

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Gladior wrote:
Does the new announcement mean that a certain Pathfinder Tales Managing Editor will have more time that might get devoted to producing Campaign Setting and Golarion module materials?

Ha! Not at all—I'll still be doing everything I did for the line before, and more. :) That said, I *am* working on a new campaign setting supplement I'm quite excited about...

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Steve Geddes wrote:

So presumably your in house publisher has now got lots of free time?

I want another Mona AP instalment! It's been too long.

If only. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Kalindlara wrote:

So the physical size is going up? :(

I liked the novels better...

(Assuming I'm not misunderstanding the "trade paperback" thing.)

Just to clarify for folks: Trade paperbacks are basically halfway between hardcovers and mass market (the small-size books like you might find in a rack at the grocery store). Odds are, you've probably already got some at home—they've been around for a long time, and are getting more and more popular because they allow for bigger cover art, higher-quality and more durable paper, often larger print, etc. Here's an example of the size difference:

Mass Market versus Trade Paperback

Hopefully that helps explain the change. (And while that example doesn't really utilize the extra cover space, I can't wait for you to see what *we're* doing with it. Every one of the new covers has been head and shoulders above what we were able to do on the smaller scale...)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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John Kretzer wrote:
Are we also going to see any hardcovers?

Not at first, but it's not out of the question.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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D'oh! You're correct—I meant his new one, Liar's Island.

It's been a busy day today. :P

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Pravus wrote:
so what, if any, impact does this have with subscribers?

Mostly your books will get bigger and prettier. :)

The MSRP on these is going up to $14.99, but we'll be offering a 30% discount on paizo.com (for subscribers AND non-subscribers), so you'll keep paying essentially the same amount, just with trade paperbacks instead of mass markets!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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MMCJawa wrote:


Will Tor be reissuing any of the already released novels in Kindle? I'd love to read Death's Heretic, but having to move back in with my parents until this upcoming Fall means space for books is at a premium, and the Kindle does help with that...

We're still working on that, but the prognosis looks good. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

captain yesterday wrote:
Orthos wrote:
Digital method might be your best option then. 90% of the books I buy now are on Kindle.

I don't have a tablet, just a computer which my kids and wife monopolize, so thats no good (tho i truly appreciate the effort)

but also i realize that "trade paperback" is probably what the larger format of books like Twilight and such are called, if so then my previous argument is rescinded, thats actually a decent price:-)

still waiting for more Pratt tho:-) Tim or Chris (you know for the (hopefully inevitable) movie ;-)

Yeah, trade paperbacks are those larger, prettier paperbacks closer to the size of a hardcover. I hope that when you see them in real life, you'll agree that it's worth the money! (Incidentally, especially with the rise of ebooks, those smaller mass market paperbacks are a really hard model to make work unless you're selling a bajillion of them...)

And you won't have to wait long for more Tim! His new one, Liar's Blade, hits in August. We figured he and Dave were solid choices to help us kick off the new Tor era right. :D

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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captain yesterday wrote:
well i'm not paying $15 for a paperback, not trying to be critical or negative, just saying that might be too high a price point, the books are good but with one income they aren't that good, i'm actually rather crushed by that:(

Ah, BUT: We'll be selling them on Paizo.com for a 30% discount. So if you buy them from us, you'll actually get them at basically the same price, just in the bigger and nicer trade paperback format. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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For those who've asked questions about Pathfinder Tales, or when the next Dave Gross book was coming out, and other things of that nature... the truth has finally been revealed:

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/industry-deals/ar ticle/65682-tor-will-do-pathfinder-novels-with-pazio.html

There'll be much more information coming shortly, but now you know why I couldn't say anything. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Haladir wrote:
James Sutter wrote:
The Council of truth was active for a while—definitely more than 5 years. And we've never published an answer to precisely when the Council of Truth was active or when they disappeared, as the dates might be too big a clue as to what actually happened to them. Sorry to leave you hanging. :)
Thanks for the response! If you're not ready to reveal what happened, I feel better about running with my own plot. It's certainly not the only change to Golarion canon I've dropped in.

Excellent! Yeah, I try to leave lots of unanswered questions in my books for exactly that reason—as a GM, I always want to speculate and make up my own answers. Wondering's the best part. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Thomas LeBlanc wrote:

James, who is in charge of making sure the 4 newest novels get a PFS Chronicle Sheet?

More Tim Pratt and Liane Merciel books please! Also, I can't wait to read Forge of Ashes.

And is there a sneak peak at the ballerina novel somewhere?

1. John Compton and Mike Brock do the PFS sheets. They've been really busy recently, but I know it's on their list!

2. Your wish is my command. Tim and Liane do great jobs. :)

3. I certainly hope not! Right now, the only people who've seen it are me and anyone who may have hacked my Dropbox account. It needs more polishing before it'll be ready to go out into the world. But at least the first draft is done!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Haladir wrote:

Hi, James.

Two years ago, I asked a question about the Council of Truth on the Campaign Setting thread, and never got an answer...

When was the Council of Truth was active, and when did they disappear?

I imagine that you're the man to ask: You introduced them to Golarion in the module Seven Swords of Sin. You also wrote about them in the Campaign Setting City of Strangers, and also in Pathfinder #63: The Asylum Stone.

We know that the Council of Truth was active in Kaer Maga starting in the fairly recent past, and then disappeared without a trace "some years ago."

Have the dates of when the Council of Truth was active in the City of Strangers ever been published? Were they active for a long time? (5 years? 50 years? 500 years?) And, how long ago from the present day did they disappear? (5 years ago? 20? 50?)

** spoiler omitted **

The Council of truth was active for a while—definitely more than 5 years. And we've never published an answer to precisely when the Council of Truth was active or when they disappeared, as the dates might be too big a clue as to what actually happened to them. Sorry to leave you hanging. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Mythic Evil Lincoln wrote:

Happy 1000th AMA post!

How's that feel?

Ooh, you're right!

I'd say it feels good, Abe. Real good.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Darkborn wrote:
At the beginning of Chapter Eleven, Sutter wrote:
“Despite it being only early afternoon, the open windows disgorged laughter and music, as well as the occasional inebriated tenant. One such long-haired vagabond was currently doing some disgorging of his own against the side of a muraled wall, while a leather-clad elven woman laughed and another woman covered in red silks and blue tattoos looked on in disgust.”

The iconics Valeros, Merisiel, and Seoni with their first cameo appearance in a Pathfinder Tales novel? Well played, sir.

:D

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Welcome, Roman!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Kir'Eshe wrote:

Hi Mr. Sutter,

I've enjoyed Death's Heretic and The Redemption Engine, and am part way through Liar's Blade. Liar's blade I have digitally, (purchased all 3). How do you feel about me letting my friend have a copy?
Yarr, Gav wouldn't have even asked:)

I believe Paizo's official policy is that digital files can't be shared.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Kendrosthenes wrote:
James Sutter wrote:

Believe it or not, I've actually always enjoyed writing erotica, and my first-ever editing gig was a zine some friends and I created while still in college called "Penitalia: Literary Erotica at the University of Washington," which featured all work by students and faculty. Though I hadn't sold any straight-up erotica in years, when Shanna started talking about the project, I thought it sounded like a blast, and was extremely excited to be invited. (I actually wrote two stories--the other one is about a bunch of female astronauts on a mission to mars. Still hoping to sell that one somewhere at some point. :)

So might there be a "Fifty Shades of Golarion" some day? :-)

I'm sure there already is, somewhere... Rule 34!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Kendrosthenes wrote:
James Sutter wrote:
I know EXACTLY who should play Salim in a Death's Heretic film! I'd want it to be Naveen Andrews, the actor who played Sayid on LOST. He was definitely an inspiration for the character.

Instead of Naveen Andrews to play Salim, what about:

1) Oded Fehr
2) Aidan Turner
3) Diego Luna
4) Misha Gabriel Hamilton
5) Ryan Guzman

You'd make a heck of a casting director! If Naveen were busy, I think the first three would be great. 4 and 5 are probably good too, but they seem a little too white to me. ;)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Kendrosthenes wrote:
James Sutter wrote:

I think that writing in multiple genres is really fun, and helps broaden you as an author. Heck, I enjoy writing in other mediums as well--in addition to gaming and fiction, I write a ton of music, and just wrote part of a Pathfinder comic. Variety keeps things exciting! That said, there's no question that I think I'll always have science fiction and fantasy as my main fare. Everything's better with a solid dose of weirdness. :)

James,

1. In the near future, do you have plans to write a novel set outside of the Pathfinder universe?
2. If so, where would the story take place--in a setting of your own imagination or somewhere else?
3. Would the genre be fantasy, general fiction, or science fiction?
4. Would the main character be a hero or a villain?

(My apologies if you've already answered these questions somewhere else.)

Yup! I actually just finished up a first draft of a creator-owned YA fantasy novel. It's a teenage lesbian romance about two ballerinas who fall through into a magical world that's totally empty except for this old woman and a bunch of weird little creatures that get reshaped by human thought. It's waaaay different than anything I've written before, and it's felt good to stretch out a bit.

As for whether the characters are heroes or villains... that would be telling, wouldn't it? :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Thank YOU folks! Watching this has been a treat. :D

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Liane Merciel wrote:

Lady Neila Anvanory - Death's Heretic

Neila was a bit tricky for me because we only see her through Salim's perspective, and for a significant chunk of the story he has a somewhat unfair opinion of her as a spoiled girl. Later he comes around to a more nuanced and respectful view, but it still takes a little work to read between the lines and sift out what she's actually like versus what Salim perceives.

But here's what I think we can say is fairly certain: Neila is of Taldan origins but lives in Thuvia; she's very rich and grew up in luxury; she's spirited, energetic, and strong-willed; she's quite young but has had to handle responsibility from an early age; she's inexperienced but courageous and has had a certain level of training in swordplay. Her youth, social status, and gender (and possibly her looks) cause men to take her less than seriously, but in actuality she's highly competent and probably cleverer than Salim is.

Neela Vermeire Creations's Mohur is therefore my match for Neila. I think this perfume suits her on a number of levels.

The background story is pretty perfect, for one thing. Mohur is named after a gold coin minted in the Mughal Dynasty, and the fragrance itself was inspired by Empress Nur Jahan, an extraordinary figure in that empire. According to legend, Nur Jahan was a great beauty who enchanted an emperor with her looks and wits, and who was capable of everything from bureaucratic administration to tiger-shooting. In her later years, she devoted her time to poetry and perfumery. She pioneered the development of perfumery in India, but that was among the least of her achievements -- and she did it all in a time and place that was not kind to ambitious women.

Marketing aside, Mohur is a suitable fragrance on its own merits. This is an opulent, spicy-sweet rose oud fragrance that draws upon traditional Middle Eastern perfumery and...

This is great! And your description of Neila is spot-on the way I've always imagined her. My biggest regret about Death's Heretic is that Salim's POV obscures so much of her awesomeness (something I have big plans to fix in a third novel...), but I'm glad that it still came through. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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xeose4 wrote:

Rereading my comment I feel like I sounded really critical and like I had my own idea of what "should" have happened - I didn't mean it that way at all. I'm really sorry if it seemed like that. I just straight-up meant it as "gee this was what I walked away from the book with and reading the short fiction was very different from what I had anticipated", nothing more.

Can I ask - if it doesn't reveal too much - what the process for choosing this story, this time period in these characters' lives, was like? I ask just from a place of intense curiosity! There are a lot of places the story could have picked up - either at their first meeting, at their first induction into the Iridian Fold, at their reasons for leaving for Kaer Maga - what was it that appealed about starting their story here?

No worries--I didn't take any offense. :) And despite the fact that I'm lurking, a book club is absolutely the place to criticize said work! Please don't hold back just because I'm here.

Lurks in the corner watching you with giant bugged-out eyes.

There were a couple of reasons I chose to write about that time period for the short story. One was that I wanted a chance to show off some Casmaron in detail, and this was a nice opportunity. :) Another was that, since the novel deals with them after they've already been together for a long time, I wanted to write something that showed them early on and really gave you a sense of their characters and their relationship before they'd had a chance to grow and mature together. But I also wanted to show something about the Iridian Fold. So this seemed like a good midpoint!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Big announcement shortly. Please stand by. :P

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

There were definitely some years between the short story and the novel. And in terms of whether they ever got to do much "official" Iridian Fold stuff, and the significance of some of the Iridian Fold signifiers (like Roshad's veils)... well, that's a story for another day. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Yeah, the journal from Pathfinder Adventure Path #3 was actually where I created a lot of Kaer Maga—before that, I'd only written maybe a column on it in Seven Swords of Sin, and we didn't know anything about its various districts. So that's pretty much going straight to the source. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Erik does indeed speak for me. I am SO EXCITED about this series! The whole process has been a ton of fun, and I can't wait to see what you all think!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Marco Massoudi wrote:
James Sutter wrote:
Zeugma wrote:
GeraintElberion wrote:

So...

A sci-fi author with no web-fiction and no published novel-length fiction is dropped into cliche-danger territory.

I am concerned.

James better be showing some mad editor-fu here and have gone full diamond-in-the-rough with this author.

Do you have any links to any of Gary Kloster's short sci-fi, or a blog, or something? My Google-fu was weak and I had trouble finding him and wasn't sure if I had him or some other Gary Kloster in my search results.

Hopefully more info about the author will be forthcoming.

For the record, both Gary and I are fully aware of the danger inherent in a novel about the Mwangi Expanse—and the opportunity. The reason Gary hasn't done any web fiction yet is because the web fiction story I assigned him was so good that I immediately made him turn around and make it the first four chapters of this novel!

Long story short, I'm *really* excited about this one. Gary took on a monumental task, and knocked it out of the park. I can't wait for you all to read it. :)

This has been moved to April. I wonder if the novel after that will be moved too because i don´t want the Dave gross novel that was scheduled for june to move too...

Do you have any information abot that?

There have been some printing delays, but as you'll see at the top of the page, I think we're still looking for Firesoul to hit in late March.

Regardless, this will have absolutely no effect on the release date of the new Dave Gross novel. No worries. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Robert Ranting wrote:

I agree with the idea that it probably means "The Cage" in some ancient language, although I favor one of the planar languages. The gods would have needed some sort of name to call the dirt-ball they were sealing Rovagug in, and it makes sense for a divinely defined term to stick around even if it is cumbersome for mortals to say. This is especially true when high level divine casters can call up the gods' servants to check their spelling. Perhaps, stored deep in Hell's libraries is the original contract that spells out Asmodeus' role as keeper of The Cage,and Golarion's name is specified in the legal definitions?

** spoiler omitted **...

RE: spoilers, I'll tell you that three of your guesses are precisely correct. :) Though I'll admit that it often works backward for me—I'll come up with something and think "That sounds perfect!" and only later realize that it sounds perfect because it's linked somehow to a word already in my vocabulary. :)

Spoiler:

That was certainly the case with aiudara. I only realized why it sounded so right *after* it had gone to press!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Yeah, in that case, that's an error on the AP side. We try to keep everything consistent, but there are quite a few plates spinning in the air at any given moment...

And I suspect that there are a *lot* of interesting ways to kill Char, if it ever comes around to it. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

(Interesting... I wrote "Boar and Rabbit" expecting people to read it *after* The Redemption Engine. I'll be curious to see how reading it first affects people's impressions of both stories!)

(Prepares to take notes...)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Rysky wrote:
Just finished Reign of Stars and I now have questions I hope you could help with.

Char: Dunno! If Tim knows, he hasn't told me.

Zernebeth: There's a time gap between the novel and the AP. Plenty of time to lose (or upgrade) an additional limb. Numeria's a dangerous place.

Alaeron: I dunno, I feel like this one could still work out, albeit in a weird way...

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Kevin Mack wrote:
I know the writer of the blog story Inheritance is also doing a pathfinder novel any details of roughly when it will be out? Also is it staring the same characters from said web fiction?

Can't say when yet, but yes to the characters. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Ross Byers wrote:
Why didn't we get a Varian & Radovan novel in 2014?

See my previous post. Also, a novel a year is a pretty brutal pace for a lot of authors—even Dave needs a vacation now and again!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Marco Massoudi wrote:

Hello Mr. Sutter

Dave Gross said that his new Varian and Radovan book would be out in summer 2015 but all other details would be up to you.

I noticed there are no Pathfinder Tales novels slated for june and beyond.

Could you shed some light on the matter?

Thank you in advance.

You've really done your homework!

Dave's new novel will indeed come out in June, but it comes with some SUPER EXCITING news that we're not ready to talk about yet, hence the lack of an official announcement yet. I hope to be able to reveal all in the next month or two. In the meantime, please stay tuned! :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

Seven Swords of Sin takes place in Kaer Maga, though admittedly it's almost all dungeon crawl, and with a hodgepodge, old-school theme to it.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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xeose4 wrote:

Sorry if the Paizo book club was meant for certain people. I really love the idea and would like participate - if it's an error for me to chime in, just me know (I would also like to see discussion of the Redemption Engine next).

I would echo the appreciation for Delani - he was the first character that felt "normal", odd as that sounds. He wasn't so extreme like the Jackal and the Half-Elf, and he wasn't reserved or posturing or obsessed with position and titles. And more importantly, the moment that he does overstep his bounds, we're shown him getting taken down a peg (or several). Him getting called on his s@&# really endeared him to me, on top of the (imo legitimate) grievance of the fey.

My favorite scene was, hands down, the encounter with the Protean (while an inevitable was there as well, no less!). Previously I'd only viewed proteans as stupid, crazy, idiot-wurms that just floated around and were weird! Quirky! That scene breathed more life into them than anything else I'd seen anywhere, ever. It was really, really cool and I'll remember it for a long time.

If I could add one character that really frustrated me, it was Neila. I commented elsewhere, I think, that she doesn't seem to have a lot of purpose in the book, aside from "generic love interest". I don't want to rag on a story I did enjoy (and I know people enjoyed her), but there were just enough times that I wanted to roll my eyes at her lack of... anything... beyond the role of "female companion that always has the right support option available for the main character" that by the end I... really did not feel that their parting was an emotional moment for either of them.

If I have a single great regret about Death's Heretic, it's that we didn't get to see enough of what makes Neila a badass in her own right. If there's a third Salim book (and I hope there will be!), my plan is to bring Neila back so she and Salim can interact more as equal partners (by which I mean probably get on each other's nerves terribly :).

She's been doing some interesting things since the events of Death's Heretic...

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