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James Sutter

James Sutter's page

Executive Editor. 2,430 posts (2,461 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 2 aliases.


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Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Tectorman wrote:

I'm not understanding something. I get increasing the cost due to the financial need to break even/turn a profit. I have no problem with the cost of the novels going up while only giving the same amount of content. Heck, I probably wouldn't have noticed.

But why couldn't you have just kept it mass market paperback size at trade paperback costs? All my other books are mass market size, so this is a significant inconvenience for me. Those books were small, unobtrusive, able to fit in my cargo shorts pockets, and I'm sorry it never occurred to me before now that I needed to praise these qualities (note to self: send multiple e-mails to other favored novel lines to encourage them to leave well enough alone).

Next time, buy me dinner first.

I'm sorry the new size isn't working for you. We felt like increasing the cost and increasing the size go hand-in-hand—people are used to paying a certain amount for mass-market books and a higher amount for the larger print/higher print quality/etc. of trade paperbacks. While I really appreciate that you would have been willing to pay more for the mass-markets—it's the same content, after all!—our prediction was that people would respond poorly to paying significantly more for the exact same novel format, and that the trade paper format would be seen as added value by the majority. As with everything in publishing, it was a gamble, and whatever way we went, it was inevitable that some people would be disappointed.

I continue to hope we made the right decision, in part because I personally love the new, larger-format covers. :) But thanks for your input!

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Khonger wrote:

I just saw Lord of Runes on audible. I'm excited to pick it up. I really love these stories.

Does this mean that all future Pathfinder Tales will be released in audiobook form?

Vic is correct! It's a bold new world!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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StarMartyr365 wrote:
James Sutter wrote:
Kalindlara wrote:
James Sutter wrote:

Also, for folks doing the math at home, it's important to remember that back in the Dungeon and Dragon days, we were mostly pretty poor. I taught night classes and frequently ate out of dumpsters during my early Paizo tenure, and not just because it was cool and bohemian (though it kinda was).

Nowadays, ten years later, I pretty much *never* eat out of dumpsters, and instead of 6 roommates in a falling-apart flophouse I have 7 roommates in an actually pretty nice house. MOVING ON UP, BABY!

Which one was your, um, musical magnum opus written for? ^_^
All of them. Some things never change. :)

I could have used that song a couple of years ago. Then again, when I finally got them to do their !@#$ing dishes someone put an entire pan of au gratin potatoes in the dishwasher without scrapping the leftovers out. The dishwasher never worked right again and I ended up kicking them out a month or so later.

Good times.

SM

Oh god. I salute your survival of the beautiful trench warfare that is shared housing. :)

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Kalindlara wrote:
James Sutter wrote:

Also, for folks doing the math at home, it's important to remember that back in the Dungeon and Dragon days, we were mostly pretty poor. I taught night classes and frequently ate out of dumpsters during my early Paizo tenure, and not just because it was cool and bohemian (though it kinda was).

Nowadays, ten years later, I pretty much *never* eat out of dumpsters, and instead of 6 roommates in a falling-apart flophouse I have 7 roommates in an actually pretty nice house. MOVING ON UP, BABY!

Which one was your, um, musical magnum opus written for? ^_^

All of them. Some things never change. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Also, for folks doing the math at home, it's important to remember that back in the Dungeon and Dragon days, we were mostly pretty poor. I taught night classes and frequently ate out of dumpsters during my early Paizo tenure, and not just because it was cool and bohemian (though it kinda was).

Nowadays, ten years later, I pretty much *never* eat out of dumpsters, and instead of 6 roommates in a falling-apart flophouse I have 7 roommates in an actually pretty nice house. MOVING ON UP, BABY!

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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wakedown wrote:


Back when I could fork out $6.99 for a copy of Dungeon and get 100+ pages of pure (sans-ad)

Not to rain on the nostalgia, but we had ads in Dungeon. LOTS of ads. As many as we could get, really—it's how we subsidized an otherwise atrocious business model (meaning the magazine business model in general). And we'd spend hours trying to figure out how to fit them all in, because some folks would buy the right to be in specific places in the issue.

One of the exciting parts of starting Pathfinder was knowing that we'd never again have to stick an ad page in the middle of an adventure. :P

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Cover art is final but text treatment on it is not.

And for folks wondering, this is one of the best novels we've published in the line. And I'm not just saying that because Wes works here—he really busted his ass making this book the best it can be, and it shows. As editor, I'm really proud of it, and can't wait for everyone to get their Ustalav and vampire fix. :)

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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captain yesterday wrote:
But are you pro tribble?

I mean, they're basically space hamsters, right? It's pretty hard to be anti-space hamster, regardless of the imminent doom.

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Luthorne wrote:

Yeah, I was mostly wondering since they're described in Bestiary 4 as being aggressively expansionistic, have no patience for people moving into their area, and fiercely defending their territory, so I wasn't sure what their boundaries were...if they objected to anyone ever entering their territory, or if it was primarily those they felt offered a credible threat to their territory or holdings (such as someone planning to settle down there or do some hunting), and whether or not they would consider diplomacy and trade with others, or were purely focused on expansion and had no interest in dealing with those whose territory they would eventually be taking anyways, etc.

And yeah, I've certainly pondered the possibility of the formians having landed in lashunta territory via their usual asteroid trick, resulting in long, bitter war which could certainly lead to hatred on both sides and with the Colonies firmly in control of what may once have been lashunta territory...but there are certainly other possibilities, so I was curious!

The craziest one I pondered was that lashunta were the result of a group of formians that went rogue after falling in love with some of the elven population, their descendants becoming more humanoid-like as they bred with other elves before finally stabilizing with only vestiges of their former heritage in the form of antennae, a limited form of telepathy, and some degree of gender dimorphism...but I figured that one was pretty unlikely!

1) Any chances of a book set on Castrovel to give us more potential hints about what things are like over there? I love Distant Worlds and People of the Stars has a bit here and there, but they just whet my appetite...

Really, what I'd love is a big Campaign Setting book all about Castrovel, but somehow I doubt that's too likely anytime soon...and ones for Akiton, Triaxus, Verces...

2) What would be some books you'd recommend reading to get in the proper mindset for a Castrovel adventure?

3) Have you looked at the...

Ha! Yeah, while I generally don't present new canon on the boards, I will say for certain that the Lashunta are *not* the result of formian-elf interbreeding. :)

1) I'd love to do more on Castrovel, too! Too many books to write, too little time...

2) Pulp! Castrovel is the land of pulp—specifically pulp Venus—and ALMURIC is the book I'd most recommend (available from Planet Stories!), though I'm sure Erik would point you toward a dozen different authors.

3) I've indeed done some work on Occult Adventures! But since I don't want to steal anyone's thunder, I'll only say that you'll be seeing some discussion of how that book ties into Castrovel in a product pretty soon here. :)

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We've said it before, but one thing about expanding the setting in small, bite-sized chunks rather than huge books covering whole continents is that you get to pour all your energy and creativity into really fleshing out a small section of the world. And then you do it again. And again. Over time, the patchwork becomes a whole, and that whole is WAY more interesting and flavorful because you as the author had the chance to recharge, to consider the interactions of previous installments, to see what people liked, etc. That's actually how we started out building Golarion, back when the Inner Sea was mostly just names on a map and brief paragraphs of info supplemented by gazetteers in the back of Pathfinder, and I think it's one of our artistic choices that I'm most proud of. Biting off too much at a time ends up with too little butter spread over too much bread.

So yeah, I'm really excited about this project, and hope that readers feel the same way. :)

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All I can add to what Mark said is that big things are coming, and soon. Please stand by. :)

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Orthos wrote:
If you could write any one story in Pathfinder/Golarion of your choosing, no restraints, no inhibitions, no limitations except those of the setting itself, what would it be?

My next one. I need to get a few projects out of the way first, but then I think it's high time to return to the First World... ;)

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Steve Geddes wrote:

As a general question to any author interested in answering it:

How many of the other PF Tales books do you read?
How much of the campaign setting stuff? Just the ones covering the area your novel is set in? The whole kit and kaboodle? Something else?

1) All of them, multiple times. :)

2) Once upon a time I got to read it all. Now I rarely get to take edit passes on the new setting books—there's just too much material given my other job responsibilities—but the other developers and editors are really good about bringing me those sections that touch on topics near and dear to my heart!

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I'm guessing this thread is going to be *very* popular with the Tales writers...

Oh, and I first came into contact with the Pathfinder setting when we all looked at each other and went "OH S*!% OH S@$@ THE MAGAZINE LICENSE DIDN'T GET RENEWED—WHAT ARE WE GOING TO PUBLISH?!" The rest is history. :)

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Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
Tacticslion wrote:
Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
What IS it about fedoras that turns young men into misogynistic, delusional, self-obsessed whiny-butts?
Psst. Trilby. It's a trilby. Fedora is a different kind of hat. I don't know why people keep calling them Fedoras, when they are clearly not. I like my fedora, thank you very much, and it is not a trilby.
Okay, then. What is it about TRILBYS that turns young men into misogynistic, delusional, self-obsessed whiny-butts?

"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the style of their hats, but by the content of their character." — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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DeciusNero wrote:


And no Casmeron? Or is that under the Vudra entry?

Oh, there's Casmaron in here. I can *personally* ensure that... ;)

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Dragon78 wrote:

What/Who inspired the Sarcesians?

Primarily Dan Simmons' Ousters from the Hyperion novels. While he's not the only person to come up with similar designs for people living in hard vacuum, the Hyperion Cantos remains my favorite SF of all time, so I can't deny the influence. :)

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Kajehase wrote:

How many roads must a man walk down, before you can call him a man?

Have you heard the word is love?

Who put the bop in the bop-she-bop?

1) One, but it's rather long, and covered in angry badgers.

2) Yup.

3) Me, and I kinda need it back.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

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Oh man, this thread! Be still, my heart!

It's always fun to see people pick out your influences, because half the time it's spot on, and half the time it's stuff you've never heard of. :)

As it turns out, while Jacobs is correct that I was hugely influenced by Dan Simmons, the pulps, and Lovecraft for various planets, probably my biggest single influence was our own solar system. While I'm the rankest amateur when it comes to most hard science, I'm really fascinated by different astronomical phenomena and how they might impact life on a given world. So while one might look at Triaxus and think "Super-long winters and summers? Talk about a Game of Thrones rip-off!", the truth is that I actually came up with the long seasons idea by thinking about planets with really eccentric orbits, and I was totally oblivious to the parallels until I was writing the entry and typed something like "Every Triaxian knows that winter is comi—OH G*%%@&N IT!" :P

So, to list some of the broad-strokes influences:

Aballon: Real-world Mercury, and the thought that robots really ought to have their own planet.

Castrovel: A wide variety of takes on pulp Venus, including some of the ones mentioned. The Lashunta were also heavily inspired by Robert E. Howard's Almuric. (Erik Mona, aka The Pulp Master, helped lay down pulp guidelines for both Akiton and Castrovel.)

Akiton: Pulp Mars, by way of Burroughs and Brackett.

Verces: Dune never crossed my mind, though I can see where you'd get that. Actually, I've wanted to write about a tidally locked planet for years—I even wrote part of a novel about one, back before I wrote Death's Heretic, and that world served as the model for Verces.

Diaspora: Dan Simmons, plus our own asteroid belt.

Eox: It just seemed like being undead would make space exploration so much easier. Plus I saw a picture somewhere of a skeleton wearing a space helmet and went "UNDEAD ASTRONAUTS! GENIUS!"

Triaxus: I've actually never read Helliconia, and as noted didn't recognize the GRRM parallels until fairly late in the game—I was just really interested in the evolutionary effects of a highly eccentric orbit. The biggest literary influences for me on this one were Richard Knaak's Dragonrealms series and the Pern novels—the Inner Sea's never really been the right place for dragon riders, so I wanted to make sure they got their own nation somewhere.

Liavara and Bretheda: Just my ideas of what life might be like on a gas world, and all the moons gave me chances to play with fun astronomical phenomena like tidal heating or Europa-style oceans that I couldn't fit in elsewhere.

Apostae: Captured objects and generation ships! There are a million books dealing with both, but lets give the nod to Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama.

Aucturn: Lovecraft, all the time.

Pretty much everything else came from my brain—making up craziness is the best part of this job, after all! Hope that helps shed some light without killing the magic. :)

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Ross Byers wrote:
So, serious question, what does the Tor contract mean for the backlog of Pathfinder Journals and Webfiction that has not yet been compiled into ePubs?

The short fiction and journals will continue to be compiled and sold as epubs on paizo.com as normal. We've just been super busy recently, and it's a ways down on Ye Olde To-Do Liste. :P

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Hey everybody! Sorry to let this thread languish so long, but I was on vacation.

Regarding Pathfinder Tales ebooks: At least initially, they'll be sold by third parties—pretty much all the major players, now including Kindle! One of the big plusses of this deal is that we can finally, *finally* get the books on Kindle, which folks have been asking for on these threads forever. There will be links on Paizo's product pages that let you buy the ebooks from the vendor of your choice. The MSRP on these is $9.99, though individual sites have the ability to discount and make deals as they wish.

I agree that it's unfortunate that there's not a "subscribe" option under this model. It's certainly something we'd love to have, it's just unclear at this point whether there's a way to do it technologically and contractually when people are buying through the other vendors.

If it's seemed at times that not all the information was available, it's because we've been figuring this thing out as quickly as possible, trying to get everything arranged on very short timelines. Trust me, it's not subterfuge—you're just watching our internal processes work in real-time. :)

Regarding the price increase, and whether this counts as a "money grab"... I'm afraid that's really up to you to decide. What I can tell you is that it's really, really hard to make money on mass-market paperbacks unless you're selling a HUGE amount—the price is simply too low, once you factor in the printing costs and the bookseller's discount. Presuming you pay your authors and artists a decent rate—which we do—you can sell thousands of copies of a book before you get close to breaking even.

When we started Pathfinder Tales, we chose mass market because it seemed like the default, and because it's what we all had such fond memories of—certainly when I was a kid, most of what I owned were mass-market paperbacks. But the market has changed since I was a kid. More and more publishers are moving to trade paperback because you simply can't make money on print unless you're publishing an increasingly small list of Big Names. If we were starting Pathfinder Tales now, there would be no question that we'd go trade paperback.

The changes—the price bumps, the new size, the partnership with Tor, being able to sell on Kindle—are necessary to help the line grow and thrive. We need the books to be a competitive price and sell more copies so that we can do right by our authors, our game, and our partners.

It's important to me to keep the books as cheap as possible. But it's also important to me to get the best authors I can, and to reach as many readers as I can. Sometimes those two conflict. And in the end, as steward of these amazing books that my authors have poured their blood and tears into, I have to opt for whatever is going to get the books out to the most people. This isn't about trading old readers for new, it's about growing beyond what we can do on our own. And while paying more is obviously never going to be folks' preference, I hope that the price increase of at most $30 a year isn't going to break the bank for most readers.

Thanks for understanding!

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Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
What is love?

Baby, don't hurt me.

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Yeah, that thing's popped up before. I don't know how people think they'll get away with it, but I hope no readers were confused. :\

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While I love everyone's interpretations (especially Marco's), the name is generally pronounced "Ing," though creatures with different types of mouths place a different amount of emphasis on the initial vowel.

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Haladir wrote:
James Sutter wrote:
DragoDorn wrote:
Are you currently playing in any Pathfinder games?
I'm in Erik Mona's Shadows Under Absalom game...
Aside from the title, is that anything like James Jacobs' "Shadows Under Sandpoint" game?

Just in that it contains a lot of the same people. :)

At least, as far as I know...

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*insert clever welcome here*

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Zhangar wrote:
What are the main differences between your job duties and Mr. Schneider's?

The beard.

Seriously, though, there's a fair amount of overlap. At a direct managerial level, I'm in charge of the editors, and Wes is in charge of the developers AND editors (including me). At the same time, I act as his second-in-command, so I pretty much step into his shoes when he's unavailable, which adds to that overlap. Beyond that, as two of the most senior folks in the pit, we're both part of the managerial team that helps guide the overall product strategy and world design, as well as internal scheduling. In terms of our development duties, Wes takes a more active role in outlining and backstopping the game books, while I captain the fiction line.

So in short, we do very similar things, but he's the boss. :)

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This thread is yet more evidence that Wayne is awesome.

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DragoDorn wrote:
Are you currently playing in any Pathfinder games?

I'm in Erik Mona's Shadows Under Absalom game, but otherwise I'm a little bit between campaigns since the Asylum Stone game I was running wrapped up. Now that I'm digging myself out from under some big writing projects, though, I'm starting to think about what I want to run next...

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Kajehase wrote:

I want more Vint.

Not a question, but I thought you should know.

Vint: Hero of the people!

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Some more in-depth thoughts from several of us at Paizo: Remembering Mike

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I'm in the middle of writing up something more substantial, but Mike was a great guy, and I owe him a lot.

For those who didn't know him: You probably know his work. Mike was instrumental in creating the Pathfinder setting, and from Korvosa to Darkmoon Vale to Shelyn to Tian Xia, Golarion wouldn't be the world it is without him.

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Berselius wrote:

What the heck did the Hezrou use to turn the tide in it's favor? Unholy Blight or Blasphemy? Either way, Jiri apparently has ALOT TO LEARN about battle. She should have focused on her spellcasting / shapeshifting instead of blasting the demon with ineffective flame attacks.

Also, this ancient evil released by the Aspis Consortium is a creature of elemental fire and Jiri's own powers and origin stem from fire? Is there some sort of connection here? Either way, she'd had better not count on giving into her rage and using fire on it because I doubt it will be very effective.

I promise that these questions are answered in the book. :D

(Well, except for the Unholy Blight/Blasphemy question... I know the answer, but I never know whether it's better to tell or let people guess...)

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xeose4 wrote:


Speaking of Ceyanan, the subtle difference in the angel's interactions with Salim in Kaer Morga - versus his interactions with Salim in Death's Heretic - were another thing that made me fall in love with how much... for lack of a better term, "better" Sutter's writing is in Redemption Engine. It's another nitpicky thing that I'm sure isn't that big of a deal, but I feel it has an element of "mastery" about it and I just want to bring it up in discussion!

In Death's Heretic, Ceyanan is a needling presence in Salim's life. Throughout the book, one gets the impression that the angel goads him by pinpricks and drawing blood, in much the way one gets a stubborn mule to start walking. While the reader, if they choose, can read it as Ceyanan's interactions with Salim specifically that causes the angel to use that method (meaning that there is intelligent choice behind the angel's actions versus the angel just being a jerk), it's not in the text itself.

In Redemption Engine, that missing piece - a very, very subtle thing - is actually made explicit, and this is another one of those savory, meaty little pieces that made me enjoy this book so much. Because we the reader are shown a slightly more objective view of the angel - one where we see him poke holes in Salim's self-righteousness, alongside the occasional moment of...

I think Ceyanan would deeply approve of your description, especially the getting-the-mule-to-move part. :)

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The new ebooks from Tor will indeed be DRM-free!

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Just to shed some light on the decision, there are two main reasons Paizo partnered with Tor:

1) It's the largest science fiction and fantasy imprint in the world, publishing iconic SF&F books ranging from Wheel of Time to Ender's Game.

2) Tor and Paizo already had several personal friendships tying them together. (For instance, I'm pretty sure that our senior sales guy Pierce Watters and Tom Doherty, Tor's founder, have been friends for longer than I've been alive...)

Those two things combined made us a perfect fit, and I'm super excited to have been a part of making it happen!

As far as the Tor.com article goes, while I don't want to get into an in-depth discussion of that particular essay, I want to make a couple of general points:

1) Tor.com is an online magazine owned by the company, not a blog or company editorial, and the author of that essay was a freelancer, not Tor staff. They run lots of different articles from authors with different viewpoints.

2) Regardless of how people feel about that particular article, gaming culture *does* have a race problem. It's something Paizo staff have been saying for a long time, and is one of the reasons why we try to make our iconics and other key characters diverse in terms of ethnicity (and gender, and sexuality, and body type, and...). Again, I don't want to get into the specifics of that article's points or approach--they're his words, not mine--but the fact that Tor.com would publish something about the issue of race in gaming (which is really just a subset of race in science fiction and fantasy) is yet another reason for us to respect them.

In my mind, our industry is getting more inclusive, but it still has a long way to go. So as much as it may hurt sometimes to have someone tell me "You're not doing enough!", I try to remember that anger is usually a symptom of hurt, and that trying to make our hobby more inclusive isn't an attack on it—it's an attempt to help it grow and flourish. Because when more people feel welcome in this space, everyone wins.

Just my two cents.

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Dave Gross wrote:

While you don't need to have read any of the previous stories or novels before Lord of Runes, it might be fun to have the others fresh in mind. Wouldn't it be great if there were a Pathfinder Tales Book Club where a lot of readers could do that at the same time and compare notes?

Ah, but there is! :) They just started The Redemption Engine, and there's still time to get in on it:

Pathfinder Tales Book Club

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For folks asking: This is indeed a switch to trade paperback for real, not a "trade and then mass market later" setup.

There are a number of reasons for this. Mostly, it's just the way the industry seems to be headed, and for good reason: mass markets have such a small profit margin that you have to sell a *ton* of them to make them financially feasible (the "mass" in "mass market"). And as more and more people switch to digital, the audience for "smallest and cheapest format possible" print books is getting rapidly smaller. So a lot of publishers are starting to move to a two-pronged strategy where digital is the cheap option, and higher-quality trade paperbacks cater to those who want something a bit more substantial. For my money, I really like them: They have more space for cover art. They have better paper stock. They last longer (especially important for libraries). They tend to have larger print and to be easier to read. And, perhaps most importantly, the higher price point allows publishers to keep printing books when it might not otherwise be feasible. :P

I understand why some people prefer mass market, but I hope that when you see the new books, you'll agree that they're things of beauty! And either way, if you're buying through Paizo, the new 30% discount means you'll be paying roughly the same price as before.

Thanks for hanging with us during this transition! I really think it's going to mean great things for the line.

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Wicked Brew wrote:
Any chance we will see audiobook versions?

Nothing official yet, but chances look good. :)

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Lord Snow wrote:

Does moving Pathfinder Tales to Tor have any impact on the line content-wise?

Will we see new authors, and how much control does Tor have on the content of the books?

I'm still the editor in charge of running the line and commissioning all the books, so all the content and quality of the stories will be the same as you're used to (or better, as I like to think I get better at my job all the time). Really, the big impact of the Tor transition has to do with business stuff like printing and distribution and finally getting our books on Kindle. You will certainly see some new authors—being partnered with Tor is prestigious, and I'm already starting to get emails from big names looking to play in the sandbox—but that's nothing new, as I've always been committed to assembling the best roster I can. Rest assured that your favorites of our current authors aren't going anywhere. :)

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Gladior wrote:
Does the new announcement mean that a certain Pathfinder Tales Managing Editor will have more time that might get devoted to producing Campaign Setting and Golarion module materials?

Ha! Not at all—I'll still be doing everything I did for the line before, and more. :) That said, I *am* working on a new campaign setting supplement I'm quite excited about...

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D'oh! You're correct—I meant his new one, Liar's Island.

It's been a busy day today. :P

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MMCJawa wrote:


Will Tor be reissuing any of the already released novels in Kindle? I'd love to read Death's Heretic, but having to move back in with my parents until this upcoming Fall means space for books is at a premium, and the Kindle does help with that...

We're still working on that, but the prognosis looks good. :)

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captain yesterday wrote:
well i'm not paying $15 for a paperback, not trying to be critical or negative, just saying that might be too high a price point, the books are good but with one income they aren't that good, i'm actually rather crushed by that:(

Ah, BUT: We'll be selling them on Paizo.com for a 30% discount. So if you buy them from us, you'll actually get them at basically the same price, just in the bigger and nicer trade paperback format. :)

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For those who've asked questions about Pathfinder Tales, or when the next Dave Gross book was coming out, and other things of that nature... the truth has finally been revealed:

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/industry-deals/ar ticle/65682-tor-will-do-pathfinder-novels-with-pazio.html

There'll be much more information coming shortly, but now you know why I couldn't say anything. :)

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Haladir wrote:

Hi, James.

Two years ago, I asked a question about the Council of Truth on the Campaign Setting thread, and never got an answer...

When was the Council of Truth was active, and when did they disappear?

I imagine that you're the man to ask: You introduced them to Golarion in the module Seven Swords of Sin. You also wrote about them in the Campaign Setting City of Strangers, and also in Pathfinder #63: The Asylum Stone.

We know that the Council of Truth was active in Kaer Maga starting in the fairly recent past, and then disappeared without a trace "some years ago."

Have the dates of when the Council of Truth was active in the City of Strangers ever been published? Were they active for a long time? (5 years? 50 years? 500 years?) And, how long ago from the present day did they disappear? (5 years ago? 20? 50?)

** spoiler omitted **

The Council of truth was active for a while—definitely more than 5 years. And we've never published an answer to precisely when the Council of Truth was active or when they disappeared, as the dates might be too big a clue as to what actually happened to them. Sorry to leave you hanging. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Mythic Evil Lincoln wrote:

Happy 1000th AMA post!

How's that feel?

Ooh, you're right!

I'd say it feels good, Abe. Real good.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Darkborn wrote:
At the beginning of Chapter Eleven, Sutter wrote:
“Despite it being only early afternoon, the open windows disgorged laughter and music, as well as the occasional inebriated tenant. One such long-haired vagabond was currently doing some disgorging of his own against the side of a muraled wall, while a leather-clad elven woman laughed and another woman covered in red silks and blue tattoos looked on in disgust.”

The iconics Valeros, Merisiel, and Seoni with their first cameo appearance in a Pathfinder Tales novel? Well played, sir.

:D

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Kir'Eshe wrote:

Hi Mr. Sutter,

I've enjoyed Death's Heretic and The Redemption Engine, and am part way through Liar's Blade. Liar's blade I have digitally, (purchased all 3). How do you feel about me letting my friend have a copy?
Yarr, Gav wouldn't have even asked:)

I believe Paizo's official policy is that digital files can't be shared.

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