Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
James Sutter

James Sutter's page

Executive Editor. 2,392 posts (2,423 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 2 aliases.


1 to 50 of 522 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Paizo Employee Executive Editor

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
What is love?

Baby, don't hurt me.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Yeah, that thing's popped up before. I don't know how people think they'll get away with it, but I hope no readers were confused. :\

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

While I love everyone's interpretations (especially Marco's), the name is generally pronounced "Ing," though creatures with different types of mouths place a different amount of emphasis on the initial vowel.

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Haladir wrote:
James Sutter wrote:
DragoDorn wrote:
Are you currently playing in any Pathfinder games?
I'm in Erik Mona's Shadows Under Absalom game...
Aside from the title, is that anything like James Jacobs' "Shadows Under Sandpoint" game?

Just in that it contains a lot of the same people. :)

At least, as far as I know...

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

3 people marked this as a favorite.

*insert clever welcome here*

Paizo Employee Executive Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Zhangar wrote:
What are the main differences between your job duties and Mr. Schneider's?

The beard.

Seriously, though, there's a fair amount of overlap. At a direct managerial level, I'm in charge of the editors, and Wes is in charge of the developers AND editors (including me). At the same time, I act as his second-in-command, so I pretty much step into his shoes when he's unavailable, which adds to that overlap. Beyond that, as two of the most senior folks in the pit, we're both part of the managerial team that helps guide the overall product strategy and world design, as well as internal scheduling. In terms of our development duties, Wes takes a more active role in outlining and backstopping the game books, while I captain the fiction line.

So in short, we do very similar things, but he's the boss. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

12 people marked this as a favorite.

This thread is yet more evidence that Wayne is awesome.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
DragoDorn wrote:
Are you currently playing in any Pathfinder games?

I'm in Erik Mona's Shadows Under Absalom game, but otherwise I'm a little bit between campaigns since the Asylum Stone game I was running wrapped up. Now that I'm digging myself out from under some big writing projects, though, I'm starting to think about what I want to run next...

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Kajehase wrote:

I want more Vint.

Not a question, but I thought you should know.

Vint: Hero of the people!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

6 people marked this as a favorite.

Some more in-depth thoughts from several of us at Paizo: Remembering Mike

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

8 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm in the middle of writing up something more substantial, but Mike was a great guy, and I owe him a lot.

For those who didn't know him: You probably know his work. Mike was instrumental in creating the Pathfinder setting, and from Korvosa to Darkmoon Vale to Shelyn to Tian Xia, Golarion wouldn't be the world it is without him.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Berselius wrote:

What the heck did the Hezrou use to turn the tide in it's favor? Unholy Blight or Blasphemy? Either way, Jiri apparently has ALOT TO LEARN about battle. She should have focused on her spellcasting / shapeshifting instead of blasting the demon with ineffective flame attacks.

Also, this ancient evil released by the Aspis Consortium is a creature of elemental fire and Jiri's own powers and origin stem from fire? Is there some sort of connection here? Either way, she'd had better not count on giving into her rage and using fire on it because I doubt it will be very effective.

I promise that these questions are answered in the book. :D

(Well, except for the Unholy Blight/Blasphemy question... I know the answer, but I never know whether it's better to tell or let people guess...)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
xeose4 wrote:


Speaking of Ceyanan, the subtle difference in the angel's interactions with Salim in Kaer Morga - versus his interactions with Salim in Death's Heretic - were another thing that made me fall in love with how much... for lack of a better term, "better" Sutter's writing is in Redemption Engine. It's another nitpicky thing that I'm sure isn't that big of a deal, but I feel it has an element of "mastery" about it and I just want to bring it up in discussion!

In Death's Heretic, Ceyanan is a needling presence in Salim's life. Throughout the book, one gets the impression that the angel goads him by pinpricks and drawing blood, in much the way one gets a stubborn mule to start walking. While the reader, if they choose, can read it as Ceyanan's interactions with Salim specifically that causes the angel to use that method (meaning that there is intelligent choice behind the angel's actions versus the angel just being a jerk), it's not in the text itself.

In Redemption Engine, that missing piece - a very, very subtle thing - is actually made explicit, and this is another one of those savory, meaty little pieces that made me enjoy this book so much. Because we the reader are shown a slightly more objective view of the angel - one where we see him poke holes in Salim's self-righteousness, alongside the occasional moment of...

I think Ceyanan would deeply approve of your description, especially the getting-the-mule-to-move part. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.

The new ebooks from Tor will indeed be DRM-free!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

4 people marked this as a favorite.

Just to shed some light on the decision, there are two main reasons Paizo partnered with Tor:

1) It's the largest science fiction and fantasy imprint in the world, publishing iconic SF&F books ranging from Wheel of Time to Ender's Game.

2) Tor and Paizo already had several personal friendships tying them together. (For instance, I'm pretty sure that our senior sales guy Pierce Watters and Tom Doherty, Tor's founder, have been friends for longer than I've been alive...)

Those two things combined made us a perfect fit, and I'm super excited to have been a part of making it happen!

As far as the Tor.com article goes, while I don't want to get into an in-depth discussion of that particular essay, I want to make a couple of general points:

1) Tor.com is an online magazine owned by the company, not a blog or company editorial, and the author of that essay was a freelancer, not Tor staff. They run lots of different articles from authors with different viewpoints.

2) Regardless of how people feel about that particular article, gaming culture *does* have a race problem. It's something Paizo staff have been saying for a long time, and is one of the reasons why we try to make our iconics and other key characters diverse in terms of ethnicity (and gender, and sexuality, and body type, and...). Again, I don't want to get into the specifics of that article's points or approach--they're his words, not mine--but the fact that Tor.com would publish something about the issue of race in gaming (which is really just a subset of race in science fiction and fantasy) is yet another reason for us to respect them.

In my mind, our industry is getting more inclusive, but it still has a long way to go. So as much as it may hurt sometimes to have someone tell me "You're not doing enough!", I try to remember that anger is usually a symptom of hurt, and that trying to make our hobby more inclusive isn't an attack on it—it's an attempt to help it grow and flourish. Because when more people feel welcome in this space, everyone wins.

Just my two cents.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Qstor wrote:

@James any chance of another Elaine Cunningham novel?

That depends entirely on a variety of factors, not the least of which is Elaine's schedule. But I'm certainly not opposed to the idea!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Dave Gross wrote:

While you don't need to have read any of the previous stories or novels before Lord of Runes, it might be fun to have the others fresh in mind. Wouldn't it be great if there were a Pathfinder Tales Book Club where a lot of readers could do that at the same time and compare notes?

Ah, but there is! :) They just started The Redemption Engine, and there's still time to get in on it:

Pathfinder Tales Book Club

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

4 people marked this as a favorite.

For folks asking: This is indeed a switch to trade paperback for real, not a "trade and then mass market later" setup.

There are a number of reasons for this. Mostly, it's just the way the industry seems to be headed, and for good reason: mass markets have such a small profit margin that you have to sell a *ton* of them to make them financially feasible (the "mass" in "mass market"). And as more and more people switch to digital, the audience for "smallest and cheapest format possible" print books is getting rapidly smaller. So a lot of publishers are starting to move to a two-pronged strategy where digital is the cheap option, and higher-quality trade paperbacks cater to those who want something a bit more substantial. For my money, I really like them: They have more space for cover art. They have better paper stock. They last longer (especially important for libraries). They tend to have larger print and to be easier to read. And, perhaps most importantly, the higher price point allows publishers to keep printing books when it might not otherwise be feasible. :P

I understand why some people prefer mass market, but I hope that when you see the new books, you'll agree that they're things of beauty! And either way, if you're buying through Paizo, the new 30% discount means you'll be paying roughly the same price as before.

Thanks for hanging with us during this transition! I really think it's going to mean great things for the line.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Wicked Brew wrote:
Any chance we will see audiobook versions?

Nothing official yet, but chances look good. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Lord Snow wrote:

Does moving Pathfinder Tales to Tor have any impact on the line content-wise?

Will we see new authors, and how much control does Tor have on the content of the books?

I'm still the editor in charge of running the line and commissioning all the books, so all the content and quality of the stories will be the same as you're used to (or better, as I like to think I get better at my job all the time). Really, the big impact of the Tor transition has to do with business stuff like printing and distribution and finally getting our books on Kindle. You will certainly see some new authors—being partnered with Tor is prestigious, and I'm already starting to get emails from big names looking to play in the sandbox—but that's nothing new, as I've always been committed to assembling the best roster I can. Rest assured that your favorites of our current authors aren't going anywhere. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Gladior wrote:
Does the new announcement mean that a certain Pathfinder Tales Managing Editor will have more time that might get devoted to producing Campaign Setting and Golarion module materials?

Ha! Not at all—I'll still be doing everything I did for the line before, and more. :) That said, I *am* working on a new campaign setting supplement I'm quite excited about...

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
John Kretzer wrote:
Are we also going to see any hardcovers?

Not at first, but it's not out of the question.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.

D'oh! You're correct—I meant his new one, Liar's Island.

It's been a busy day today. :P

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
MMCJawa wrote:


Will Tor be reissuing any of the already released novels in Kindle? I'd love to read Death's Heretic, but having to move back in with my parents until this upcoming Fall means space for books is at a premium, and the Kindle does help with that...

We're still working on that, but the prognosis looks good. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
captain yesterday wrote:
well i'm not paying $15 for a paperback, not trying to be critical or negative, just saying that might be too high a price point, the books are good but with one income they aren't that good, i'm actually rather crushed by that:(

Ah, BUT: We'll be selling them on Paizo.com for a 30% discount. So if you buy them from us, you'll actually get them at basically the same price, just in the bigger and nicer trade paperback format. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

For those who've asked questions about Pathfinder Tales, or when the next Dave Gross book was coming out, and other things of that nature... the truth has finally been revealed:

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/industry-deals/ar ticle/65682-tor-will-do-pathfinder-novels-with-pazio.html

There'll be much more information coming shortly, but now you know why I couldn't say anything. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Haladir wrote:

Hi, James.

Two years ago, I asked a question about the Council of Truth on the Campaign Setting thread, and never got an answer...

When was the Council of Truth was active, and when did they disappear?

I imagine that you're the man to ask: You introduced them to Golarion in the module Seven Swords of Sin. You also wrote about them in the Campaign Setting City of Strangers, and also in Pathfinder #63: The Asylum Stone.

We know that the Council of Truth was active in Kaer Maga starting in the fairly recent past, and then disappeared without a trace "some years ago."

Have the dates of when the Council of Truth was active in the City of Strangers ever been published? Were they active for a long time? (5 years? 50 years? 500 years?) And, how long ago from the present day did they disappear? (5 years ago? 20? 50?)

** spoiler omitted **

The Council of truth was active for a while—definitely more than 5 years. And we've never published an answer to precisely when the Council of Truth was active or when they disappeared, as the dates might be too big a clue as to what actually happened to them. Sorry to leave you hanging. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Mythic Evil Lincoln wrote:

Happy 1000th AMA post!

How's that feel?

Ooh, you're right!

I'd say it feels good, Abe. Real good.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Darkborn wrote:
At the beginning of Chapter Eleven, Sutter wrote:
“Despite it being only early afternoon, the open windows disgorged laughter and music, as well as the occasional inebriated tenant. One such long-haired vagabond was currently doing some disgorging of his own against the side of a muraled wall, while a leather-clad elven woman laughed and another woman covered in red silks and blue tattoos looked on in disgust.”

The iconics Valeros, Merisiel, and Seoni with their first cameo appearance in a Pathfinder Tales novel? Well played, sir.

:D

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Kir'Eshe wrote:

Hi Mr. Sutter,

I've enjoyed Death's Heretic and The Redemption Engine, and am part way through Liar's Blade. Liar's blade I have digitally, (purchased all 3). How do you feel about me letting my friend have a copy?
Yarr, Gav wouldn't have even asked:)

I believe Paizo's official policy is that digital files can't be shared.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Kendrosthenes wrote:
James Sutter wrote:

Believe it or not, I've actually always enjoyed writing erotica, and my first-ever editing gig was a zine some friends and I created while still in college called "Penitalia: Literary Erotica at the University of Washington," which featured all work by students and faculty. Though I hadn't sold any straight-up erotica in years, when Shanna started talking about the project, I thought it sounded like a blast, and was extremely excited to be invited. (I actually wrote two stories--the other one is about a bunch of female astronauts on a mission to mars. Still hoping to sell that one somewhere at some point. :)

So might there be a "Fifty Shades of Golarion" some day? :-)

I'm sure there already is, somewhere... Rule 34!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Kendrosthenes wrote:
James Sutter wrote:

I think that writing in multiple genres is really fun, and helps broaden you as an author. Heck, I enjoy writing in other mediums as well--in addition to gaming and fiction, I write a ton of music, and just wrote part of a Pathfinder comic. Variety keeps things exciting! That said, there's no question that I think I'll always have science fiction and fantasy as my main fare. Everything's better with a solid dose of weirdness. :)

James,

1. In the near future, do you have plans to write a novel set outside of the Pathfinder universe?
2. If so, where would the story take place--in a setting of your own imagination or somewhere else?
3. Would the genre be fantasy, general fiction, or science fiction?
4. Would the main character be a hero or a villain?

(My apologies if you've already answered these questions somewhere else.)

Yup! I actually just finished up a first draft of a creator-owned YA fantasy novel. It's a teenage lesbian romance about two ballerinas who fall through into a magical world that's totally empty except for this old woman and a bunch of weird little creatures that get reshaped by human thought. It's waaaay different than anything I've written before, and it's felt good to stretch out a bit.

As for whether the characters are heroes or villains... that would be telling, wouldn't it? :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
xeose4 wrote:

Rereading my comment I feel like I sounded really critical and like I had my own idea of what "should" have happened - I didn't mean it that way at all. I'm really sorry if it seemed like that. I just straight-up meant it as "gee this was what I walked away from the book with and reading the short fiction was very different from what I had anticipated", nothing more.

Can I ask - if it doesn't reveal too much - what the process for choosing this story, this time period in these characters' lives, was like? I ask just from a place of intense curiosity! There are a lot of places the story could have picked up - either at their first meeting, at their first induction into the Iridian Fold, at their reasons for leaving for Kaer Maga - what was it that appealed about starting their story here?

No worries--I didn't take any offense. :) And despite the fact that I'm lurking, a book club is absolutely the place to criticize said work! Please don't hold back just because I'm here.

Lurks in the corner watching you with giant bugged-out eyes.

There were a couple of reasons I chose to write about that time period for the short story. One was that I wanted a chance to show off some Casmaron in detail, and this was a nice opportunity. :) Another was that, since the novel deals with them after they've already been together for a long time, I wanted to write something that showed them early on and really gave you a sense of their characters and their relationship before they'd had a chance to grow and mature together. But I also wanted to show something about the Iridian Fold. So this seemed like a good midpoint!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ross Byers wrote:
Why didn't we get a Varian & Radovan novel in 2014?

See my previous post. Also, a novel a year is a pretty brutal pace for a lot of authors—even Dave needs a vacation now and again!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
xeose4 wrote:

Sorry if the Paizo book club was meant for certain people. I really love the idea and would like participate - if it's an error for me to chime in, just me know (I would also like to see discussion of the Redemption Engine next).

I would echo the appreciation for Delani - he was the first character that felt "normal", odd as that sounds. He wasn't so extreme like the Jackal and the Half-Elf, and he wasn't reserved or posturing or obsessed with position and titles. And more importantly, the moment that he does overstep his bounds, we're shown him getting taken down a peg (or several). Him getting called on his s@&# really endeared him to me, on top of the (imo legitimate) grievance of the fey.

My favorite scene was, hands down, the encounter with the Protean (while an inevitable was there as well, no less!). Previously I'd only viewed proteans as stupid, crazy, idiot-wurms that just floated around and were weird! Quirky! That scene breathed more life into them than anything else I'd seen anywhere, ever. It was really, really cool and I'll remember it for a long time.

If I could add one character that really frustrated me, it was Neila. I commented elsewhere, I think, that she doesn't seem to have a lot of purpose in the book, aside from "generic love interest". I don't want to rag on a story I did enjoy (and I know people enjoyed her), but there were just enough times that I wanted to roll my eyes at her lack of... anything... beyond the role of "female companion that always has the right support option available for the main character" that by the end I... really did not feel that their parting was an emotional moment for either of them.

If I have a single great regret about Death's Heretic, it's that we didn't get to see enough of what makes Neila a badass in her own right. If there's a third Salim book (and I hope there will be!), my plan is to bring Neila back so she and Salim can interact more as equal partners (by which I mean probably get on each other's nerves terribly :).

She's been doing some interesting things since the events of Death's Heretic...

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Dragon78 wrote:

1)Was the race that lived on Melos a known race or something that has not been stated up yet?

2)Does Dykon have a crystal based playable 0HD race?

3)Would the centaurlike race from Arkanen be a playable 0HD race?

4)So for the red skinned people of Akiton should we just use human stats or would they be modified human stats? example would be they loose the bonus feat or bonus skill points for an endure elements or fire/cold resistance or different racial mods such as hardy(+2 Con), intelligent(+2Int) but weak because of the low gravity(-2Str).

5)The People of the Stars book says for stats for Vercites use ether Elf or Half Elf as the base, so wish one do you think is closer the Elf or Half Elf?

1) Ain't tellin'. :)

2 & 3) Sure, why not? Again, though, I try not to state definitive decisions about things unless the answer is about to be published anyway, because if someone else at Paizo someday stats up those creatures and they're not 0 HD, I don't want folks to tell them they're wrong. :P

4) I'd modify them. Variety is the spice of life!

5) Hmm... I'd probably go half-elf, though of course that's only for the ones that haven't augmented their meat-bodies. :D

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Guang wrote:

Hi James

I have a few Triaxus questions for you.

1. With an orbital year of 317 years, and "many" generations of each summer and winter, and "a single" generation of fall and spring, what is your definition of generation? It's obviously not lifespan, as 80x4=360.

2. Are there any plans for Triaxus (or Verces) in the foreseeable future? Do you have more details on the creatures of Triaxus all figured out, or will you wait to fill in details when needed?

3. How, specifically, would Spurhorn and Ivoryglass be different in Summer from the way they are presented in Frozen Stars? It seems to be implied that the Vahara glacier never completely melts.

4. What does the Triaxian language sound like?

1. I was thinking of generations in the sense that your parents and grandparents are all different generations than you. So in that sense, I was pegging a generation at something like 20 years.

2. No plans yet! I don't think it's too much of a surprise that I'd love to write a novel set there someday, but that day is still far off, if ever. :) And no, I try to make a policy of not coming up with a bunch of "head canon" beyond what gets published in a given sourcebook. That both makes sure that other designers don't accidentally introduce "conflicts" (which of course aren't really conflicts, if the details they're conflicting are only in my head), and it also ensures that I have plenty of questions to answer and room to play if I revisit the subject later!

3. Spurhorn and Ivoryglass are really Rob's babies, so I cede that part of the map to him. :)

4. I'm not sure! My first guess would be something fluid and kind of twittery, humanoid with hints of ferret or birdsong, but I'd want to consult with folks who know way more about linguistics (like Paizo editor Judy Bauer) before I nailed anything down.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Zeugma wrote:
GeraintElberion wrote:

So...

A sci-fi author with no web-fiction and no published novel-length fiction is dropped into cliche-danger territory.

I am concerned.

James better be showing some mad editor-fu here and have gone full diamond-in-the-rough with this author.

Do you have any links to any of Gary Kloster's short sci-fi, or a blog, or something? My Google-fu was weak and I had trouble finding him and wasn't sure if I had him or some other Gary Kloster in my search results.

Hopefully more info about the author will be forthcoming.

For the record, both Gary and I are fully aware of the danger inherent in a novel about the Mwangi Expanse—and the opportunity. The reason Gary hasn't done any web fiction yet is because the web fiction story I assigned him was so good that I immediately made him turn around and make it the first four chapters of this novel!

Long story short, I'm *really* excited about this one. Gary took on a monumental task, and knocked it out of the park. I can't wait for you all to read it. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Liane Merciel wrote:

Salim Ghadafar - Death's Heretic

Almost as soon as I started to consider this character, one answer leaped out at me: Tauer's L'Air du Desert Marocain. Obviously. It could be nothing else.

L'Air du Desert Marocain is an interesting composition. It's a dry, spicy Oriental that harkens back to an earlier age in its style. This is an intense, complicated, powerful scent that can easily become overwhelming if not applied with care, which I think mirrors Salim's personality quite nicely. It doesn't make any attempt to be nice or accessible in its first impression -- there's no gentleness in its opening and very little sweetness until you get to the drydown. Instead it hits you immediately with a full-force gust of arid desert spice and resinous woods.

I actually didn't care for Desert Marocain the first time I sampled it. The intensity was overwhelming, and there's really no compromise with this one; you either accede to its presence or you don't. But on a revisit, the complexity and nuance of the fragrance won me over. This is a powerfully evocative scent, and what it evokes is the archetypal image of a dusty, sun-baked city of the ancient Middle East, all spice and exotic smoke and fragrant, carved screens of cedar and sandalwood shading windows overlooking the market square, with a whispery tumble of dried rose petals blowing over the flagstones.

So that one seems like a fairly easy pick to me.

Wow, that's awesome!

*crosses out his own guess, which was "sweat, dust, and ghoul entrails"*

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

3 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm loving this thread. While it's true that (as far as I know), Erik didn't have a specific meaning in mind when he came up with the word, the idea of it being elves from Castrovel's name for the planet would probably be my explanation of choice.

(As always, this is on the messageboards, and thus not canon... though if I had thought to put it in Distant Worlds, it might be. ;)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Personally, I've never been a fan of the "undead = evil" trope--to me, it's always seemed unnecessarily prejudiced. So I think the idea of a non-evil organization that protects undead and helps them deal with their weird existence sound pretty awesome!

In addition to your suggestions, I could honestly see a lot of gods being willing to support this sort of thing: Shelyn, because she's all about love and sees the potential even in Zon-Kuthon. Sarenrae, to try and redeem the redeemable. Abadar, because hey, maybe you've got a contract, and here's folks trying to find a way to make the undead productive members of society. Really, it's only Pharasma who has a direct doctrinal edict against the undead--most other gods can be swayed (hence the reason Geb hasn't been wiped from the map).

Note that this is all just *MY* opinion. No single staffer gets to speak for the gods in an official capacity unless it's in a published book. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Just wanted to drop a link here for anyone interested in the fan-run Pathfinder Tales Book Club's read of Death's Heretic and its webfiction prequel. There's still time to get in on the discussion!

Pathfinder Tales Book Club

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.

It's been so long since I wrote this one that I only kind of remember what happens, which makes reading this analysis even more fun and surreal. :D

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Purple Dragon Knight wrote:
James Sutter wrote:

Karazh in Casmaron is also a good spot, as it drew a fair bit of influence from Mongolia and Kazakhstan. So far, it's only been detailed in the web fiction story Boar and Rabbit.

So far. :)

Karazh = Cambulac?

Not exactly! The capital (such as it is) of Karazh is Ular Kel, but while I drew inspiration from all over the region, I didn't have a direct analogue for the city.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Karazh in Casmaron is also a good spot, as it drew a fair bit of influence from Mongolia and Kazakhstan. So far, it's only been detailed in the web fiction story Boar and Rabbit.

So far. :)

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Drejk wrote:


In a completely unrelated announced, I would like to see more about Kaer Maga.

I know we're entering Shameless Plug Town*, but did you Kaer Maga fans know that THE REDEMPTION ENGINE is set there? I do a fair bit of expanding on the details from CITY OF STRANGERS in that one, as well as in Pathfinder #63: The Asylum Stone.

Spoiler:

*Welcome to Spoilertown! Population: Me.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Mythic Evil Lincoln wrote:
I like places that are more questions than answers.

Hear, hear!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Yay! These are so cute!

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

5 people marked this as a favorite.
W E Ray wrote:

Absalom.

Really, Absalom is my my top 5 -- then, in order: Korvosa, Egorian, Augustana, Nisroch, Ilizmagorti, Magnimar and Katapesh.

But it's a shame the designers seem to refuse to do much with the Flagship Location of the campaign setting. Absalom needs so much more development!

That's because Absalom is destined to be Erik's opus, and he refuses to do anything in half measures. One day he'll reveal his glorious city-child, and all will quail in love and fear...

1 to 50 of 522 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

©2002–2015 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.