Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
James Jacobs

James Jacobs's page

Creative Director. Pathfinder Society Member. 40,946 posts (42,777 including aliases). No reviews. 2 lists. No wishlists. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 9 aliases.


1 to 50 of 5,134 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Loros wrote:

At the back of all of the companion books I've noticed the catch phrase "Would you like to know more?"

Is this a subtle nod to the old Starship Troopers film? And if so...
I'm doing my part!

Well done, citizen!

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.

My philosophy is indeed that the templated monsters are better served in the body of the adventure or as NPCs in the adventure appendix. We might do "template expansions" like what we did for animated objects etc. in Carrion Crown again some day though.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Lloyd Jackson wrote:

True. All the other diety-level Qlippoth beings are dead...

Actually, that might NOT be entirely 100% true...

Paizo Employee Creative Director

7 people marked this as a favorite.
Prince of Knives wrote:

First, thank you very much for taking the time out to answer my question. Like just about everyone else I've got campaign settings in my underwear drawer, and I do sometimes stop to tinker around with them. I wanted to bring up the bolded sentence and ask you to expand on it a bit. There's a noticeable trend in RPG writing for blatantly gender-dominant societies - but especially matriarchies - to be portrayed as evil as well as, well, have Man Vision Problems (to wit, drow in D&D and its legacy systems tend to dress in outfits made of floss while their males invest in things like, say, armor). Any feelings or thoughts on how this has been treated for Golarion?

Not well enough.

There IS at least one good matriarchy on Golarion—the nation of Holomog is the largest and most powerful human nation on southern Garund... and possibly on all of Garund, and it's a good-aligned matriarchy. We haven't done much with Holomog yet simply because we haven't done much with southern Garund, but I do want to do something with it some day. I'm relatively sure there are others out there too.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

6 people marked this as a favorite.

Earth could learn a lot from some of the things we do in Golarion though.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
The Shaman wrote:
I am actually quite curious - how many people would consider it a dealbreaker if there were (relatively minor) stat adjustments for males and females of all or most races? I think one of the early D&D editions had those... probably AD&D (the 1E version).

It'd be a dealbreaker to me.

Early editions of D&D didn't have stat adjustments for geneder, but they had something that's arguably worse—stat maximums based on gender, or more precise, stat maximums if your character wasn't a guy. A woman could never be as strong as a man in AD&D.

Probably the most important way the game has matured/evolved over the years is that it dropped that silly bit.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

16 people marked this as a favorite.
Prince of Knives wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Deadmanwalking wrote:
Gnolls tend to be patriarchal as well (oddly enough)
That bit there's kind of an error we're working on fixing. Gnolls should be matriarchal.

Personal question - how difficult have you found it to be in attempting to design Golarion with gender equality in mind? Is it hard not to include unintended mores from your culture in real life (not making any assumptions on what culture that is)? What does the term 'gender equality' mean for you in terms of setting design?

[notebook poised]

When I'm designing for Golarion, not all that difficult at all.

When I'm developing work from some authors, quite difficult, since some authors don't realize their male privilege is showing quite so blatantly when they write.

What "gender equality" means to me is kinda complex, but you can look at the gender mix in our deities or our iconics to get a sense of the tip of that iceberg. In terms of setting design, it basically means that it's important to look at every NPC and decide if that NPC needs to be a man or a woman or whatever, and to try to keep an equal spread of genders represented across all NPC types, be they villains or heroes, victims or persecutors, monsters or humans, etc. And as good as you think you can do, and as unbaised as you hope you are... you can always do better—and it helps to have folks other than yourself read and edit the work you do to bring new perspectives to things.

That said, there are cases where there is NOT gender equality, particularly in certain societies (drow, gnoll, orc), religions (Kostchtchie), races (harpy, hag, satyr, xill), and the like. In those cases, the gender dominance tends to be a key part of things and a defining element of that society, religion, or race. Writing about gender inequality is not the same as promoting or supporting gender inequality, any more than writing about depravity is supporting depravity. To paraphrase Ebert in his 4 star review of George Romero's "Dawn of the Dead," "A movie can be about depravity without being depraved."

Personally, though, I tend to err on the side of more female NPCs in my writing than male NPCs, particularly when it comes to positions of power or prominence in a story line. Thus, for Burnt Offerings as an example, the mayor of the town is a woman, the primary villain of the adventure is a woman, the most significant PC ally is a woman, etc. Pretty much because I try NOT to fall into the trap of only writing from the viewpoint of a man writing in a society with a lot of male-dominated issues and influences. I like to think of myself as a feminist, I guess, but I kinda get nervous claiming that because I'm a man. It's complicated, in other words, and I hope that does at least a little good in there somewhere to answer your question.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Dragon78 wrote:

1)Will the "Bio-tech" found in the Iron Gods AP volume 4 be useable by the PCs( and humanoids in general)?

2)Will the Technology guide book have rules for space ships? If so will it have different kinds of space ships?

3)Will the last hardcover of the year be revealed at Paizo Con, Gen Con, or before those two?

4)When will we find out more about the People of the Stars book? Is it a race book, or a general players guide, or both?

5)Are we getting any more monster revisited books this year?

6)Are Kaiju born, created, or both? Do Kaiju ever form mated pairs or reproduce asexually?

7)Will Warpriest have to choose a deity like clerics?

1) Maybe. Not without disadvantages, I suspect. It's certainly not intended to be something most humanoids would desire.

2) Nope. Space travel enables Iron Gods, but is not a PART of Iron Gods. What we do with space ships will be largely handled as part of the adventure backgrounds and location features, not as specific rules PCs can use.

3) Probably Gen Con, but the actual timing of that is up to Erik, not me.

4) We'll have more about it later, but you can infer plenty from the fact that it uses the same naming scheme as something like "People of the North" and NOT "Blood of the Moon."

5) We haven't announced any yet, but the office of expectation management suggest you not anticipate any more monster revisited books anytime soon.

6) It varies from kaiju to kaiju.

7) In the core rules, no. It's worded like the cleric is in the core rules. On Golarion, yes, I hope tehy will. Another battle lost by me.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

8 people marked this as a favorite.
Deadmanwalking wrote:
Gnolls tend to be patriarchal as well (oddly enough)

That bit there's kind of an error we're working on fixing. Gnolls should be matriarchal.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Matrix Dragon wrote:
I have to say that I find it kind of odd that Saventh is listed as 'only' a fighter 20/champion 6 considering that she basically defeated a god single handedly. At least, the more recent descriptions of Ydersius make him sound like a god rather than a demigod.

NPCs get to do things PCs can't.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.

EDIT: Changed my post. Wasn't worth it.

Make of Sandpoint what you will to work best in your game.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Aaron Scott 139 wrote:
James far be it for me to tell you how to run Paizo, BUT if you don't do a follow up book to this one you are an insane person who hates money.

I've been called worse.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Jeffrey 'Zerzix' Swank wrote:
James, as you create monsters do you ever sit and think to yourself, "when we cross the line to the boundless and hideous unknown—the shadow-haunted Outside—we must remember to leave our humanity and terrestrialism at the threshold..." ?

Nope. Usually it's more like "Oooh... this monster is really cool!" when it gets that far out there.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
ARGH! wrote:
Would the Empire from Star Wars be able to conquer Golarion or would magic be the deciding factor? Now, this is conquest, not destroying (so basically no superweapons). I could see a couple of(meaning at least a dozen) AT-ATs taking on the Tarrasque or maybe Treerazer, although Cthulhu might take orbital bombardment to clear up. Would those foes even be able to be killed by Imperial technology?

That depends on who was paying the bill to produce the crossover. If it were me, then no, the Empire would fail miserably and be crushed by Golarion.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Making our adventures actually entertaining and fun to just read is one of the most important parts of my job. In fact, at times, I think it's THE most important, because if something's not fun to read... why would someone read it? And if someone doesn't read an adventure, they're certainly not going to run it.

I subscribed to Dungeon magazine from issue 1, and while I ran a lot of adventures from those pages, I suspect the total of adventures I actually ran from Dungeon is close to 1 percent overall. Maybe 2 or 3 percent. But the ones I read? Much higher... not 100% but close.

Reading adventures and not running them is, as far as I am concerned, a perfectly good use of an adventure and justifies the money spent. At the very least, they're enjoyable to read. But even if you don't run an adventure, the ideas it sparks will help you run your own games. There's not really a better way to expose yourself to new ideas and concepts as far as creating your own adventures goes than reading adventures written by others.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Justin Franklin wrote:
Did Occulus make up for Argento's Dracula?

It didn't really have to. I don't really think of movies I see as having to keep an overall balance of quality.

Oculus was VERY good though, that's for sure.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Tels wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
So what you're saying is that the cleric is the only divine spellcasting class that explicitly HAS to have a deity?
On Golarion? Yes, that is correct.

What about the Warpriest? Will he be someone who has to worship a deity (on Golarion) once the class debuts?

James Jacobs wrote:
Chalk it up to "just one more Aroden mystery" if you want, but there's plenty of other deities out there who kill demon lords and demigods (Achaekek, Desna, Lamashtu, Nocticula, etc.).

Nocticula is a Demon Lord herself, so wouldn't she be exempt from that usual rule?

Would you say Achaekek is the only deity that is kind of 'exempt' from the usual mandate, being the God's Assassin and all that? Unless his stuff has been retconned out, we know that he's been very active in assassinating people who attempt to rise to divinity.

The warpriest in the ACG is heavily implied that he needs to worship a deity, but since the core cleric has the language that allows a non-deity cleric to exist, that language got grandfathered into the warpriest. My preference will be to say that warpriests must worship deities on Golarion though since they descend from clerics.

Demon lords are demigods, so one would think they would have to follow the divine rules as well. But again... those rules are not written down (on purpose) so we don't know all the permutations or loopholes that exist (again on purpose).

I really want to keep all the "rules" about how and why the gods do what they do undefined, frankly, to preserve the fact that they're GODS and as such are beyond mortal ken.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Generic GM wrote:

Hello Mr. Jacobs! I hope you are well!

I have a few questions for you good sir.

1. Would the closest Pathfinder equivalent to The Others or White Walkers be a Winterwight? Or is there a better fit?

2. If I remember correctly, I once read that you would cast Chow Yun-fat as Runelord Karzoug. That got me wondering who would you cast to play the other runelords?

3. After Iron Gods wraps up, is there a good chance that another runelord might wake up to bother adventures? Perhaps a fiery redhead?

Thank you for your time and answers sir!

1) Nope. The best match for a white walker or an other would be a plain-old wight. Maybe one of the variant wights. For tougher ones, add fighter or ranger class levels.

2) Just off the top of my head...
Alaznist: Tilda Swinton
Sorshen: Scarlett Johansson
Belimarius: Kathy Bates
Xanderghul: Daniel Day Lewis
Krune: Javier Bardem
Zutha: John Goodman

3) Not gonna say.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Jessica Price wrote:

Huh, I went through the Iomedae article during development, and looks like that sentence got imported unchanged from the original article in Council of Thieves. Sorry about that -- I really should have made sure to clarify.

My understanding (of course, James can confirm or correct), is that while Iomedae doesn't have the same focus on redemption as Sarenrae (who, I think, is pretty delighted whenever anyone whose heritage or other factors predisposes them toward evil decides to serve her or other good deities), that doesn't mean that she doesn't believe in it.

As there's been more tiefling material, "spawn" has come to have a more precise meaning (the oni-spawn, etc. tiefling subtypes in Blood of Fiends), whereas I suspect that, back in 2009, it was a badass-sounding way to say "fiends and similar creatures."

I can't imagine that Iomedae would reject a tiefling paladin.

So, that sentence should probably read, "She loathes incorrigible evil, fiends, traitors, and those who abuse good in the name of “greater” good."

I'll check in with James on Monday to make sure that usage of "spawn" wasn't intentional in the original article.

She would absolutely not reject a tiefling paladin.

And yeah, I suspect that the original use of the word "spawn" was just flavor meant to refer to fiends in general.

It's not meant to mean that she is intolerant of all tieflings at all, but neither should one assume that tiefling worshipers of Iomedae are common. They aren't. They do exist though.

And remember, in pretty much ALL CASES where we present something about a religion or organization or race that approaches hyperbole, that's usually meant to refer to NPCs. PCs break rules. That's part of what makes them, in-world, unique characters.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Dragon78 wrote:

1)I noticed that Brigh only has four domains so does this mean she is only a demi-god or is this a misprint?

2)I see that Iomedae doesn't like any fiend-spawn so does this mean she will not allow Tieflings as her worshippers?

3)Will we ever find out what Desna's original form was before she took humanoid form?

4)If Pharasma is older then most other beings then is it safe to assume that her original form was not even humanoid?

5)Since the Peacock spirit is dead, Is the only reason you haven't revealed who or what it was is because it may still be around as some undead creature or something else?

6)Has it ever been said if any of the non-evil core deities have any children? children with mortals? children with other gods?

7)Will Rovagug ever release a new (major) spawn ever again?

1) Brigh is and always has been a demigod. It's not a misprint.

2) There are always exceptions. She allows tieflings as worshipers, but they're very rare, and they have to be EXTRA devout and serious about their faith, pretty much. All that means that there's no reason a PC can't do this, but don't expect to see many NPC tiefling worshipers of Iomedae show up in print ever.

3) Maybe.

4) Not necessarily. Taken another way... If she's that old, and she's humanoid, wouldn't that explain a lot as to why that shape is so common in the multiverse?

5) Nope. I have very specific plans for what it/he/she is and those plans are still far from being ready to be revealed.

6) If not in print, it's certainly implied.

7) Depends on if we want to tell that story. At this point, we have no public plans to do so.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

3 people marked this as a favorite.

I call upon the internet to photoshop Sutter's beard on to that grippli!!!

GO, INTERNET! GO!

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Lord Fyre wrote:

What happens if the PCs (who have a thriving business in Riddleport) tell Kwava "No"? (This is a reference his plea on page 8-9.)

Given the likely "neutral" alignments of characters from Riddleport (remember the campaign traits), the adventure has neither "pull" (inducement to go) nor "push" (compulsion to go) to get them to leave for Crying Leaf.

You either end the campaign there and start something new, or you keep going and build an entirely different adventure for the PCs. Hopefully, by the time you get tot he end of the 2nd adventure, you know your players well enough to know how they'll take that answer and be ready for it.

Or even better, you adjust and sculpt and manage expectations during those 1st 2 adventures so that the PCs end up WANTING to help in book 3.

It's certainly an awkward transition, and one that if I had a time machine I'd go back and fix... but I don't so I can't so that falls to the individual GM to tackle.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Justin Franklin wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Justin Franklin wrote:
James, could you please reinvent the Campaign Setting? ;)
That's one way to induce a panic attack in me.

Time to make an Eric Mona alias. J/K.

Since you have said that the current mass combat rules aren't as detailed as you would like. What would you want to do there?

Figure out a way to build robust rules that don't shunt your character sheet to the side. I want a mass combat game in Pathfinder to be one where you NEED your character sheet to play, because that's the game Pathfinder is. Subsystems that don't really involve your PC are less satisfying to me.

The mass combat system should be easy to learn but difficult to master, and should have a wealth of expansion and customization without being overwhelming and impossible to learn.

I'm not sure it's something that can exist, in other words.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Justin Franklin wrote:
James, could you please reinvent the Campaign Setting? ;)

That's one way to induce a panic attack in me.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

12 people marked this as a favorite.
Dylos wrote:

This deserves to be noted: According to Paizo's FAQ, Evangelist can be entered into as early as 4th level.

These are the requirements for Evangelist:
Alignment: Within one step of chosen deity.
Deity: Must worship a single, specific deity.
Feat: Deific Obedience*
Special: Any one of the following: base attack bonus +5,
5 ranks in any skill other than Knowledge (religion), or
ability to cast 3rd-level spells.

A default Aasimar meets the bolded requirement from their Daylight Spell-like ability, and various class abilities can also fulfill this requirement. Neither of the other two allow for early entry, but early entry into Evangelist would mean gaining the boons at 5th level, 9th level, and 12th level.

The ability to cast 3rd level spells in this case does NOT mean spell-like abilities.

That's an unfortunate side effect of a FAQ entry, and frankly, we should re-evaluate that FAQ entry since spellcasting is NOT the same as spell-like abilities.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Paladinosaur wrote:
How about bearded half-orcs, James? I don't recall ever seeing one

Half-orcs can have beards.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
ulgulanoth wrote:
James, what do you think Sandpoint would look like in 100 years in the future from the current setting?

Different.

(For questions like "What would X look like in Y years?" I generally answer evasively, because that's basically asking me to reinvent the campaign setting and that's beyond the scope of what I have time for in this thread.)

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as FAQ candidate. 5 people marked this as a favorite.

It probably should be FAQed... but frankly, I think you SHOULD be able to summon flying creatures in flight. That's the point of them being able to fly.

Summon monster isn't meant to allow you to create "bombs" is all. That type of effect is certainly possible (if kind of silly), but it'd need to be its own specially-researched spell, set at an appropriate level where the damage it does is appropriate. AKA: The spell's level isn't set by the power of the creature, but the damage it does when it lands on you.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Never fear. More beards are on the way.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Bob790 wrote:
Are there any chaotic gods that have large temples dedicated to them?

Absolutely. Being chaotic has nothing to do with how big your temple gets to be.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

15 people marked this as a favorite.
Steven "Troll" O'Neal wrote:
But Numeria is a part of Golarion, and it's a science fantasy setting. Therefore, the pizza had chocolate all along, you just hadn't bitten into it yet.

A better analogy is to think of Golarion as a big supermarket. Not everything in there is to any one person's liking, but you shouldn't eat everything in there anyway.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Sean K Reynolds wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
I have to trust that we did indeed fix that. If we didn't... I might just give up and move to the Arctic Circle and become a hermit.
Nothing to worry about, James, see page 24. :)

Whew!

(starts unpacking bags!)

Paizo Employee Creative Director

11 people marked this as a favorite.

If it helps put things in perspective, it might be good to remember that a fair amount of Paizo's employees, including us developers and editors and artists, are LGBT. So it's as much us writing and creating a world that WE want to game in as anything else, in that regard.

Sorry if it feels overbearing to some folks, but I really believe that the good it does to be inclusive with our NPCs vastly outweighs any impact to the financial bottom line.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Justin Franklin wrote:
James, per the earlier answer about my ability to ferret out announcements. Would it help if I annotate where I got the information from, or hurt?

As long as folks don't think you've got insider knowledge, it doesn't matter, I suppose! :P

Paizo Employee Creative Director

5 people marked this as a favorite.

And for what it's worth, I do agree that we need to put more guys in specifically as romance option NPCs. We've got some in there already, but the balance could absolutely be better. Something to strive for.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Mikaze wrote:

To be honest, as a GM I just flat-out ignore Orcs of Golarion and as a player hope the GM does as well. As a player's companion, it really seemed to work against players more than with them. Unfortunately, it leaves you without any culture at all to draw from.

And that's the absolute right way to handle it.

But don't expect us to change our vision of Golarion to match, is all I'm saying.

The fact that folks can change and adapt as much or as little of Golarion as they want for their campaigns is, in fact, pretty much the entire point of the world. It's why we made the setting so compartmentalized. If you want a Golarion where orcs aren't 99.99999999999% chaotic evil, then it's easy enough to excise or adjust Belkzen and presto, you're done! The other 45-some regions don't really need any adjustment at all.

And frankly... maybe picking up some Warcraft material for non-evil orc stuff might scratch the itch? If you're comfortable ignoring an official Golarion product, you should be comfortable canonizing stuff from elsewhere, yeah?

The Shoanti are pretty anti-orc, though... again, on purpose and by design. A place where the Shoanti and orcs live in peace isn't really something I'm interested in building for Varisia.

ANYWAY... it strikes me that my presence in this thread might actually be disruptive... so I'll bow out for now, and sorry if I threw anything off course.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Mikaze wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:


There could be. We aren't doing anything with that any time soon, though.
I really really hope you guys do someday. I've been aching for that kind of material since Orcs of Golarion was announced... And not just from a GM standpoint. That kind of information is priceless to a player looking to have a background and cultural flavor to pull from outside the "tragic child of violence" trope. :)

Anything is possible... but frankly, and from the interests of expectation management... it's not that high on the list of things I'm personally interested in. I think that orcs work better as evil creatures. Not as tragic children of violence, but as a race who whole-heartedly embraces violence. The game NEEDS bad guys, and with orcs in particular, Warcraft has, in my opinion, more or less said what needs to be said on them being misunderstood or not intrinsically evil. Havging a remorselessly evil race (or several) is important for the game and for the world, and I'm not comfortable making that race humans or any of the core races. It's important to have completely good races as well... but not AS important, since the game's default is heroes fighting bad guys.

And that has nothing to do with "rape babies." Don't conflate that unfortunate half-orc stereotype with orcs themselves. Half orcs and orcs are very very very different, and we've actually been trying hard to actively avoid the "rape baby" angle of half-orcs. At the same time, it's not appropriate to sugarcoat things and turn a blind eye to the ugliness of the world. But that said... NPCs like Anevia are very much placed front and center with the spotlight on them so that there are more and more examples of half-orcs who don't fall into that category.

But again... half-orcs are not orcs.

So that means you can expect us to do something big with orcs being evil long before we do something with a significant portion of them being not evil.

Those not evil orcs are more memorable and more interesting and more important when they ARE the exception, after all.

I've said may times before that you can't have EVERYTHING in a game world. On some levels, there's already too many things in Golarion as it stands... woe to any GM who wants to model a realistic predator/prey food chain for the Inner Sea region with all its predators! Defining a game setting or anything is partially what ISN'T in the setting.

There aren't halfling nations, for example. There certainly could be, but there isn't. The fact that halflings don't have a "homeland" is part of their character on Golarion.

Likewise, the fact that the orcs of Golarion are savage and evil is part of THEIR character. There are exceptions to this, but they're not big and they're not things we're going to spend more time detailing than we will the evil orcs, since if we do spend more time detailing them, it doesn't matter how small they are... in print, they become bigger.

There ARE bestial races in Golarion that fit this bill of the "not beautiful but also not evil" though. Lizardfolk, strix, locathah, ratfolk, andnagaji all come to mind.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

7 people marked this as a favorite.
Axial wrote:
So, chances are that the re-written Asmodeus article won't mention Paladins of Asmodeus. ;)

I have to trust that we did indeed fix that. If we didn't... I might just give up and move to the Arctic Circle and become a hermit.

Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
The NPC wrote:
Merisiel Sillvari wrote:
snickersimba wrote:
what is it between you and kyra? What do you think of damiel and seltyeil and balazhar

Umm... we're a couple?

Damiel is fun but kinda weird.

Seltiyel is pretty funny and edgy and can be a breath of fresh air.

Balazar is the funniest of the three. HIs nicknames are to die for.

A couple of what? Considering she's a short term commitment at best.

Does anyoneever call Seltiyel Silt or Siltiyel? Also, do you describe him as "edgy" or is that how he describes himself?

Stab.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ross Byers wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Wrong thread! The "Ask Ross Byers questions" thread is over there, somewhere! :-P
Sorry.

HA! No worries!

(shifts Ross off the no-fly list, back onto the watch list)

:-P

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Davick wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Crellan wrote:

James,

A creature with scent can pinpoint the square of an invisible person who comes within 5' of the creature. Does pinpointing in this way require a move action as it would if the creature with scent were trying to discern the general diction of a scent within 30'?

Thanks!

Doesn't say it requires a move action, so it doesn't. It's like noticing something with your eyes or ears. It's pretty much automatic.
I've seen from a developer somewhere that a creature pinpointing something invisible with scent would still have concealment were they to attack that thing. If that's true, what would be the term for when something is not subject to concealment due to a nonvisual confirmation (blindsight, tremorsense maybe)?

That's absolutely correct. Pinpointing a location is basically just letting you automatically know what square(s) the invisible creature is standing in. Without that, you have to guess the square. With it, you don't... but the creature is still invisibile and therefore you have a 50% miss chance.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Cthulhudrew wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Not really; that's a different kind of technology that'll be touched upon elsewhere (in Iron Gods #4, to be precise). Living weapons and biotech like that isn't really what the crew of the ship in Numeria were about.

More hints about the Dominion of the Black. I can't wait for that one to hit. The Neh-Thalggu have been one of my favorite monsters since X2: Castle Amber.

Speaking of weird alien creatures- are the items in the Technology Guide the sorts of things that Mi-Go would use, or is Mi-Go tech even more exotic than this? (Or perhaps they simply use whatever tech they find and take a shine to?)

The items in the Technology Guide are basically things humans invented. So, no... they're not really appropriate for mi-go. At least, not without a fair bit of flavor reskinning.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

4 people marked this as a favorite.

Jessica: NO! There are no worms in my tea!

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Ross Byers wrote:
Modulok wrote:

Hi James,

Here's a rules question I've seen debated on these message boards over the years, but I can't seem to find a definitive answer. The scenario plays out this: the party's sorcerer would like to take the Brew Potion feat at 3rd level and use it to mainly craft cure light wounds potions. Since he casts arcane spells, he obviously does not have cure light wounds on his spell list. Can he work in concert with the party's druid to brew these potions? I see three possible answers.

a) No, since a potion functions as a spell completion item
b) Yes, but with a +5 to the Spellcraft DC since he lacks one of the crafting prerequisites
c) Yes, but with no penalties to the crafting DC since the druid is casting the spell for him

Thanks like usual for your input!

A or C.

Wrong thread! The "Ask Ross Byres questions" thread is over there, somewhere! :-P

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Daethor wrote:

Achaekek looks incredible. One of the best pieces I've seen in a while.

Azathoth's favored weapon is warhammer...interesting. It's not a bad fit, I'd just like to hear the rationale behind it.

Azathoth doesn't really care what his priests fight with, of course. But his priests revel in the primal destructive power of their god, and warhammers are really good at smashing things. If you get one big enough, you can smash planets, of course.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Dragon78 wrote:
I hope there will be rules for living armor, living weapons, bio tech, etc.

Not really; that's a different kind of technology that'll be touched upon elsewhere (in Iron Gods #4, to be precise). Living weapons and biotech like that isn't really what the crew of the ship in Numeria were about.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Wildebob wrote:
Pardon me if this question has already been asked - I searched, but no dice - does Golarion have a language of magic? It is my understanding that Draconic is the language of magic in at least one of the D&D settings. Did this carry over to Golarion?

The "magic" language, as in the language magic spells are written in or that verbal components are composed of, is just that... a language of magic. It doesn't have a name, nor can you speak it or read it, since it's pretty much exclusively for working magic.

I suppose, though, that the closest analog among the actual languages would be Aklo.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
AlgaeNymph wrote:
What is it about Game of Thrones you like so much? I mean, isn't the series basically about villains getting away with screwing over the few decent characters?

Nope.

There's plenty of good guy triumphs as well, but it's not a foregone conclusion that "Good will win." I like the incredible amount of detail that's gone into the world, the masterful way that the supernatural elements are introduced, and above all else, the INCREDIBLY excellent characters. Martin has a gift at building characters so rich that in Book 1 you might hate them, but in Book 3 you love them. And the fact that there's an idea that anyone could die at any time removes the safety net... this isn't a safe setting. And that ramps up the excitement quite a lot. And also... I love the fact that it's for adults. It's a VERY mature series, and before it came along, most fantasy was too "safe" for my tastes.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Archpaladin Zousha wrote:

It all comes back to Thassilon, doesn't it?

Turns out, Thassilon is pretty important to Avistan's history.

1 to 50 of 5,134 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.