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Ezren

Haladir's page

RPG Superstar 7 Season Star Voter, 8 Season Star Voter. Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber. 4,121 posts (8,035 including aliases). 2 reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 31 aliases.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I have male pattern baldness, and what's left has gone gray.

I shave my head.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Back in my day, the PCs regularly ran away from some encounters because they knew they'd die if they tried to fight.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I guess that lets you build...

(•_•) ( •_•)>⌐■-■ (⌐■_■)

...LEGOlas.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The Head of Vecna


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

As a GM, I pride myself on pretty much always being able to get PCs to fall into a pit trap, if I really want them to!


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I've been a gamer for long enough to know that, in the "Old School" days, there was NO assumption that any given encounter was survivable... or even fair. Parties that lived to see mid- or high levels were parties that learned that there's no shame in running from a fight that's going to end badly.

There was no concept of Challenge Rating, or level-appropriate encounters, other than the level of the dungeon you were on. (The deeper you went, the tougher the monsters!)

The most dangerous thing a party could do in those days was to take an overland journey. Unlike when dungeon-delving, there were no "dungeon level" tables on the overland wandering monster tables. If you were traveling through the mountains, you could get attacked by anything from a mountain lion, to a band of ogres, to 1d4 red dragons! It didn't matter if you were only 4th level!


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My wife asking me, "Does this dress make me look fat?"

Wait... that's my least favorite trap...


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John Kretzer wrote:
Vidmaster7 wrote:
second movie is air heads Brandon Fraser Adam Sandler and Steve Buscemi. made in 94 so before nerd culture came into power.
Yeah that was it...I just remember getting pissed of. Around the same time I remember a SNL sketch with the same joke...that is when I really started hating Adam Sandler.

Adam Sandler and I grew up in the same town, and we were in high school at the same time (though not at the same school or grade). I didn't know him all that well, but we had a couple of friends in common, and occasinally we were at the same events.

Honestly, I thought he was kind of a jerk.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'd just use the Random Harlot Encounter Table from the AD&D 1e Dungeon Master's Guide.

1d100 ⇒ 2 ...A slovenly trull! How nice!

(I really think that Gary Gygax just looked up "prostitute" in his dog-eared copy of Roget's Thesarus when he wrote that table...)


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I'm an unabashed narrativist player: I come up with the PC story first, then I try to figure out the best class options and other mechanics to bring that character to life, and to make it decently effective.

To me, the character's story and motivations come first, and then I pick the class.

Some of my favorite characters that come to mind...

A physician who lost the love of his life to the walking dead. He then turned his scientific mind to the study of necromancy in order to learn all he could about undead creatures... so as to better destroy them, destroy them all! NG Human wizard (necromancer) with the Caretaker trait, Skill Focus (Heal), and max ranks in Heal skill.

The eldest son of a minor nobleman whose father squandered the barony's fortune, leaving a huge debt to another noble house after his death due to excessive drinking. After a youth spent as an idle dilletante, he started taking life seriously when he inherited the title of Baron, only to find that he and is family were land-rich but penniless. Taking the sword of his grandfather, a legendary hero of the realm, he pledged himself in direct service to the King in order to bring honor and glory back to his family, sending back most of new-found wealth to re-build his barony's treasury. LG human aristocrat (1 level)/fighter. Used the 3.5 Legendary Item rules to start play with an ancestral weapon (bastard sword) that increased in ability with his level.

The Westcrown-born daughter of a native Varisian and a Chelish merchant. Born with a butterfly-shaped birthmark, her Varisian mother realized that she had been blessed by Desna, and raised her under the tutelage of an illegal underground Desnan church. When she came of age, she took vows as a priestess of Desna in secret, always a step or two ahead of the Asmodean authorities. She then began a career as a professional troubadour who surreptitiously wove Desnan teachings into her performances throughout the devil-haunted land of Cheliax. CG human cleric of Desna (hidden priest) with the Sacred Birthmark trait, posing as a bard.

A half-orc warrior from the mountainous Hold of Belkzen. As a young man, he had been impressed by the combat skills of a Crusader heading off to the Worldwound. The crusader had called himself a "Paladin of Iomedae." Thinking that "paladin" meant "god-inspired warrior", he then became a "paladin" of his own god: Gorum, Our Lord in Iron. CN half-orc barbarian. When he "smites" his foes, mecahnically he's actually entering a rage.


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I'll admit I haven't read beyond the first page of this thread, but...

Why is there no Good succubus equivalent?

Because there doesn't have to be a direct analogy or parallel of everything between Good and Evil!

I think the game is more interesting if there isn't a direct parallel.

But that's just my opinion, YMMV.


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Pros

Daily time commitment is low
The usual commitment for PbP games is one post a day. As a player, a well-thought single post only takes 5-15 minutes of your time. GMing often takes more time to post (especially running a combat), but even those usually only take 15-30 minutes.

Ability to play in many games at once
Since the time commitment for a single game is low, it's rather easy to be involved in several PbP games simultaneously.

Speaking strictly for myself, I'm currently in six active PbPs: a player in four, GM of two.

Mobility
In general, you can play from anywhere: You can easly post from a smartphone or tablet. And, given the low time commitment, it's easy to play while you're doing something else... like taking public transportation, or sitting in a waiting room, or standing in a long queue.

Cons

It's ...S...L...O...O...O...W...
For example, I'm running a "Rise of the Runelords" campaign in PbP. We are about 85% of the the way through Book 1. The fist post of the campaign was 6/1/2014. (That's 2 1/2 years ago.)

This also makes keeping track of in-game time difficult. For example, the current game-day has taken us eleven months of real-world play time!

At this rate, it will take us about 15 years to finish all six books of the AP!

People drop out... and flake out
Players and GMs will sometimes simply disappear, with no warning or explanation. That Runelords game I mentioned? I wasn't the initial GM: I had been a player. But then the GM simply disappeared in the middle of a combat about six months into play. I then took over the GM duties.

Since then, two other players vanished. One player, who had been one of the most dedicated players in the game, just stopped posting, with no warning or explanation. He hasn't been seen on the boards at all since October 2015. The other likewise disappeared for about a year. He later reappeared on the boards (and in other PbPs), but never mentioned anything to the other players of our campaign... or responded to any of our PMs. And I had another player in the campaign who formally resigned due to real-life issues. I found relacement players, but the party is down to one original PC... over the course of a week of in-game time!

Because of player churn, it can be tough to keep character-focused plotlines running the way you want to.

Looking at my PbP campaign history, I have seven inactive campaigns. Two of them ended early because the GM got busy in real life and announced that they had to walk away and cancel the campaign. The other five ended when the GM simply stopped posting and disappeared.

That said... by its very nature, playing D&D with strangers you've never met over the Internet has a much lower level of importance/significance in most people's lives than IRL commitments. It's very understandable to put PbP gaming at the bottom of one's priority list.

It's too easy to overcommit
While the time commitment for a single game is low, once you start to get involved in several games at once, you can suddently realize that you have a major daily time commitment. For example, my current PbP habit usually eats up about an hour or so a day... more if the games I'm GMing are both in the middle of a combat.

When you don't have a lot going on in your life, it's really fun to have a lot of PbP gaming going on. The flip-side is that if you have committed to a lot of games, it can get tough to juggle them all if your life suddenly get busy again.

For example, you often see a lot of recruitment activity in May and June... when students (and teachers) are on summer vacation. And most players who ghost seem to do so in late September or October... which happens to be when the first major school projects of the year tend to be due. Coincidence? (I think not.)


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Whenever I play with new people, I always talk a little about my GMing style. In an IRL game, we'll talk about it in Session Zero.

In PbP games, I always write something like this in the Recruitment thread, so everyone is on the same page.

Original post from by Castle Ravenloft PbP, from which this is excerpted

GM Haladir wrote:

Dice rolling: We'll use the Paizo dice roller. I will make all my rolls behind the screen (i.e. behind a Spoiler tag.) I will ask that players honor the "GM Only" spoiler tag and not peek behind it. I will freely admit that I do occasionally overrule dice rolls to keep the game on-track.

On my style as a GM:
To me, the magic of a role-playing game is the collective storytelling aspect. When I GM, I strive to spin a fun, engaging story where the players take on the roles of the protagonists. As a collective experience, I very much encourage players to add to the story. Go ahead and build references to your own (or other PCs'!) backstories in your posts. When appropriate, make up minor NPCs to interact with. Take the story down an unexpected path.

I'm not a fan of pointless PC death. It's one thing to make a heroic sacrifice to defeat the Big Bad, or to hold the pass to let innocents escape. It's quite another to get decapitated by an owlbear in a random forest encounter, or to get your throat cut during a fight with Thug#3 who happened to score a two critical hits and roll max damage both times. Consequently, my philosophy is not to let a bad die roll derail the plot. (Complicate the plot? Certainly. Derail? No.) That said, being an adventurer is dangerous profession, and it can be deadly. I'm far less merciful with PCs making bad decisions than I am with bad dice rolls.

I'm not a huge stickler for rules-as-written, and try to live by rules-as-intended. (This is why I'd make a lousy GM in PFS.) I have no problem with ruling "No. Because that's dumb." If the rules are getting in the way of everyone having fun, then I'll ignore them on an ad hoc basis. Usually, I'm pretty liberal with interpretations, unless it leads to absurdity. None of the PC submissions in this game use bizzare combinations of corner-case rules, so that's probably not going to be a big deal.

It's less a thing with PbPs, but in the case of rules questions, I like to make a table ruling to keep the encounter moving, and then figure out the real rule between sessions. Since PbP is asynchronous, that's less an issue.

I will also invoke the Rule of Cool if the player comes up with something that would be cinematically appropriate and spectacular for the scene. In that situation I'll usually take the approach of "You succeed. Roll to see how awesome."


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TOZ wrote:
Gamemastery Guide, pg33 wrote:

Cheating

Though it’s considered more polite to call it “fudging,” cheating happens—sometimes a GM will be tempted to alter a die roll to make the story go a certain way, or to save a player character from a blow that would kill them and knock a fun personality out of the game. Should the GM give in to the temptation to cheat? And if the GM is truly in control of the world, and making his or her rolls in secret—is it really cheating at all?

There are several schools of thought on the matter. One side says that the dice are there to assist the story, not determine it—if a GM needs to occasionally alter or totally fabricate some die rolls for the sake of making an encounter a perfect challenge for the players without killing them, then he’s just doing his job. Others say that it’s the randomness which creates the realism and sense of danger, and that PCs who believe the GM won’t let them die lose half the fun. And a third notes that GMs who clearly cheat or have too many coincidences—the party’s powerful new items always getting stolen by sticky-fingered halflings, or villains being saved by miracle rolls when a player comes up with an unexpectedly effective strategy—undermine the players’ enjoyment, and subtly encourage the players to cheat as well.

Where you fall on the spectrum is a personal call, but if you do decide to fudge rolls for the sake of the game, it’s best done in secret, and as infrequently as possible. And only—only—if it results in more fun for everyone.

Bolded text is how I run my table.


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And way back in 1990, I co-wrote a tournament adventure for the brand-new second edition of AD&D. This was the first time character customization had actual rules support in the game.

The adventure used 4 pregen characters. Character selection was everyone roll a d20 to determine PC choice order. The PCs were described as, "A fighter, a cleric, a magic-user, and a thief."

Fighter: Female human lightly-armored acrobatic punching & wrestling specialist. Highest stat was Dex.

Cleric: Heavily armored male half-elf cletic of the God of Justice. His highest stat was Strength.

Magic-User: Female elf evoker with a hot temper. Highest stat was Charisma. Also the party leader.

Thief: Male dwarf locksmith. Had not allocated any thief ability to Pick Pockets, Climb Walls, or Hide in Shadows, but was amazing at Open Lock, Find/Remove Traps and Read Language. Highest stat was Intelligence.

The players were more than a little surprised when they got their sheets!


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This was back in D&D 2e, but I had grim and gruff, hard-drinking warrior who just called himself "Duke". He was lightly armored, was a crack shot with a crossbow, and wore a sombrero and poncho. (Heavily based on "The Man With No Name" from the Sergio Leone spaghetti westerns.)

I think I got him to 5th level before the other players realized he was a paladin.


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If your players don't trust you, you're doing it wrong.

I think this boils down to the "Narrative vs. Simulation" argument. I am unabashedly a narrativist, both in my GM and play style. Story always comes before rules at my table.


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Honestly, as a player, I'm more suspicious of GMs who open-roll. It's been my experience that such GMs often prioritize the mechanics of the game over making sure everyone is having a fun time.

Player metagaming is my biggest pet peeve as a GM. I do not think I would enjoy GMing for the OP's group.


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A GM should always conceal rolls, pretty much for the reasons you cite.

Unless, in a specific case, it's more dramatic not to.

And, it's my opinion that a bad die roll should not get in the way of a good story...so I do occasionally ignore rolls in the name of making the experience more fun. (E.g. to avoid a meaningless PC death, like if Cultist #3 happens to roll max damage on a critical hit with a scythe.)

The rules of an RPG, including the dice rolls, are a framework for collective, cooperative storytelling. If the rules get in the way of telling a fun and exciting story, then they should be ignored.

This is why I don't GM PFS.


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If you've never read the festering trash heap that is Breitbart, I recommend doing so. Just use an incognito tab on your browser so they don't get cookies on your computer. It's good to know what your enemies think.

I know it all too well from the email forwards my crazy racist 80-year-old aunt is always sending out.

She has NO IDEA that her favorite grandson is gay, her favorite grand-neice (my daughter) is queer, or that her favorite nephew (me) is bi.


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Secret of Kells (2009) is a real gem! The animation is gorgeous, and the storyline is fascinating. It's one of my daughter's favorites. I took her to see it in the theatre when she was 9, and we ended up buying the Blu-Ray when it was released. I never buy the Blu-Ray!


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Eric Hinkle wrote:
The Robot Vs. the Aztec Mummy

I see your robot and raise you:

Wrestling Women vs. the Aztec Mummy (1964)

Or, the re-dubbed so-bad-it's-good comedic version (sadly only availble on VHS)...

Rock 'n Roll Wrestling Women vs. the Aztec Mummy (1987)


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TL;DR: Serpent's Skull was published in August 2010, four months before before Bestiary 2. Paizo had to rely very heavily on third-party OGL content, as the Pathfinder brand was still young (and the Pathfinder Role-Playing Game was only a year old.)

* * *

When Paizo lost the license to publish Dungeon and Dragon magazines back in 2007, they turned their attentoion to publishing their own Adventure Paths as a monthly subscription service. They called this product line "Pathfinder," and their first issue was Pathfinder #1: Burnt Offerings, the first volume of the Rise of the Runelords Adventure Path. This was published under the 3.5 Open Game License. They followed suit with the next three APs: Crimson Throne (2008), Second Darkness (2008), and Legacy of Fire (2009).

Because these were OGL publications (2001-ish?), they could not use any closed-content material from Wizards of the Coast. That meant: no monsters, classes, races, magic items, or spells from any Dungeons and Dragons publication that wasn't released in the OGL... which essentially meant nothing outside of the Players Handbook, Dungeon Masters Guide, or Monster Manual.

That meant Paizo didn't have the rich collection of closed-content D&D monsters to use anymrore: They only had the monsters from the 3.5 SRD, so they had to rely on third-party content.

Early in the life of the OGL (2001-ish?), Necromancer Games managed to get permission from WotC to publish a large number of 'second-string' monsters from the AD&D days under the OGL. This opened up a whole lot of monsters from the old AD&D Fiend Folio (1981) and Monster Manual II (1983) into the OGL, which made them open for any other third-party publisher. (Specifically: WotC allowed Necromancer to use monsters from those sources that WotC itelf wasn't planning to publish in its own D&D 3e Monster Manual II.) These, and some original content, were published in Necromancer Games' Tome of Horrors series.

Green Ronin also had published two very popular 3.5 OGL monster books: the Advanced Bestiary (a book monster templates), and The Book of Fiends, a bestiary of evil outsiders.

Paizo didn't publish the PFRRG Core Rulebook until 2009 and the Bestiary until 2010. Before then, they relied exclusively on 3.5 OGL monsters. So, espeically in the early APs, you'll see a lot of references to the Tome of Horrors, Advanced Bestiary, and Book of Fiends, plus a number of other 3PP OGL sources.

You'll see references to the earlier OGL sources even if the content had been re-published for Pathfinder. For example, you'll note that in the OGL section of Pathfinder #65: Into the Nightmare Rift, there's a reference to the caryatid column from Necromancer Games Tome of Horrors (its original source for the OGL), even though the monster had already been published in Paizo's own Bestiary 3. I'm not a lawyrer, but I understand that is is part of the OGL license terms.


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The only way this storyline works in an RPG is when the GM and the player are both completely on the same page: The player wants to tell a story of her PC paving the road to Hell with good intentions AND the GM wants to facilitate that story.

This isn't a storyline that can be imposed from either end... at least, not to anyone's satisfaction.


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What MageHunter said.

The baseline assumption of the Golarion campaign world is that animating the corpses of the dead is an evil act, regardless of the intent of the caster.

In Golarion lore, the animation process traps a fragment of the dead person's soul into the corpse being animated. It's not enough to prevent the soul from being judged, but that soul is then incomplete on its journey through the Great Beyond. Diminishing someone else's soul in this way is evil. Animating corpses is also considered to be desecration of the dead, which is itself an evil act.

In Golarion, even mindless undead (skeletons and zombies) are hatefully jealous of the living. When not under direct command of a necromancer or evil cleric, they will seek out and attack living creatures to rend and consume their flesh, even though undead have no physical need of such sustinence. This is why even mindless undead in the game are listed as being neutral evil in alignment.

If your GM wishes to change the baseline assumptions and in-game lore of her version of the Golarion game world, then that's up to her. But if she's playing it base-line, then animating the corpses of the dead is an evil act.

That said, the necromancy school of magic is not inherently evil. There are plenty of ways to be a good necromancer in the canonical Golarion, but those ways would not include creating undead.


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Don't thumb your nose at the Heal skill.

In a Carrion Crown game I'm in, my good-aligned necromancer (who hates the undead) is a physician in his day-job. For that character, I took the Trait Caretaker (giving Heal as a class skill), the Feat Skill Focus: Heal, and maxed out the Heal skill. At L4, he's got a +15 on his Heal check, and with a Healer's Kit and surgeon's tools, that goes up to +18... meaning that he can pretty much always make the DC 20 for Treat Deadly Wounds. He acts as the party's secondary healer.


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Three big Pathfinder kickstarters I backed back in 2015 are all getting fairly close to delivery... This one, Robert Brookes' Aethera Campaign Setting, and Sandy Petersen's Cthulhu Mythos for Pathfinder (which James Jacobs is also working on!)

Combine that with the Freeport: City of Adventure hardcover that I bought myself as a late Christmas present, I (will) have a LOT of reading to do!


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In this case, the bonus feat is redundant, and the PC gets no benefit for gaining a bonus feat that he already has.

If you're the GM and want to be nice, you could let him substitute a different bonus feat. But that's entirely your call as the GM; you're not required to be nice under RAW.

(If I were the GM, I'd allow taking a different, related feat.)


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58. He said he was going out for cigarettes but never came back.


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297. While walking through a city, the PCs are approached by a pair of acolytes of a very unpopular faith (e.g. Razmir), who politely ask the PCs to take a few minutes to hear the words of the god and its tenets. They are unfailingly polite but also annoyingly persistent.


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I'll be flying in from New York!

I have my con badge and banquet ticket, my hotel reservations, and my plane tickets!

It will be my first Paizocon and my first RPG convention since the '90s!


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Flagged for the mods to change the thread title.


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Haladir wrote:
I just got back from the Women's March in Ithaca NY. Organizers planned for 2500. My estimate is twice that number showed!

According to today's newspaper, we had 10,000 at the march... That's 1/3 the city's population!


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I just got back from the Women's March in Ithaca NY. Organizers planned for 2500. My estimate is twice that number showed!


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It's 3:30 AM. I just dropped of my wife and daughter at the parking lot where eight buses will bring a total of 400 people from my town to the Women's March on Washington. Yes, they're wearing the hats.

I will be attending a local march.

In solidarity, we shall overcome.


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I think the death of Aroden is a mystery and should remain mysterious.


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Hmmm...

By canon, at least, along the Lost Coast, slavery is pretty much universally deemed abhorent.

Slavery is not practiced at all in Magnimar or Riddleport, or in any of their demesnes.

None of the native populations of Varisia have any tolerance for slavery at all. (i.e. the Varisians, the Shoanti, the elves of the Meriani Forest, or the dwarves of Janderhoff)

Slavery is not practiced in Korvosa or its holdings either, but... Korvosa's affinity toward Cheliax means that there may be some tolerance for slavery among some of the less-moral noble houses. In such cases, the houses may have servants or other domestic employees that are effectively slaves, even if they may be technically free. For example, the servants may owe their employers thousands of gold, which they are taking in exchange for labor... and charging their servants' accounts exorbitant fees for food, clothing, and shelter, such that they'll never be able to pay off their debt.

Slavery is openly practiced in Kaer Maga and in the orc-dominated city of Urglin in the Cinderlands.

Unless you want to make some changes to the Scarnettis' motivations and personalities, I wouldn't make them secret slavers. That said, the Scarnettis don't really come into play much as part of the main storyline, so if you wanted to change their story, do what works best for you and your group.

If I had a PC who wanted this backstory, I'd probably say that he could be a scion of a Korvosan noble house, and fled to the Lost Coast after realizing his family wasn't as noble as he thought they were.

But... you're the GM, so do what you think is best for your group!


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I'm torn here.

In theory, I'd be fine with bringing back political discussions on the boards, insofar as they stay segretated in a particular area (i.e. OTD). In better circumstances, I would advocate a return to the policy from before the current ban on political threads. I know that in the past, I've gleaned a fair amount of insight from political discussions here. I've never seen the Paizo forums devolve into the the flamewars you see on other sites like Reddit, or ENWorld, or the cesspool that is 4chan.

At the same time, with Liz' departure, it stands to reason that the Community Team just doesn't have the staffing levels it used to, putting more stress on Chris and the other mods. And I don't see the political polarization of the outside world getting any better any time soon.

So... maybe we should keep the political forums dark, at least for a few more months, or until Paizo has the resources to beef up the Community Team for more thorough forum moderation.


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I have noticed that DriveThruRPG, Frog God Games, Legendary Games, and Kobold Press don't watermark files purchased through their sites, so there's no personalization process. That does make it more difficult on their part to fight piracy. That's a business decision by those companies that apparently made the most sense to them.

Speaking as someone who has purchased well over 200 Paizo PDFs over the years, I really don't see why/how waiting 10-30 sec for a the download is any kind of hardship.


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Female human Rogue (Unchained) 1/ Investigator 4
Stats:
hp 33/33 | AC 17 (touch 13; FF 14) | Init +11 | Per +14 | Fort +2; Ref +7; Will +5

Hey, everyone: Forgive me if it looks like I'm trying to control your characters... I see Vera as the kind of person who thinks that she's always the smartest person in the room, and in a fight would just kind of shout orders and expect to be obeyed.

Feel free to have your character ignore her suggestions... it might annoy Vera, but it sure won't annoy me!


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James Sutter wrote:
...It's also, in this most recent Worldscape one, a chance to work with our partners at Dynamite to try and convert comics readers into gamers and vice versa...

It just might be working on me!

I haven't been reading comics since I quit the hobby cold-turkey in the early 1990s, but I have to say that I'm loving the comics series in this bundle.

I'll probably be buying the Pathfinder: City of Secrets series pretty soon!


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Feros wrote:

Yep that's a bad title. But the Golden Turkey award for Worst Title Ever remains untouched:

Rat Pfink a Boo Boo!

I dunno...

Some titles that might be worse include (in no particular order):

The Incredibly Strange Creatures That Stopped Living and Became Mixed-Up Zombies (1964)
Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! (1965)
I Eat Your Skin! (1971)
To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything, Julie Newmar (1995)
Ballistic: Ecks Vs. Sever (2002)
Octopussy (1983)
Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971)

EDIT: And I now realize that I just replied to a year-old post... Oops!


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By all means, keep using infernal healing! It's perfectly safe.

Pay no attention to the fact that casting it requires evil components, that one radiates evil while under its effect, or that it won't heal damage caused by weapons that we devils are succeptable to. That's all just meaningless window-dressing. Giving this spell to mortals has nothing to do with damning the souls of the corruptible.

You can trust me. I'm lawful. I would never lie to you!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Jurassic Pratt wrote:

I love how threads about infernal healing always become a morality debate.

Because of that I'd say the spell has more out of game consquences than in game :)

The existence of the spell is intended to be a morality conundrum. At least, that's how I use it in my games!

Asmodeus released that spell into the world to corrupt mortals. Given how much the spell is used (and the board debates about it), I think it's working!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Melkiador wrote:
Haladir wrote:
dwayne germaine wrote:

I think Infernal healing is a great spell, and I really wish that it's flavor wasn't watered down in PFS with the whole "evil spells aren't really evil" ruling that they have.

Half of the point of the spell is that there is possible corruption involved in it's use, but it's so very effective... and cheap, that the temptation is there for everyone to use it.

Actually, I think that's the entire point of the spell...
I think if they wanted real temptation, then it'd be a spell that does superior damage for its level. As it is, it's mostly just really efficient out of combat healing, which is good but also boring. Boring things aren't usually your first pick for temptation.

Ahh... the banality of evil. Asmodeus smiles.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Lorewalker wrote:
Here is a big conflict with the Horror Adventures aligned casting rules people have(along with how many casts cause an alignment switch). There, it states performing an evil act with good intentions is still an evil act. Thus, casting a good spell for an evil reason is a good act. Actions trump intent.

Performing an evil act for good means is still an evil act, but the reverse is not true.

Honestly, it's pretty simple:

It's easier to be evil than to be good

Intent matters, but the ends do not justify the means.

Evil means, evil intent: Evil action.
Evil means, good intent: Evil action.
Good means, evil intent: Evil action.
Good means, good intent: Good action.

Being good is supposed to be an uphill battle... just like in the real world.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Crystal Frasier wrote:
mechaPoet wrote:

I'm furious.

This movie is just going to further stigmatize people with DID (not to mention the other "scary" sounding mental illnesses) and trans women, and it's going to get them killed. I want to break into M. Night Shyamalan's house and break all of his plates.

Really sick of this "crazy trans lady is a murderer" trope, when we're so frequently the victims in violent crimes and so rarely the perpetrator.

Agreed 100%.

Shyamalan's a hack. He hasn't made a decent film since Unbreakable, which was "fair-to-middling," and has never made anything as good as The Sixth Sense, which itself was gimmick filmmaking at its most blatant.

I'm more angry at the studio for greenlighting a film like this. It's just lazy storytelling on two fronts. "Multiple personality" psycho-thrillers have been done to death on both the big and small screens. And the whole "crazy trans lady murderer" trope is likewise distasteful and over-done: from Psycho in 1960 to Dressed to Kill in 1980 to The Silence of the Lambs in 1991, and on and on.

I will not be seeing this film, and will encourage others to do likewise.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I dunno... The Bight is a bad dream, but in a good way!

As for the delay in the main book... I would pretty much always choose quality over on-time, especially with anything crowdfunded.


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CG Female Human (Varisian) Witch (cartomancer)/VMC Cleric of Desna 5
stats:
hp 27/27 | AC 14; touch 14; flat-foot 12 | Fort +2; Ref +3; Will +6 | Init +2 | Perception +2

Zee awakens in her quarters and prepares for the day. She studies the patterns of her Harrow deck and performs her daily reading:

Harrow Reading:
Suit: 1d6 ⇒ 1 ...Hammers
Ethic: 1d3 ⇒ 3 ...Chaotic
Moral: 1d3 ⇒ 1 ...Good

The Big Sky

The card of freedom from bondage. Perhaps we shall set someone... or something... free today.

Harrowed ability today: Strength

* * *

As their jolly-boat approaches Maroux' hut, Zee shudders. "Mr. Kandamerus, what sort of person is this Maroux again? And what should we expect?"

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