Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Ezren

Haladir's page

RPG Superstar 7 Season Star Voter, 8 Season Star Voter. Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber. 3,792 posts (7,146 including aliases). 2 reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 30 aliases.


1 to 50 of 877 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I rarely post to either the Rules or Advice boards due to their general level of vitriol, but when I do, I try to remember to phrase my question as:

"I'm the GM of a home game, and I'm not sure I made the right call/I'm not sure how to rule this situation.

I ruled it/am thinking of ruling it this way. What do you think?"

I find I get the most helpful responses when I phrase my questions that way.

That said, when a question pops up that's clearly about how something functions within a campaign world (e.g. alignment questions), AND it's mot made clear that the poster is the GM, AND it's not clearly specified that the game is for PFS, then "Ask your GM" is the appropriate response!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Jiggy wrote:
Stupid stomach flu. :(

Ugh. My condolences.

I had a bout of norovirus a few months ago... not fun.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Kalindlara wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:
I think the real question here is, do you want tusks, or do you want to spend the entire campaign knowing you could've had tusks if you'd just tried harder.
A brief how-to. ^_^

I like your how-to better than this one.

Although this Tusk ain't bad!


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I find that old-school GMs are much more comfortable making table rulings to keep the game moving, then looking up the actual rules later. I know that's how I roll. I'll also modify the regular rules in some circumstances to keep things cinematic.

I do make that clear to my players at "Session Zero".

My penchant for table rulings and for overruling the regular rules from time-to-time is why I've never been interested in GMing for any organized play group: The requirement for play consistency cramps my GM style.

In that light, I'm kind of getting overwhelmed with the rules complexity of PFRPG. While I love the campaign world, and will continue to set my home games in Golarion, I think I'm ready to move to a less-complex ruleset, like D&D 5e, Swords and Wizardry, FATE Accelerated or Dungeon World.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I've been playing D&D since 1981, so I think I count.

I started playing when I was 12 with a bunch of guys who were much older (I think they were college-aged or just out of college). They'd been playing a while, and were running their own OD&D/AD&D hybrid game set in their own campaign setting (I think). I played with them for only a couple of months, mainly due to the age difference. After I quit that group, I bought a copy of the Tom Moldvay Dungeons and Dragons Basic Set, and started GMing for some of my friends. I bought the D&D Expert Set a few months later, and a few months after that, I bought the three core books for Advanced Dungeons and Dragons (the original covers).

I never got into wargaming.

I've played the following RPGs over the years...

[Note: I've put an asterisk next to games I've played in campaigns that lasted at least six months, as opposed to the occasional one-shot or campaign that fizzled out after 4 sesions or fewer.]

Dungeons and Dragons / OGL family:
A weird OD&D/AD&D hybrid.
The Tom Moldvay/Dave Cook Basic Dungeons and Dragons*
Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 1st edition*
Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2nd edition*
Dungeons and Dragons 3rd edition*
Dungeons and Dragons 3rd edition, revised*
Dungeons and Dragons 5th edition
Pathfinder RPG*
d20 Modern
Monte Cook's Iron Heroes
Swords and Wizardry
Lamentations of the Flame Princess
OSRIC

Other RPGs...
Gamma World*
Boot Hill
Top Secret
Star Frontiers
Marvel Super Heroes
(the TSR version)
Psi World
Paranoia
Star Wars RPG*
(the West End Games version)
Star Trek RPG (the FASA version)
Traveller
Champions*
GURPS*
Call of Cthulhu*
Ars Magica
Chill
RoleMaster/Middle-Earth Role-Playing
Cyberpunk 2020
Amber Diceless Roleplaying*
Vampire: The Masquerade
Mage: The Ascension
Star Trek: The Next Generation RPG
(The Unicorn Press version)
Kill Puppies for Satan
Savage Worlds
FATE Core
FATE Accelerated*
Lords of Gossamer and Shadow
Dungeon World*
Uncharted Worlds*
Tremulus


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

As was stated earlier, deities are nearly all-powerful, and as such, do not have stat blocks. Stories involving conflict with deities are fully under the purview of "GM fiat."

Because there are no epic-level rules for Pathfinder, there are no official PFRPG stats for creatures with a CR over 30. CR 30 is the power cap for statted creatures.

The stat block you cited was from an early third-party supplement (Tome of Horrors from Frog God Games), that was originally written for OGL/3.5 and was later converted to PFRPG rules. It was one of the earliest monster books for PFRPG. If I recall correctly, when Tome of Horrors was published back in 2009, it hadn't been clear that CR30 was the power cap for statted creatures in PFRPG.

Lucifer does not exist canonically in the Pathfinder campaign setting; third-party stats for creatures over CR 30 are likewise non-canonical.

That said, if you want to play with creatures of deity-level power, go ahead and use the old 3.5 rules. Feel free to build your own cosmology, or play with the canonical system as you see fit. If you're the GM, it's your world, and as long as your players are having fun, there's no need to hew to the official rules of the game.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Male human (Kellid) Barbarian (Savage Technologist) 2/Gunslinger 1/Champion MT1
Stats:
hp 35/35 | AC 16 (touch 13; FF 13) | Init +5 | Per +7 | Fort +5; Ref +6; Will +2 (+3 raging)

Oh my God... it's full of stars!


8 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Being a part of the majority is playing life on "Easy Mode."

I'm a straight-identified, cis, male, upper-middle-class, Christian, white guy. Most of the time, I get the benefit of the doubt. Most of the time, people take me at my word. They accept my checks. They trust me around their children. They let me walk around stores without following me. Cops let me talk my way out of tickets, and I've never had my car searched. People will even let me do questionable things without challenging me.

For example... A few years ago, I lost the key to my bicycle lock when my bike was chained up in front of the city library. I took the bus home, and then drove back with a hacksaw. It took me about fifteen minutes of sawing through the chain to free my bike, which I then proceeded to load into my car. Dozens of people watched me. Only two passersby asked me what I was doing: I said it was my bike and I'd lost my key to the chain. They said "OK," and went on their way. A cop car slowly drove by while I was sawing away, but didn't stop.

That's white privilege.

Seriously... would I have gotten the same reaction if I was black? Or Latino? Or trans?

I didn't ask for this benefit. I can't turn it off. I didn't choose to play life on "Easy Mode." But that's the lot in life I drew. I didn't even realize that others had to play in "Hard Mode" until I was well into my 30s. But it's important for me to realize that I have this privilege and to "use my powers for good" when I can.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Nohwear wrote:
Am I being a poor sport for hoping that this proves to be a fatal mistake for GW?

I'm kind of with you there... every experience I've had with GW as a business has been uniformly negtive.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Best of luck to you, Liz!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Will this book have slithy toves that gyre and gimble in the wabe?


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Your humble narrator

Thanks for the well-wishes, everyone!

I think I'm back now.

Given other things going on in my life, I'm going to shoot for daily posts again, but I'll consider it a success if I can make 4-5 posts in a week.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Male human (Kellid) Barbarian (Savage Technologist) 2/Gunslinger 1/Champion MT1
Stats:
hp 35/35 | AC 16 (touch 13; FF 13) | Init +5 | Per +7 | Fort +5; Ref +6; Will +2 (+3 raging)

Hi, folks. Sorry for radio silence, and i want to give you an update. It may be another week or so before i resume posting.

My dad had a major stroke. He's in the hospital still, but the prognosis isn't good. He's 78. I've been helping my mom go over their financial records and insurance info... the kind of stuff my dad had taken care of for the past 49 years.

Anyway, I wanted to let you know what was going on. I may start up again sooner if I need the escape from reality.

Thanks for bearing with me.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Anyone can deliberately (and automatically) fail a skill check.

If you want to fool someone who's watching you into thinking you're really trying when you're not, that's a Bluff check.

If I were GMing, I'd probably give a circumstance bonus to the check based on how you're trying to fail and/or your normal skill check.

So, let's say that a PC rogue has been captured by the bad guys and they're making her try to break into a vault. She doesn't want the bad guys to get what's in there, so she's poking at the lock, making it look like she's trying to open it, but really isn't. If the bad guys aren't watching her, she can waste as much of their time as she wants and just not pick the lock. If they are watching her, she'll need to make a Bluff check (opposed by their Sense Motive) to convince them she's trying her best, but failing.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Arcane: delayed blast fireball

Divine: heal

Psychic: explode head


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I think Second Darkness would benefit the most from a rewrite. The transition from Children of the Void to The Armageddon Echo is very rough, and there are a lot of problems overall with Endless Night. On his AMA thread, James Jacobs has stated that he has a bunch of ideas on how to fix it, and would like to do so some day if the stars were right.

That said, Second Darkness isn't close to selling out in print, so demand seems low. I think a Second Darkness reprint would be much more of a financial risk than either Runelords or Crimson Throne.

I predict that the next one they'll reprint (if they do another one at all) will be Kingmaker.

First, it's almost entirely sold out, with used copies of some individual volumes selling for over $75 on the used book market. It costs about $225 to get your hands on all six volumes, and Paizo sees none of that money. That price-point alone really signals the demand: with the pricing algorithms in use these days, a high price signals that somebody is actually paying that price.

Second, Paizo has greatly expanded the kingdom building rules in Ultimate Campaign (and elsewhere), and a rewrite would allow use of the expanded rules, which would not have to be reprinted in the hardcover.

As for when... I'll go out on a limb and guesstimate it'll be two years from now...so 2018.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
The only times I've ever been out of California or Washington (or Oregon since it's between the two) is when I flew out to Gen Con. One of these days I hope to actually travel somewhere not for work so I can actually enjoy the place I'm going (and actually go to a place that's enjoyable)... but so far, not yet.

While I love to travel, I do know a lot of people who don't. But if you're going to mostly stick areound one city, Seattle is an excellent place! (I've only been there twice, once for a professional conference in '07, and once for a week's vacation a year later. I had a great time both times! I was hoping to get to Paizocon this year, but it wasn't in the cards.)

Where would you like to travel to once you get the chance?


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Crystal Frasier wrote:
Haladir wrote:
How do you feel about your GoFundMe meeting its goal in less than 12 hours?
Humbled and vaguely frightened. A little bit nauseous. I hate asking for handouts, and my father gave me a lecture about begging for money when he saw the fundraiser. We aren't not a family that accepts charity.

Don't feel bad at all. Know that there are a bunch of people out there who think you're awesome and want to help!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Hey, Mark!

I actually have a rules question...

Can a character use the Aid Another action to aid herself?

[Bottom line up front: I ruled "no" at my table.]

The Core Rulebook wrote:

Aid Another

In melee combat, you can help a friend attack or defend by distracting or interfering with an opponent. If you're in position to make a melee attack on an opponent that is engaging a friend in melee combat, you can attempt to aid your friend as a standard action. You make an attack roll against AC 10. If you succeed, your friend gains either a +2 bonus on his next attack roll against that opponent or a +2 bonus to AC against that opponent's next attack (your choice), as long as that attack comes before the beginning of your next turn. Multiple characters can aid the same friend, and similar bonuses stack.

You can also use this standard action to help a friend in other ways, such as when he is affected by a spell, or to assist another character's skill check.

The player pointed out that "friend" isn't ever clearly defined in the rules, but "ally" is. And as This FAQ points out, you always count as your own ally.

In the specific case, the PC has the Effortless Aid Investigator talent that allows using Aid Another as a move action. Consequently, action economy could conceivably allow using Aid Another on oneself.

I ruled that words have meaning in common parlance, and that "friend" in this case means "an ally that is not yourself." (After all, the name of the action is "Aid Another," which is clearly the RAI.) I then said that if you want to spend an action to try to improvie your own next attack, that's a feint.

I'm happy with this ruling at my table, but would you make the same call?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

There's a reason I still have a copies of a bunch of WOTC 3.5 monster books on my shelf...

Honestly, for any 3.5 monster that you want to use, just compare the 3.5 numbers with the Monster Statistics by CR table and adjust upward as necessary. As presented, 3.5 monsters are usually a CR or two behind what their stats would indicate in PFRPG.

I use carrion crawlers in my games not infrequently... ditto umber hulks.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I avoid this kind of situation in my games, and find the whole exercise distasteful.

If a player wants to run a paladin, I respect that choice and run adventures where she can be a pure-hearted hero that does heroic things.

GMs don't regularly torture wizards by always having their spellbooks catch fire; why do so many GMs love to plot the downfall of paladin PCs? It makes no sense to me to mess with players like that.

If I was playing a paladin and the GM was always trying to cook up a situation where I'd lose my powers, I'd quit playing with that GM.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Why are white people called "Caucasian?"

Racist 19th-century pseudoscience.

A better term would be "European," which is what I try to use now.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

We're working on it, Steve! We're working on it.

The only way to fight hatred and violence is with joy and peace.

Oh, and I totally agree with Freehold DM!

Completely ignore the perception about the Big Apple being dangerous. New York City is one of the safest cities in the US. It's an amazing place: the cultural and financial capital of the US. There's always something interesting to do.

And New Yorkers can be some of the friendliest people you'll ever meet!

In fact, the only city I love more than New York is Boston...

(Go Sawx!)


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
GreyWolfLord wrote:

Brenda Lee Marquez McCool was a 49 year old woman who went to the club with her son Isaiah that night. Many of those who went to Pulse would know her and her support for LGBT. She had moved to Orlando from California. She had survived Cancer, but she loved her kids. She was there enjoying the club with her son. She has a facebook page and she posted a video that night (prior to the tragedy) of the club activities. If you see that and realize what happened after that, I think it could hit home just how terrible this tragedy is.

When the shooting began, she told Isaiah "Get Down" which he did and she moved in front of him. She got shot protecting him after that. She literally saved her son's life.

I can't express just how choked up that makes me, and how much her sacrifice really expresses the love right there.

This past Sunday the (openly gay) pastor of my church read the names and a short bio of all of the fatal victims of the Orlando shooting during the service, as part of a prayer for healing. There wasn't a dry eye in the house. I somehow managed to hold it together until he read about Brenda...


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

It was a possibility in the 3.0 OGL, and like many rules that were changed in the transition from OGL from 3.0 to 3.5 (and to PFRPG), a not-insigificant number of GMs either didn't realize the rule changed or preferred the old rule.

The 3.0 rule:
There was no penalty for firing into melee per se. Instead, given the positions of the combatants, the GM needed to determine if another character in the melee provided some level of cover to the target; and, if so, how much cover they provided (1/4, 1/2, 3/4, or full). The level of cover determined the target's AC bonus. If the attacker's roll would have missed the target due to the cover, but would have hit the target without the cover, then the cover itself was hit; this becomes relevant if the cover was being provided by another character.

The rule got changed in the transition to 3.5 because it's complex and cumbersome. The simple -4 penalty is much easier adjucate at the table.

As an aside, I will occasionally invoke some aspect of this old rule in certain circumstances, such as if the defender grapples another character and tries to use him as a human shield.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Perhaps we should shy away from referencing real-world religious figures when talking about game mechanics.

Just sayin'.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

It's only at 64 pages, but Parsantium: City at the Crossroads is pretty cool!


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Really! I'm not making this up:

Slate: King Tut Had a Dagger that Fell From Space

This story really makes me want to start that Mummy's Mask campaign I've been thinking of...


7 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Ugh. Take it from someone who's been playing since the early 1980s: Tomb of Horrors is a terrible adventurre, and has caused more gaming groups to break up than any other module ever!

It's designed to be a huge "F--K YOU!!" to players from GMs who think their players have gotten too big for their britches. It's illogical, it's petty, it's full of "HA! GOTCHA!!" moments, and there are no in-game rewards that are worth the risks. It's designed to be a TPK factory.

It's full of "If you do this, you die, no save" encounters... and written such that "doing this" is the most seemingly logical thing to do from the PC's perspective.

And if, somehow, at least one PC makes it through to the end alive... all of the treasure is cursed.

Honestly Tomb of Horrors is, at best, an interesting historical anomaly and a great example of how big a jerk Gary Gygax could be when he wanted to.

If you must, though, WotC released a free 3.5 conversion of it on their website about a decade ago. It's probably still in the WotC web archives.

TL;DR: Unless the GM is a true sadist, Tomb of Horrors is not fun to run, and is less fun to play. Avoid it.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I've been playing tabletop RPGs for over 35 years, and I can assure you that there has pretty much always been a shortage of GMs, for the same reasons as today...

GMing is a much larger investment.

1) More time is required. GMs need to spend a lot of out-of-game time prepping/writing an adventure, drawing maps, bookkeeping, scheduling, etc.

2) More money is required. GMs need to buy the player and the GM resources. GM resources tend to be thicker, and therefore more expensive. Plus the maps, minis/pawns, combat tracker, dice tower, etc.

3) More maturity is required. A good GM needsto be able to control the group insofar as to mediate disputes, massage players' egos, bring side-chats in line, and be empathetic to players' needs.

When I GM, I probably spend two hours out-of-game prepping for every hour of play. My players don't see this at all.

GMing is a big commitment. I can't run more than two or three ongoing games at a time, and that includes PbP.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Not wanting to brag, but the state of my mental health is pretty darned good.

I am generally happy most of the time. I am very comfortable just being me. I don't feel that I have anything to prove to anyone.

Despite the occasional setback, my life seems to keep getting better and better as time goes on.

I tend toward optimism. I get along with most people, and I make friends easily.

I had a very happy childhood. I get along very well with my parents. I've been married to the love of my life for more than 20 years. I have a great relationship with my teenaged child.

I have a decent job that I like, that pays pretty well, and I get along well with everyone on my team... including my manager and the director.

Basically... I think I'm in a good place and am pretty much okay.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

When I started gaming, the now-traditional d10 was very new and somewhat rare. Most d20s were numbered 0-9 twice. Dice weren't painted, and you filled in the recess with a crayon. On the d20, you filled in each 0-9 numbers with two colors of crayon, usually white (or black)/red, where red was 10+result.

Some cheaters would fill in both 0's or 9's with red, upping the odds of rolling well; Gygax made a comment about that in the 1st ed AD&D Dungeon Masters Guide.

I still have a few of those dice from the early 1980s in my dice bag.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

"Would Mr. Jefferson jog your memory?"

...any time the PCs try to bribe someone.

A while ago, we were playing a GURPS modern-day game set in New York. The PCs were trying to trace the movements of an informant who'd gone missing. Anyway, they were pretty sure he was holed in a particular neighborhood in the Bronx and were canvasing the neighborhood. They were questioning a drug dealer who usually worked a particular corner when this exchange took place:

Player: I show him the photo and ask, "Have you seen this guy around here?"
GM: He glances at the photo and shakes his head. "No, I ain't seen nobody like that."
Player: I hold the photo in front of his face and say, "C'mon, take a good look. You sure you haven't seen him?"
GM: Rolls dice He pushes the photo away and says, "I said no. Now get the f**k outtta here!"
Player: I pull out my wallet and take out a bill. "Would Mr. Jefferson jog your memory?"
GM: Makes quizzical face ...Um, you're trying to bribe him with a two-dollar bill?!
Other players *laughter*
Player: Wait! "Jackson!" I meant, "Jackson!"


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

It's not invisible, but I'd give I a very big circumstance bonus to a Stealth check...


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
dragonhunterq wrote:
Varisia "here be adventurers"

That joke map you linked is not particularly funny, kind of offensive, and more than a little bit racist. I don't approve.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Varisia. It's the "baseline fantasy/D&D" region of the kitchen-sink world that is Golarion.

I highly recommend getting your hands on The Inner Sea World Guide for an overview.

The gazetteer for Varisia is in the Anniversary Edition Rise of the Runelords Players Guide (which is free). Also useful is the Players Companion Varisia: Birthplace of Legends.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Advice for GMs:

Game mechanics are just a tool for telling a compelling and exciting interactive story. Game mechanics should never get in the way of the story, and should NEVER detract from the fun.

When running a game, be sure that every character gets roughly equal time in the spotlight. But don't let any one character/player hog the spotlight, or you'll start to see resentment among the other players.

When running a prepared adventure, always tailor it to your party. Make sure that there are encounters that can let each PC strut their stuff. Likewise, alter the loot given away to make it more interesting to your PCs.

Never let an inconvenient die roll get in the way of the story.

PC death totally sucks for the player, unless it's really meaningful to the story. Going out in a blaze of glory to protect the Realm can be an awesome way to end a character; getting cut down in an alley by Cultist #4 who got max damage on a critical hit with a scythe is not. Try to avoid putting the PCs in situations where meaningless death is likely.

Don't take away players' autonomy over their PCs. While getting captured by the enemy is a tried-and-true movie plot, players HATE THAT... especially if they feel like they had no say in the matter.

Don't run scenes of sexual violence in your game. It's lazy writing while also potentially traumatic to the players. Just don't do it.
Whenever possible, when a player says, "I do this..." you say, "Yes, and..."


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

TACO CANNON!!!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The nice thing about running a game for young players is that you can play all of the stereotypical tropes and/or obvious plot twists completely straight: They probably haven't encountered them yet!

38. A moustache-twirling villainous landlord (think Snidley Whiplash) is trying to evict an orphanage. Thieves have stolen the rent, and the kind-hearted operator of the orphanage needs the PCs to recover the stolen money and deliver it to the landlord before the rent is due. (The PCs learn that the landlord hired the thieves as a pretext to evict the orphans.)

39. Misguided fey are terrorizing a village with their practical jokes. The PCs learn that the fey don't actually mean any harm, and have to convince the fey that the villagers don't find the jokes funny and to find a more appropriate outlet for the fey's desire for fun.

40. Hunters are stalking a unicorn in the nearby woods, and the unicorn comes to the PCs for help.

41. The ghost of a man killed along the road beseeches the PCs to retrieve a special object from the bottom of a well to his still-living (and much older) beloved so he can move on to the afterlife. But his killer wants the past to stay buried, and will stop at nothing to prevent the PCs' success.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Well, if you're the GM, then just say it exists! Feel free to make up whatever stats you need as appropriate.

If you're the player: talk to your GM and express your wishes. Perhaps your PC can do research on some kind of fabled lost magical musical instrument, and your GM can write a series of adventures to recover it.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I ran a highly modified version of TPK Games' The Reaping Stone. The BBEG in the printed module is a priest of a goddess of undeath; I switched it to a priestess of Urgathoa. I redesigned the boss battle, stealing a page from Seven Days to the Grave, and had her turn into a Daughter of Urgathoa after the party though they'd defeated her.

I used this trope later in a follow-on adventure when the party was fighting an evil sorcerer and his minions. The PCs killed them, only to have intellect devourers crawl out of their mouths and press the attack!


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I have some house rules about the spell teleport.

1) You can use teleport to duplicate the effects of dimension door.

2) If you can see the destination by line-of-sight, there's no error. (I.e. Teleporting from the summit of a mountain to a plain below.)

3) You have to have a reasonable idea of both where you are and where you're going. If you don't know current location, the chance for error increases.

4) Scrying on a person usually does not provide enough information to teleport to that person's location. (I.e. "scry-and-fry" is not a valid tactic.)


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

First, I figure out the character's background, personality, race/ethnicity, and culture where the character was from.

Then, I start thinking about names. I play human characters about 90% of the time, so I usually look to real-world cultures for inspiration. If the campaign world has some kind of naming guidelines (e.g. Inner Sea World Guide) I'll look to that for inspiration.

Examples...

I played a character who was a minor nobleman whose father had squandered the treasury. I figured that a barony would be the right size for such a region. I then decided that his family would have a name that could sound either heroic or menacing and came up with "Stryker." The culture was Germainc, and I wanted him to have a first name that was not from the real world, but had an edge to it. Thus: "Baron Drax von Stryker."

I'm playing a wizard who, by day, is a practicing physician, and by night is a hunter of the undead. I based the character on Dr. Abraham van Helsing from Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula. Hence, "Dr. Stefan von Herzog."

In my Dungeon World group, I'm playing a bard whose family ran out of money, causing her to have to drop out of music school, so she started writing songs praising the exploits of the criminal underworld. The concept was inspired by the real-world Mexican narco-baladeers. The game is set in Parsantium: City at the Crossroads, which is inspired by Byzantium. She plays the oud. I figured a Turkish-sounding name would best, so I went with "Zeharra."

In a Skull and Shackles game, my concept was a gnome sorceress who is spiritually connected to the sea. She's a sorcerer with the elemental (water) bloodline. I went with the typical gnomish naming conventions of havning a one-syllable first name, and a long surname evocative of her calling (water). Hence, "Del Burblesquall"


9 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The 4th Circuit Federal Court has ruled that Title IX allows trans students to use the bathroom that corresponds to their gender identity.

North Carolina is in the 4th Circuit, and is covered by this ruling.

If North Carolina attempts to encorce its "bathroom law" on any publicly-funded schools, it will forfeit $4.5 billion in Federal education funds.

In other news of the backlash against North Carolina's anti-LGBT law; Bruce Springsteen, Boston (the band), Cirque de Soleil, and Pearl Jam have canceled all stops of their 2016 tours in the state.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'm cis and straight (mostly), but I play female PCs about half the time. I've played gay and lesbian PCs as well. In my gaming circles, in-game sexuality doesn't often come up.

The closest I've come to playing a trans character was a long time ago, in a GURPS Fantasy campaign. The character was inspired by Marion Zimmer Bradley's character Lythande the Star-Browed from the late-'70s shared-world anthology Thieves' World. She was a lesbian who was pretending to be a man, and if her secret got out, would lose her magical power.

Honestly, back in the early 1990s when I played the character, I really didn't know much about trans people or issues, so playing the character as trans didn't really cross my mind.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
CG Female Human (Varisian) Witch (cartomancer)/VMC Cleric of Desna 5
stats:
hp 27/27 | AC 17; touch 13; flat-foot 15 | Fort +2; Ref +3; Will +6 | Init +2 | Perception +2

A few years ago, my family was playing tourist in London. At the Tower of London, we'd taken the guided tour. Toward the end of the tour, the Beefeater who was leading the tour asked if there were any Americans in the group. All the Yanks raised their hands. He then smiled and said, "Just think: This could all have been yours too, if you'd just paid your taxes!"


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Male Human (last I checked) Techie 2 / Bureaucrat 5

Well, it might have been quite a bit longer before my next GM post... I almost got arrested today!

Bonehead move #1: I forgot that in DC, entering just about any public building requires a security screening. I normally carry a Swiss Army knife and a Leatherman, and did not think NOT to carry them as usual today.

Consequently, I couldn't get through security screening at the National Archives Museum. Both of these tools have sentimental value, so I didn't want them to be confiscated. I asked the security guard what I should do, thinking that they may have some kind of item check system.

Bonehead move #2: Failing to recognize that the guard's reply of, "Well, you could go outside and hide them in a planter or something, then come back in," was NOT good advice.

Let's just say that I'm glad that the DC Metro police officer who challenged me with "SIR!! What did you just put in that planter?!" merely took my name, gave me back my knives, and let me off with a "OK, I'm not going to arrest you, but get the hell out of here!"

I obliged.


8 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The situation reminds me of this.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The thing that annoys me about made-up names in RPGs is when players decide to make jokes about them, and then use the joke-name at all times.

For the love of all that's holy, don't do this!:
In my original "Rise of the Runelords" game, my loveable knucklehead players came up with these...

Norgorber became "Nor-Burger, God of Food Poisoning"

Shalelu became "Sha-Na-Na"

Xanesha signed a letter to Aldern Foxglove as "Wanton of Nature's Pagan Forms." She became "Won Ton Soup."

Jakardos became "Jerkwad"

Ironbriar bacame "Iron-On"

Mokmourian became "Mork from Ork"

and Karzoug became "Gadzooks!"


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
TriOmegaZero wrote:
I always laugh because I want to say Norburger.

If you're ever at Blackfingers' Bar and Grill, I would advise against ordering the 'norburger.'

1 to 50 of 877 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

©2002–2016 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.