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Ezren

Haladir's page

RPG Superstar 2014 Star Voter. Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber. 2,554 posts (3,145 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 23 aliases.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Wylliam Harrison wrote:

So my homebrew is thusfar proceeding decently.

The group is a 5 members party. The lone guy is a mobile fighter, with the 4 women being a monk, sorceress, oracle and bard.

What are spells that are, for this party, hilarious against this sort of party?

Frankly, this is an extremely bad and incredibly immature idea.

This kind of thinking is emblematic of the misogynistic undercurrent that unfortunately suffuses much of "geek culture."

Be a bigger man and stop feeding the misogyny.

Don't do it.

Wylliam Harrison wrote:
@All female players reading this; this is solely for humor. No offense meant.

That's like saying, "I'm not a racist, but <offensive racist joke>."

Not cool, man. Not cool.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

A paladin has to be lawful good to remain a paladin.

Worshiping an evil god is a voluntary evil act.

If a paladin were to try to worship an evil god in a manner that doesn't violate her lawful-goodness, then she's not worshiping the god correctly by the religion's practices. That's a chaotic act.

Ergo, no, a paladin can't worship an evil god.

And if you're looking to figure out how to play a paladin that can worship an evil god... I think you missed the point of the paladin class.

But that's my interpretation. Do what works best in your game.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I have thrown "six orcs" or "fifteen zombies" at the PCs before. Sometimes, especially it's an impromptu encounter, you just don't have time to stat up special individual monsters with character levels.

This is one of the reasons I'm looking forward to the Monster Codex!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Honestly, I think it's generally a good idea to wait for all six parts to be released before starting an AP.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

If you're looking for third-party materials, Legendary Games has Adventure Path Plug-Ins for the following APs...

Far East series for Jade Regent

Gothic series for Carrion Crown

Kingdom Building series for Kingmaker

Pirate series for Skull and Shackles

and the Righteous Crusade series for Wrath of the Righteous

So far, I've only bought products in the Pirates series, and they're fantastic!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Actually, I think the vibe is more this link.

Of course, the blend of sci-fi and fantasy has a very long history in the genre.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
CommandoDude wrote:
GypsyMischief wrote:
I feel like the Law-Chaos spectrum is weird.
The solution is to read lots of Warhammer 40k.

Or Michael Moorcock (Elric Saga, et al.)

Back to the subject...

w01fe01 wrote:
just wondering what makes you look at a class and go "eww"

I'm speaking more as a GM than a player...

1. Any class that requires the GM to do a ton of extra bookkeeping to keep the player honest.

2. Classes that require their own point-based subsystems (e.g. monk and the ki pool, gunslingers and Grit, etc.)

3. Classes that put extra combatants in the battle (animal companions, eidolons, etc). In my opinion, having extra combatants in the battle drags out combat and lets the players with multiple combatants hog too much of the spotlight during the game. (Ditto the Leadership feat.)

4. Classes that allow too many options in the heat of the moment-- this tends to promote player paralysis and taking way too long on their turn to declare an action.

I can deal with a character with one of these, but with two or more, I usually say, "no."

(Summoners hit all four... one of the many reasons I ban them at my table.)


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Keep a stockpile of potions of magic fang on hand. Or paw.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Rynjin wrote:
Ross Byers wrote:
Westphalian_Musketeer wrote:

GM says (to an evil cleric): "Is your skeleton still with you?"

GM means: "There is a high level paladin coming up, and you're not going to be able to bluff that the skeleton is just a remarkably thin human."
Always buy a hat of disguise for your undead/demonic minions.

Problem.

Disguise Self wrote:
You cannot change your creature type (although you can appear as another subtype).

...which is why I have this item in my undead-heavy campaign...


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Matthew Shelton wrote:
After all this, the petitioner is given the choice, and must answer the challenge: are they truly worthy of godhood? There will be no "maybe" and no "let me get back to you on that". No double-talking, no bargaining, no demagoguery, no false appeal to flawed logic. The truth will point to itself. The petitioner will know the answer, the Starstone will know the answer, and eventually everyone else will know the answer as well (whether the petitioner survives or not).

If someone asks if you're a god, YOU SAY YES!!!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I have all six volumes of the original Runelords, plus the Anniversary Edition. Unless you have a burning desire to run Runelords in the D&D 3.5 ruleset, there's really no need to have the original six, except as collector's items.

As far as I can tell, no parts of the actual adventure were cut in the transition to the Anniversary Edition. Many encounters were expanded, added, or otherwise modified for playability. For example...

Spoiler:
The stats for the TPK-machine Xanesha and her pushover sister Lucretia were reversed in the AE, based on player feedback.

The only things present in the original editions and not present in the AE were the support articles. I'd say about 97% of the information in those support articles has been revised for Pathfinder and reprinted in a product from one of the other product lines.

Here's what's missing in the AE, and where to find the revised version of the same information:

Rise of the Runelords Players Guide (original):
- Overview of Golarion races (revised and expanded in Inner Sea World Guide
- Overview of deities (reprinted in Core Rulebook)
- Overview of character classes in Varisia (revised and expanded in Varisia: Birthplace of Legends)
- Equipment of Varisia (revised in Inner Sea World Guide)
- Overview of Varisia (revised and expanded with some retcons in Varisia: Birthplace of Legends)
- Player's guide to Sandpoint. (not reproduced anwhere else)

Pathfinder #1: Burnt Offerings
- Thassilon: Notes on a Fallen Empire (revised and expanded in Lost Empires; sin magic sidebar revised and expanded in Inner Sea Magic)
- Pathfinder's Journal: The Pathfinder Society (content revised and expanded extensively throughout many products, including Inner Sea World Guide)
- Bestiary Revised versions published in Bestiary, Bestiary 2, Bestiary 3, and Inner Sea World Guide.

Pathfinder #2: The Skinsaw Murders
- Magnimar Gazetteer present, but greatly reduced in the AE. (Information extensively expanded in Magnimar: City of Monuments)
- Desna (revised in Inner Sea Gods)
- Pathfinder Journal: The Journey Begins (all subsequent Pathfinder Journals are compiled and reprinted in The Compass Stone: The Collected Journals of Eando Kline)
- Bestiary revised versions of all creatures appear in Bestiary and Bestiary 2

Pathfinder #3: Hook Mountain Massacre
- Keeping the Keep The AE downplays having the PCs running Fort Rannick, based on player feedback. The information provided in that article is therefore mostly moot for Runelords, but much of it can be found in Ultimate Campaign.
- Varisia Gazetteer Revised version in Rise of the Runelords Anniversary Edition Player's Guide.
- Pathfinder's Journal
- Bestiary "argorth" and "smoke haunt" have not been revised, but neither actually appeared in the adventure. Other creatures not in the AE are in Bestary 2.

Pathfinder #4: Fortress of the Stone Giants
- Born of Stone (information revised and expanded in Giants Revisited)
- Dragons of Golarion Information significantly retconned, revised, and expanded in Dragons Unleashed.
- Pathfinder's Journal
- Bestiary Creatures not appearing in the AE appear in Bestiaries 2 & 3.

Pathfinder #5: Sins of the Saviors
- Magic of Thassilon Some spells and items were not converted to PFRPG. Others appear in various products, including Inner Sea Magic and Lost Kingdoms.
- Lamashtu Revised and expanded in Inner Sea Gods
- Pathfinder's Journal
- Bestiary "Ercinee" was not converted to PFRPG, but did not appear in the adventure. Revised versions of other creatures appear in Bestiary 2 and Inner Sea Gods

Pathfinder #6: Spires of Xin-Shalast
- Hazards at the World's Roof Not reproduced as far as I can tell, but information about adventuring at high altitude appears in the Core Rulebook.
- Pathfinder's Journal
- Bestiary Creatures not revised in the AE appear in Bestiary 2.

So... there ya go.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
I wrote:

I've been negatively inclined toward psionics in fantasy since 1st-edition AD&D. I felt that the flavor doesn't mesh well in the fantasy stories I wanted to tell in my Dungeons and Dragons games. I've also had some major problems with having a completely different game mechanic system that did more-or-less exactly what magic already did.

TSR/WotC continued the flavor mis-match and system dichotomy for psionics in both AD&D 2e and in D&D 3.x.

The 3.x psionics system (including DSP's updaiting of it for the PFRPG) are very well thought-out, and balanced systems. However, I just don't see the point of introducing another full game mechanic system that's pretty much equivalent to magic. Consequently, even though it's a fine system, I don't use it.

There is "psychic magic" in my game, to represent things like ESP, telepathy, psychokinesis, object reading, pain suppression, etc. It's essentially a sorcerer bloodline/archetype.

Setting aside game mechanics, another big thing that turns me off about the 3.x / DSP psionics system is what the various psionic character classes are named. The names just seem way too "game-y" for my taste, and are very much out of tune with those of the traditional character classes.

"Rogue," "bard," "wizard," "ranger," "alchemist," "druid," "ninja," "paladin," "sorcerer," "witch," "cavalier," and the rest are all real-world words with long histories in legend and/or literature. The classes reflect, more-or-less, what the words mean in plain English.

The psionic classes have names that don't mean anything outside of the context of the game: "psion," "soulknife," "vitalist," etc. If I referred to a non-gamer about a "wizard" they'd know what I was talking about. If I mentioned a "soulknife..." well, not so much. Heck, even the term "psionics" has far more traction within the role-playing gaming world than as a general term.

Better names for the classes, with ties to what the names actually mean in a literary, mythological, or socio-historical context would greatly increase my desire to use them. Terms like "telepath," or "seer," or "spiritualist," or "fakir," or even just "psychic" have meaning outside the context of the game.


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Favored enemy: undead.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Ventnor wrote:
My hypothesis: no one did it. One day, when people least expect it, Asmodeus will pull off a mask and reveal that he was Aroden the entire time.

"And I would have gotten away with it too, if it weren't for you meddling adventurers!"


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Player says: "To hell with the captured princess. I go to the tavern and get drunk."
Player means: "I don't like your adventure hook, and I'm bored."

Player says: "I'm done with talking to this guy. I draw a sword and attack him."
Player means: "I don't like this role-playing encounter, and I'm bored."

Player says: "Can we move this fight along?"
Player means: "I'm bored."


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Haldelar Baxter wrote:
Can a creature that has been turned to stone from a Flesh to Stone spell be the target of an Animate Objects spell ?
Yes.

Oh, man! I have a great idea for an encounter...

1. Bad Guy casts flesh to stone on a PC.

2. Bad Guy casts animate object on the now-petrified PC, and makes it attack the party!

My question is: How evil is that?


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I blame Cosmo for that guy outside my window playing Nickelback on his car stero. While parked.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

GM says: "Are you sure you want to do that?"
GM means: "Please don't do that."

GM says: "Are you really sure you want to do that?"
GM means: "That's a VERY BAD idea, and I'm letting you take it back!"

GM says: *deep sigh* "Well, okay then..."
GM means: "Don't say I didn't warn you..."


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NobodysHome wrote:
...amazing summary...

Um, what he said.

Seriously, this is my favorite adventure series, ever. You can't go wrong with Runelords!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

But I find their "Charm Customers" ability to be enchanting!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Ravingdork wrote:
Haladir wrote:
And now I'm going to have to stat up a new recurring NPC for my game... Captain Andoran of the E.A.G.L.E. Knights.
What does the acronym stand for mean?

It means that someone really wanted the initials to spell out "eagle."


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I've been negatively inclined toward psionics in fantasy since 1st-edition AD&D. I felt that the flavor doesn't mesh well in the fantasy stories I wanted to tell in my Dungeons and Dragons games. I've also had some major problems with having a completely different game mechanic system that did more-or-less exactly what magic already did.

TSR/WotC continued the flavor mis-match and system dichotomy for psionics in both AD&D 2e and in D&D 3.x.

The 3.x psionics system (including DSP's updaiting of it for the PFRPG) are very well thought-out, and balanced systems. However, I just don't see the point of introducing another full game mechanic system that's pretty much equivalent to magic. Consequently, even though it's a fine system, I don't use it.

There is "psychic magic" in my game, to represent things like ESP, telepathy, psychokinesis, object reading, pain suppression, etc. It's essentially a sorcerer bloodline/archetye.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Zhayne wrote:

There's precisely zero reason Paladins should have alignment restrictions, outside of tradition. The 3e design team were going to drop the alignment crap from it, but their playtesters called the waaaahmbulance.

The correct method to do this is make paladins without alignment restrictions, then put any limitations on them in setting-specific material. It's far easier for players and GMs to exclude extant material than create their own.

I know that you and I have diametrically opposed opinions on the question of the utility of alignment, but I will completely disagree with you on this point.

The whole point of the paladin class is to be a champion of goodness and justice, like Sir Galahad from Arthurian legend.

Taking away the alignment restriction on the class defeats the entire purpose of the class.

And I'm now jumping out of this YAPT*.

*Yet Another Paladin Thread


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And now I'm going to have to stat up a new recurring NPC for my game... Captain Andoran of the E.A.G.L.E. Knights.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Ooh-- and a rust monster destroying Amiri's iconic sword on the cover art! Awesome!

And now I'm thinking that Amiri will be weilding that orc's chainsword in the art in the rest of the AP... or at least I'm hoping!

(It can happen! Lirianne has a ray gun on the cover of Fires of Creation!)

And I am so psyched to see Mr. Logue back in the saddle again!


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WitchyTangles wrote:
Hardwool wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
LARPing?
Well, it happened, but normally we just sit in front of each other, talking dirty :D
My BF and I have been having this kind of fun for ages =D

And of course, this made me think of this song.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

A game has to be fun for everyone-- including the GM. If you're not enthusiastic and excited to run a campaign, then you probably shouldn't do it.

When I'm in that situation, I'll usually suggest running a few one-shot or two-shot games in either your regular or a different game systems, just to shake things up. How bout a short session with the PCs as pirates raiding the seas. Or a crazy one-shot high-level game where the PCs have to kill a demon lord. Maybe a short 1930s pulp scenario in Savage Worlds, or a cyberpunk adventure using Fate, or a session of Fiasco.

Or maybe it's time to step away from campaign play altogether-- run a bunch of short things for the foreseeable future. Some games will be amazing, others less so, but you won't have to do a lot of world-building, and you can get really creative. And if your players don't like this week's session, next week's will be completely different.

Good luck!


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And the Party invented the aeroplane, and we've always been at war with Eastasia.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Mark Hoover wrote:
And speaking of beer in supermarkets it never ceases to amaze me. Here in MN the entire state is dry on Sundays and only supermarkets are allowed to do liquor sales on Sunday. Even this is highly contested. Yet this is the same state where if I say the word "Vikings" out loud I'll have an instant mob. How can a state have such rabid football superfans and also hate selling beer on a Sunday?

So many states have completely schizophrenic laws about booze.

Last summer, I was camping in Kentucky, and was very surprised when the local Piggly Wiggly didn't sell beer. When I asked, I was told that I was in a "moist" county: you can't buy alcohol in bottles. You can only buy alcohol by the drink, at a restaurant, for consumption on premises. ("You mean a bar?" "No, a restaurant. Bars are illegal here. You have to have table service, seat at least 30, and make less than 20% of your total sales revenue from alcohol.")

So, we went to a local Mexican restaurant, and they were selling craft beers at $2 a pint, and margaritas for $3 a glass! This was by far the cheapest booze I'd seen in years-- and we drank a bit more heavily than usual.

I asked the waitress why the booze was so cheap. She said that it was because the restaurant can't take in more than 20% of its total revenue from alcohol, they have to sell it really cheap relative to their food.

"But doesn't that make people drink more?"

She smiled and said, "Yep. Sure does."

"But since you can't buy booze and bring it home, doesn't that make it more likely people will drink and drive?"

"Yep. Sure does. That's what you get when people who don't drink make the alcohol laws!"


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Appeals to developers don't hold much weight at my table. I'm the GM, and I'm the final authority. (Not that I'm a jerk about it-- I document any changes to the rules or rulings I've made on gray areas on my campaign website.)

Honestly, it's the obsession with the rules that I've noticed with PFS players (both on the boards and in real life) that have made me decide not to play or GM PFS. As a GM, I feel that I need the freedom to change things I don't like, or to make ad hoc rules decisions on-the-fly without having to look stuff up in the heat of combat.

I would imagine that my GM style would make too many PFS players get bent out of shape. Looking over the PFS GM guidelines in the Guide to Organized Play, I don't think that I'd be able to abide by the PFS GM rules, anyway-- they feel too constraining to my play style.

I'm enough of an old-school GM that I don't want any higher authority in my games than my own.

Now, out-of-game, you want to question my ruling or interpretation? Fine! Let's go out and discuss it over a beer like reasonable people. Persuade me. Why does your interpretation make the game better/more fun?


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Sharktopus. It became the barbarian's catchphrase.

When my party was looking for rumors about Thistletop, I had them talk to two old sailors who had once tried to fish around there. One of the fishermen had spotted the bunyip that lives near there, and had assumed it was the Sandpoint Devil. He described the bunyip fairly accurately. To which the barbarian replied, "Wait, that's not the Sandpoint Devil-- that's a sharktopus!"

Later, when the PCs actually attacked Thistletop, the barbarian got dropped off the rope bridge into the water. I deiced that the bunyip would come around and take one attack, then swim off. When that happened, the player shouted, "Holy sh*t! There really is a sharktopus!"

Later, when the PCs explored the bunyip's lair, and ultimately killed it in one round, the barbarian exclaimed, "Man, that sharktopus was a sharktopussy!"

Several sessions later, when the PCs were playing tourists in Magnimar (during the course of The Skinsaw Murders), they paid an impromptu visit to the Aquaretum. One of the exhibits on display was a stuffed bunyip, labeled properly. The barbarian called over the proprietor and explained, "Hey-- you've got the wrong label on your sharktopus!" A long argument ensued between the barbarian and the gnome, and the PCs were finally asked to leave. On the way out, the barbarian exclaimed, "I can't believe we're getting kicked out because of a stupid sharktopus!"

And, finally, when the PCs fought Black Magga, the Barbarian exclaimed, "Holy sh*t! That's the biggest freakin' sharktopus I've ever seen!"


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DM says: [rolls a die, doesn't look at it.] "You still don't find anything."
DM means: "THERE'S NOTHING HERE!! CAN WE PLEASE MOVE ON ALREADY?!?"

DM says: "Make a Knowledge (local) check. The DC is 5."
DM means: "You really haven't been paying attention, have you."

DM says: "I'll send out a list of the treasure by e-mail after the session."
DM means: "There are neither quest items nor any clues for the adventure in this trove. It's just loot."

DM says: "Huh! That's an interesting theory!" (frantically scribbles notes.)
DM means: "Wow! I wish I'd thought of that! Time to re-write the plot!"

DM says: "The name of this random tavern you happened by? Um... it's the...um... Happy...uh... Hobgoblin. Yeah. The Happy Hobgoblin."
DM means: "This location is not important."

DM says: "And you chase down the fleeing orcs and kill them."
DM means: "This combat has gone on too long, so I'm hand-waving it."


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LazarX wrote:
Haladir wrote:

However, you're the GM, so feel free to run your campaign as you see fit. Just keep in mind that you're not going to get much, if any, official product support for those kinds of stories.

That's wrong. You have all the product support you need to run the games you want. The hullabaloo about non-evil undead has NOTHING to do with mechanics, but with pointless complaints that the default story of the default game world is written in a certain way.

I beg to differ.

I know from previous discussions that you downplay alignment, but there are a bunch of both built-in storyline elements and game mechanical elements that generally assume that all undead are evil.

If you change that assumption of the game, you'll have to make other adjustments in, say, plotlines of published modules and Campaign Setting books. Some game mechanics also get weird if non-evil undead are commonplace. (e.g. detect evil as written pings all undead as evil.)

Many of these points are moot if you're running in a campaign world that doesn't use or downplays alignment. But if you're running in Golarion (i.e. what I meant by "product support"), you're going to need to make more changes.

But if that's what you want to do, go for it! I hope your players love what you write!


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WAY back in the '80s, for my first character in the Champions super-hero RPG, I created a martial artist character. I thought I was being original when I named him "Iron Fist." I didn't read Marvel comics at all at the time (I was a DC loyalist), and had never heard of the Marvel character. No one believed me.


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Male Human (last I checked) Techie 2 / Bureaucrat 5

I will not. My wife and I are on vacation on Cape Cod this week celebrating our 20th wedding anniversary. That kind of trumped PaizoCon.


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Welcome Mark "Roge Eidolon" Seifter to the boards as Paizo's latest designer!

Mark, be careful what you wish for!

I'll start!

Mark, when you're not designing or playing RPGs, what do you do for fun and excitement?


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Where were they when they started walking around with a 25-foot-long zombie snake-woman? Magnimar? How'd they get their zombie-Xanesha out of town? Did they hire a boat in Underbridge... and pay an exorbitant fee to the Sczarni captain?

Because if they just tried to walk out of town with an undead lamia matriarch in tow, they'd get a WHOLE LOT of unwanted attention! You can be sure that the paladins at the Temple of Iomedae, plus any Hellknights of the Order of the Nail that were in town, plus the Magnimar guard under the command of General Odinburge would all drop their differences, band together, and try to put down a party of necromancers and their undead monsters!

Magnimar may be neutral, but open practice of necromancy sure wouldn't be legal!

And if they brought these monstrosities to Sandpoint? I think the town would likewise turn on their erstwhile heroes!

Just because the rules allow it doesn't mean that it's a good idea. Frankly, the undead creation rules are there more for the GM to run bad guys. Creating undead is an Evil act with a capital "E." They're going to make a LOT of good-aligned enemies if they start wandering around with a retinue of undead monsters. Honestly, if they're not there already, I'd give them all a voluntary alignment change to evil.

If, somehow, they managed to get away with this, I'm sure a band of inquisitors of Pharasma would be hunting them down.


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Ashiel, if that's how you want undeath to work in your world, then fine. Your ghoul blacksmith character sounds pretty cool.

The setting-generic rules from the hardcovers are deliberately vague on souls and the afterlife. How the afterlife works and what, exactly, happens to a soul when a dead creature is animated by necromancy is left to the GM.

In my version of Golarion, all undead creation spells do indeed grab a fraction of the creature's soul-- even for unintelligent undead. This both saddens and angers Pharasma, which is why she regards undeath as an abomination against nature.

For nonintelligent undead, it's not enough of the soul to prevent it from passing to the Boneyard and receiving judgement and becoming a Petitioner, but it does diminish the soul somewhat. It's also what bestows unintelligent undead with their innate hatred for and desire to slay the living. Intelligent undead that don't retain much of their former personality (e.g. ghoul, shadow) retain a little more of the soul. Again, not enough to prevent the soul from becoming a petitioner, but enough to diminish the Petitioner and twist the undead creature to evil.

Intelligent undead that retain much of their former personality (e.g. dread ghast, vampire, lich) do retain their soul, preventing an afterlife. The physical and psychological changes that occur with the passing to undeath make it extremely hard not to become evil. Possible, yes, but a very difficult struggle that few can master. Usually, the new urges toward evil become irrestible.

In my world, undeath is always a perversion of nature and an abomination. Just about the only non-evil undead are newly-created and conflicted vampires, or the rare ghosts that stay behind to finish their last task before moving on.


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Casts raise thread

So the Core 20 deities are now all presented in Inner Sea Gods.

That book did not include much beyond a one-column article on some of the more-popular lesser deities. It did not reprint or update the longer deity articles for the lesser deities that were originally published in the Adventure Path series.

So, here's a listing of the non-Core 20 deity articles in the APs:

Besmara #55: The Wormwood Mutiny (Skull & Shackles part 1)
Groetus #64: Beyond the Doomsday Door (Shattered Star part 4)
Kostchtchie #69: Maiden, Mother, Crone (Reign of Winter part 3)
Lissala #65: Into the Nightmare Rift (Shattered Star part 5)
Milani #68: The Shackled Hut (Reign of Winter part 2)
Szuriel #70 Rasputin Must Die! (Reign of Winter part 5)
Ydersius #42 Sanctum of the Serpent God (Serpent's Skull part 6)

Additionally, APs presented shorter deity artilces for a pantheon:

The Old Cults #46 Wake of the Watcher (Carrion Crown part 4)
Gods of Ancient Osirion #80 Empty Graves (Mummy's Mask part 2)

Finally, the Core 20 dieties of the Dragon Empires are talked about in the Dragon Empires Gazetteer.


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White cards...

Edition wars.
Trolling the Paizo messageboards.
The random prostitute table.
Hitting on the GM.
F.A.T.A.L.
Pleading for mercy.
A succubus with a rope of entanglement.
James Jacobs.
Rappan Athuk.
Psionics.
Pesh addicts.
An evangelist of Arshea.
Max damage.
Farting at the game table.
Killing it with fire.
Hero points.
Asheia, the Sword of Lust.
A severed head.
Staking a vampire.
Boning the barmaid.
Spelljammer.
Demons.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'm very much looking forward to this book! NPC creation is the most time-consuming part of adventure design. The NPC Gallery from the GameMastery Guide and the NPC Codex have been HUGE time-savers for this GM. Honestly, time is my most precious commodity these days.

It's discouraging to spend four hours statting up an NPC or unique monster when I know it's going to be dead in three rounds. Anything that's going to enable me to spend more time designing awesome encounter areas rather than statting up monsters is a Very Good Thing!


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Aww, come-awns! We jes' wanna play wich'yas!

Now, lemme hear ya squeal like a pig, boy.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

And here I was looking for stats for building a Cheesecake Factory franchise using the downtime rules from Ultimate Campaign...


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Huh. I really enjoy first-level characters, both playing them and GMing them.

Honestly, between low-level play (1-5), mid-level play (6-11), and high-level play (12+), low-level is by far and away my favorite, and high-level is my least favorite.

But YMMV!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Hi, Gwen.

Just a clarification: You say you're playing a homebrew campaign. I assume that means that you're playing in a (mostly) unmodified version of Golarion?

I ask because if you're playing in a homebrew campaign world, then you should ask your GM, not here.

That said, the afterlife and how soul move throught the Great Beyond is Very Mysterious: i.e. the developers have been deliberately vague about it, so that GMs are free to write their own stories without being fettered.

By my understanding (and how I would rule it in my game):

1a) After a soul dies, it goes to the Boneyard to be judged by Pharasma. Before judgement, it is possible for the soul to be brought back by mortal magic (i.e. a raise dead or more powerful spell). After judgement, it is not possible at all for that creature to be brought back to life without the direct intervention of a god. (There are no rules for that-- that's a storyline decision for the GM.)

I houserule that scrying does not work across planes of existence, but greater scrying can... although the DC is harder. "Piercing the veil" is difficult, after all!

I would suppose that it might be possible to attempt to visit a dead soul in the Boneyard. That would be a very cool adventure, akin to the story of Orpheus and Eurydice. I would run that as an extraplanar adventure, not something that you could just "do" as a routine thing.

1b) After a soul becomes a petitioner, it retains little-to-nothing of its previous memories and personality. The sould essentially becomes something else, and I would rule that you could no longer scry on it at all without some sort of new connection.

2) The Great Beyond is a big place. It never gets overrun by souls. Not every outsider becomes a mortal again, but some do. The process is again Very Mysterious. (i.e. The GM can use the vagueness to write the stories she wants to write.)

3) No. An outsider called to the Material Plane and killed there is just dead.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Black cards:

"Goblins are in the bakery! They just threw _____ in the oven!"

"Sandpoint: ______ of the Lost Coast."

"If I lived in Thassilon, I'd be the Runelord of _______ ."

CHOOSE 2: "Kneel before me! I am _________ , Demon Lord of ________ !"

White cards:

Mummy rot.

Sneak attacks.

Alchemist's fire.

Mammy Graul.

Called shot to the groin.

Permanent level drain.

Failing a bluff check.

Arazni.

Fur-lined masterwork manacles.

The Decemvirate.

A bartender who's a retired 10th-level fighter.

magic missile.

Taking an arrow to the knee.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

A Sazerac! Very nice!

I enjoy combining two parts reposado tequila, one part Cointreau, and one part fresh-sqeezed lime juice. Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. (Alas, I'm on a low-sodium diet and must skip the kosher salt on the rim.)

For breakfast, I enjoy blending up plain yogurt, frozen berries, a banana, and some almond milk. Best smoothie ever!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Dracoknight wrote:

Can a spotanious caster use a higher level slot for a lower level spell?

Forexample a Sorcerer wanting to give up a 2nd level slot to cast a Magic Missile for whatever reason.
Nope. Not as far as I know. It's an interesting idea for a house rule though.

Actually, I think they can... It was the same in 3.5.

(I only know this from once playing a sorcerer who suffered 6 points of permanent Charisma drain, and could no longer cast his highest-level spells...)


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I haven't had a character I was playing die in years.

The last time was a 3.5 game. My fighter/ranger/Demon Hunter deliberately Bull Rushed the BBEG of the campaign off ledge into a one-way portal to the Abyss. We could see scores of demons crowded around the far side.

I told the GM I also wanted to pin his arms so that he couldn't grab hold of the ledge. The GM warned me that I could do it, but I'd fall in too, no save.

I told him that was the plan.

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