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Stone Giant

Fabius Maximus's page

854 posts (855 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist. 1 alias.


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Blayde MacRonan wrote:
Has anyone watched Métal Hurlant Chronicles? Though technically sci-fi, since it is what we in America call Heavy Metal, we can expect some good old fashion fantasy thrown in as well.

I watched the first episode. It's gloriously awful.


Lord Snow wrote:
Can't believe nobody mentioned Doctor Who yet. While it's not, strictly speaking, a "fantasy", the science in it is silly enough to be magic. There are monsters, aliens, distant worlds/times, and a pulp adventure vibe. For me, at least, Doctor who certainly suffices when in need of some pulpy fantasy action. Well, it does when it's good, anyway, so not the last couple of seasons, but there are 4 other that are very nice.

Sorry to be that guy, but that's the first acceptable mention in this thread. The others are pretty much terrible. (I don't count Youtube series, though.)

Vikings - while excellent - doesn't count, as it is based on Nordic sagas. It features a lot of mysticism, but there's no magic.

The only other good example I can come up with is Robin of Sherwood. Magic swords, Celtic gods, a diverse group of adventurers combined with good scripts and good actors (though Jason Connery was a let-down). Even the freaking ninja works and he shouldn't.


Cosmo wrote:

I'm going to guess Imagine Dragons, as I've heard that SnowJade is a big Lou Diamond Phillips fan...

** spoiler omitted **

They just look so smug all the time, don't they?


Which peoples will it represent then?


Well, this is definitely good news. Congratulations.


Lord Fyre wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:

You could consider leaving out part 4. It reads like it's a very good adventure. It just doesn't fit well into the AP.

** spoiler omitted **

That is a significantly better plot then the one in the AP.

Why, thank you. *blushes*

If you don't want to change much, I guess the original could work better if you give the PCs more information than originally intended. They need to know more about the Council after part 2. All the background info for the GM is just chaff if it doesn't come into play.

What Lies In Dust:
Also, be consistent. I just noticed today that Aylin pays for information about the whereabouts of all the missing Pathfinders. The thing is: Loremaster Liriam cannot be found in Westcrown, since he left the city for Absalom in the early stages of the Chelish Civil War, which - apparently - Aylin doesn't know. The PCs have no way of finding that out.


Hama wrote:
Well, the whole point is that us not in the U.S. Would survive. Mostly. I hope.

Don't fear. We have our very own huge magma chamber right next door beneath the Mediterranean.


You could just tack it on after the 5th, and having all Hell break loose after the PCs exit the dungeon. The problem is that the AP string the players along endlessly until they even come close to the solution.

My players seem to be very careful. They didn't go near the "ball" after it started lashing out at them. They didn't want to be "cured", either.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

You could consider leaving out part 4. It reads like it's a very good adventure. It just doesn't fit well into the AP.

Part 5:
My group's just finished What Lies In Dust and I will not send them into the Spiral. Rather, I'll skip to Mother of Flies. I made Ilnerik the shadow leader of the Council by holding Eccardian hostage (and making him a vampire called Jair) and using his sister as a socialite to bring him the city's leaders so that he can dominate them. The PCs don't know about the whole conspiracy yet, anyway.

The downside is of course that you'll have to adjust the encounters to fit a lower level party.


The Morphling wrote:
What book(s) should one read to learn more about the other planets (and about the Malebranche)? I've been trying to get more familiar with the lore of Golarion but I'm not sure where to look. I was incredibly annoyed that the Book of the Damned described what the Malebranche are but didn't name a single one.

I recall that several Malebranche are described in The Book of the Damned I. At the very least they are among the pseudo-deities listed on the inside back cover.

For the solar system, there is only Distant Worlds.


Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

Didn't watch a movie in a while and when I did, it was Escape from L.A.

Vive le Snake Plissken!

I tried to forget about that one, damn you!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

"Hey, who turned out the light?"


Threeshades wrote:
Does anybody know a place in europe i can order this from? I would realy like to have the hard cover version but ordering it from the USA directly would probably drive the shipping to unreasonable heights.

All DSP products end up on Amazon eventually. We just have to be patient.


Kirth Gersen wrote:
Drinking Cu Chulainn Irish Whiskey in honor of St. Patrick's Day.

I'll be having a Connemara later tonight.


Rhianna Pratchett will probably not write Discworld novels herself. She recently clarified in an interview that she'd only be responsible for managing Terry's work when he dies, not for continuing it.

Your list matches mine almost perfectly, by the way. I'd add Small Gods and, yes, Jingo to it.


Tinkergoth wrote:
On the topic of Pratchett... Unseen Academicals. Probably the most disappointing Discworld novel for me. It felt disjointed in terms of how it told the story somehow. It's not that I'm not familiar with the concepts the book was based around, I'm a big follower of footall (real football I mean - go St Mirrens!) and know all about the hooliganism associated with it... It just didn't click the way the others have. Initially I thought it was due to his early onset Alzheimer's, but Snuff was released afterwards and is one of my favourites in the series. Still, Pratchett's worst novel is still an excellent read, so I'll probably give it another chance sometime soon.

Firstly, I agree with your last sentence.

I didn't have problems with Unseen Academicals, but Raising Steam probably is Pratchett's worst novel since The Colour of Magic. The pacing is off, the dialogue's in the first half are sub-standard and I didn't care for the characters. He gets back to his usual form in the second half, though. The inside cover lists his wife as co-author, but I don't know how much work she actually did.


feytharn wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
feytharn wrote:

Usually Hello or Good Morning / Evening, etc, often accompanied by a handshake.

Within my circle of close friends we hug, but that seems to be the exeption.

Edit: Forgot to mention - Germany

You also forgot "Good Day". ;)

The weird thing here is that even friends greet each other with a shake of hands. Not to mention the he beginnings of a bow accompanying the handshake, especially when greeting women. As much as I want to suppress that, it still happens.

I prefer a simple "Hi" or "Hello".

'Good Day' was part of the etc...as was the infamous 'Mahlzeit'...

Oh gods, I tried to forget about that.


feytharn wrote:

Usually Hello or Good Morning / Evening, etc, often accompanied by a handshake.

Within my circle of close friends we hug, but that seems to be the exeption.

Edit: Forgot to mention - Germany

You also forgot "Good Day". ;)

The weird thing here is that even friends greet each other with a shake of hands. Not to mention the he beginnings of a bow accompanying the handshake, especially when greeting women. As much as I want to suppress that, it still happens.

I prefer a simple "Hi" or "Hello".


Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
So, dropping sentences is inventing stuff and inserting an agenda?

Yes, if it changes what the interviewed person said.

Also, invention is featured in my examples. The English version says that the Ukrainian Communist Party "counter-posed" (note the spelling mistake) Russian chauvinism. Which is the opposite of what you can read in the original.


Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

A couple of days old but...

Australian commie site translates a German interview with one of my Russian comrades (I think).

The translator inserted a lot of agenda in the English version; he even invents stuff. The original is much more careful in its tone.
The Aussies aren't comrades of mine [Ultraleft sectarian cursing], but would you care to provide any further examples?

For example, the answer to the first question should read: "We have strong links to the left in Ukraine and I travelled to Kiev two weeks ago when the situation was coming to a head and the anti-demonstration laws were introduced, which could have made a police state possible.

A sentence from the answer the the question "What are your impressions of the movement?" was cut: "All this is being done by ordinary people, not the parties."

The answer to the question "What’s their [the Ukrainian communist's] attitude towards the Maiden movement?" should read:

"They criticise the Ukrainian nationalism but not from an internationalist perspective. Rather, the argue from a Russian chauvinistic perspective. I advise all leftist parties in Europe to break contact with the Ukrainian Communist Party. We cannot tolerate this policy."

There are a few other issues, mostly cutting parts of the answers from the German version.


Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

A couple of days old but...

Australian commie site translates a German interview with one of my Russian comrades (I think).

The translator inserted a lot of agenda in the English version; he even invents stuff. The original is much more careful in its tone.


Worf, however, is a pretty interesting character.


ENHenry wrote:
Dammit, first, Paizo goes fully Incorporated, and now has Baba Yaga as a Developer! What's next - The Headless Horseman in PR, and Spring-Heeled Jack in Typesetting?

Did no one tell you about the bogeyman in sales?


Question wrote:
Yea i was hoping it would be able to display the URL instead of requiring additional text to "name" the URL...

Why? If you put descriptive text in there, it looks cleaner.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Robert Brookes wrote:

This is preceding a partnership with EA and the development of a Dragon Age style Pathfinder console title, yes?

a man can dream

EA? Stop giving them ideas! That would be a nightmare!


Question wrote:
Why cant the forums do that automatically? This is literally the first forum ive seen that doesnt do that, or screws up a URL by adding random spaces in the middle of it.

I, OTOH, have never seen a message board adding URL tags automatically.

It's not that hard to do yourself.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Or you could just use URL tags. See "How to format your text".


Dragon78 wrote:
They tend to chaos but are not always chaotic; there is variation. They are not outsiders so are not nearly as limited in there alignment selection so you could have a lawful version of any of them if needed.

Yes. However, inventing lawful fey just to have them making deals with Chelaxian administration is a bit contrived, don't you think?


Dragon78 wrote:
Fey are not inherently chaotic since fey can be any alignment. They just tend to be chaotic of neutral, though. There are lawful types.

There are. The overwhelming majority is non-lawful, though, with some being neutral on that axis.


There are fey in Cheliax, much like anywhere else. As far as I know there are no deals between Hell and the First World or any kind of fey on Golarion. It wouldn't make sense anyway, because fey are inherently chaotic, and devils abhor chaos.

Don't conflate real-world stories with Pathfinder mythology too much. In Christian mythology, Hell stands for chaos, not order.


DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:
Dune?

That could very well be the only correct answer.


Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
Karen Eiffel, Author wrote:
I blame Cosmo for the Oxford comma being used less and less.
I, on the other hand, applaud him for that.
{breaks the fourth wall} Oh course you realize, this means war.

Eh, no problem. I'll just stall you until you give up out of frustration.

Veni, vidi, cunctabar.


Rynjin wrote:

SKR did indeed state that about historical crafting times.

Even after someone posted evidence proving him wrong on the realism front too.

And yes, Jason Buhlman decided to nerf the weapon cords because he had played around with his mouse all day, unsuccessfully.

I understood that that was a joke.


Karen Eiffel, Author wrote:
I blame Cosmo for the Oxford comma being used less and less.

I, on the other hand, applaud him for that. That doesn't mean I have forgiven his other transgressions (my arm still hurts).


FreeholdDM is right.

BigNorseWolf wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
It carries the meaning that there are distinct human races akin to subspecies (which is used to distinguish animals).
Well there are. It can be important, especially with certain medications or when diagnosing genetic illnesses.

Genetic differences between people are not severe enough to justify the race classification. The same goes for subspecies. Human beings belong to the species Homo Sapiens and the subspecies Homo Sapiens Sapiens.

Quote:


Quote:
It has an biologistic undertone and can be used to declare people belonging to said groups as biologically inferior.
Which is racist and contrary to biology. Everything that has made it this far is equally evolved.

Of course it's racist. But the usage of an imprecise term helps that along because racists don't accept that.

The usage of "race" referring to people automatically sets them apart.


90 entries later ...

Irontruth wrote:

Fabius, are you saying it is impossible to classify groups of people based on characteristics?

Or are you just trying to crusade against the word "race"?

Because just getting rid of the word racism isn't going to make the problem go away.

"Crusading" is a bit strong a word, I think.

I'd like to get away from using "race" as a qualifier for lumping people in certain groups based on phenotype (or rather: get US Americans to think about not using the term, as it's not used in this manner in Old Europe anymore). It carries the meaning that there are distinct human races akin to subspecies (which is used to distinguish animals). It has an biologistic undertone and can be used to declare people belonging to said groups as biologically inferior.

Stop using "race" in this way and you can spot racists a mile away, because they'd be the only ones using it in this context.

"Racism" is still useful, if used in a precise manner.


Tels wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Set wrote:
Alexander Augunas wrote:
That is a word with an incredibly specific meaning.
German words are fun, like backpfeifengesicht.
And now I have a favorite word!
That is an AWESOME word!

Not if you have one.


Caineach wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
pres man wrote:
@FAbius, I think you are purposefully not seeing the forest for the trees.

I think it's the other way around. The point is that denigrating a certain group of people because of a perceived shared attribute like phenotype, descent or religion is hostile. Pure and simple.

The label "race" is part of the problem because it is simply incorrect in relation to people. It's not even used in biology anymore.

If you keep on using "race", you're making it easier for people to denigrate people based on that term.

Scientific accuracy and common usage are not the same thing.

And your point is?


pres man wrote:
@FAbius, I think you are purposefully not seeing the forest for the trees.

I think it's the other way around. The point is that denigrating a certain group of people because of a perceived shared attribute like phenotype, descent or religion is hostile. Pure and simple.

The label "race" is part of the problem because it is simply incorrect in relation to people. It's not even used in biology anymore.

If you keep on using "race", you're making it easier for people to denigrate people based on that term.


pres man wrote:

I think it is silly to assume that people are going to stop classifying groups of people based on perceived characteristics shared within the group.

That is exactly how we as humans understand the world. When a child is learning about animals, they have to learn that both their housecat and the lion at the zoo are cats. They have to see the characteristics they share and notice that some other animals do not share these characteristics. They then need to understand that lions are not the same as housecats even though they are both cats. And they have to recognize those differences.

What is a chair and what is a table? Is a stool a chair or a table? Why is it a stool and not a chair?

The way we understand these things is to classify them. It is not an issue of low self esteem, but a natural part of how we as humans understand the world. We will never understand how to combat these prejudices as long as we act as if classifying groups of things based on perceived characteristics is inherently wrong, because we are just denying our natural method of understanding the world.

By using an example from the animal world - and even two different species -, you highlighted the problem with that concept. (Your other example is just ridiculous.) There are no different human races.

Perceptions can be altered. Categories, too. We do it all the time.

@IcyShadow: Discrimination is an action that results out of said hostility.


The thing is, Jeff, that you play into the racists' hands if you keep using "race" to describe groups of people that are not races. The concept simply isn't true when it comes to human beings.

'Racism' is another problematic word. The phenomenon it describes exists, of course, but it's to narrow to use it to explain things like 'Homophobia' or 'Islamophobia', even if its definition has been expanded to encompass those phenomena as well.

These 'phobias' are problematic words, too. Sure, fear is a big motivator for people to reject other people. But it's not the only reason.

However, we need a word or a term that describes all of the above, because they are essentially the same: the rejection of people because of a perceived common attribute. German scientists came up with the word monster "Gruppenbezogene Menschenfeindlichkeit" (basically: "group-related hostility towards people"). It's very accurate, but difficult to say or write.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Maybe it would help to stop speaking of different races when people just look different? It's an outdated concept anyway.


Yep, it really was an all around good experience working with Creighton and I hope I get the chance again.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Definitely Absalom.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Liz Courts wrote:
Trace Coburn wrote:
Call me an old-school MechWarrior at heart, but I’ve always considered “What does the ’Mech say?” a more pressing question. ;-D
In my play experience, the answer to that is usually "alpha strike" or "death from above." :D

If it comes with blaring bagpipes, it's a Highlander Burial.


el cuervo wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:

I found that the maps in Paizo's adventures are hit and miss. Taking Council of Thieves as an example:

** spoiler omitted **

I also found that the maps in the map packs are the same as in the module. That means that they contain every secret door and trap, which makes them useless as handouts or floor plans. The only option you have in this case is get the PDFs, extract the maps and modify the pictures yourself.

I wanted to point out that if you buy the PDF versions of the APs (at least RotRL, not sure of the others), you get "interactive" maps, where you can toggle on and off both the grid and the traps/secret doors/other GM-only stuff.

Now that's useful. I only own APs as books.


Set wrote:


Reminds me of that Lovecraft story set on a German u-boat, where, after spouting hateful crap about every other type of person, one of the officers begins ranting about the other's inferiority, because he's a Prussian and not a Rhinelander... (or vice-versa, I don't recall)

No, that sounds about right. Prussia was the biggest, most powerful state in the German Empire as well as under the Nazis and also mostly protestant. Rhinelanders are mostly catholic. The division between confessions was still rather high back then, with people in mixed marriages being looked down upon or even shunned. That made for an interesting demographic mix after WW II, when we had to integrate protestant fugitives from the East into the catholic South.

Nowadays, the ire is mostly directed at Muslims (because they're all terrorist thugs, stealing our jobs and only want to receive social security payments). Although of late it's Romanians and/or Bulgarians (because they're all thieving gypsies, are stealing our jobs and only want to receive social security payments). /snark


Gancanagh wrote:
that is a shame... :-(

It is indeed.


DrDeth wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:

Guys, I really don't want to antagonize anyone here, but in the last few days, I think Nathanael is just being contrary for the heck of it. First the psionics thread, then the wild shape thread and now this.

If this post is not okay, I'm okay with its deletion, btw.

He's been attacked pretty savagely by the usual bunch of Pathfinder "haters", so I have sympathy.

Knowing Rynjin's posting history, I am pretty sure he didn't mean it in a derogatory fashion or as a slur. Mind you, tempers got pretty heated in that thread.

Well, I feel kind of bad about this. I should have send a PM instead, if anything.


Whipthorn Icescale wrote:

Per Lingering Performance: "Any other requirement, such as range or specific conditions, must still be met for the effect to continue."

Which means that limits on rounds are still in effect when it lingers. The feat is designed to carry on bonuses (barring any other requirements, like rounds available) after you would normally cease your performance.

Six threads! That's a whole horde of undead.

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