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Stone Giant

Fabius Maximus's page

1,088 posts (1,089 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist. 1 alias.


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8 people marked this as a favorite.

I think it goes back to some BS race theory from the 19th century.


Thanks. I'll put it on my list.


This is relevant to my interests, but sounds like young adult fiction, which I'm generally not a fan of (anymore).


You want to make sure people remember your face? Give them too much money for too little in return.


Kobold Cleaver wrote:

I'm kind of sad the base races are all on the way out except boring old humans. Mainly just because of gnomes, though. I think gnomes, those eccentric fey constantly a desaturation away from insanity and death, would be a lot of fun in space. I hope they still exist as a rarer species.

What I don't want to see, Pt. 1:

Giffs.

Scros.


Werthead wrote:

Clearly we disagree on the issue, so rather than carry on with that dead end, I'll drop that there.

For those who may be interested, here's a selection of other reviews of the series:

Help me out here. Is that what you call an appeal to authority?


That is good news.


When you've finished with Breaking Bad, give Better Call Saul a try. That show is much better, mainly because it much more focussed and has a somewhat likable main character.

I suggest The Americans as replacement for The Man in the High Castle. No Nazis involved, but a couple of Soviet sleeper agents in the US of the 1980s.


A clinically depressed person who has difficulties feeling anything. She tries to find a way to cure her ailment, but it is hard for her to care for anything anymore. The person works with others out of necessity, but would rather remain alone. An Alchemist or maybe a (Transmuter) Wizard would work. (Any sulky teenagers will receive a dose of a mild poison from her so that they finally have a reason to complain about something.)

A person who has lost her memory who is trying to piece together her former life. I'm thinking a Mesmerist trying to find ways to send herself in ever deeper trances.


Hitdice wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
Irontruth wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
I've recently made the discovery that the Glenlivet 15 does not really taste more interesting than the 12-year-old.

In some ways, age really is just a number. Even if a whisky changes over the years, it might not be for the better. That said, older whiskys will always be more expensive, because you're paying for the storage space for all those years.

Most American whiskey is only aged 2-6 years, with few being aged for 10+ (15+ is exceptionally rare in America).

Just seeing this now.

I expect older whiskeys to at least have a more complex aroma (if that makes sense) than their younger selves, but the 15-year-old Glenlivet is basically the same as the 12-year-old, although it may be a little smoother.

Still, it is not a bad whiskey. And it beats the Green Spot, which I was looking forward to due to high praise. Maybe pot still whiskey is not for me.

Does it taste sort of hoppy or something? I'm not saying I'd turn down a sample, but it sounds like weird, weird flavor combination.

What do you mean?


Irontruth wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
I've recently made the discovery that the Glenlivet 15 does not really taste more interesting than the 12-year-old.

In some ways, age really is just a number. Even if a whisky changes over the years, it might not be for the better. That said, older whiskys will always be more expensive, because you're paying for the storage space for all those years.

Most American whiskey is only aged 2-6 years, with few being aged for 10+ (15+ is exceptionally rare in America).

Just seeing this now.

I expect older whiskeys to at least have a more complex aroma (if that makes sense) than their younger selves, but the 15-year-old Glenlivet is basically the same as the 12-year-old, although it may be a little smoother.

Still, it is not a bad whiskey. And it beats the Green Spot, which I was looking forward to due to high praise. Maybe pot still whiskey is not for me.


Fabius Maximus wrote:

People are upset because they took a thoroughly Japanese story set in Japan told through Japanese characters and mainly cast non-Japanese actors without even bothering to change the characters' names. They could have adapted the Laughing Man story by setting it in an alternate universe. There even is precedent within Ghost in the Shell lore, as the series and movies only share characters and themes.

There is also the question that if the filmakers can't even be arsed to remain faithful to the original in casting, how can they faithfully adapt the rest of the material in its complexity to a live-action version?

Nothing against Johansson; she's good, as are a lot of the other actors. But this white-washing nonsense has to stop. I'm getting tired of always seeing the same type of face on the screen. Rinko Kikuchi would have been a better choice for the role of Major Kusanagi, for example.

As for financial success: I couldn't care less. The franchise is not doomed; Arise just came out last year. It wasn't as good as Stand Alone Complex, but good enough.

Arise unfortunately WASN'T good enough. Arise was supposed to be a 6 episode OVA but failed to get enough funding to make more than 4 episodes. Talk was that the setting of GitS was dead and soon to be buried. Then out of the blue the American's start a live action movie project and suddenly funding is restored Arise got completed as a TV show instead of an OVA and the setting is once again on people's minds. THIS is why it is important that the live action movie succeed because interest in IT is what is keeping the entire setting alive right now. If a major actress like ScarJo can do the role justice (and I believe she is one of the best people out there who CAN... certainly not Ming Na who we have seen in Agents of SHIELD.) In fact if ANYONE can elevate this production from obscurity it is Scarlett Johansson.

BUT it's whitewashing! So what. I would rather the better actor or actress fill a role than the one with the approved race. Just look at what amazing work Samuel Jackson did as Nick Fury (a white part played by a black actor).

I wasn't aware that they had trouble financing Arise. That sucks.

I suspect Johansson's presence alone will not help much, though. GitS may be pretty high profile for an anime in the Western world, but the movie came out 21 years ago. I don't think that most people know either the series or the sequel. It's not exactly a household name. I doubt that the screenwriters and the director have the experience to turn this into a success.


I avoid anything written by Stephen King, so I have no opinion on the Dark Tower.

I also don't think that a black James Bond would be against the character. Why should it be? Is he intrinsically white?


6 people marked this as a favorite.
Aranna wrote:

Why are people so upset about ScarJo? She is a HUGE action star. Her name alone will fill seats in the theater. I would much rather they keep ScarJo and have a big success with this franchise than use a less known asian actress and risk the movie having a bad launch dooming the franchise.

People are upset because they took a thoroughly Japanese story set in Japan told through Japanese characters and mainly cast non-Japanese actors without even bothering to change the characters' names. They could have adapted the Laughing Man story by setting it in an alternate universe. There even is precedent within Ghost in the Shell lore, as the series and movies only share characters and themes.

There is also the question that if the filmakers can't even be arsed to remain faithful to the original in casting, how can they faithfully adapt the rest of the material in its complexity to a live-action version?

Nothing against Johansson; she's good, as are a lot of the other actors. But this white-washing nonsense has to stop. I'm getting tired of always seeing the same type of face on the screen. Rinko Kikuchi would have been a better choice for the role of Major Kusanagi, for example.

As for financial success: I couldn't care less. The franchise is not doomed; Arise just came out last year. It wasn't as good as Stand Alone Complex, but good enough.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Tacticslion wrote:
Deadmanwalking wrote:

Iomedae has always been pronounced in my head something like this:

EYE-ohm-eh-day

Which doesn't sound that uncomfortable to me. I've always liked the way that one flowed, personally.

For me, it was always Eye-OHM-eh-day. :D

Same here, although I treat the 'I' as a 'J'.


Marvin, I would not recommend Sanderson. Lord Snow's praise was pretty faint, and I had the impression that he uses language like a blunt instrument.


You have to take into account that the Tales line is not only genre fiction, but sub-genre fiction, i.e. Fantasy RPG novels. They primarily exist to show off the setting. That's why many of the Tales are not great, even when written by experienced, previously published authors. Some of them read as if they were rushed through editing. The best ones probably will not offer you anything new, only refreshed old fantasy tropes. Still, they can be enjoyable to read.

Nightglass by Liane Merciel is one of them. The Worldwound Gambit by Robin D. Laws is basically Ocean's 11 with demons. Death's Heretic by James Sutter deals with an atheist who's working for the church of Pharasma against his will. And Wendy N. Wagner's Skinwalkers has a former pirate trying to protect her clan against raiders.

However, if you want something akin to literary fiction in the fantasy genre, you should check out Steven Erikson's A Tale of the Malazan Book of the Fallen. It is 10 thick books long and the first one can be kind of hard to get into, but I rarely have read anything better in any genre.


wraithstrike wrote:
I think orogs were orcs/ogre crossbreeds.

You're right. It was changed for the 3.5 FR, however.


Kazaan wrote:

Well, you could maybe design a "deep orc" race, analogously similar to the relation between Dwarves and Dwergar. It could be a sub-species of Orc that lived particularly deep in the ground and never, ever visits the surface.

That would be Orogs, if I'm not mistaken.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
thejeff wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
Hama wrote:

Audience score is 85%, also audience is comprised of about 120.000 people.

Critics are idiots.

No, they are not. They just have different standards than the average member of the audience, whose opinion generally boils down to "I had fun" or "I did not have fun". That does not tell anything to anyone.

Critics are usually exposed to a wider variety of movies (music, art, what have you) than the average audience member, even if their individual knowledge of the matter differs in composition.

So if a majority of critics say that a movie is not that good and qualifies why, I'm bound to trust their verdict rather than the one of the general public.

Depends what you're looking for. The general public may be a better choice when it comes to "Will I enjoy seeing the movie", which is generally what I'm interested in. The critics may be right on some grander artistic level, but there are plenty of works that I acknowledge as artistic masterpieces, but don't actually like. And plenty of more formulaic things that I greatly enjoy.

I repeatedly found that the general public's sense of enjoyment and mine differ wildly.


Hama wrote:

Audience score is 85%, also audience is comprised of about 120.000 people.

Critics are idiots.

No, they are not. They just have different standards than the average member of the audience, whose opinion generally boils down to "I had fun" or "I did not have fun". That does not tell anything to anyone.

Critics are usually exposed to a wider variety of movies (music, art, what have you) than the average audience member, even if their individual knowledge of the matter differs in composition.

So if a majority of critics say that a movie is not that good and qualifies why, I'm bound to trust their verdict rather than the one of the general public.


There used to be 3 women in my group of 6 players. Unfortunately, one had to recently drop out because of her job.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Lamontius wrote:
wait where does it say that this is a new forum version rather than something that broke that Paizo is trying to fix?

Exactly. What new forum?


Marios wrote:
Karui Kage wrote:
Version 1.2: Here

Several years later... hehe... talk about ressurection!

This link doesn't work anymore, anybody got the above mentioned software? Sounds excellent!

I'd say don't use it. The whole sequence is - probably inadvertently - created to bore and frustrate players. I suggest simplifying it; get the PCs lost a couple of times, have them meet goblins once or twice, maybe an Armiger patrol, and throw in some encounters of your own. Then get them to the exit.


BadBird wrote:
Drinking ale instead of Irish whiskey on St.Patrick's day makes me just a little sad. Kind of in the same way as seeing Bono singing somewhere back behind the Dubliners in the video.

That's where he belongs, as far as I'm concerned. Way behind Shane MacGowan.

You could drink Irish red ale.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Kirth Gersen wrote:
Anyway, "Bavaria," for whatever reason, is the English transliteration for Bayern, Deutschland.

Because the region is called after what the Romans called the tribe the found there: the Baiuvarii.


Without a Cleric the campaign can be quite hard. And a meat shield never hurts. So maybe a Paladin or Crusader Cleric?


Oh, and give the Speyburn Bradan Orach a wide, WIDE berth. Unless you like cheap tequila.


I've recently made the discovery that the Glenlivet 15 does not really taste more interesting than the 12-year-old.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Gorbacz wrote:

Posen, the capital of the German province Wartheland, temporarily under Polish control and under the name 'Poznań'.

Dear Germans, please invade and annex us, kthxbai.

Thanks, but we're not interested anymore. It's never been really ours, anyway.


Berlin, Germany.


SmiloDan wrote:
I want to avoid using yuan-ti and their ilk because I'll be starting a new campaign pretty soon that will probably feature a lot of them.

Naga or Dragons come to mind as alternatives.


Addendum in case you want to go down the faerie path (be careful lest you lose you way) and stay somewhat authentic: the Nuckelavee is a mythic creature from the Orkney Islands, not Ireland.

The grumpy cobbler version of the Leprechaun is Irish, as are Bean sidhe, Leanan sidhe, Dullahan and Selkie.


SmiloDan wrote:

I hope you do know the stories about Indiana Jones.

;-)

I did get the reference. :)

I'd like to endorse quibblemuch's idea about using snakes (or snakefolk, maybe) and "driving them out". It's what St. Patrick is famous for, after all.


SmiloDan wrote:

Why did it have to be snakes?

I hope you do know the stories about St. Patrick.


According to the Numeria sourcebook, Orcs frequently raid the human tribes and towns in the country, either independently or in the employ of the Technic League. I'd say they are not well liked.


Skylancer4 wrote:

Not every warrior knows every move in the history of fighting.

Choosing maneuvers lets you customize how you fight, what your "style" is.

My character's style is determinded by the maneuvers he knows, not by those that he has prepared.

As for the rest:

1. Choice is inherent to the system, yes. I'm fine with that; implying I'm not is just a strawman you're putting up, right next to the one that I don't see the balance in this system (I do; I just do not agree with the manner how it is achieved) and the strawman where your imagination about my concept of balance ran away with you and that I should play something else. The last one you coated with extra BS and it stinks to high heaven. If that is what you call reasoning, please leave me alone.

2. Throne, that Warder ability comes at level 7 and requires a full-round action of being completely useless to activate. The other classes still don't have a similar way of switching readied maneuvers on the fly. And yes, I don't like the rest of the mundane 1/day abilities either, but I can chose not to take any of them. They are a core mechanic in ToB/PoW, however.

3. iDesu, the Brawler can use a move action to change their combat feat. That's exactly what initiators cannot do. It can be seen to represent thinking about what tactic would be useful next. Essentially, the Brawler knows all combat feats, but has only access to a limited amount at the same time. Initators have to think hard about why they forgot to use their tricks mid-combat to regain the same ones they prepared before.

4. Aksess, I agree that using the same trick over and over would get one killed quickly. But that only applies if fighting one opponent. The next one in an encounter would not be ready for the same trick. Also, using the same ability again and again becomes boring really fast.

To re-iterate: I do not want my characters to have unlimited access to all maneuvers at all times. I have never said that. If I did, please point it out to me. I am suggesting a different kind of resource manangement.

I'd like initiators to have access to all the maneuvers they know, like a spontaneous spellcaster. Right now, they use a prepared spellcasting mechanic, which I think does not represent a flexible combatant well.


Skylancer4 wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:

Disclaimer: I never played with the Path of War rules. I have only read some of the playtest documents and never bothered to dive further into the system because it uses the same basic mechanics as described in the Tome of War, with which I am familiar.

I have a problem with the system because of its dissociated mechanics, i.e. the vancian fire-and-forget approach for something as mundane as combat abilities that are acquired through training. There simply is no in-game reason for a non-magical character using an ability and then not having it available for the rest of an encounter.

A quick and dirty fix for that problem with my Warblade was making a Sorcerer out of what used to be a Wizard before. The spontaneous spellcasting system emulates fatigue better than the memorisation system while keeping the spellcaster flexible in the application of his maneuvers. It worked equally well.

But they do have it, either through a standard action recovery or special class based recovery. That amounts to, take a breath and recover after the strenuous combat action, and do it again. Same encounter.

Your problem with the system isn't a problem, because it doesn't exist. And that was in the playtest documents IIRC. I believe all initiator classes have dual recovery mechanics, some might have been altered from playtest, but they had it. Most of the PoW stuff is on d20pfsrd if you want to take a better look and see what you seemed to have missed in the playtest docs.

What do they have? An in-game reason?

I had a look. For starters, every class doesn't have all known maneuvers available to it at any time, which is simply inacceptable. They also can only ready any given maneuver once, to boot. That's part of why it is a variant spellcasting system.

The recovery mechanics are part of the problem, actually. All three classes have to either only move or be passive to recover one or more maneuvers. In know that is better than in the ToB, where you had to stand still for a round being useless in the midst of battle (and only the Warblade could do that), but it still is disappointing.

And that includes only the maneuvers they had previously prepared. They can't change them on the fly. You can probably take a feat for that, which is frankly ridiculous for an ability that should be a class feature.

The system is really rigid. I had high hopes that DSP would fix that.


Disclaimer: I never played with the Path of War rules. I have only read some of the playtest documents and never bothered to dive further into the system because it uses the same basic mechanics as described in the Tome of War, with which I am familiar.

I have a problem with the system because of its dissociated mechanics, i.e. the vancian fire-and-forget approach for something as mundane as combat abilities that are acquired through training. There simply is no in-game reason for a non-magical character using an ability and then not having it available for the rest of an encounter.

A quick and dirty fix for that problem with my Warblade was making a Sorcerer out of what used to be a Wizard before. The spontaneous spellcasting system emulates fatigue better than the memorisation system while keeping the spellcaster flexible in the application of his maneuvers. It worked equally well.


Kirth Gersen wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
Kirth, if you're up for some British TV, I'd strongly suggest trying Utopia
IMDB wrote:
After a group of people, who meet online, discover a bizarre graphic novel...
More comic books!

True, but it is not based on a comic book, and you really would be missing out. Fargo might be the best series currently on TV, but Utopia is the best series of the decade. Where is Jessica Hyde?


Kirth, if you're up for some British TV, I'd strongly suggest trying Utopia as well as Life on Mars and its sequel, Ashes to Ashes.


The Sword wrote:

I also found Constantine very enjoyable. The main character is a lot of fun and I like the concept. Shame the second series is unlikely but the first episodes had a lot of flavour.

Edit: just realised this is a comic book adaption! Sorry. But it is a very good one and in my opinion much better than some of the other tut.

The show has also already been cancelled and John Constantine relegated to a third-rank character on Arrow.


Irontruth wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:
Irontruth wrote:

I tried watching The Leftovers. I didn't get it. Best I can tell, it's a slice of life show after people mysteriously disappear. It's well acted and written, but I don't get the point of it. I don't understand where it's going or why. It has a ton of potential though.

The Leftovers is about many things: how to deal with loss (especially when you don't know what happened to the missing person), religious fanatism, why life is worth living, mental health, etc. It is a but slow, but I think it's worth it.

I get what you're saying, and I think what you said is covered in the part of my post that I bolded. I'm not big on slice of life stories. A paragraph long summary is usually just a list of events that happened, without actually describing a story.

I loved The Wire. It was a slow show, with tons of characters, often loosely connected. At the same time, it had a direction and I can easily identify what the show is about and tell you where it's going to take me very early on.

I don't know where The Leftovers is going. As far as I can tell, it's not going anywhere, it's just going to be a period of time out of these people's lives when some things happen. Maybe later one when some big reveals happen, the point and direction of the story will come into focus. If that happens, I'll probably take the time to catch back up and watch the show.

If you're looking for a big reveal, Leftovers might not be for you. The story gets more focussed, though, as the Guilty Remnant starts to play a big role. It is what drives the story, but you have to be patient.


Irontruth wrote:

I tried watching The Leftovers. I didn't get it. Best I can tell, it's a slice of life show after people mysteriously disappear. It's well acted and written, but I don't get the point of it. I don't understand where it's going or why. It has a ton of potential though.

The Leftovers is about many things: how to deal with loss (especially when you don't know what happened to the missing person), religious fanatism, why life is worth living, mental health, etc. It is a but slow, but I think it's worth it.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Fargo is probably the best series on TV right now. Everything about it is top-notch and season 2 is probably even better than season 1.

Rectify is superb, but really depressing. Thankfully the seasons are relatively short.

In the same vein is The Leftovers, a Damon Lindelof show about how 2% of Earth's population just vanishes into thin air. It deals with the effects on the eponymous people that were left. Christopher Ecclestone, Liv Tyler and Justin Theroux are part of the cast (the latter is suprisingly not bad).

The Americans is about two Soviet sleeper agents in the 80s. Excellent writing and great performances all around.

I agree with Imbicatus that James Spader is the best thing about The Blacklist. The rest of the show is a big pile of hot garbage, however.


Occult Lore by Atlas Games has a rule subsystem for herbalism (among other interesting things). It is very detailed, containing a list of herbs and the concoctions you can brew out of them.


Dotting.


Kryzbyn wrote:

Since Putin is fighting them in Syria openly, I wonder why they haven't targeted them...

Oh. Putin.

There was that Russian civilian plane that probably was brought down by a bomb over Sinai.


MMCJawa wrote:
Fabius Maximus wrote:

It's headed by Alex Kurtzman, one of the guys responsible for writing the Transformer and the new Star Trek movies as well as Amazing Spider-Man 2 and Cowboys & Aliens.

It will be a trainwreck.

Only as a producer. He won't be the primary showrunner. He produced Sleepy Hollow and Fringe as well, which are a bit better than his movie output depending on your views of those shows.

I'd like to remind you that Berman and Braga also "only" were (executive) producers of the latter seasons of Voyager and the first three seasons of Enterprise and they pretty much ruined the franchise. And yes, Kurtzman will be executive producer (aka showrunner), sharing the position with Heather Kadin.

On Fringe, he shared that position with 6 other people. There are even more of them working on Sleepy Hollow, so you can't pin any success (in the former) or going-off-the-rails (in the latter) on him.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

It's headed by Alex Kurtzman, one of the guys responsible for writing the Transformer and the new Star Trek movies as well as Amazing Spider-Man 2 and Cowboys & Aliens.

It will be a trainwreck.

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