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Erik Mona

Erik Mona's page

Publisher, Chief Creative Officer. Pathfinder Society Member. 6,363 posts. 3 reviews. 1 list. 1 wishlist. 1 Pathfinder Society character.


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Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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We're all looking forward to seeing you folks at this year's show!

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Yes, this is the Gen Con release.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Cat-thulhu wrote:

1 in 10 so far, I could go 1 in 5 sets. I agree with you Steve there are way too many gargantuans that need doing, I could list 15-20 I desperately want to see in plastic without resorting to books.

PLEASE DO.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Marco Massoudi wrote:


When can we expect the 2016 Paizo product catalogue now that it comes out twice a year?

When I get around to doing it, probably appearing in a couple of months.

Thanks for the idea of small dragons. I'll see what I can do.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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My problem with Laori Vaus as far as minis are concerned is that I feel that the artistic style of her illustration doesn't quite match the Pathfinder aesthetic. Accordingly, I think she'd make for a pretty boring miniature. Flat color, very difficult to sculpt spikes, and a goofy face is a good recipe for a bad miniature.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Berk the Black wrote:


I'd sure like to see an alchemist lab in the future. Potion apparatus, bookcases, and a desk.

THAT is a very sexy idea.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Duncan7291 wrote:

My case had at least one of every mini. Here was the breakdown of the case:

1 super box with Feiya and King Irovetti in it.
1 cart, wagon, bed, barrel.
2 tables, crate

I cracked my personal case last night, and got a somewhat different mix of dungeon dressing:

1 cart, wagon, barrel, table
2 beds, crates

--Erik

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Marco Massoudi wrote:


Is the number of minis and set list for the next set (#11) already fixed and how many dungeon dressing pieces will it contain?

Same number of figures. Same amount of dungeon dressing. Same distribution method.

(So far as I'm aware. I haven't seen digital sculpts yet, so we're in the early stages of production when things still have plenty of time to change, but that's what I know at the moment.)

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Duncan7291 wrote:
Erik, have yall thought about a dungeon dressing mini set along same lines of undead and goblin packs?

Yes.

WizKids did not sell enough of the goblin or undead sets to continue with this format, though I do think it's probably the most appropriate for a dungeon dressing set. It's something I will continue to discuss with them. I know we're all pleased with how well the dungeon dressing singles have been selling.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Couple things.

1) The singles for this set are moving fast. That is strong encouragement to bust some more cases. So in a strange way, the faster these things disappear, the more likely we are to restock them. I understand the subscriber concerns, which is even more encouragement for us to dive back into the cases. I hear you.

2) We'll sell the promo beds until we run out, even if that is longer than a month.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Awesome! Congratulations to you and your team, Brother Willi!

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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James Jacobs wrote:
j b 200 wrote:
I'm curious about the design decision to have Aroden die. What was the reason for choosing this event as THE event to shape the campaign setting. Was there something in particular that you wanted to do with his death? Was it just a cool idea that everyone liked so you stuck with it?
Lots of reasons, but mostly to start the setting off on a dramatic note, where heroes are very much needed. It's a humanocentric setting, and having the god of humanity die off is a huge kick into uncharted territory for the future.

Since this was my character and my idea, please allow me to also add that I specifically HATE the use of prophecy as a cliché in fantasy gaming (or fantasy in general). Killing the god of humanity and screwing up prophecy in one shot was a way to put the onus of heroism directly on the player characters. They aren't heroes because some forgotten book or poem said they would become heroes, but because of their own actions.

I remember spending a lot of time thinking about what to call the current "age" in the world, and this dovetailed with "Age of Lost Omens," which everyone on the staff sounded cool. Everything else we considered was kind of lame, as I remember.

So that's the origin of killing off the god of humanity. :)

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Announcement soon. Hayato soon.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Zhangar wrote:

My understanding was that Aroden was a straight-up wizard that fought with a sword. His sword was probably even his arcane-bond item.

Keep in mind that Aroden was mythic, (Mr. Jacobs has mentioend he'd even make Aroden a Champion), and so Aroden had a lot of options that a normal wizard wouldn't have.

Aroden was immortal even before he was a god, so he had lots of levels in lots of different stuff. He certainly had wizard levels, but my personal opinion is that he also had fighter levels, as he started as a common swordsmith, not some kind of archmage.

When we later released the magus, I thought that fit too, so if you want to go that way it certainly works from my perspective.

Since you can't really fight him, I honestly didn't put a ton of time into thinking about Aroden's stats beyond what I've stated above. A little from column A.....

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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captain yesterday wrote:
He was slain, and it took awhile, coinciding with the Chelish civil war (coincidence?).

Aroden's disappearance coincides with the beginning of the Chelish Civil War.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Kirth Gersen wrote:
I'm a big fan of almost everything James Jacobs and Erik Mona have done

Thanks, Kirth! That means a lot, especially from someone named after a Jack Vance character! :)

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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We've considered doing short videos covering certain parts of the setting, with visuals provided by some sort of interesting montage of art from our books.

Oh, to have more time and budget for a video/streaming RPG employee.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Azten wrote:
Kinda sad we might find out what happened to Aroden now. Where will the fun be, the conspiracy theories?

Ha.

I just wrote thousands of words on Aroden for Pathfinder #100.

"What happened to Aroden" is exactly none of them. ;)

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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It didn't take much pressure, honestly. I think Vic or Mike (or both) suggested it, and I said "GREAT IDEA," and in he went. ;)

Any other requests from the card game side? I've been trying to sneak in several of the class deck characters in the last few sets, and will continue to do so as we move forward.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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And that particular section of that comic was co-written by me (Aroden's creator) and James, so I'd say it's about as official a statement on Aroden as you're likely to get.

Until Pathfinder #100...

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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CBDunkerson wrote:
I can see where keeping extra minis around for years wouldn't be cost effective for Paizo, but 'two weeks after release' seems too short. It takes that long for me to just GET my subscription package... on a good month. That'd make it pretty difficult to wait to see what you got in your set and then order appropriate singles separately.

I can appreciate that being a bummer. :/

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Joana wrote:
I second Steve's question. Since one of the benefits of the Battles subscription is a discount on purchasing singles, it's a bit disconcerting to hear that there will be less of an opportunity to use the discount in the future.

We will continue to sell singles of sets as they release, and future restocks are likely, but it is more likely to be a "here and there" sort of thing where we pop a few cases if we have any left, and we hope to eventually run out. With many of the earlier sets we took a "let's stock this forever" sort of approach that is not really feasible after 10 sets for a variety of reasons.

We'll also still sell promo minis and (I hope) other special stuff.

I appreciate that the policy change could be construed as a reduction in the value of a subscription, and I do apologize.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Warning: I cannot for the life of me convince WizKids to make chairs at the moment, so I strongly suggest using alternative methods if chairs are important to you. There will be _no_ chairs in Pathfinder Battles for the foreseeable future.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Rarity on these items is not up to me. I know the current model is meant to be a tentative "toe in the water" test in case people didn't like these items.

That doesn't appear to be much of a problem, but ultimately it is not up to me.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Kajehase wrote:
Which is your favourite Doctor Who serial?

Ha ha ha.

WAY too difficult.

Allow me to do it this way:

ONE: The Dalek Master Plan*
TWO: The War Games
THREE: Inferno
FOUR: City of Death
FIVE: Earthshock**
SIX: The One Doctor***
SEVEN: Battlefield****
EIGHT: Chimes at Midnight*****
NINE: Dalek
TEN: Blink
ELEVEN: Day of the Doctor******
TWELVE: Mummy on the Orient Express*******

* Incomplete, impression based on reconstructions and existing episodes. "An Unearthly Child" is my favorite episode from the Hartnell era, but the rest of that serial is terrible, so I didn't list it. Runners up include The Daleks, The Aztecs, The Edge of Destruction, Marco Polo, The Crusade, and the War Machines. I really like a lot of episodes in this era.

** Or maybe Enlightenment. I liked the Fifth Doctor era a lot more as a kid than I do as an adult. Now I can see that the rot really began to set in in Tom Baker's last season, and while I can watch and enjoy nearly all of Five's episodes, it has a lot of foreshadowing of the decline to come.

*** Look, there are no truly good Colin Baker episodes. I find them all appalling for one reason or another. He had zero good companions, and the worst writing and production values the program ever had. The poor guy never had a chance. Even his Patrick Troughton team-up is terrible. So I picked "The One Doctor," one of my favorite Big Finish audio dramas. Other great ones include Ish, The Holy Terror (with Frobisher!), The Marian Conspiracy... so many. Colin Baker is delightful in audio. Literally any of the 30 or so audio adventures of his I've heard, some of which are not awesome, are better than any of his actual episodes. Poor guy.

**** Maybe? Look, I am not a Sylvester McCoy guy. The show was waaaaay too much a pantomime in this era for my tastes, and the much-lauded "Cartmel Master Plan" reads to me like fanfic that I am glad never happened, even if some of the early set-up was more interesting than what came before. I like Ace as a companion, but Seven is my least favorite Doctor. He doesn't really even work for me in audio.

***** Another audio. In this case, there's not much to choose from in TV. McGann is sometimes great in audio, and sometimes he seems bored out of his skull. This is his best story, and maybe Big Finish's masterpiece in their entire range. A fantastic episode filled with "timey-wimey" goodness.

****** If I'm not allowed to pick a multi-Doctor story, I guess I'll go with "Let's Kill Hitler." The Smith era is also one of my least favorites, for numerous reasons. Plenty of good episodes, but in my view very very few excellent ones. Day of the Doctor was one of the best episodes in the history of the series, though, so credit where credit is due.

******* So far!

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The Minis Maniac wrote:
Does it pay to bribe the Dev team to get what you want published?

I think you misunderstand how things work. As I am the one who sets the schedule, I am the one who should be bribed. ;)

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Luthorne wrote:
The manasaputras are something I am looking forward to from Bestiary 5, thanks to that little snippet from the Esoteric Planes, which, incidentally, was one of my favorite parts of the whole book, so kudos!

Thank you! I've been noodling with a lot of ideas and concepts that went into Occult Adventures for a long, long time--since maybe as early as second edition D&D. "Psionics" never really worked for me, and I always thought that an occult "reskin" of the idea of mental magic opened the door for a lot of cool storytelling possibilities.

The Energy Planes always struck me as kind of the lamest and least usable element of the existing cosmology (also going way, way back), so I wanted to put a marker on that section to make sure I had a chance to make them a little bit more interesting.

Luthorne wrote:
1) What's some of the more interesting pieces of trivia you learned while researching for Occult Adventures?

During the research period and writing of Occult Adventures, I became completely obsessed with the Theosophical Society cult, and now have a pretty encyclopedic knowledge of their organization, history, and beliefs (at least for an outsider).

One of the most interesting sidelines of the cult, to me, comes in the early 20th century, a couple of decades after the death of the Society's founder, H. P. Blavatsky. Blavatsky's successor in the mainline Society (there were by this point already several offshoot organizations) was a woman named Annie Besant, and Besant's most influential guru was a mystic named C. W. Leadbeater. Leadbeater's codification, explanation, and extrapolation of Blavatsky's cosmology in a series of books with titles like "The Astral Plane" and "The Devachanic Plane" heavily informed (though likely indirectly) Gary Gygax's conception of places like the Astral Plane and Ethereal Plane he incorporated into the original AD&D cosmology, so long ago. (The monadic deva, for example, is a theosophical concept, as is the solar angel).

Anyway, every good cult needs a mystic with claims of some sort of great power or esoteric insight. While Besant was a skilled writer, orator, and leader, she did not herself claim highly developed psychic powers, at least in comparison to others like Blavatsky or Leadbeater (or a similarly fascinating woman named Katherine Tingley, who at the time ran the biggest American offshoot of the Theosophical Society from a giant commune in southern California). So Besant ended up confiding in Leadbeater and trusting him to an outrageous degree, overlooking multiple charges of inappropriate sexual conduct with young boys because his occult insight (i.e. charlatanism) was so important to the organization and to her personally. Her defense of Leadbeater caused another great rift in the Society, with co-counder Henry Steel Olcott personally voting to ban Leadbeater from the Society, and a bunch of American and British sections breaking away from the mainline Theosophical Society, which was now based at Adyar, India.

About a decade later, Besant found a way to bring Leadbeater back (she frankly needed him), and once again CWL was publishing books about the secret prehistory of humanity, as revealed to him via psychic consultation with the Akashic Record. Leadbeater was the Akashic Record master. His visions focused primarily on the previous incarnations of prominent Theosophists. The Society grew more and more obsessed with reincarnation after the move of their headquarters to India, and Leadbeater's work is emblematic of the apex of this influence. Monthly columns in "The Theosophist" recounted past lives, giving "star names" to the souls of key theosophists like Orion, Sirius, Selene, and hey, even Mona.

At this time, Leadbeater was living with Besant in the headquarters compound in Adyar. One day, while taking a midmorning stroll along the riverside beach, Leadbeater beheld the most beautiful sight he had ever seen: the dripping, nubile, taut young body of a young Indian boy named Jiddu Krishnamurti.

No, I'm sorry. The _AURA_ of young Jiddu Krishnamurti, which Leadbeater later described as "the most wonderful aura I had ever seen, without a particle of selfishness in it." It was definitely the aura that so attracted Leadbeater's attention. The fact that he had constantly surrounded himself with young Indian or Asian boys, keeping them as special occult students and even sometimes sleeping in the same bed as them probably didn't enter into it.

Anyway, Leadbeater was so transfixed by the 14-year-old Krishnamurti's aura that he convinced Besant that the youth could only be the vessel for a great "World Teacher" spirit that would soon emerge and lead the world's intellectual and spiritual development. This concept is known as the "Maitreya," and works hand-in-hand with the Theosophical cosmology of souls on the path of evolution and development from lesser forms to otherworldy intelligences designed to nurture the development of humanity toward enlightenment. (This Celestial Hierarchy goes by a number of names in Theosophical occult teachings, one of which being the manasaputra, which is how I brought them into Pathfinder). So similar to prophecies of the reincarnation of Jesus is the Maitreya/World Teacher theology that the Theosophical Society and aligned organizations began to publish books with titles like "The Coming of the New Christ."

The idea, basically, was that Krishnamurti was not yet the World Teacher, but that he would become inhabited by that spirit at some point. The top level of the Adyar Theosophical Society became almost single-mindedly focused on developing Krishnamurti as an appropriate vessel for this spirit. Members of the society earnestly believed that they were on the precipice of a New Age.

As Besant and Leadbeater toured Krishnamurti around the world, having him speak (particularly to Theosophical youth organizations) on issues of morality and occultism and further spreading his legend. Tales of his travels and speeches appeared regularly in "The Theosophist," often accompanied by florid descriptions of Krishnamurti's past lives in a Leadbeater-penned series originally entitled "Rents in the Veil of Time," but which ultimately became known as "The Lives of Alcyone," citing Krishnamurti's own star name, and focusing solely on him as the primary character. Allegedly mental transcriptions and descriptions of Akashic Records observed by Leadbeater while projecting his consciousness into the Astral Plane, these accounts read like someone's Pathfinder campaign notes, replete with corrupt nobles, descriptions of eldritch ancient civilizations, cities, and rituals, and even, every once in a while, with monsters. They're pretty awesome, and no doubt helped the increase the popularity of the Coming World Teacher. ("Behold," many Krishnamurti book covers say, "he comes quickly."

All of this, of course, drove further rents not just in the veil of time, but in the Theosophical Society itself, with more chapters spinning off into their own side-branch organizations (some of which still exist). As a complete aside, some of these organizations focused on the Masters of Ancient Wisdom, the esoteric "Great White Brotherhood" of secretive immortal sages and scholars who first introduced the key concepts of Theosophy to H. P. Blavatsky. These organizations developed, in the mid-20th century, in the the "Ascended Masters" branch of the New Age movement, with prominent branches including Elizabeth Claire Prophet's Church Universal and Triumphant and the "I AM Activity," which swears itself to the Ascended Master St. Germain, one of my personal obsessions and favorite quasi-historical figures.

But back to Leadbeater and Krishnamurti. The Lives of Alcyone grew more and more popular, and soon not-so-prominent Theosophists were paying money to get their own star names, which Leadbeater worked into his monthly column as minor characters. A Theosophist might know that he was really the wife of Krishnamurti's father in ancient Chaldea, for example, and one's closeness in past lives to Alcyone was seen as a measure of status within the Society. While there were certainly skeptics, I cannot emphasize enough how much people believed this stuff.

Anyway, as the 1910s and 1920s went by, a major problem started to develop. Jiddu Krishnamurti just wasn't that into it. Over time he became sullen and unsure of himself in his cause. The death of his beloved brother Nitya in 1925 shook his faith in Theosophy itself. In 1929, at a national convention dedicated to his cult of personality and organized by the leaders of the Theosophical Society, Jiddu Krishnamurti, the World Teacher, finally gave the great religious message he had been born and groomed to deliver:

"I maintain that truth is a pathless land, and you cannot approach it by any path whatsoever, by any religion, by any sect. That is my point of view, and I adhere to that absolutely and unconditionally. Truth, being limitless, unconditioned, unapproachable by any path whatsoever, cannot be organized; nor should any organization be formed to lead or coerce people along a particular path. ... This is no magnificent deed, because I do not want followers, and I mean this. The moment you follow someone you cease to follow Truth. I am not concerned whether you pay attention to what I say or not. I want to do a certain thing in the world and I am going to do it with unwavering concentration. I am concerning myself with only one essential thing: to set man free. I desire to free him from all cages, from all fears, and not to found religions, new sects, nor to establish new theories and new philosophies."

That message is, to put it lightly, un-Theosophical, and sent shocks through the convention that reverberated in Theosophical lodges all over the world. Krishnamurti dissolved the convention, dissolved the "Order of the Star in the East" that existed to serve him, and basically tore down the idea of organized religion in general, which, probably more than anything else, essentially destroyed the Theosophical Society. The group exists here and there, but ever since this event it has been fading in popularity. You just can't botch a second coming of Christ.

So, to answer your question, THAT's my favorite piece of trivia that I discovered while researching "Occult Adventures." I love the idea that the great religious secret that it took hundreds of thousands of years and numerous almost-perfectly enlightened reincarnations to deliver to us is: "This is all B.S."

Luthorne wrote:
2) Do you have a favorite of the six new classes from Occult Adventures? If so, why?

I really like most of them, but I think my personal favorite at the moment is the mesmerist. I wrote Meligaster's "Meet the Iconics" story, and I've been enjoying writing the character in the Pathfinder: Hollow Mountain comic. I haven't had a chance to play any of the classes yet, but mesmerist is a strong contender for my next character.

Luthorne wrote:
3) What genres of literature are you particularly fond of, and why?

I'm a big pulp magazine collector, so my favorite stuff tends to be early 20th century science fiction, fantasy, and adventure. I'm more interested in the genres earlier in their development, before they became too codified. I tend to prefer fantasy from before J.R.R. Tolkien, so I focus on authors like Robert E. Howard, C. L. Moore, Henry Kuttner, Clark Ashton Smith, and Leigh Brackett. A lot of those authors also wrote horror or science fiction.

Surprise: I like fantasy, science fiction, and horror.

I've recently been reading some late 19th century and early 20th century occult fiction. Most of it is pretty boring, but the language is quite advanced and somewhat florid, which is another characteristic of authors I enjoy, as exemplified by authors like H. P. Lovecraft, Clark Ashton Smith, A. Merritt (one of my absolute favorites), William Hope Hodgson, and even more recently Jack Vance, Matthew Huges, and even China Mieville.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Steve Geddes wrote:


Is Hollow Mountain a return to a more serial approach?

Yes, very much so. The entire series is a single six-issue narrative almost entirely set within the context of a giant megadungeon.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Kalindlara wrote:

I think you missed this one. ^_^

Kalindlara wrote:
How do you feel about kytons, anyway? (I know that Mr. Schneider is behind most of Pathfinder's kyton content.)

I think it's great. I love the references, and the takes on the various types. I think it's one of the strongest bits of development we've added to something that started as a pretty one-dimensional concept.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Luthorne wrote:
1) What's your favorite outsider race with its own unique subtype? (Like kyton, angel, daemon, genie, etc.)

Wow. That's a very difficult question to answer, because I like so many of them.

Fifteen years ago my answer most certainly would have been demons, as you can tell by looking at my creative output at the beginning of my writing career. Heck, my first official TSR credit was as a creative consultant on a Planescape book called "Faces of the Abyss," where I helped the design team navigate the existing official D&D lore on demons to bring the Planescape line a little more in line with classic D&D. Around the same time I wrote about a dozen Living City adventures for the RPGA, many of which were either set on the Abyss or heavily featured demons. The first article I ever had published in an official D&D magazine, Polyhedron, was about magic items associated with demon lords. My first RPG book, Green Ronin's "Armies of the Abyss," was all about demons. One of my biggest D&D credits was "Fiendish Codex 1: Hordes of the Abyss," where I wrote the Abyss chapter (among other things). As editor I did a ton with demons in both Dragon and Dungeon magazines.

So, really, I've kind of said everything I need to say about demons. Used them up, so to speak. Creatively speaking, they're in safe hands with James Jacobs. All is well in demon land.

These days I guess I am most interested in aeons and a new class we're introducing in Bestiary 5 called manasaputras, which are based off of the Theosophical Society cult in the late 19th century (and to a muuuuuuuch lesser extend ancient Indian mythology). I didn't write these creatures in Bestiary 5, but I did about a year of research to figure out what they were all about and how to appropriately adapt them for a fantasy RPG. They tie in pretty heavily to the Esoteric Planes section of "Occult Adventures" that I DID write, and I helped to develop them a bit.

Aeons built the multiverse, and manasaputras guide the spiritual development of mortals who dwell within it. They are the reincarnated spirits of survivors from a previous incarnation of the multiverse, or the reincarnated spirits of natives of this one on the path through the various manasaputra types to the highest expressions of spiritual enlightenment.

These days I like the mysteries and the lesser-developed ones. The fact that very few people like aeons makes me want to polish them up and make them better.

Luthorne wrote:


2) What are three of your favorite outsiders that don't have their own unique subtype? (Hound of Tindalos, Cerberi, Shining Child, etc.)

Jyoti. I think they're really interesting. I used one in my Emerald Spire level and had a great time roleplaying a creature from the Positive Energy plane. The Esoteric Planes section of Occult Adventures dealt a lot with the Positive Energy Plane as a source for life energy in the multiverse, so I like the challenge of figuring out how a creature that basically looks like a bird-person would exist in such a realm (and, I guess, why). I'm very obsessed with the Energy Planes these days.

Next I guess I'd say valkyrie, because I love nordic themes and I think it's cool that we have them in the game. Lots of potential for development there. I don't know that the execution is super fun or anything, but I like that they're there and it'd be fun to do more with them.

I guess I put norns in the same category, so I'm going to claim them as the last one.

But I gotta say, I just went over the list and there weren't exactly a ton of contenders. I think we've done a good job expanding previously unique creatures into whole subtypes, so there aren't that many of these. Maybe we need more?

Luthorne wrote:


3) Is there anything in particular from 3.5 that wasn't covered by the Open Gaming License you wish you could have brought to Pathfinder?

Not really.

I've completely cut the cord in that regard. I don't even miss mind flayers anymore.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Swashbucklersdc wrote:
Who is your favorite comic book hero?

Probably the Jack Knight Starman DC published in the 1990s. He was created by James Robinson and Tony Harris in the wake of the "Zero Hour" event, and the series was a highlight of a period that saw a lot of creative highlights (and a huge majority of garbage). Even with Harris's amazing art, Starman was a writer-driven comic, with a very specific point of view and a strong sense of the hero's inner voice, motives, and values.

It didn't hurt that the series tied into the original Starman and through him the Justice Society of America, my favorite sub-section of the DC universe. Robinson and Harris rooted the series in their own original "gem" city, Opal City, which was so strongly developed that it became a character itself, very much like Gotham with an art-deco/50s design sensibility.

Most of all, Starman was a "father and son" narrative, which I have a particular weakness for. Jack's relationship to his father (and, via brilliant annual ghost sequences, his dead brother) was the cornerstone of the book, and the subsequent drama made him really appealing.

Harris left the book about halfway through, and Robinson had Jack give up his Cosmic Staff at the end of his run, so the character seldom/never appears in continuity anymore. I read this as creator-to-creator respect for a job well done. Starman was so superlative that subsequent writers barely even use Opal City, or any of the book's supporting characters, because no one wants to XXXX it up.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Swashbucklersdc wrote:
Any chance of a rabbit prince mini? I would pre-order it now!

Interesting. Probably not, for a long time.

I like the idea of doing a Harrow-based set, and that would include a rabbit prince mini, but that's pretty esoteric. I expect such a set would end the line in a blaze of glory.

Barring that, I've sometimes dreamed of doing a Jabberwock/Bandersnatch two-pack, and that impossible dream has just been modified with the addition of a rabbit prince figure to go with them.

So many more useful figures to make first.

I'm afraid that the more esoteric choices are not tremendously appreciated by the market in general. For every guy who was like "Wahoo, a rabbit guy!" there would be a hundred who would complain that we don't even have stats for rabbit people in the game, and that it was a "waste" of a slot.

I'd be fun to do a Kickstarter for a "Prove Us Wrong" set of impossible-to-justify figures, but I don't think that's something that could ever really happen.

That's why I really like the Dungeon Crawler Classics line, but I sadly suspect a rabbit person is pretty low on his priority list too.

Paizo Employee Publisher, Chief Creative Officer

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Steve Geddes wrote:
What part of Golarion would you most like to expand on (presuming you had nothing to do for a while and could put all your effort into whatever you felt like)?

1. Absalom

2. Nex

3. Azlant

Steve Geddes wrote:
Are the comics going to continue to be written by Paizo staffers going forward?

They will be for Hollow Mountain and the series after that. Beyond that, we've not determined.

How do you think we are doing?

Steve Geddes wrote:
Which is your favorite deity of Golarion?

Aroden.

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Mine all mine...don't touch wrote:
Speaking of minis and repaints will the convention repaints be appearing soon? I know I want to grab some of those as Christmas gifts if possible.

Thanks for the reminder!

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This list gives you a list of VCs as a starting point, but I couldn't find the exact list you're looking for.

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Definitely the werecrocodile.

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baron arem heshvaun wrote:


Speaking of which, Erik, who is your all time favorite Comic book Villain? Please feel free to enumerate why.
[/ooc]

The one that springs immediately to mind is a time-traveling DC scientist named Per Degaton who was always getting into scrapes with the Justice Society of America and (especially) the WW2-era All-Star Squadron (which had a great comic in the 80s).

The thing I like about him, other than his fashion sense and overall character design, is that he's really just a P.O.S. lab assistant who gets caught in a sort of time loop. So every time he is defeated, he gets zapped back to the moment of the accident, with his overbearing scientist boss saying "Stop mumbling, Degaton, and wash these tubes like a good fellow."

Here's the panel.

My favorite villains are the simpering, XXXX-eating self-serving kind, and Degaton is a great example. Others include Starscream, Cobra Commander, Grima Wyrmtongue, to some extent Veris or Littlefinger from Game of Thrones, etc. I like the way Degaton goes from world dominator to lowly lab assistant every time he's defeated. I dunno. I just like him a lot.

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Kalindlara wrote:

Are there still plans to replace the old Feiya and King Irovetti miniatures at some point? I like the original Feiya pose far more than the Iconic Heroes one.

They are going to be inserted into The Rusty Dragon Inn, which is now set for a January release.

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The Minis Maniac wrote:
So Erik. Are there going to be any more huge minis coming from the pathfinder Battles line?

Yes.

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Kalindlara wrote:


Is there any chance of still seeing the Seoni, Iconic Fighter mini?

This idea is growing on me.

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It would have to be "generic" enough to appeal to the general customer, and I don't really want to do an "NPC-heavy" set for a while after The Rusty Dragon Inn, but I do like the idea in general and I suspect there are some monsters that would be really fun to include.

Like the giant ape from Mists of Mwangi.

I could do a faction of Aspis Consortium agents, maybe.

It'd be fun to make the case incentive the phoenix from "Requiem for the Red Raven," but that might be a little self-indulgent. :)

I welcome other suggestions for figures for a set loosely based on the Pathfinder Society.

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Lava Child wrote:

About Janira Gavix -

Almost every PFS group plays "The confirmation", and some GMs love to have the actual minis for each encounter and NPC.

Sooo. . . as a VL, what are the possibilities of a PFS themed set of pathfinder miniatures with characters like the VCs, major creatures from games like wounded wisp, confirmation, etc. that are heavily played?

I think that's a good idea for a minis set, honestly.

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We will get around to this. The resources that would have gone to doing this instead went to bridging the gap while we looked for a new Campaign Coordinator.

Since our new Campaign Coordinator is now happily in place, we'll put this back into the mix once the PFS team has had a chance to catch their breath.

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Oh, yes.

And I'd be a Sensate, obvs.

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Kalindlara wrote:
Is there anything you do when you're sad and upset to shake those feelings?

Good question!

I don't tend to get depressed or mopey too often, but when I do, all of the stuff I've stored up in my Scandinavian way tends to come out and I get almost pathetically maudlin.

When that happens, honestly the best thing for me to do is to go to sleep and start over the next day. Some days you just have to write off as total losses.

I live with a girlfriend and a pug, both of which offer much love and warmth, and both certainly help.

I find it difficult to read and concentrate when I am moping about some BS, so one thing that tends to help is playing video games. If I concentrate on that I'm not thinking about whatever's getting me down, and it messes with my brain chemicals enough that I often come out the other side feeling better. Sometimes I just need peace and quiet while I'm nominally concentrating on something else so that my backup memory can work out whatever's bugging me.

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Justin Franklin wrote:
If the Akashic Record has a perfect psychic record of every moment in history, couldn't you just go there and find out how Aroden died?

Theoretically, yes.

In practice, it's much more difficult than that. Certain moments in history are likely "sealed off" from general access in the Akashic Record, probably because they contain secrets of such power or blasphemy that they could do damage to the multiverse.

I would put the death of Aroden in this sort of category.

No doubt so would the Lipika Aeons, the so-called "Lords of Karma" that are detailed in Bestiary 5. These unyielding gentlemen patrol the Akashic Record and protect secrets just like this one, regulating the use of the plane and generally being very conservative and aeon-like.

They have several arms and some really nasty powers. If they tell you the library is closed, you're probably better off moving on to somewhere else. :)

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Kor - Orc Scrollkeeper wrote:

Thank you for the replies Erik.

While we are on the subject of buying singles, do you know when (if) the elusive Fire Beetle and Duergar Soldier may be available in the Paizo store?

We put our promo minis on sale _after_ the con season and _before_ the holiday shopping season.

Since the "con season" officially ended yesterday with the close of New York Comic Con, we're officially on the clock for this, so I'd expect it relatively soon. Certainly by the middle of November.

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Kor - Orc Scrollkeeper wrote:


Do you still anticipate that the new and improved Feiya and King Irovetti minis will be available with the release of the Rusty Dragon Inn set?

Yes. WizKids has confirmed that the replacement minis will be in this set, one each per case.

Kor - Orc Scrollkeeper wrote:


1) I believe the original plan was to include each of these miniatures within a case of Rusty Dragon Inn. I just wanted to confirm if this was still the plan? (Those boosters/bricks are all packed into their cases pretty tight, so I am unsure how this will be done unless these are extra minis that are placed into a booster -- or perhaps they will be included with the case promo?)

This is still the plan. I am not certain if these are purely "bonus" minis, or if they will swap out an uncommon similar to what is done with the dungeon dressing. I will try to confirm that soon.

Kor - Orc Scrollkeeper wrote:


2) For those that don't order any cases, is there anyway they can purchases these minis? (Will Paizo be getting a specific stock of them or will you only be getting them the same way everyone else is?)

Paizo will have a VERY small number of singles of these guys for sale, equivalent to what we do for rares by breaking cases and selling singles that way. I'll get into this more in future blogs, but we intend to carry FAR, FAR FEWER singles of this set than we have of previous sets, so if you're a singles buyer, I strongly suggest shopping very early, or you're going to have to get your singles somewhere else.

Kor - Orc Scrollkeeper wrote:


3) Do you know if WizKids will be making these available in their replacement program? (I realize you probably won't have the answer for this one. Since these minis are from old sets, their typical method of replacement would be to replace the mailed in miniature with a miniature with a similar rarity from the most recent set. I am hoping that they would convey to the staff who handle replacements, to replace Feiya and King Irovetti with the new ones.)

I do not know this, but I will ask.

Kor - Orc Scrollkeeper wrote:


4) Does Paizo plan to offer their own replacement option for these 2 minis?

No.

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Edenwaith wrote:
When Lisa stopped by did she also say, "Don't be biased on my account, don't save all the cool sculpts for female mini's. Make more awesome male ones proportional to our player base..."? Just curious if she said anything like that at all.

You know, she actually _has_ said something very much like that before!

I put the Forest Shadow in The Lost Coast specifically to add a sweet male elf archer based on that comment.

Justice Ironbriar is also technically a male elf. We'll do more male elves as time goes by.

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Fomsie wrote:

I am definitely pleased with the direction this sets seems to be going, having quality NPC and set dressing minis really can make a game more immersive, in my opinion.

I do have one serious question for Erik Mona or whomever makes these decisions; Does Paizo plan to maintain the same rate of "Rare" minis per brick as previous cases?

There are no changes to the rarity scheme of Pathfinder Battles.

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