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Endzeitgeist's page

3,878 posts. 1,519 reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist.


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Conclusion of my review:

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting is okay, but not that great - there are quite a few editing/formatting glitches to be found herein, sometimes acting as slightly detrimental to the rules-language. Layout adheres to RC's per se beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. The full-color artworks are almost universally completely awesome. The hardcover book's cover-artwork is not as blurred as the one of FaSB. Paper is rather thin in the physical version.

Lou Agresta, Tim Hitchcock, Tom Knauss, John Ling, RA Mc Reynolds, Rone Barton and Greg Vaughan are all talented designers and authors and it shows in the compelling narratives herein, in the setting-flavor that oozes in buckets from these pages. In the brightest moments, this guide indeed captures well the flair and panache of Razor Coast and showcases their capabilities. Unfortunately, that does not extend to the whole pdf - there are quite a few issues with the rules-language herein, filler-feats, massive issues with the Yohunga base-class... all of those accumulate.

Another issue would be that this pdf endeavors to be a player's guide and partially succeeds at its goal - at the same time falling flat of guiding players regarding the tone the campaign shoots for, which approach (as per the RC-book) to take etc. - if one player shoots for a Disciple of Dajobas, another for a Tulita and a third for essentially a colonialist pirate, as a DM you have an issue on your hands. Especially the former class does simply not belong in a player's guide - or at least requires a massive caveat. As a sourcebook, it fares slightly better, though e.g. the decision to include the player-material indulgences in the campaign setting instead of in this book should be considered slightly unfortunate. Personally, I also would have loved to see a slightly tighter synergy with FaSB, but that's okay and just a nitpick on my part. In the end, the Freebooter's Guide to the Razor Coast makes for a valid companion for a RC-campaign, but one that should see careful DM-oversight due to some problematic options/balance-concerns (*cough* Pele Liberator /*cough*).

In conclusion: Some light, some shadow - a mixed bag - final verdict: 3 stars.

Posted first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine, then posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop. And yes, the Rest of RC-books will follow soon.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here and d20pfsrd.com's shop. Even RSP can't win em all, it seems.


In time for my birthday! Yeah!!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Coming SOON!


No need to apologize, Christina. It still is a glorious book and the editing sure isn't bad. It's rather normal to see glitches creep into a book of this size and they aren't THAT many, hence also me not downrating the book. It's just a bit grating to notice in a tome of this quality. Cheers!


Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are one of the unfortunate weaknesses of this book and one reason it did not score even higher on my Top Ten list of the best of 2013 - from bolding errors, wrong page-headers and typos to even map-glitches, one more thorough editing pass wouldn't have hurt this one. Layout adheres to Midgard's two-column full-color standard and is gorgeous. The same holds true for the extremely evocative, cool b/w-artworks throughout the book that convey so much better the darkness and grit of these modules than the deceptively light cover implies. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Speaking of artwork and maps - there is a second pdf that contains look-see-handout versions of the superb artworks and maps and while I'm not a big fan of non-KS-backers paying extra for them, I wouldn't complain, after all the maps are awesome. Or rather, I wouldn't complain, for the second gripe I have is that, once again, we get no player-friendly maps of the places, not even in the extra, for-sale handout-pdf! That's NOT cool - had I paid extra for handouts, I would have at least expected to have the maps sans letters, creature-markers etc. So yeah, that was the second factor that brought this down a notch. On the plus-side, the hardcover I got from the KS is a solid beauty with good paper and solid craftmanship -it certainly looks awesome and production values are top-notch here!

Now don't get me wrong - I've been at my top-notch complaining level throughout the whole review - there is not a single bad module herein. Not one. There isn't even a mediocre one in here. the worst I could say about any given module in this anthology would be that a module is just "good". But how is the ratio? 7 of these modules, on their own, would have me gush, grin and heap superlatives on them. 7.

That's more than 50% A++-modules, of which, I guarantee that much, you won't be disappointed. Add to that that the other modules all occupy slots at the higher echelons, never dipping to mediocrity, and we have an anthology that succeeds at its lofty goal of proving modules that players WILL talk about. That, ladies and gentlemen, is superb density regarding quality and sheer narrative potential. Have I mentioned that most modules herein coincidentally also make simply good reading material? To cut a long ramble short:

This anthology is well worth its place on my Top Ten of last year and 5 stars + seal of approval.

Finally got this done. Reviewed here on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here and on OBS.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


I believe in giving credit where credit is due. My primary goal in criticizing pdfs is to improve them, to help make sure the wording is precise etc. Books like this, where my automatic "try to tear it asunder"-reflex finds next to nothing to latch on to, and that also have compelling fluff to entertain...yeah. Believe it or not, being able to once in a time write a review like this is a blessing and soothes the soul. So...thanks for making such a great book! Also for the fun it brings to my table!


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop. Cheers!


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted ehre, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


My own humble contribution to the project, an ecology, has been a joy to write and is, of that I'm positive, not something you'd expect.


Thanks, OSW. Didn't notice it, probably due to sighing too much.

Conclusion of my review:

Editing and formatting are no longer okay - while not as bad as it could have been, especially rules-editing is simply not precise enough - there are a lot of issues and ambiguities herein. Layout adheres to Kobold Press' beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. The artworks herein are nice b/w-pieces.

As (almost) always with Kobold Press, the fluff is superb - this book presents cool ideas galore in that department and the nomenclature-table is simply glorious, as are some of the smaller pieces of crunch herein, though ardent fans of the Midgard-setting will experience severe déjà-vu here and there, with several pieces already known from various other sources.

All right, I'll cut right to it: I so HOPED that Kobold Press would take a very close look at the book that details the titular humanoids. Well, seems like some of the tasked kobolds celebrated "We no work day." (Midgard-fans like yours truly hopefully got a chuckle out of this one...) Authors Nicholas Milasisch and Matt Blackie have crafted a supplement full of glorious ideas - the items, the sobriquet traits, the damn cool fluff - there is a lot to like, love even, herein. Unfortunately, a lot of this supplement is also very deeply flawed, to the point where some glitches/oversights render parts of the content utterly op or unusable. Which sucks. This is one of those sad reviews, where I look at a pdf of glorious potential and just shake my head. I won't complain about the reused content, since it's great, but I wish that e.g. the traps has been modified for player-use instead of just cut-copy-pasting them. In the end, though I do love so many ideas herein, I can't even rate this as average anymore - the flaws are too pronounced and thus, I will settle on a final verdict of 2 stars - the good ideas herein don't deserve being rated down to one.

Endzeitgeist out.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


This was a sad review to write. I hope the pdf gets a revision - the ideas in here deserve it. Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here.


Well, light armor spell failure chance can be gotten rid off, if one really wants an armor-wearing ethermancer. I don't see a contradiction between having the proficiency and still incurring spell failure chance. I think both are there as intended - if you want, you can make light armor wearing work, but it'll take a bit of an investment.

That being said, the one currently in my group doesn't need armor to be rather awesome. :)


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, the submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted it here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop. Cheers!


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop. Cheers!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Thanks, Eric! I also enjoyed your review (I always read them, you know) and while I could get behind your perspective on this one, it didn't click with me to that extent. Cheers!


Here's to many more crushing books +5 that have been made from PC-skins and tempered in the tears of players!!


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here and on OBS. Great work! Cheers!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

More coming. ^^


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop. Cheers!


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


18 pages, full color. 2 ethnicities (human + dwarf), short primer on underworld races/classes to expect, gazetteer of Rybalka (starting village), survival equipment for sale, primer on spelunking, rumors.

Hope that helps, though I will also review this as soon as real life stops kicking me in the shins.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here and on OBS.

Cheers!


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.

Cheers!


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


@ Erevos Cs: I did not wish to imply that your adventures would be that simple.

I wanted to suggest that keeping 200-250 personalized adventures for different groups would be something I'd consider next to impossible to accomplish, unless either the stable of authors is huge or the amount of customizations somehow automatized, like the MMORPG-quest-structures I quoted.

So yeah, definitely intrigued, but not convinced so far.


I'd really be interested how one can avoid the "Kill X of Y", "Scavenge Z of W"-quests with such a premise...


Actually...yes, it will. The VD-series gets quite some use in my game. ^^


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop. Cheers!


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here and on d20pfsrd.com's shop.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Tons of practical XP with many of them, will get back to it (and reviewing) once rl stops kicking my behind.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Ähem, yes, there actually is one - at least the first two installments. Ultimate Psionics put it on the hold, but it may resume soon.

Here's the link!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted on OBS, here and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here and on OBS.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Yes, I think so. While it does not feature naval combat, it's a great horror-themed ship adventure. And hard. So yes, Skull and Shackles and Razor Coast benefit from having this one added.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.

Cheers!


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.

Endzeitgeist out.


Conclusion of my review:

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good - though not as tight as I'm used to by Interjection Games: For once, the header spells "Gadgeeer"[sic!], missing a "t" on each and every page's central box - which made me exceedingly neurotic during the reading of this. Beyond that, quite a few entries read "Gadget points" instead of "Structure Points", which was the beta's terminology and could result in some confusion. Layout adheres to Interjection Games' 2-column b/w-standard and artwork is thematically fitting stock art. The pdf comes with rudimentary bookmarks - but not truly extensive ones. Individual accessories, for example, get no individual bookmark, which makes navigation slightly less comfortable than I would have liked.

Ahhh, Interjection Games classes - there are none quite like them out there. With the notable exception of Morgan Boehringer's superb Direlock, none take me as long to review as mastermind Bradley Crouch's beasts (looking especially at you, Ethermancer and Mechgineer!), and there's a reason for that - they have a lot of customization-options, are complex and never simple in their math. That being said, my primary gripes with them tend to be minor instances where things are handled slightly differently than in comparable spells/maneuvers etc. Then I started looking in-depth at this one...and was honestly surprised.

Why? Well, most classes are centered on combat. This one is not. Yes, it has combat capabilities, yes, fiddling with one's customized weapons is fun. But honestly, the class is simply not that awesome in combat and after Tinker, Herbalist and especially Ethermancer, I somewhat expected another class with such a focus. Still, the spark did not really ignite me - the weapon customizations are nice, yes, but the gadgeteer is generally is decidedly not about inflicting max damage.

It's not intended to. Its only restrictions to what it can do are the skill ranks/levels required, which means each gadgeteer has an incredible amount of things to do/jury-rig - and these, especially the accessories, can be summed up as "Batman's Rogue's Gallery's Gadgets - the Class" - which honestly hits a VERY soft spot of mine. I'm a total Batman fanboy and from cigar-parabols to buzzers, the gadgeteer makes for a superb gimmick-based agent-type character. Will the gadgeteer shine in every campaign/environment? No. While not a bad choice in dungeon-crawls, the class is simply not that geared towards hacking and slashing everything apart, instead providing ample thoroughly unique options that have been lacking in the game so far. In short, it does something defiantly new in its focus on the ROLEplaying, with multiple options requiring smarts of not only the character, but also the player. If you're into espionage/investigation-modules, this should be considered a required purchase. The gadgeteer makes for a great support character that has its best moments to shine beyond the tawdry concerns of combat - and it is, at least in my opinion, that is what makes it great.

That being said, I also think that the gadgeteer, more so than other Interjection Games base classes, would benefit extremely from expansions, so here's to hoping we'll see some - the agent's toolbox still has quite a few options the class could emulate beyond its already impressive arsenal and an Innovator-like monster-weapon with even further enhancements to weapons might turn out to make the class also more interesting in combat. What about customizing armor? Bluffing magical means of detection/discerning truth? Expansion potential galore that unfortunately also shows that teh base-class, while good, could use some further fuel to widen its focus.

That being said, there are some minor glitches here as well - take e.g. the custom weapon modifications: Do e.g. penalties also apply when not wielding the weapon? Why can certain acids not be applied against constructs? There are a few of these instances, and while not enough to drag this class down, they remain minor blemishes.

The gadgeteer is not a min-maxer's class, but it's a great class for anyone who wants to go secret agent/MacGuyver and aforementioned complaints should not deter you from taking a look. As written, due to the glitches and minor oversights, though, I have to rate this down to 4 stars - in spite of really, really loving what the class does.

Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek, GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.

Endzeitgeist out.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here on OBs and d20pfsrd.com's shop.

Also note that designer Owen K.C. Stephens has written a reply concerning some of my criticisms on Endzeitgeist.com - read it for further information whether this is for you. He *does* have valid points.

Thanks for your attention, Endzeitgeist out.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek, GMS magazine and potsed here, on OBS and d20pfswrd.com's shop.


Reviewed first on ENdzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine, posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine, posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop!


2 people marked this as a favorite.

This book is 188 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page KS-thanks, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD and 1 page back cover, leaving us with182 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?

Full Disclosure: This review is mostly based on the Hardcover of the book, which I got for backing the Kickstarter. With just a minimum delay and communication throughout the process, I might add. I was in no way affiliated with the production of this book.

That out of the way... Before you click on another page due to the book's price: WAIT. Just a second, okay? Please read on, I guarantee you won't regret it. This book is filled to the brim with crunch and in order to avoid bloating this review unduly, I promise I'll try to be as brief as possible, given the matter at hand. Let me ask you a question to begin:

Have you ever wanted to run an aerial chase, dogfights on dragons, with manticores, chimera and giant eagles crashing into one another, while their riders duke it out in free fall as their mounts try to rip each other asunder? Have you ever wanted to blast after a dragon-riding villain and perhaps even ride your own dragon to face the tyrant as your army and the forces of darkness clash below you? Have you ever wanted to jump from the highest window of the sapphire tower, jewel of Hashk-Kanep in hand, only to land on the back of your trusty Pegasus, while the sultan's enraged men cover the sky with hundreds, nay, thousands of arrows and bolts? If you have ever wanted to do something like that, then by all means, read on.

Do you know what all of these scenarios have in common? They don't work properly in PFRPG.

But more on that in a very short bit - after all, this book is about helped, personal flight - from the means to achieve it, broken down by class and taking various archetypes into account, this pdf leaves, from the very first page, no doubt on how serious it handles the topic: If you have ever had a flying PC or taken any amount of time to concoct a story-line featuring the lofty skies, you'll realize one thing as soon as you take a look at PFRPG's flight-rules. They're there. Somewhere.

This pdf organizes them in a way that actually make them USABLE. Don't believe me that the basic rules are just not that well-organized? What about encumbrance for flying creatures that are quadrupeds? Why is this relevant? Flying mounts can't fly in medium or heavy barding - which doubles as counting as medium/heavy-load equivalent. Which means only light load, otherwise no dice for your flying mount to carry you aloft. I just wished I had this book prior to having to pierce this together from sentences throughout the core rule book. Now different playstyles have different preferences and hence, just about EVERY set of rules has three options - a simulation-style approach, a hybrid approach and a cinematic approach that is more focused on what's cool. Tables of mount sizes and rider sizes in comparison to show how many passengers they can carry, negotiation with intelligent mounts -all of that is concisely broken down and explained in a clarity that would have spared me about 2 weeks of frustration, book-switching and browsing through boards. Yeah, go figure.

We get three classes in here - the magical beast rider (a cavalier archetype),who can teach his/her mount arcane talents and choose from selections as exotic as the winged cat & dog Bixie and Hainu to Griffons and Spider-Eaters. The airshaping sky pilgrim alternate monk, in the meanwhile, feels like an expertly-executed nod towards "The Last Airbender", gaining the option to shape winds, fly etc. and, in fact, working much better than the rather lame monk base-class. (Hint for Owen K.C. Stephens should he read this - I'd love to see this made "talented"...). Now speaking of former Super Genius, now Rogue Genius Games - their Dragon Rider base-class is powerful, but many people don't particularly like the amount of actions they eat. For those of you looking for an alternate take, herein is the Wyrm Rider, an alternate cavalier that rides on a domesticated, less dangerous species of dragon, which, while not as powerful as a regular dragon, also doesn't eat your actions for a different playing experience.

This book being about flying companions, we get concise lists of animal companions that can fly, with entries on being ground-suitable, aerial trip CMDs, options to carry things (and people), full companion stats etc. - there is a LOT of work in these tables and they cover regular dragon cohorts gained via leadership and also faithful companions: The latter are rather ingenious options for characters in aerial-heavy campaigns that want a flying mount, but don't have the suitable class - faithful companions can be rescued, raised etc. and, while not as efficient as animal companions, make for awesome pets. The rules here are once again an example for concise, easy to grasp material.

New race-wise, we get the Half-Fey - which comes with 6 variants that feature an ARG race-point break-down for each and range from their point values from 1 at 10 points to 4 11-point builds to 1 20 point-build for higher fantasy campaigns. Aforementioned Bixie and Hainu also get full statblocks/bestiary-style entries, as do so-called lesser chimera, which essentially are flying animals that have a rather simple template added. oh, and we get a one-page easy-to-grasp overview over flying constructs with a streamlined single look, you have all information handy on one page.

At this place in time while writing this review, I was honestly feeling like I was failing - why? Because I just can't mention everything this book does, the level of detail it provides - take weapons - not only do we get new ones, this book also deals with the question what happens when flight is common in a setting: The importance of ranged combat and the proficiency thus required, a whole page of bardings, signaling kites, slow-burning smokesticks, aeronautic balloons - and all of these even before brooms of flying or even Thunnorad, Thor's chariot (WITH properly spelled names for the two rams - the scholar of Scandinavian literature rejoices!) or flying Vardos enter the fray with concisely-worded and at the same time iconic rules. Oh each, OF COURSE, also are all collated in tables with appropriate NPC levels / PC levels to have them, gp value etc. - If only the regular rules were that well organized!

Now if you've been following my reviews, you'll know that I consider vehicles to be underdeveloped and this book also has some ideas here - first of all, it proposes a less insane driving-DC (which I've house-ruled ages ago); secondly, from balloons to alchemical skiffs and air barges to batman-style kite-gliders, we get some cool additional vehicles. Yay! Suffice to say, once again, the rules are almost painfully concise and easy to grasp in their presentations.

Now remember the example at the beginning, with the sultan's archers? Want to fly over an enemy army and rain death on them? enter missile mooks! By providing concise rules for volley-shots of large quantities of archers/crossbowmen and no less than 4 (!!!) pages of tables that include perception, CRs, XP-values, ACs, atks and damage, we get mooks for literally EVERY situation, spanning the Crs from 1/3 to 18! This chapter will get a tremendous amount of use, not only by me.

Have I mentioned concise lists of flying mounts by their terrain that cover the first 3 bestiaries 8the 4th hadn't been released yet...), the extensive rules on creating storms with wind-speeds, rain, climate, clouds, max visibility and special occurrences like lightning, hail and turbulences? Oh, for EACH SEASON and THREE CLIMATES? a concise system to create weather hazards on the fly?

What comes up, must come down, as the saying goes, and falling-rules, from simulation-style half-rounds to cinematic style options to ground-catch or mid-air catch targets are not only explained, their pros and cons are weighed and individual systems are provided for your preference. so yeah, if you always thought that Superman's arms should have sliced Lois Lane clean in three parts - here are rules for that as well as one-glance tables that show you the amount of damage caused. And yes, unconsciousness, the diehard feat, ferocity, being big and rings of feather falling - all in here, all taken into account.

Now how to handle this grid-wise? The book actually also has various ways for you to handle this, with sidescroll, top-down, full-blown 3d via two maps and tables of vertical reach summed up cleanly for you. If you don't want to go full-blown simulation, there are varying and all feasible abstract grid-options with corresponding rules to be found in here as well, including abstract ranges, movement etc. The Fly-skill's maneuvers, including u-turns of varying degrees on a more simulationalist grid are also perfectly explained and detailed alongside ascending/descending. And yes, they are expanded from the basis provided to include e.g. 135°-turns, the concept of expanded flight and different ways of dealing with the problem of the face of creatures -whether you want to keep it or get rid of it - this book has you covered. Have I mentioned strong winds, flying through canopies etc.?

Gamemasters aren't left hanging in the cold stratosphere either - this pdf literally has thought EVERYTHING through: The repercussions of common flight, from preferred weapons to the role of small folk like halflings and gnomes, the costs of maintaining herbivore/carnivore armadas of flying creatures, trade winds, guild-systems, flags & pennants, politics, ley lines, artforms (GEOGLYPHS!), strategic cliff-dwellings, food pyramids, overland travel via fly-speed distances (again, in 3 different forms) - this chapter is a world-builder's dream and perfectly summarizes key question of what would change in a world if flying was really common.

That is not where this book stops, though - Fly maneuverability templates and companion/cohort-sheets for just about EVERY CREATURE as well as token galore for the creatures, a missile mook sheet, a rules-checklist (so you can recall which of the various options you and your players settled on - e.g. a world with trade winds, but no organized sky guilds?) and finally, a concise summary of fly, ride and handle animal-skills -all of these can be found in here as well.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are SUPERB - I only noticed two minor typos, one of which was my nick in the backer-list, but who cares - at this length an impressive achievement. Layout adheres to a printer-friendly, easy-to-read 2-column b/w-standard that makes the tables herein (and there are A LOT) easy on the eyes. The b/w-artwork, of which we get a LOT is rather cartoonish/very old-school in many places, whereas some pieces are downright awesome. It took me some time to get used to it, but it does have its charm. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and if you can track one down, get the hardcover - it is solidly and very professionally produced. I'm not 100% sure whether all the creature-sheets of the KS are included with this book on non-KS-venues, so I can't include those in my final verdict.

This book left me utterly, completely flabbergasted. I backed this when I wasn't as dirt-poor as I'm right now on a whim and honestly didn't expect to ever see it. One company that never released a supplement prior to this one, what can one expect? I had honestly forgotten about this book when it found its way into my mail-box - not due to excessive delay, but simply due to much on my plate. In an age where kickstarters by established RPG-companies sometimes are overdue by more than 2 years and often lack anything resembling regular communications, this was one surprise. It went promptly on my shelf in favor of daily reviewing and only after some time found its way into my hands. I read it and my jaw just dropped, smashed through the floor and hit the floor of the cellar.

I'm living on the 8th floor.

This is a once-in-a-blue-moon-book that is not only a testimony to Neil Carr's dedication and passion to the topic of flight, but also to his work ethics: To think that ONE designer made this is mind-boggling.

Let me spell it out: This book belongs into the library of every PFRPG-DM. No exceptions. Ne leeway. This is the Cerulean Seas of the sky and does what Cerulean Seas did for underwater adventuring (albeit aesthetically slightly less appealing) for flying, aerial combat, aerial campaigns etc. I'm going a step further: Players wanting to play flying characters should get this and get their DM a copy. This book is a milestone, a glorious beast that came from nowhere and that shows that having no track-record is never an excuse for faulty rules-language: This is as tightly worded, as concisely phrased as any book by Paizo, perhaps even beyond it. It covers all topics, intelligently and in varied ways and manages to deliver something for ALL playstyles, with huge amounts of customization-options. This is a RULE-book to judge all rule-books, a supplement that ups the ante, a book that is a superb example on what kickstarter can deliver - "Companions of the Firmament" is as important for PFRPG as Cerulean Seas, as the APG or Psionics Expanded; This is a Rulebook of the highest caliber that will be used all the time - you have no excuses; Unless you don't want to cover flight at all (then why are you reading this?), this book should be considered one of the best possible investments into rules one can currently make. This is revolutionary in much the same way as Ultimate Campaign is when combined with Legendary Games' stellar supplements to actually make the system work.

Unless you're very focused on artwork/layout, this pdf, and that I can guarantee, will NOT disappoint you - the sheer amount of useful rules, options etc. herein mean that there is no way I could rate this any other way that offer the highest praises. If there were ten stars, this would be 10/10. If there were 6, this would be 6/6 - by any scale I apply, this ranks among the apex-books in its usefulness, coolness, level of detail it covers and foresight. This must be a 5 star +seal of approval, a hot contender for the no. 1 spot of my Top Ten of 2013 and the most furious, impressive first product I've seen any 3pp produce in ages. Miss this at your own peril.

Posted first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here and on d20pfsrd.com's shop. Couldn't post it on OBS due to not having a coupon and it seems to not be sold here on Paizo - something I hope GIC will remedy.

Endzeitgeist out.


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


@Gondolin: Yes, it's available in print.

@Tom Philips: I *hope* I managed to convey why it's awesome, but also why it has some weaknesses. I consider it a great buy still and DEFINITELY look forward to the 3-parter you mentioned (and also to teh collaboration with Richard!)! If I may: Some social scenes/investigations/non-combat scenes would also have benefited the module - other than that: RIGHT up my alley! Your writing slowly but steadily has made you one of the authors I look forward to reading.

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