Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Count Strahd Von Zarvoich

Digitalelf's page

Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 2,515 posts (2,592 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 3 aliases.


RSS

1 to 50 of 2,515 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber

I won't be able to participate. But if you'd like, I'll keep an eye on this thread until you guys actually start, and help out in any way that I can...

And thank you GMEDWIN, for putting up with all of my questions. ;-P

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Panguinslayer7 wrote:
Also Paizo doing Dragon magazine again would be awesome. Just saying.

While that would be cool, James Jacobs has pretty much stated that will not happen:

James Jacobs wrote:
As for Paizo doing a magazine... chances of that are VERY VERY unlikely. We don't have the staff, the infrastructure, or the finances to do something like that.
James Jacobs wrote:
Paizo won't be dipping her toes in the dreadful scary cruel horrific razor-edged boiling acidic waters of the magazine industry again, I'm relatively sure.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Mark Hoover wrote:

I've stipulated over and over that the GM

1. Not be a jerk about it
2. Work with the player

But to say that the backstory is somehow immutable I find disturbing.

I agree.

Like I've said, I am upfront with my players that I sometimes use elements of character backgrounds; which is not to say that whenever I do, it automatically means that something will happen to the character's friends and/or loved ones.

So when I do use an element of a character's background, the player isn't blind-sided by it...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Samy wrote:
Okay, thanks!!

No problem!

Glad I could be of help... :-D

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Samy wrote:
Thanks, that sounds very promising. I assume armor is everything, too? How does that proficiencies stuff work?

Yeah, they can wear any armor.

And as for how proficiencies work...

If you haven't already, I highly recommend that you read pages 70-75 of the Player's Handbook (of the 1995 "black cover" release), or pages 50-56 (of the 1989 "orange cover" release). I list two different ranges of page numbers because the page numbers between the two different releases of the Player's Handbook are not the same...

But, in a nut shell:

Proficiencies are just ability checks with different names. Take hunting for example: it is based off of your character's Wisdom score with a -1 penalty, so if your character is out hunting, and your DM asks you to make a "hunting check", you'd simple make a WIS check with a -1 penalty.

Red Knight specialty priests are required to take the 3 proficiencies listed under "Required Proficiencies" (and a 1st level Priest receives 4 proficiency slots, plus an additional number of "bonus" slots based upon their Intelligence score). However, Specialty priest's of Red Knight gain the 3 bonus proficiencies listed for free in addition to their starting number of slots (i.e. the 3 proficiencies listed, the 4 slots the character gets for being a 1st level priest, plus any "bonus" slots the character gets due to their Intelligence score).

Hope that helps, (and makes sense)... ;-)

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Samy wrote:
Ooo, nice fluff. Thank you! Awesome getting some "off the books" info.

Yeah, it was cool to get such a lengthy answer to my questions from him.

Samy wrote:
Do Red Knight specialty priests get to wield the deity's sacred weapon, the longsword? (I think clerics in 2e all had the same weapon proficiencies regardless of deity.)

Yes, here are the prerequisites:

Powers & Pantheons wrote:

Specialty Priests of Red Knight (Known as "Holy Strategists")

Requirements: INT 13, WIS 13, and CHR 10
Prime Requisites: INT and WiS
Weapon: Any
Major Sphere Access: All, Charm, Combat, Divination, Healing, Law, Protection, Travelers, and War
Minor Sphere Access: Creation, Guardian, Necromantic, Thought, and Wards
Required Proficiencies: Etiquette, Heraldry, and Land-Based Riding (Horse)
Bonus Proficiencies: Engineering, Gaming, and Hunting

There are also a lot of special abilities that Holy Strategist's of Red Knight get as well...

Pertinent to 1st level characters:

Powers & Pantheons wrote:

Holy Strategists can cast spells from the Travelers and War spheres as if they were twice their actual level (Only the effect of the spells is impacted, not the number of spells available).

Holy Strategists are resistant to illusions, and get a +1 bonus to their saving throws vs. spell against illusions for every three levels of their ability (rounded up) to a maximum of +5.

Holy Strategists can select nonweapon proficiencies from both the Priest and Warrior groups with no cross-over penalty (and of course the General group as well).

There is a 1st level spell available to Holy Strategists, called "Analyze Opponent".

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Samy wrote:
the character I've always wanted to send into Maztica is a priest of the Red Knight... Red Knight is not one of the deities in FRA, but a quick Google says she has some info in Powers & Pantheons which I don't have. Any chance to get a summary of that info?

Well, it's not the info from "Power's & Pantheons" (nor can the following info be found within that, or any other FR source-book), but back in March of 2004, In the "Questions For Ed Greenwood" thread over at Candlekeep, I asked him the following questions:

Digitalelf wrote:

What lore of The Red Knight can you offer?

Specifically, what prayers and offerings would a young follower offer to her?

Also, a few oaths would be much appreciated

His answer was through "The Hooded One", which is apparently one of his long time friends; but I'm not sure (Oh, and I edited some of his language to be more "Paizo Friendly"):

"Ed Greenwood wrote:

digitalelf, typical offerings on the altar of Red Knight are coins won in wagering over games of skill (such as lanceboard) but never in ‘games of chance,’ and [the greatest possible offerings of all, if the games themselves are well-designed] new strategy games (board, pieces, and rules) personally devised by the worshipper.

If given in a temple, these always vanish from the altar (taken by the clergy of the temple, of course). If offered in private, in the open or at a shrine, such offerings are to buried with a symbol of the goddess (a crude horsehead chesspiece design scratched into a piece of bark or onto a stone will suffice, if nothing better can be had), in earth into which a single drop (or more) of the worshipper’s blood has been spilled.

It is sinful to the goddess for the same worshipper to unearth such things and re-use them as offerings, or for other faithful of the Red Knight to knowingly use the previously-used offerings of another in their own prayers to the goddess, but it’s quite acceptable to use them in other ways (spend the coins, and play, sell, give away, or bet on the games).

Note that devout faithful of the Red Knight often have scores of red horse-headed lanceboard pieces made for them to carry, and use in just such situations. If non-clerical worshippers of the Red Knight are travelling with a priest of the Lady of Strategy and make prayers to the goddess, it IS acceptable for the priest to collect and carry along all such offerings, to turn them over to a temple of the goddess at the first opportunity. If this becomes impossible, such ‘sacred goods’ are to be buried if this can be managed.

Typical prayers to the Red Knight are whispered pleas for insight into the thinking of foes when planning strategies against them, and requests for inspiration (and a true follower of Red Knight believes that all tactical thinking or dreams of battles and battle-strategies are bestowed by the Red Knight, and will thank her for her aid: in other words, a devout worshipper of Red Knight NEVER takes credit for brilliant strategies or tactics, believeing they have all come from the goddess).

When a devout follower suffers defeat, overlooks some stratagem of an opponent, or is outwitted, they typically make offering to the goddess by procuring a shard of good-quality battle armor, gashing themselves with it, and leaving the bloodied metal on the altar with a prayer, not binding their wound or seeking healing for it until their prayers are complete. Many worshippers of the Red Knight take good armor from opponents they’ve personally felled and shatter it, so as to have a ready supply of such shards awaiting times of failure, in order to properly ‘square their standing’ with the Lady of Strategy.

Great victories are also celebrated on an altar of Red Knight by placing trophies of the defeated foes on it, with prayer (weapons, armor, and even blood and body parts). If no altar is handy, the prayer may be offered literally ON the body or trophy of the fallen, on the battlefield or place of death.

Prayers to the Red Knight often begin “Oh, Lady of clear calm” or “Great Lady of Armor Blood-Red” and the goddess betimes gives long-worshipping individuals a secret name by which they can call her (imparted in dreams, these names are different for every individual, and are NOT thought to be even echoes of her true name, but rather a personal token or ‘pet-name’ symbolizing her favour of the devotions of the individual; typical examples are: “Divine Arlanna” and “Divine Elmrara”).

Formal priestly prayers often include the lines “Lady whose armor is drenched in blood for us” and “Armor blooded to remind us of our faults and defeats, but eyes bright to make us mindful ever of unquenchable spirit and battlemastery of fields to come.”

Battle-oaths to the Red Knight (given when smiting foes or launching an attack) include these:

“Bright wit, clear thought, keen sight!”
“Forward the Game Undying!”
“Let this game now be ended!”
“Smite smart!”

Obscenities uttered by faithful of the Red Knight when personally upset include these:

“Alavaerthus!” (equivalent of “dang-it!” or the “F” word [this word, pronounced “Alah-VAER-thus,” was the name of a member of the Fellowship who had a large hand in founding the church of Red Knight, but went mad in a battle and sent his forces to their dooms through a series of stupid or reckless commands; “playing Alavaerthus” is an informal Fellowship expression meaning to ‘totally screw up’)

“Blood of the Lady!” (equivalent of “Oh my [insert strongest personal obscenities here] Gosh!” [used as a stronger replacement for “Alavaerthus!”)

“Checkmate!” (formal, usable-in-polite-company equivalent of “Darn!” or “Crap!” or “Blast!” [invoking the name of the Lady’s blade])

“Keltor!” (equivalent of “Darn!” and pronounced as “KEL-tor” [spat out swiftly])

“Teskyre!” (equivalent of “Crap!” and pronounced as “Tess-kEYE-ur”)

“Witless!” (equivalent of the “F” word [the strongest personal oath of a faithful of the Red Knight alludes to stupidity in strategy or tactics])

So saith Ed. Hmm; almost all of this is new to me, and goes straight into my Realms notes.

The original post can be found here at the: Candlekeep Forum (It's about halfway down the page, posted by "The Hooded One").

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
GMEDWIN wrote:
Cool. #8 is a fun way to make a character.

Do have the Core Rules 2.0 CD-ROM and Expansion? That is how I intend to generate my character, if you do, I could just send you the file...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Terquem wrote:
I too have been without a home group for a couple of years now (grown old and all my players have moved away, and as I've said before it is difficult for me to start playing with younger players).

Have you considered contacting the members of your old group and playing via Skype or a VTT?

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber

I have just been assuming that this would be a pbp game, but just to be clear, is that what you had in mind, or were you thinking of something else, like playing over skype or a vtt like Roll20 for example?

Grand Lodge

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
TOZ wrote:
May I suggest stop giving them more reading material? They have plenty as it is. :)

You'd think, that considering just how at odds my play style is with the majority of the people posting on these boards is, that I would do that...

Silly me!

But I make no appologies for how I play, because I am a card carrying, "You kids get off my lawn" grognard. And I have fully embraced that fact.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
gamer-printer wrote:

My post was specifically responding to one person in this thread that insists that its his right to find loopholes in his players backstories and seems to deliberately use those to disassemble the players story into something entirely different.

I am not speaking in general to all PC backstories - just regarding the one poster.

If that poster is me, then I refer you to my above post. Obviously it was not directed at you, but the basic point remains applicable...

If that poster is not me, then, well... Nevermind... ;-)

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Orfamay Quest wrote:
You know, when you're in a hole, you should at least stop digging.

You are reading far more into my posts than is actually there.

I have said that I am using extreme examples, because it illustrates my point of what I mean when I say nothing a character possesses or is written in his background has plot immunity in my games (and I have been very specific with my examples); you seem to want to take that to mean something even more extreme, by adding your own examples that are so unlike the examples that I have given. And you do this despite the fact that I have on numerous occasions now, said that I do not specifically target a character's background, nor do I actively look for loopholes that I can exploit.

I have further said on numerous occasions that what happens, is when an appropriate opportunity presents itself, I MAY use it, or, I may not use it, but whether I do or not is totally based on the in-game situation.

Something else that I have said numerous times now, is that these are my views, and this is how my table plays it, and my players are 100% on board...

I have also stated that as of yet, no player has declined an invitation to play at my table, nor has any player ever left my table because of my play-style.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Orfamay Quest wrote:
Including the laws of cause and effect? I'm sorry, but if this statement extends to the identity of the country where I grew up,.... well, no.
Orfamay Quest wrote:
You said that everything I did not explicitly label as untouchable was fair game for a re-write. You also said that I wasn't allowed to make a habit of suggesting certain things were untouchable.

I never said places or locations, I always used items, people, and events in my examples... Those are the things I mean when I speak of not having plot immunity (i.e. items, people, and certain non-location based events).

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
thejeff wrote:
you still look for loopholes and feel free to use them to screw with the player.

No, what I said was:

Digitalelf wrote:
I am actively looking for loopholes for this example, which is not something I'd do in a game

You're free of course to call it "screwing with the players", but that's not what it is within the context of my games... I have been giving extreme examples here, only to highlight exactly what I mean by nothing having plot immunity...

As I keep saying, I do not go out of my way to target these things, but if an appropriate opportunity presents itself during the game, I MIGHT, take advantage of it. I do not always do so... There have been whole campaigns where I never exploited a character's background.

Regardless, I view a character's background as another tool to use within my GM toolbox whether I use it or not...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Orfamay Quest wrote:
Well, he just mentioned that the father whom I saw die peacefully of old age is secretly alive.

Not what I said... Not by a long shot...

I said "died of old age" as an example of coming to me with an explanation of how dear old dad died and therefore shouldn't just show up again one day, instead of just saying rather generically, "father died"... If you said he died of old age and you witnessed the event, I wont have him show up alive and well one day, but if you say he just died, and give me no reasons as to why, or you give me a reason that could make his sudden reappearance justified, I might have him show up again... Might... I never once said that I absolutely would, absolutely every time...

It may be anecdotal, but like I keep saying: my players all go in to the game knowing full well that nothing has plot immunity... And so far, no players have declined to play at my table or have ever left my table because of my play-style.

Orfamay Quest wrote:
If my backstory is that my character was born in Cheliax but moved to Andoran at a young age, until his father died of some horrible disease and he was forced to start working as a street entertainer to feed his mother and two younger sisters, I do not have to tell you that you shouldn't decide mid-game he was born and raised in Absalom, that his father is still alive but his mother was killed by Red Mantis assassins, or that he's an only child.

That doesn't even retain the general spirit of what I have been talking about within these two threads...

Grand Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Orfamay Quest wrote:
Then you'd stop GMing.

Like I said in the other thread, I tell my players beforehand that nothing has plot immunity, so It would be one thing if the player got blind-sided by it out of the blue, but if you go in to a game knowing full well that nothing within a background has plot immunity, and then get your feathers all ruffled up when something does happen, the issue is not on the GM's shoulders.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
ElterAgo wrote:
I think that since the familiar is such an integral part of my PC, I should design/control/choose that personality and quirks.

In the edition that I play, in order to gain a familiar, you have to have a spell (i.e. Find Familiar), and when you cast it, the familiar that comes to you, is the familiar that you get, and should you be too picky by not wanting that type of animal or creature as a familiar and you send it away, you have to wait a full year in game before you can cast the spell again.

Obviously in Pathfinder, that's not he case, but regardless of edition, I view familiars as NPCs. That's not to say that the familiar just goes and does whatever it wants... The character still tells the familiar what to do and where to go, and for the most part, the familiar is obedient, it's just that sometimes, (because it has its own personality, and identity) there can be cases where the familiar hesitates, or needs more coaxing...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Tormsskull wrote:
Or, if I wrote that my character's father was a great warrior, then learned that anything is fair game, I might change it so that both of my parents were killed, and I didn't have any real family.

Granted, I am actively looking for loopholes for this example, which is not something I'd do in a game, but I might have your character find out about long lost uncle Fred, or, much less likely, but still within the realm of possibilities, is find out that dear old dad did not die in that orc invasion after all, but was taken prisoner and...

In my games, nothing within a character's background has plot immunity. However, if you come to me every once in a while, and not with every single character that you make, and say to that you really want dear old dad to have passed away peacefully of old age, and so, you never want to find out during game-play that he is still alive, then I can accommodate something like that (just don't make a habit of it). And don't be surprised if dear old dad's ghost happens to "haunt" the place he died, because while he may have died peacefully in his old age, that darned son or daughter of his just kept... :-P

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
ElterAgo wrote:
a familiar is very much closely tied to the PC, is loyal, and is obedient. It is very much an integral part of my character.

Even in the edition that I play, a familiar is very much a part of the character; so much so, that if it dies, your character loses hit points, and the familiar cannot be replaced as easily as it can be within Pathfinder.

And just because it is loyal and obedient to you, does not mean that it does not have its own personality or quirks... Or even question what it is told; even the most loyal and well trained dogs or horses can have bad days and need to be told to do something more than once, and familiars are much more intelligent than even the smartest of dogs or horses. Heck, there's even a 3rd party sourcebook that was originally written for 3rd edition, but has been converted to Pathfinder, that has rules for familiars as player characters.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Tormsskull wrote:
I'll probably leave out the part about the things I don't want affected, and only write in the things that I'm okay with the GM messing with.

And if I hit upon one of those things you don't want affected and thus left out of your character's background?

That's why plot immunity for anything is just a bad idea in my opinion...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
gamer-printer wrote:
I think a GM should be hands off regarding it; its not your PC so leave it alone.

In my games, the PC exists in a living, breathing world, where events can effect him, his possessions, and those around him that he loves.

In my opinion, it is indeed the player's character, but that character's father and the rest of his family are NPCs that should have their own lives and their own motivations once play begins; sure, those motivations and desires can be based upon what, if any, parameters the player sets up in his character's background, but once play begins, that person becomes the providence of the GM.

As you can probably guess, I am not a fan of player's running their character's followers, cohorts, and familiars either for the same reasons...

Like I said in the previous thread, I am not going out of my way to target things within a character's backgrounds, but characters within my game worlds are living out their daily lives, and sometimes, bad things happen, and when something or someone within a character's background has plot immunity it breaks the verisimilitude within my games.

Grand Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Tormsskull wrote:
Our experiences are definitely different then

I would agree...

Tormsskull wrote:
The GM already has a ton of control over what the PCs encounter, the events that befall them,

And having a spellbook or heirloom sword stolen falls right square in the middle of "events that befall them"...

Tormsskull wrote:
trying to also contradict what a player puts in their character's back story smacks of a control-obsessed GM.

Maybe some GMs are "control-obsessed", but just because a GM uses a part or parts of a character's background that the player did not anticipate does not make him so by default...

It would be one thing if the player got blind-sided by it out of the blue, but if you go in to a game knowing full well that nothing within a background has plot immunity, and then get your feathers all ruffled when something bad does happen to dear old dad, the issue is not on the GM's shoulders.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
GMEDWIN wrote:
a mixed breed Half-Maztican/Elf could be possible in this time frame.

What will the start date be for this then?

Cordell arrived in Maztica in 1361 DR, so for there to be native half-elves, the date would need to be at least 1378 for a half elf with a human mother (9 months of pregnancy), and 1379 for a half-elf with an elven mother (2 years of pregnancy). And that's only for half-elves that start out at the lowest age possible (which is 16)...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Tormsskull wrote:
tell the GM what is and is not off limits in your back story. If you write about your character's wife and family, you should be able to tell the GM that you don't want your character's wife or family to be used as a plot hook or at least you don't want anything terrible to befall them.

I just cannot agree with that on any level. I think that absolutely nothing within a background should have plot immunity.

In my games, a player is playing out the life and times of a character within that world, and the world can be an evil, cruel place where bad things can and do happen to good people.

And my thinking that nothing should have plot immunity extends not only to the people in a character's background, but important items or heirlooms as well, up to, and including a wizard's precious spellbook. And what's more, sometimes, an item cannot be recovered or a family member cannot be brought back.

And yes, I absolutely make that clear to new players. And you know what? That has not stopped them from including things or people within their character's backgrounds that are important or precious to them.

Don't get me wrong, I am not saying that I go out of my way to target these things, because I don't. But sometimes, sometimes I will target these things if an in-game opportunity presents itself...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber

I tend to fall somewhere in-between thejeff and Mark Hoover...

If my character goes into a bar, I love to roleplay things out like casually talking to the barkeeper and the patrons (about anything really, like stuff that has absolutely nothing to do with the adventure at hand), or playing various "bar games", but I do not improv by adding anything that the GM does not provide (like adding a crowd in an area where the GM was not specific about placing one in that area).

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Deylinarr wrote:
Are there any links to materials/rulesets you can point me to?

If you're looking for free (legal) online versions of the 2nd edition core rulebooks (i.e. specifically the Player's Handbook, Dungeon Master's Guide, and Monstrous Manual), there aren't any.

However, there is a very good 2nd edition retro clone available; it's called "For Gold and Glory"

This site HERE has a lot of the 2nd edition material on PDF for sale. Unfortunately, the material for Maztica is not among them (and of course neither are the core 2nd edition rulebooks).

Wizards of the Coast used to have the Maztica material available on their web site as a free download once upon a time, but it's gone now...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber

You mention the "Player's Option" Skills & Powers" book, and suggest that we use method VIII from that book to generate ability scores.

Do you want characters created using that book as well (e.g. characters having 12 sub-abilities, Wizards being able to "purchase" the ability to use long swords, Rogues being able to "purchase" the ability to take "Weapon Specialization", etc.) or created using the Core 2nd Edition Player's Handbook?

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
GMEDWIN wrote:
The hishnaweaver is actually a rogue subtype. :)

With access to divine magic!

Something I did forget however, is that both Feather and Talon magic (Pluma and Hishna) was divine magic even though Pluma Weavers had spells that were very much like that of arcane magical spells...

Feather and Talon magic:
Zaltec's "priests" were Hisna Weavers, and Quotal's "priests" were Pluma Weavers

Regardless, your game, and you've made your call. It's all good... :-D

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
GMEDWIN wrote:
I hope I answered the questions well.

Yes, thank you. :-)

I do have one additional question: Why are you going to go with a standard cleric instead of a hishna weaver? I mean, I am totally cool with your call, I was just wondering why...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
GMEDWIN wrote:
I am not sure what you are asking about the Maztica setting.

I'm asking, because the setting, by default, for example, does not have elves or half-elves that are native to the setting, or have standard native mages or clerics, instead using pluma and hishna weavers (which, while similar to the mage and cleric, are not the same thing); especially since you mentioned that there should be some distrust and animosity between the natives and the Faerunese, I personally would find it hard to believe that there would be any native characters embracing foreign magic (i.e. becoming a "standard" mage), or that the native thief class does not have access to "pick-pockets" because native characters do not have the same sense of personal possession that a foreign character would.

The setting does not have most of the standard Player's Handbook classes for that matter, and those that it does have (like the thief), are modified to fit the setting better. There are other differences as well... But it's those sort of things that I am asking about because to me (and granted, I know I am not the one who is going to run this, and it is ultimately your call), it's these small, little details that make a setting like Maztica stand out from other settings and indeed, other areas of the Forgotten Realms...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Digitalelf wrote:
I'm not the one who will be running this game, and so it's obviously not my call, but the 2nd Edition Player's Handbook only has one a "point buy" option, and if you utilize the "Player's Option: Skills & Powers" book, but all of the "point buy" systems offered in 2nd Edition are different than those of 3rd Edition and Pathfinder...

Wow!

I apologize for such a confusing post; I ran out of time to edit it properly.

What I was trying to say, is that there is only one "point buy" option listed in the 2nd Edition Player's Handbook, and if you include the "Player's Option: Skills & Powers" book, you are provided with three additional "point buy" options, but, all "point buy" options presented in 2nd Edition are different than those of 3rd Edition and Pathfinder...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
GMEDWIN wrote:
I would like a mixed party. A couple to be Mazticans and the rest can be from anywhere else in the realms...

Telsyn Setiva's post has me wondering: How closely to the Maztica setting do you plan to (or would like to) run this?

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Telsyn Setiva wrote:
I think a 25 pt. buy is fair.

I'm not the one who will be running this game, and so it's obviously not my call, but the 2nd Edition Player's Handbook only has one a "point buy" option, and if you utilize the "Player's Option: Skills & Powers" book, but all of the "point buy" systems offered in 2nd Edition are different than those of 3rd Edition and Pathfinder...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Vincent Takeda wrote:
If I was a wizard who wanted to have a few levels in cleric back in 2e, I had to weigh the fact that I might have to wait an extra level to get my 9th level spells, or if I took too many cleric levels it might remove 9th level spells from possibility completely...

Nitpick:
In 2nd edition, once a character dual-classed into a new class, that character can no longer gain experience (i.e. levels) in the old class.

So if a Wizard dual-classed into Cleric before he was able to cast 9th level spells, it is no longer a matter of he "might remove 9th level spells from possibility completely", it is a done deal, he can never go back:

The 2nd Edition Player's Handbook wrote:
After switching to a new class, the character no longer earns experience points in his previous character class and he can no longer advance in level in that class. Nor can he switch back to his first class at a later date, hoping to resume his advancement where he left off. Once he leaves a class he has finished his studies in it.

And if you're talking about the demi-human's ability to multi-class, all of their classes are chosen at character creation (and once play begins, those classes are set in stone for the life of the character), and then all XP they earn is divided equally among all of those classes; so there is no picking or choosing which class to level first.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Tectorman wrote:
but because you kept referring to the in-universe professions with the same term as the out-of-universe collection of game mechanics (i.e., you kept calling them classes), it read as you adhering to some kind of correct way to view classes in-universe, and not SOLELY your choice.

There was a side tangent where I was stating how things worked specifically in 2nd edition as I interpreted the RAW (including optional rules within the RAW), but that is all it was; a side tangent that had very little to do with the overall topic at hand. I went on said tangent to clarify where my views of character classes as jobs/professions stems from...

But in all other aspects, I did my best to clearly and plainly state that what I was posting, was solely how I view and play the game.

I apologize for not making myself clearer in that regard.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber

There are 7 Paizo modules available on PDF for free; 2 of them were written for 3.5, while the remainders are for the PFRPG, though those should be fairly easy to convert...

HERE is a link to them.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Sissyl wrote:
Arcane Age was superb, both eras.

I would have loved to have seen an "Arcane Age" boxed set done for the Suel Empire in The World of Greyhawk...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber

I'm not sure, but the closest thing I can think of from an "official source" is the four-part map Paizo made that appeared over the course of 4 issues of Dungeon Magazine. It listed a lot of locations from the various modules across 3 editions of D&D. I do know however, that most of the "classic" 1st edition modules gave specific hex locations of where the adventure site is located...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber

With all of the flaws it had, I really liked the 2nd edition "Chronomancer" supplement. Sadly, I never got the chance to use it...

I also liked the 2nd edition "Arcane Age" supplements for the Forgotten Realms, which mentioned the possibility of time travel (never got an opportunity to use them either).

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Tectorman wrote:
the statement means that the character is aware of what he can do, is aware that, from his perspective, he acquired these skills from a readily identifiable source (his profession)

I view that the characters within the game world are aware that their chosen profession has a name, and that the name of their profession is the same name that both you and I refer to when we say the words "character class" (e.g. Ranger, Fighter, Mage, etc.), however, they do not and would not ever refer to their profession as a "class", as that is a term we use in the real world, and not something a character within the game world would know or understand (again, they would call their profession the same thing we call their class; Ranger, Fighter, Mage, etc.).

I further view that the characters within the game world are aware of the skills imparted by their chosen profession in the same manner that you and I are aware of the skills imparted by our real-life jobs. For example, we know that if we apply for a job flipping burgers at a burger restaurant, we will at the very least, learn how to properly flip a hamburger, just as a character becoming a Ranger for example, would know that he will learn how to do such things as track, walk quietly in a wilderness setting, etc.

Obviously there are game mechanics behind those skills, but the characters within the game world are not aware of that; to them, like you and I, they are just doing what it is that they were trained to do, and that as in our real world, they succeed or fail. But again, at no point does the character within the game world know or even realize that his whole life hangs in the balance of some dude eating cheese puffs while tossing dice to determine the outcome...

If this is not what you mean, then I apologize, for I am truly at a loss as to the point you are trying to impart to me.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Tectorman wrote:
Um, the class itself IS a mechanic.

Um, not if you view a character class to be virtually the same thing as a "real life" job or career is, it isn't...

To me, a class provides the game mechanic, but it is not a game mechanic in-and-of itself.

I keep saying this over and over; I don't view classes as a list of tools to be moved around and arranged however someone wants them (thus, I do not like re-tooling, re-skinning, re-fluffing, or re-flavoring classes).

The Fluff, the flavor, or however you want to say it, is VITALLY important to me, more so than the skill set that the class provides a character with is (which remains important, but NOT NOT NOT as important TO ME as the flavor or fluff of the class is)... I view character classes as an in-game profession; something that the character does for a living, something that when asked, the character himself actually, in the game, answers with: I am a Fighter by profession!, I am a Mage by profession!, or whatever the name of their class is... Just exactly the same as someone in the real world would answer: I am a Cashier, I am a Fork-lift driver, I am a - whatever the name of their job is.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Tectorman wrote:

I don't know. Any one of those explanations, or any combination thereof, or any other explanation I didn't mention could very well be the reason why. But I have no idea, no more than Drizzt knows that he's a ranger and that this is reflected by a Ranger class. I also have no idea why I should know, or even would know, such a thing.

I said I view that characters are aware of their class, not the mechanics behind it. I mean sure, they would be aware that through this or that class, they will be able to learn this or that skill or ability, but the character would certainly not be aware of the mechanics behind the skills or abilities (e.g. know that they are getting a +1 to hit - vs. knowing that they will, through hard work and dedication, get a little better overall with weaponry).

And personally, if I were playing a game using one system, and the GM could not make it one week, but had the choice of still being able to play using the same characters but using a different game system, I'd politely bow out that week, as it would ruin my sense of immersion. I'd feel the same way about permanently converting characters from one game system to another totally different game system for the same reasons.

Converting characters from one edition to another within the same game system usually isn't a problem, because while certain mechanics have changed from edition to edition, a fighter has remained a fighter from original D&D in 1974 to 5th edition D&D here in 2015. That being said, if I had a character who's class or abilities do not exist in the new edition, and I cannot make the character believably fit within the new rules, I'd rather just to make a totally new character...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Tectorman wrote:
Conflating the two, fluff and crunch, is just not necessary.

I am aware of what you are saying, and when I play a skill-based game system, my views of what skill-sets characters associate and possibly identify themselves with is quite different than when I play a class-based system (because my expectations are different).

And so while it may not be necessary to view character classes as a character's job/career/way of life, I, none-the-less view them as so. I also view the classes as something that the characters know about in-game; though a character would never say that his "class" is "Fighter" for example, however, he would say that his chosen "career" is "Fighter", (though he is free to refer to his career as some similar name like "Warrior" or "Swordsman").

But whatever he calls his chosen way of life or career, he is quite aware of the fact that he is indeed, a "Fighter" by both trade and title in the same way that a cashier is aware the name of the job he does for a living is also his job's title (and this is true for me for all of the classes in the game, regardless of the edition that I am playing).

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Lemmy wrote:
It's a pointless and arbitrary restriction. It also doesn't make much sense in-game,

Obviously I don't think it is pointless, but I do however, think that it makes perfect sense in-game.

For example, the military does not have a single one-size-fits-all course for training their raw-recruits; each branch of the military trains its recruits to the specifics of their particular requirements even though one can claim they all use and possess very similar skill sets...

Thus, in my games, if they were set in modern times, I would require separate kits for each of the 5 branches of the US Armed Forces; or at the very least, have a generic, full "soldier" class, with kits representing the various "special forces" within the different branches of the military (i.e. Army Green Beret, Navy SEAL, Air Force Pararescue, etc.).

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
TriOmegaZero wrote:
I don't consider 2nd edition at any point in what I say.

But you kept responding to very specific things that I said, and I make it very clear that the things I say are said while keeping 2nd edition in mind...

But like I said to Lemmy, the things I said in my first couple of posts were edition neutral.

Grand Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Lemmy wrote:
This is Pathfinder, not 2e.

And this is the generic "gamer talk" area of the boards where everybody gets to share their opinion regardless of the game being talked about.

That being said...

My initial couple of posts were fairly edition neutral.

There is no rule in Pathfinder that prevented me from viewing classes as an in-game fact of life for the characters. There is like-wise no rule in Pathfinder that prevented me from viewing character classes as much more than just a sack of tools to be used however one sees fit.

THAT thought process is 100% edition neutral...

It is nothing more than your opinion, that classes are a set of skills that you can use as you see fit. Granted, it is an opinion that is shared by the majority of the other posters here, but make no mistake, it is still nothing more than an opinion on the way classes should work...

Lemmy wrote:
IMHO, restricting specific fluff to an specific class (or vice-versa) is, not only limiting unimaginative, but rather pointless.

And again I say that just because I view classes as more than just a set of skills to be manipulated however one wants does NOT mean I think a character cannot be more than the sum of his class, as he has other abilities at his disposal that are outside of those granted by the class.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
TriOmegaZero wrote:
he will never actually know that in-character.

Again, 2nd edition has schools, academies, and universities in-game that train and teach the various classes. So, in 2nd edition, the classes are very much a thing a character knows about in-game (though they would not refer to them as "class", which is probably why the 2nd edition Player's Handbook uses the terms job and career to describe what a character class means and represents to the character).

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Lemmy wrote:
but they don't go to "Fighter College" or "Rogue School" a la OotS.

Ahh, but in 2nd edition, there ARE schools that teach the various classes... There ARE "Fighter Colleges" for example.

Lemmy wrote:
Your class tells what your abilities are, not your profession or personality.

I can agree to disagree, no problem, but you say this with such authority... Like it's a fact for every edition, for every situation. I don't even think it's a fact in Pathfinder, or they wouldn't keep pumping out new character classes in darn-near every rule book they release...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
TriOmegaZero wrote:
Thing is, that cashier doesn't necessarily have levels in the Cashier base class. It's entirely up to the character if he calls himself a fighter, but he isn't talking about the Fighter class when he does it. He means he is one who fights. Even if his class is Barbarian.

Like I said, I think a character class is a way of life to the character, so calling himself a Fighter (capital "F"), is announcing to the world that he is more than just someone who simply carries a sword and uses it to fight with.

That's not to say that someone with the Barbarian class can't refer to himself as a fighter (lower case "f") in the sense that he too carries around a sword and uses it to fight with.

This doesn't cause much confusion because, how a character is equipped, says quite a bit about what class is probably belongs to (at least in the edition I play)...

1 to 50 of 2,515 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

©2002–2015 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.