Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Dwarf

Diego Rossi's page

Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 8,822 posts (9,094 including aliases). 1 review. 1 list. No wishlists. 4 aliases.


RSS

1 to 50 of 8,822 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Jiggy wrote:
Dave Justus wrote:
I would expect anyone who goes to the expense of a serious magical trap (permanent, self resetting etc.) would make sure to cover it with a thin sheet of lead.

More likely, magic aura; a sheet of lead could potentially interfere with the trap itself.

In fact, in my own lair, I'd probably scatter trapless magic aura effects all over the place, with false auras of evocation and necromancy and all sorts of fun stuff. Then the actual traps would be magic aura'd into auralessness or, just to screw with intruders, weird crap like divination or conjuration (healing).

But I'm evil like that. >:D

Magically reinforced walls here and there, permanent light spells and/or everburning torches, casting prestidigitation to change the color of the walls, casting arcane mark (the best solution, it is permanent and you can set it to be invisible).

Remember:

PRD wrote:


Magical areas, multiple types of magic, or strong local magical emanations may distort or conceal weaker auras.

A arcane mark and a trap with a CL of 5 or less have a faint aura.

Start placing Arcane mark at random and one or more of them on the trap and either the characters will slow down to a crawl or they will not be able to sue detect magic to discover traps.

I doubt that there are a lot of party that will go: "I detect magic on the area ahead." After 3 rounds: "There are magical auras, universal school there, there and there." "Good we will avoid them." After walking 60': "Stop, I will check again." Another 3 round waiting, then another 60' and so on.

It could be done, even avoiding the tedium at the table by the simple expedient of saying "We cast detect magic every time we enter a new area and wait to see what we find." But the party speed would become 60' every 4 round. Your minute/level spells will last very little.

BTW, there are easy solutions on the part of the trap builder against people doing that:
- put the trap behind a corner, far away that it is hidden by the wall thickness until you pass the corner but close enough that the people crossing the corner are hit by it.
- place the trap in a deep and narrow niche, possibly hiding the opening with a small layer of plaster. It the trap is far back enough you can't detect it trough the wall, but when you are in front of the opening, if it has the wight properties, it will detect you and trigger.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Jiggy wrote:
shadowkras wrote:
The text says that it can penetrate barriers, but what defines a barrier in the rules?
The same freaking sentence that says it penetrates barriers wrote:
The spell can penetrate barriers, but 1 foot of stone, 1 inch of common metal, a thin sheet of lead, or 3 feet of wood or dirt blocks it.

The spell can detect magical auras in the next damn room.

Actually, it will not, if we are speaking of medieval or renaissance walls and not of cardboard walls. Generally a medieval interior wall in a good house is larger than 1'. In a low quality house generally you have only a curtain or a wooden wall so detect magic will pass it.

Jiggy wrote:


Also:
Detect Magic wrote:
3rd Round: The strength and location of each aura. If the items or creatures bearing the auras are in line of sight, you can make Knowledge (arcana) skill checks to determine the school of magic involved in each.

The only thing that's contingent on line of sight is ID'ing the school. But you've already determined the strength and location, even without line of sight.

You can literally walk up to the outside of a brick house and, after three rounds, know how many magical auras are in the living room, where they are, and how strong they each are.

i have seen a few house under construction in the US while I was visiting, so I have an idea of where you come from, but I have seen a great deal of farmer houses, city houses, manors, castles and so on built during the renaissance in Italy and none had exterior walls less than 1' tick. I doubt it is different in Golarion, especially seeing what go around there,

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Zoomba wrote:

So in the Monster Summoners Handbook (awesome Companion!) there's a new Magic item called the Rod of Giant Summoning:

Monster Summoner Handbook wrote:
The wielder can use the rod up to three times per day to augment her casting of a conjuration (summoning) spell, causing all of her summoned creatures to gain the giant simple template. The lesser rod can be used with spells of 3rd level or lower, the standard rod can be used with spells of 6th level or lower, and the greater rod can be used with spells of 9th level or lower.

I know that Metamagic rods cannot be used with SLAs, only spells. This Rod however, does not apply a metamagic feat, only a template to the spell's effect.

Could a summoner use this rod with their Summon Monster ability? If not, could an Occultist Arcanist through Conjurer's Focus?

"Augment her casting of a conjuration (summoning) spell,"

SLA aren't spells. It don't work whit them.

BTW a summoner can cast regular summoning spells and it will work with them.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Ravingdork wrote:
I thought knowledge checks to identify a creature's strengths and weaknesses were generally done the moment you see the creature. If you don't learn of the immunity then, then you don't get a second check later. The knowledge skill description makes that clear.

This. and a successful knowledge check don't give you everything. It give you very few informations:

PRD wrote:
You can use this skill to identify monsters and their special powers or vulnerabilities. In general, the DC of such a check equals 10 + the monster's CR. For common monsters, such as goblins, the DC of this check equals 5 + the monster's CR. For particularly rare monsters, such as the tarrasque, the DC of this check equals 15 + the monster's CR, or more. A successful check allows you to remember a bit of useful information about that monster. For every 5 points by which your check result exceeds the DC, you recall another piece of useful information.

"It is a demon" (or whatever is the type or subtype of the creature) is an information. Actually the that kind of information, the first you get, give you a lot of useful informations:

- it can be targeted by spell or effects that target animals/humanoids/outsiders/etc?
- it has darkvision/low light vision/nothing?
- an idea of how muck skills it has and how much BAB for its HD
- it is immune to criticals or not
and possibly other informations.

The check that Cuuniyevo suggested is something very different, it can be a Knowledge (arcana) check with a question like "What are the reasons that can cause this spell to fail?" and you can guess what protected the creature by that, but it don't give you direct informations on the creature.

- * - * -

On a aside, scorching ray isn't a targeted spell. it is a ray, then you target the ray.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

As getting a adamantine black blade would require purposely (or, you know, "accidentally")destroying it and then reforging it, something that I don't think a sentient weapon wouldn't like at all, a adamantine weapon (for the ability to cut through items with less than 20 hardness) can be useful.
My preferred back up weapon is a adamantine dagger.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Kazaan wrote:

If you had a Double Weapon, were using TWF rules to get an off-hand attack, and also wanted to drop the axe in order to use your Bow with Rapid Shot, you'd do the following:

Axe(main-hand) +6(-4)/Axe(off-hand) +6(-4)/[drop axe, quickdraw Bow] Bow +1(-4)/Bow(Rapid Shot) +6(-4)

Or, you could start with the Bow and switch to the Axe. You only need to order iteratives from high BAB so the remaining attacks can be shuffled where you please.

PRD -Rapid Shot wrote:


Benefit: When making a full-attack action with a ranged weapon,

In your example you aren't making a full attack with a ranged weapon, you are using a mix of melee and ranged weapons.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Gisher wrote:
Sagotel wrote:

@TGMinMaxer, you're right again! I'll need to sit down with my GM.

Sean K. Reynolds wrote:
GMW is the exception, and is called out as an exception because if it were a "true" enhancement bonus (and mind you, I hate that we have "enhancement bonuses that count" and "enhancement bonuses that don't count"), it would be cheaper to just cast GMW on your weapon every day and not invest mucho gp in your weapon to actually give it that enhancement bonus.
I didn't need to buy that adamantine scimitar!
Being a Bladebound Magus means never having to spend money on weapons. :)

A +1 darkwood longbow rated for you strength is still a good thing to have. Cheap (at level 12 at least) and useful. You get a ranged magic weapon and can enhance it if needed.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Felyndiira wrote:
Diego Rossi wrote:

Exactly the kind of assumption I was pointing out. You assume the caster know in advance everything and is prepared against everything while the enemy shouldn't do the same.

You guys play with the Schroedinger caster, the one that change to be the most powerful in every situation.

I don't see the Schroedinger's caster here. You have a tower in front of you. Are you saying the wizard is somehow cheating if he tried to find out where the BBEG is and stone shape right to him using his spells?

Also, Wizards can get the exact spell they need with one minute of studying. Both leaving slots blank and fast study are a part of pathfinder, after all.

So:

- he is traveling with all his spellbooks. Risky but doable.
- he can stop near the enemy base to study his spells. Hmm. Why the enemy has no security?
- he is never spotted in advance.
- why the enemy should build a tower in a world where tower are not a good defense? If he really want a tower, why one without outer defenses? Why a damned medieval tower? Most magical attacks are very similar to the effects of artillery, mines and sapping. By the end of the 15 century we had very efficient defenses against those. With a world with thousand of years of history about using magic in warfare most fortifications will be more similar to the fifteen century fortifications (with added protection against aerial attacks) than those of the twelfth century.
- unless the caster is really high level most spells have a shorter range than a composite longbow. Shooting the caster is a great way to limit his options.

Sure, a high level caster can fly invisible to the top of the tower and disintegrate an opening in it. Most of the time the owner will not live at the last floor of the tower.
You know that he probably live at the fist floor and disintegrate an opening there? Oops, most fortification walls are ticker than 10' and can maintain structural integrity even with a 10'x10'x10' hole in them.
And making that hole make your presence obvious.

Stone shape on a building ... "You can form an existing piece of stone into any shape that suits your purpose." Not a structure, as single piece of stone. Even not considering that at least half of the building will be made by bricks (easier to made and very efficient at thwarting a lot of spells) your spell work on 1 stone at a time. never seen a medieval castle? The stones aren't large, they were moved by men. On the average they are a bit bigger than a PC cabinet, but not by much.
The more rich castles than had large slabs of stone dressing the exterior to make them more beautiful, but the structural part were stones weighting less than 50 kg, bricks and mortar. Some corner stone was larger, and disintegrating the right one would cause a partial collapse if you chose well, but only if we hypotize a medieval castle, i.e. the kind of structure that is most wulnerable to this kind of attack.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Felyndiira wrote:
Diego Rossi wrote:
At that level things like disruptive, making ranged AoO with bows, the combat patrol feat exist, so the life of a caster isn't so simple, unless yous tack the deck in advance to their favor.

One of the arguments I've always seen people make is to reduce the entire game into a common combat scenario with the party on one side and enemies on the other.

This is not what makes casters more powerful than melee. If the battlefield control spells and blasts are the sum of everything that a wizard can do, then they would not be Tier 1 classes at all. Instead, wizards are powerful because their abilities can affect the narrative. Think about it this way: why did the party enter combat against that encounter #90210 in the first place? Was it because they had an objective that they had to accomplish, but the encounter #90210 is in their way? If so, is there something they can do to bypass #90210 entirely and still reach their objective?

That is what makes wizards so powerful. Did you have a tower full of enemies with the BBEG guarding the macguffin on the very top? Wizards just bypass the entire tower and initiate a direct attack on the BBEG, or alternatively bypass the BBEG entirely. In order to prevent this, you have to mount all sorts of defenses against the various abilities that the wizard might use to initiate this full dungeon bypass. Did the wizard want to disguise the party and bluff their way up? Nope, doesn't work. Did the wizard fly right up and stone shape a door into the wall? Nope, doesn't work. Teleport? Warded. Divination? Fails. Burrowing? Adamantium walls. Illusions? Everything has true seeing. Trying to drain the BBEG's budget? Remove his support lines? Dispel his magic defenses? NO, THEY HAVE +45 TRILLION AGAINST DISPEL. Trying to just take the object with magic? No, artifact stuff. You basically have to make more and more elaborate defenses specifically against everything that the wizard could potentially do against what you...

Exactly the kind of assumption I was pointing out. You assume the caster know in advance everything and is prepared against everything while the enemy shouldn't do the same.

You guys play with the Schroedinger caster, the one that change to be the most powerful in every situation.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Avh wrote:
HWalsh wrote:
I mean, for example, an 84 HP Wizard who suffers a full round sneak attack from a Rogue, which just means that the rogue went first, if 2 of the 3 attacks hit, can eat two 1d4+8d6 damage (using Rogue Unchained and daggers, or more if he's a bow user) hits that result in a combined total of 18-104 damage and die outright.

18-104 does an average of 61 damage. It's not enough to kill a 84 hp wizard (you only have maybe 10-15% chance of killing him, if those attacks actually hit her).

Quote:
A dedicated Fighter who is an archer with a composite bow, a +2 strength, that grants him/her the effects of Gravity bow (easily doable for a level 15) while having weapon specialization can do up to 10d6+42 damage in a single full attack... 52-102 damage can end a Caster in a single action.

IF all those attacks hit.

And in average, you do 77 damage, so still not a good chance of killing that wizard (less than 30% chance IMO), even if all those attacks hit.

And believe me, a 15th level wizard may have way more than 84 hp (especially if it is a PC).

And a 15th level archer will do about 50 points of damage with each hit and get more than 4 arrow in the air in a round.

Rapid shot, manyshot, boots of speed, +3 or better bow, 18 strength, all things he will have at level 15.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Milo v3 wrote:

Note, NPC enemies exist. Would you be fine as a group of PC's 15th level martials against a group of NPC 14th level full casters? No, probably not, not unless the GM is going easy on you.

Balance between classes isn't required because of videogames. It's required because classes don't exist in a vacuum.

Really? How many assumptions are you making?

Like:
- the caster know in advance, because ... Ah caster always know the enemy and always prepare for him
- the casters had time to buff because ... Ah caster always have time to butt, after all they know in advance about their opponents
- casters know/have selected the right spells ... Well, some are obvious, so that is credible
- caster hare somewhat invulnerable ... No really, what caster can survive a a full attack from several enemies unless he has prepared in advance? And unless the 15th level martials have chosen their equipment badly they will have a way to move and make a full attack at least once or get a full attack with the bow
- martials always fail their saves ...Why? And what is the effect? Most failed reflex Saves man a few hit point of damage. Failed fortitude and will saves can mean death, but for the will save the martial is 4 points below someone with a good will save at level 15. Iron will halve that. Improved iron will give you a reroll.
Unless you have dumped will to 7 you have a decent chance to save.
Fortitude is your better save if you are a martial, so no problem there.

There are a few ways to avoid several of the worst will saves.
Protection from XX or even better magic circle against XX work wonders against that and can be made in potion form. You risk having the wrong protection, but it help most of the time. Magic circle against Xx will protect several characters at the cost of the action of only one.

At level 15 UMD is fairly reliable if you have maximized it and that will allow access to even more defensive effects.

At that level things like disruptive, making ranged AoO with bows, the combat patrol feat exist, so the life of a caster isn't so simple, unless yous tack the deck in advance to their favor.

Milo v3 wrote:
HWalsh wrote:

Largely depends on the items that both sides are equipped with and the set up. It is very possible for the Martials, in that situation, to tear the casters apart. Feats, initiative, equipment, distance... Lots of factors...

I mean, for example, an 84 HP Wizard who suffers a full round sneak attack from a Rogue, which just means that the rogue went first, if 2 of the 3 attacks hit, can eat two 1d4+8d6 damage (using Rogue Unchained and daggers, or more if he's a bow user) hits that result in a combined total of 18-104 damage and die outright.

A dedicated Fighter who is an archer with a composite bow, a +2 strength, that grants him/her the effects of Gravity bow (easily doable for a level 15) while having weapon specialization can do up to 10d6+42 damage in a single full attack... 52-102 damage can end a Caster in a single action.

And those are without even tricking out the combatants that much or assuming an abundance of magical items. So a 2 on 2 battle can end with all the Casters dead before they even get a chance to cast a single spell. (I said *can* not *will*) so it really depends on a whole load of variables.

It does depend on variables, but it's severely stacked against the martials. Army of outsider minions, simulacrums, and charmed monsters and battlefield control spells, vs. the martial's damage.

That isn't hyperbole, that is what my players would expect from me from a group of mage villians. Since I have done truename discovery, simulacrums, planar bindings, item crafting, etc. as a player.

Q.E.D. you stack the deck and then say "but the side with the advantage will win".

Why you assume that the caster are prepared and the martials aren't?
Why you assume the casters had unlimited time and resources to prepare and the martials hadn't them?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Sometime features have the same name but are different.

Look the difference between the Shaman and Oracle Life Link ability

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Non lethal bleed damage would be a nice way to represent internal injuries that kill in hours and not seconds.

That said, I think that bleed damage is always lethal. It is alway defined as "damage", the therm used for lethal damage, and nowhere it say that bleed can dealt non lethal damage.

PRD wrote:
Dealing Nonlethal Damage: Certain attacks deal nonlethal damage. Other effects, such as heat or being exhausted, also deal nonlethal damage.

That piece of the rules imply that the attack that deal non lethal damage say that explicitly.

When you suffer from a Bleed effect the original source is irrelevant (barring specific rules about the source of the damage, example the Infernal wound ability of the Horned devil), lethal, non lethal, even effects that don't do directly hp of damage can be the source of bleed damage, so if a creature suffer from it, it take the listed amount of lethal damage.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
noble peasant wrote:
The Unchained rogue can take Ninja talents, one of those talents is Rogue talent, giving you a talent form the original rogue, ...

The bolded part is where you stumble.

Ninja tricks a give Rogue talent, but the Unchained Rogue feature is "Rogue talents", not "Unchained rogue talents".
So if you are taking it as a unchained rogue the ninja trick point to the unchained rogue class feature, not to the CRB rogue class feature.
It is an effect of who take the feature. An unchained character take it, it point to the unchained version of the feature.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
TheTheos wrote:
Diego Rossi wrote:

Telepathy don't allow you to "hear thoughts".

PRD wrote:
Telepathy (Su) The creature can mentally communicate with any other creature within a certain range (specified in the creature's entry, usually 100 feet) that has a language. It is possible to address multiple creatures at once telepathically, although maintaining a telepathic conversation with more than one creature at a time is just as difficult as simultaneously speaking and listening to multiple people at the same time.
AFAIK you need to know that someone exist and is in range. I wouldn't require line of effect but I would require prior knowledge of the creature existence or seeing it when you start communicating.

Hmm. I was under impression telepathy works both ways.

Example of how I think it works:
Being A has telepathy. B - doesn't have telepathy ability
A makes telepathic contact with B and is able to speak (send sound of words) to B. While this is happening B is also able to respond to A and also filter what he is just thinking (not sending to A) and what he means to transfer to A.
I never thought it was one way communication.

Hear thoughts =/= communicate with someone

With telepathy you can communicate with someone that want to communicate, so you telepathically hear what he want to say to you, but you don't hear his thougths. It is not Detect Thoughts.

- * -

You can use this spell as a reference:

PRD wrote:

Telepathic Bond

School divination; Level sorcerer/wizard 5

Casting Time 1 standard action

Components V, S, M (two eggshells from two different creatures)

Range close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels)

Targets you plus one willing creature per three levels, no two of which can be more than 30 ft. apart

Duration 10 min./level (D)

Saving Throw none; Spell Resistance no

You forge a telepathic bond among yourself and a number of willing creatures, each of which must have an Intelligence score of 3 or higher. Each creature included in the link is linked to all the others. The creatures can communicate telepathically through the bond regardless of language. No special power or influence is established as a result of the bond. Once the bond is formed, it works over any distance (although not from one plane to another).

If desired, you may leave yourself out of the telepathic bond forged. This decision must be made at the time of casting.

Telepathic bond can be made permanent with a permanency spell, though it only bonds two creatures per casting of permanency.

With "normal" telepathy you have a range limitation, but I think that this spell show that it is meant to work trough most obstacles.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
DM_Blake wrote:


2. I have no idea what the RAI is supposed to be or not.
PRD wrote:

Bard: Add one spell known from the wizard's illusion school spell list. This spell must be at least one level below the highest spell level the bard can cast. The spell is treated as being one level higher, unless it is also on the bard spell list.

Oracle: Add one spell known from the wizard's illusion school spell list. This spell must be at least one level below the highest spell level the oracle can cast. That spell is treated as one level higher unless it is also on the oracle spell list.

I think that the bolded part make RAI clear.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Telepathy don't allow you to "hear thoughts".

PRD wrote:
Telepathy (Su) The creature can mentally communicate with any other creature within a certain range (specified in the creature's entry, usually 100 feet) that has a language. It is possible to address multiple creatures at once telepathically, although maintaining a telepathic conversation with more than one creature at a time is just as difficult as simultaneously speaking and listening to multiple people at the same time.

AFAIK you need to know that someone exist and is in range. I wouldn't require line of effect but I would require prior knowledge of the creature existence or seeing it when you start communicating.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
My Self wrote:
Improved Unarmed Strike / Unarmed Strike proficiency is a weird thing. It would be awesome if it could be something like "Unarmed Strike is a Martial Weapon", and "Improved Unarmed Strike grants you proficiency with Unarmed Strike if you didn't have it already and do lethal damage with no penalty"

Why you want to make it more restrictive?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Pizza, limited wish is needed to remove it, if it function. A successful dispel magic stop if from functioning for 1d4 rounds.
Your car engine can propel your car at 150 mph, but if I disable the transmission you go nowhere.

Adding a teleporting ability you are changing the object. The ability you cite isn't one that all cursed weapon have. It was a specific ability that some cursed weapon had in the 1st and 2nd edition of D&D and isn't present in the current description of the weapons.

PRD wrote:

Sword, –2 Cursed

All damage dealt is also reduced by 2 points, but never below a minimum of 1 point of damage on any successful hit. The sword always forces that character to employ it rather than another weapon. The sword's owner automatically draws it and fights with it even when she meant to draw or ready some other weapon.

Very limited. If the -2 curse sword isn't on you but in a chest at your house, it don't teleport in your hand. And it don't force you to run home to recover it.

Don't mix how it worked in other editions of the game with how it work now.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

OP question:

1) to put the necklace on an victim he need to be one of
- helpless
- pinned
- willing to put up the necklace
- maybe there is some feat or spell (like Beguiling gift) that can bypass some of those limitations, but you need the right feat/spell.

2) "It cannot be removed by any means short of a limited wish, wish, or miracle and remains clasped around the victim's throat even after his death." don't mean that it can't be made temporarily non magical by an anti magic field and removed as a normal necklace, that the magic can't be temporarily suppressed by dispel magic, that it can't be sundered and so on.
There are ways to counter the item as it isn't an artifact.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

As the spell give the target random features and the spell don't specify a game mechanic either your GM set a chance for it to stop the target from speaking, or he can simply say that the target can speak.

The chance that the spell will stop someone from speaking would be a totally arbitrary number as the spell don't say anything. So a good number of game masters would make it happen only when appropriate to the story.

Note that if the target is under the effect of another polymorph he will be affected by Face of the Devourer only if he want .

FAQ wrote:


You can only be affected by one polymorph spell at a time. If a new polymorph spell is cast on you (or you activate a polymorph effect, such as wild shape), you can decide whether or not to allow it to affect you, taking the place of the old spell. In addition, other spells that change your size have no effect on you while you are under the effects of a polymorph spell.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Larkspire wrote:
@Diego Rossi - What's your take on using a brilliant energy weapon to CDG them in the ice tomb RAW?

How transparent is the ice? I think I would be like packed snow, so very little.

So:
1) You don't have line of effect, but you have a way to struck trough the obstacle.
2) You don't have line of sight.
3) Ice has 3 hp for every inch of thickness. The ice from ice tomb has 20 hp. That mean that it is almost 7" thick.

I wouldn't allow a coup de grace with a brilliant energy weapon against someone encased in the ice from Ice tomb as you would have a hard time aiming for the right spot.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
BigNorseWolf wrote:

Dammit, what idiot asked this. Now its going to be months before I find out if my kitsune needs dodge/mobilit... oh this was one of mine...

;-)

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Theolodin wrote:
Diego Rossi wrote:

The ice envelope the creature, giving it total cover. As you can't hit the creature you can't make a coup de grace.

PRD wrote:
Total Cover: If you don't have line of effect to your target (that is, you cannot draw any line from your square to your target's square without crossing a solid barrier), he is considered to have total cover from you. You can't make an attack against a target that has total cover.

Ok. So, I do not see where the Ice Tomb description/rules states that it gives the target total cover. I know that the description says that it "envelopes" the target, but that is it.

I am not being argumentative, I am just curious.

If the ice isn't encasing it, it is hard to see why destroying it will "free the creature" that is the target of the hex.

As Rynjin "Ice Tomb is ATROCIOUSLY worded".

Theolodin wrote:
Larkspire wrote:

The ice is in the way,it has to be destroyed before you can attack the creature inside.

Now...with a brilliant energy weapon...you may be able to do it.
I would look at it that way. So I would attempt the Coup de Gras, and lets say my total damage is 60, then I would subtract the 20 and then the target would have to rule a fort save against 40. So you can say you hit so hard that it broke the ice and hit the target. This would all happen with one swing.

The ice is an object, so it is not subject to critical hits or a Coup de grace. From that it follow that you can't taget the ice and make a coup de grace, nor the creature enveloped by the ice. "Enveloping" something mean wrapping it completely, not only part of it. So you have a ice envelope around the target and you need to break it to attack the target.

Unless you have specific feats the damage dealt to an object don't carries over to other objects of creatures. And even if you have the feat you aren't targeting the creature, you are targeting the ice.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The ice envelope the creature, giving it total cover. As you can't hit the creature you can't make a coup de grace.

PRD wrote:
Total Cover: If you don't have line of effect to your target (that is, you cannot draw any line from your square to your target's square without crossing a solid barrier), he is considered to have total cover from you. You can't make an attack against a target that has total cover.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Purple Dragon Knight wrote:
If you can't abide by the language of the text, restrict yourselves to the examples provided.

So if something is printed after a feat/spell/whatever, that feat spell/whatever will never work with it as it is not included int eh examples?

It is bad advice in a game that is constantly evolving.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The problem, for me, with the idea in the OP post, it is the "brace with the ready action" part.

If the rouge was saying "I attack the first guard that get within my reach" I would require a way easier bluff or stealth check and apply the sneak attack if the guard fail his perception check or if it get a lower initiative as he is running at the start of the turn. But that is already part of the normal rules.

But what he is trying to do is way ore complicated and require blind and stupid guards and some arm twisting of the rules. This kind of images give an idea of what "bracing against a charge mean". You can't do that surreptitiously unless you are capable to do it as a swift action when you make the attack.

Without the ability to do it as a swift action the stealth check is a automatic failure.

If you use a ready action you react to something that the other guy has done. The other guy can't act in the surprise round but you get to react to his non done action? sorry, it don't respect the rules at all.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The problem is that the rules say that a surprised guy can't act at all in the surprise round, while you have them continuing the previous action.

Let's make an example;

out of initiative:
The PC have entered a enemy sanctuary in disguise during a sacrifice.
GM: the priest plunge his knife in the heart of the sacrificial victim.
PC ROGUE: No way! I draw my dagger with quickdraw and throw it at the priest. I am hidden in the crowd he will not see me in time to react.

The priest perception check against the rogue stealth or bluff 8whatever is more appropriate for the situation) is a failure.

Surprise round priest roll a 18 in initiative. The rogue roll a 1 and get a total of 8.

Normal version of the rules:
During the surprise round only the rogue act and get to throw his dagger doing his sneak attack damage. Maybe that is enough to kill the priest.

The version where the NPC continue his previous action:
at initiative 18 the priest deliver a coup de grace to the victim. Probably he or she dies.
at initiative 8 the rogue can make his sneak attack, but probably now it is useless.

It seem that "the NPC continue his previous action" idea has some problem, don't you think?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Yes, it copies you, so if you are invisible the image is invisible.
Sometime it can help if some of the enemies can see invisible things.

As long as you are invisible and the attacker can't see invisible creatures it has no discernible effects. It will not be destroyed when someone fail to hit you by 5 or less and the attacker don't check to see if he hit a figment.

From mirror image: "An attacker must be able to see the figments to be fooled. If you are invisible or the attacker is blind, the spell has no effect (although the normal miss chances still apply)."

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Jokem wrote:

A related question is -

If a Demon gets Dimensional Anchor cast on it. Then what happens if it flunks the save for the Dismissal Spell (or any other effect that pops an Outsider to it's home plane)?

Summoned by a summoning spell? he should disappear. dimensional anchor say that it don't stop summoned creatures from disappearing.

Conjured? He would stay.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Byakko wrote:

I'm going to side with the people saying FoM doesn't protect against Anchor.

FoM enables you to act and move normally. I don't consider a teleportation power to be normal movement.

But yeah, FoM always causes arguments which will never be conclusively settled.

Best argument against, so far.

@Dave FoM don't give you flight too.
So if you are flying a web or a solid fog would work?
It don't give you a swimming speed, but it specifically give you huge benefits wen moving and fighting in the water.

If you get fly or swim speed thank to magic, FoM will not help you as it is not your "normal" movement?

Or instead "normally" mean "as normally allowed by your current movement abilities, included the magical ones"?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Defining a form of teleportation "movement" is common in the rules:

Dimensional Steps (Sp): At 8th level, you can use this ability to teleport up to 30 feet per wizard level per day as a standard action. This teleportation must be used in 5-foot increments and such movement does not provoke an attack of opportunity. You can bring other willing creatures with you, but you must expend an equal amount of distance for each additional creature brought with you.

Dimensional Hop (Sp): At 8th level, you can teleport up to 10 feet per cleric level per day as a move action. This teleportation must be used in 5-foot increments and such movement does not provoke attacks of opportunity. You must have line of sight to your destination to use this ability. You can bring other willing creatures with you, but you must expend an equal amount of distance for each creature brought.

So saying "Also the fact that dimensional anchor uses movement in one way does not mean freedom of movement is using the term in the same way." is really disingenuous.

The definition of the Teleportation sub school don't help much:

PRD wrote:


Teleportation: A teleportation spell transports one or more creatures or objects a great distance. The most powerful of these spells can cross planar boundaries. Unlike summoning spells, the transportation is (unless otherwise noted) one-way and not dispellable.

Teleportation is instantaneous travel through the Astral Plane. Anything that blocks astral travel also blocks teleportation.

it speak of travel, but that don't necessarily implies movement by the target.

So far the opinions against are been based on "because it is not movement" without a rule citation supporting that, while there are a few rule citations that tenuously support he opinion that it is movement.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

That was my initial response, but FoM protect you against stuff like Hold person, that is a purely mental effect, so its protection is all encompassing.
It is a hard call.
By the rules text RAI can be argued both way, RAW lean toward "it protects from most of the effects of dimensional anchor".
Planar movement is a form of movement.

Spell level vs spell level it is 4 vs 4, so it is not far fetched to think that it protect against Dimensional Anchor.

FoM is a ungodly good spell that I would pilfer with another class if I had a chance.

Liberty's Edge

4 people marked this as FAQ candidate.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Preparing a high level adventure I noticed this the potential interation of those 2 spells.

PRD wrote:

Dimensional Anchor

...
A green ray springs from your hand. You must make a ranged touch attack to hit the target. Any creature or object struck by the ray is covered with a shimmering emerald field that completely blocks extradimensional travel. Forms of movement barred by a dimensional anchor include astral projection, blink, dimension door, ethereal jaunt, etherealness, gate, maze, plane shift, shadow walk, teleport, and similar spell-like abilities. The spell also prevents the use of a gate or teleportation circle for the duration of the spell.

A dimensional anchor does not interfere with the movement of creatures already in ethereal or astral form when the spell is cast, nor does it block extradimensional perception or attack forms. Also, dimensional anchor does not prevent summoned creatures from disappearing at the end of a summoning spell.

PRD wrote:


Freedom of Movement
...
This spell enables you or a creature you touch to move and attack normally for the duration of the spell, even under the influence of magic that usually impedes movement, such as paralysis, solid fog, slow, and web. All combat maneuver checks made to grapple the target automatically fail. The subject automatically succeeds on any combat maneuver checks and Escape Artist checks made to escape a grapple or a pin.

The spell also allows the subject to move and attack normally while underwater, even with slashing weapons such as axes and swords or with bludgeoning weapons such as flails, hammers, and maces, provided that the weapon is wielded in the hand rather than hurled. The freedom of movement spell does not, however, grant water breathing.

It has been show several times that the bolded part of Freedom of movement work against all kinds of powers that impede movement.

So what you think, it work even against dimensional anchor, that explicitly state that it block extra dimensional forms of movement or not?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Kayerloth wrote:

Unaware (surprised) guards continue Running and he impales the first idiot to foolishly rush into the situation. (double damage for braced weapon)

...
Yes? No?

You are forcing the NPC to continue an action that they were doing outside of initiative when initiative start, in the surprise round, when they should not act at all.

Do that to the players and see how they react.

So, No.

And if you take a strict reading of readying a weapon with the brace ability to say that readying isn't obvious, you should take a strict reading of the "against a charge" part too. The NPC are charging? No. The ready action don't trigger.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

For Half-Blood Extraction the check isn't "what type is affected by the spell" against animal bond.
The check, in the spell is: "Target willing half-orc touched". animal bond change the target line of you into a target line of touch.
And change the type that you can affect to animal.
It don't change the subtype that you can affect.

If you have a spell that affect Humanoids with the aquatic subtype animal bond change it to affect animals with the aquatic subtype.

It don't change any other requirement beside the type.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

It was changed, it is possible that you have an old CRB with the pre errata version of the rules.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Guys, it continue to give you a specific permission: "even if the spells normally do not affect creatures of the companion's type (animal)".
If you have a requirement that isn't based on the type you haven't the permission to cast that spell.
The permission don't cover other requirements.

Avoron: "The druid may cast a spell with a target of “You” on her animal companion (as a spell with a range of touch)"
Paragon Surge
Range personal (half-elf only)
no target.

By RAW you don't get the permission to cast personal range spells at a range of touch, you get the permission only for spells with a target line of you.

The ability very clearly use target in with a target of “You” as a game term, if the Devs meant "every spell that target you" they would have used something like [i]a spell that can target you[/b].

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Rathendar wrote:
FLite wrote:


GM: Okay, that puts you directly ahead of the guards and you have acted for this round. Now they all get their full action.

PC's can be surprisingly creative at times. what if they had waited to stab the last guy in line? the guards would be mostly inside the structure with an unexpected hostile on their flank.

Just a counterexample.

Perfectly acceptable, but the the others guard have entered the tavern and are stopping his companions.

In the scenario depicted, I, as a GM would have the guards very wary. They are entering a bounty hunters tavern where everyone has a weapon to stop a brawl.
In their position I would consider that as "entering a potential battle zone".

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

You are making an assumption: that you can take combat actions while out of combat but that your opponents can't. But that isn't how it work.

The moment in which you declare that you are readying an action all people that can see you are involved in that combat, everyone check his perception against your stealth (or potentially against your bluff in this instance, but I would give you a huge penalty for wielding a reach weapon while trying to appear harmless).

Everyone roll initiative, as for the normal rules. So it is possible that you will ready your weapon after the guards have got there. You haven't a free pass to win initiative.

If the guards fail against your stealth/bluff you will have a standard action during the surprise round while they don't have it. You can use your action to ready an attack with your weapon. As it has the brace special ability you can "set it to receive a charge".

But that is the condition that will trigger your attack. So, if they are charged you will use your readied action to attack the guy that is charging you and get double damage thanks to the brace rules.

The guy that move beside you without charging you? It don't trigger your action. You get an AoO with sneak attack if he is running, but not the "set against a charge" damage increase. Ready action triggers are specific. If you are set to receive a charge you don't have a ready action of "I attack the first valid target that approach the door", you have a trigger of "I attack a guy that is charging me"

PRD wrote:


Readying a Weapon against a Charge: You can ready weapons with the brace feature, setting them to receive charges. A readied weapon of this type deals double damage if you score a hit with it against a charging character.

- * -

Overthinker wrote:

So the last issue is them stopping on a dime at the last second. If they do stop before the end of their movement would that effectively end their turn? And allow me to automatically win initiative and make a full round attack before they can act? I'm lost on actions where not everyone has rolled initiative yet, but is still acting.

Again the same problem. If you surprise them and ready the weapon in the surprise round they don't act at all. The next full round they can run toward you (one at a time) if your stealth/bluff check was successful, but you get to attack once with your readied action, possibly the first guard that move. Then the other guards get to act and probably wouldn't run full tilt toward you.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Gabriel Cantrell wrote:
Talon Stormwarden wrote:
Restarting the day count back to 0 is not the same as fulfilling the ' 'died within 1 round' requirement of Breath of Life. This would not work by the rules.
Actually the dust very specifically states that it allows the corpse to "be identified or raised as if it were killed recently". So by the rules then it COULD work. Of course I imagine it would be subject to a GM ruling.

There is a gulf between "killed recently" and "killed in the last 6 seconds".

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The current text of grappling in the magic section:
quote=PRD]
Grappling or Pinned: Casting a spell while you have the grappled or pinned condition is difficult and it requires a concentration check (DC 10 + the grappler's CMB + the level of the spell you're casting). Pinned creatures can only cast spells that do not have somatic components.

The grappled condition at the end of the book require a concentration check for spell an spell like abilities, but no limits to the somatic components.

About your initial question: it is not really clear if "you can take any action that doesn't require two hands to perform," mean that you can't use a two handed weapon or if it mean that you can't use 2 weapon combat or things like spell combat, actions that require the availability of 2 hands but don't use 2 hands at the same time. (spell combat has a sequence of actions, either cast then attack as many times you can or attack and then cast,).

There is people supporting either interpretations.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Sithis of Fangwood wrote:

There are two problems with that logic.

First, Paragon Surge doesn't specify subtype anywhere. The range is "Personal (half-elf only)". Half-elf is not a subtype. Elf and Human are subtypes of Humanoid.

Second, look again at clause #2 above. Paragon Surge normally does not affect creatures of the animal type. Therefore, it qualifies for Share Spells.

Of course, if this is for PFS, the Druid would still have to be an actual Half-elf to have access to the spell in the first place, so it's not like it's available to any Druid out there.

1) half-elf is part of the elf and humans subtypes.

PRD wrote:

Elf Subtype: This subtype is applied to elves and creatures related to elves. Creatures with the elf subtype have low-light vision.

Human Subtype: This subtype is applied to humans and creatures related to humans.

They are part of the "creatures related to elves" and the "creatures related to humans" groups.

2)

PRD wrote:

Share Spells (Ex): The druid may cast a spell with a target of “You” on her animal companion (as a spell with a range of touch) instead of on herself. A druid may cast spells on her animal companion even if the spells normally do not affect creatures of the companion's type (animal). Spells cast in this way must come from a class that grants an animal companion. This ability does not allow the animal to share abilities that are not spells, even if they function like spells.[/quot]

Step by step:
a) [quote)PRD]Paragon Surge
Range personal (half-elf only)

It has no target of you, but I agree that a range of personal is the same thing.

So "range Personal is covered.

b) There is a further requirement: (half-elf only).
Half elf is a subtype, the type is humanoid.

What say the Animal bond ability:
"even if the spells normally do not affect creatures of the companion's type (animal)"

So it allow you to bypass the creature type limitation, but this spell hasn't a limitation based on the creature, it has a limitation based on the sub-type, and you don't get any special exemption from that.
You are simply unable to affect someone that hasn't the appropriate subtype.

You want to stick to "half-elves aren't a subtype?
Even better. You only get the permission to waive the target you and type limitations. Not other limitations. If half elf isn't a subtype not a type, it is a limitation that you can't waive.

Think it as a credit card.
Your have a credit card that say "This CC work with all the credit card circuits of the world".
Then some CC company say "Gold CC and above get get a discount when they reserve a flight".
The ability of your CC to being used with any circuit don't do anything for that. You still need a gold CC to get the special feature.

Avoron wrote:

You think Paragon Surge is strange on an animal companion? Try half-blood extraction.

It's a good thing it's not PFS legal, because I'd pity any PFS GM whose player tried to do that.

PRD20 wrote:


Half-Blood Extraction
Casting Time 1 hour
Components V, S, M/DF (oils and poisons worth 3,000 gp)
EFFECT
Range touch
Target willing half-orc touched
Duration instantaneous
Saving Throw none; Spell Resistance no

1) "The druid may cast a spell with a target of “You” on her animal companion"

vs
Target willing half-orc touched

I don't see a target of you here, so it already fail the check there.

2) Same objections as above, no permission to bypass the half-orc requirement.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Sithis of Fangwood wrote:

Yup.

And Paragon Surge.

Paragon surge don't check the creature type, it check the creature Sub-type, and the share spell ability don't give exemptions for that.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
FAQ wrote:

Spell Mastery: Can an alchemist, magus, or witch select this feat?

As written, no, as the feat's prerequisite is "1st-level wizard."
However, the feat was written before the existence of the alchemist, magus, and witch classes, and it is a perfectly reasonable house rule to allow those classes to select the feat and apply its benefits to an alchemist's formula book, magus's spellbook, or witch's familiar.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Quintain wrote:

The question isn't specifically about the abilities of close range and spellstrike, but more in a general sense of having an ability of channeling a ray into a weapon attack, and then have it use touch attack AC.

Unless the weapon has a very specific rule, a weapon can't make touch attacks. Gloves of Deliquesence or similar items aren't weapons for the rules.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Cheapy wrote:

Additionally, here is commentary from a former member of the Pathfinder Design Team ranting about the rods.

Sean K Reynolds wrote:
Honestly, I think all of the metamagic rods are cheesy and should be removed from the game. The metamagic feats are already annoying and weak and there's no strong incentive to take them, and on top of that you can pick up the rod as a cheap feat-in-a-can and not have to prepare the spell ahead of time, and on top of that, they can bypass the 9th-level spell limit (normally you can't quicken anything 6th or higher with the feat because there are no 10th-level spell slots), so the rods are even better than the feat.
The parenthetical statement is clearly at odds with the idea that the rods allow you to prepare the spells ahead of time using the metamagic feat, as if that were the case, you couldn't use the rod of quicken, despite what the statement above states.

How I love SKR when he write this stuff. I have always disliked how metamagic rods work. I have houseruled them away, substituting them with books that you study while preparing your feats. They give you access to the feat (with all of its costs when using it) for 24 hours at the cost of a longer preparation/refresh time.

Probably they are still too strong but at least there isn't the potential ability to cast 13th level spells.

I agree that some metamagic is too weak for the cost, but that is a problem of how we can break up the cost. 1 spell level is a large difference.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
alexd1976 wrote:
Nefreet wrote:
alexd1976 wrote:
As I read it, the nearest fly gains the benefits of the spell as it is cast.

Apparently we each see RAW differently.

It must be FAQ'd!!

Just doing what I always do: bringing attention to literal, and selective, readings of the rules.

Obviously the rods give casters the benefits of the listed feat up to three times a day, anyone arguing against that needs to take a breath, grab a drink and read it again.

Admittedly, it would be hilarious if the rods actually affected flies, not the intended targets.

PRD wrote:


Metamagic Rods

Metamagic rods hold the essence of a metamagic feat, allowing the user to apply metamagic effects to spells (but not spell-like abilities) as they are cast. This does not change the spell slot of the altered spell. All the rods described here are use-activated (but casting spells in a threatened area still draws an attack of opportunity). A caster may only use one metamagic rod on any given spell, but it is permissible to combine a rod with metamagic feats possessed by the rod's wielder. In this case, only the feats possessed by the wielder adjust the spell slot of the spell being cast.

Possession of a metamagic rod does not confer the associated feat on the owner, only the ability to use the given feat a specified number of times per day. A sorcerer still must take a full-round action when using a metamagic rod, just as if using a metamagic feat he possesses (except for quicken metamagic rods, which can be used as a swift action).

No fly in the actual text of the rules, so if you want to joke about the rules, find something that is worth the joke in the rule.

The "on the fly" part was a comment by DM_Blake.

- * -

The description is very clear "Metamagic rods hold the essence of a metamagic feat, allowing the user to apply metamagic effects to spells (but not spell-like abilities) as they are cast.":

1) it contain the essence of a metamagic feat
2) that essence can be used and applied when the spell is cast.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

2012 thread.

And the simulacrum spell is silent about regeneration. As construct can have regeneration or fast heal I would say that it work for a simulacrum.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Orfamay Quest wrote:
Orfamay Quest wrote:


I don't think the intention was to allow a first-level wizard to take this feat, so I think A is right out, as well. At a minimum, it would need to be A1: Magic jar needs to be on my spell list at a level that I can cast.

Further to previous, I think A1 (as above) trumps B (in my spellbook).

The reason being, feats are eternal, spellbooks are ephemeral.

If I have magic jar in my spellbook, and someone steals it or sunders it or burns it, have I just lost the feat? I would argue no,.... which means not-B.

A.1.1

Magic jar needs to be on my spell list at a level that I can cast and I must have learned it at some point in my career.

A spellcaster can't cast a spell he hasn't learned and the prerequisite is the ability to cast.

And we still have the problem of a sorcerer that has taed it away for another spell after learning the feat. I would say that he lose access to the feat.

Orfamay Quest wrote:


.... which would be very odd/unusual. I can't think of any other magical feats offhand that can be turned off by a sunder maneuver.

Not magical feats, but:

- Power attack when you get strength 13+ thanks to your belt of giant strength
- Combat Expertise when you get intelligence 13+ thanks to your headband of vast intelligence
and a few other feats.

Another corner case:
- a cleric that follow a divinity with a domain that give him magic jar and that change the divinity he follows, or simply retain his domain selection can lose permanently access to the spell and tush to the feat.

1 to 50 of 8,822 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

©2002–2015 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.