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Diego Rossi's page

Goblin Squad Member. Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber. Pathfinder Society Member. 9,625 posts (10,107 including aliases). 1 review. 1 list. No wishlists. 7 aliases.


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Liberty's Edge

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This reply from SKR made when he still was a developer and the one in charge of replying to questions made in the forum is enough?

Sean K Reynolds wrote:
Sep 24, 2011, 02:43 am
Oliver McShade and the Core Ruleook wrote:
"It is possible for more than one character to cooperate in the creation of an item, with each participant providing one or more of the prerequisites. In some cases, cooperation may even be necessary."
A wizard and a cleric cooperating to craft a scroll of cure light wounds are, between the two of them, meeting all of the prerequisites for the item's creation. Thus, the "you cannot create this if you don't meet all the prerequisites" rule on page 549 does not apply, because "you" in the case of cooperative crafting is "the people involved in crafting the item."

It is here.

And:

PRD - Ultimate Campaign wrote:

Cooperative Crafting

If you need another character to supply one of an item's requirements (such as if you're a wizard creating an item with a divine spell), both you and the other character must be present for the entire duration of the crafting process. If the GM is using the downtime system, both you and the other character must use downtime at the same time for this purpose. Only you make the skill check to complete the item—or, if there is a chance of creating a cursed item, the GM makes the check in secret.

If the second character is providing a spell effect, that character's spell is expended for the day, just as if you were using one of your own spells for a requirement. If the second character is a hired NPC, you must pay for the NPC's spellcasting service for each day of the item creation.

FAQ wrote:

Crafting and Bypassing Requirements: What crafting requirements can you bypass by adding +5 to the DC of your Spellcraft check?

As presented on page 549 of the Core Rulebook, there are no limitations other than (1) you have to have the item creation feat, and (2) you cannot create potions, spell-trigger, or spell-completion magic items without meeting their spell prerequisites. So racial requirements, specific spell requirements, math requirements (such as "caster level must be at least three times the enhancement bonus"), and so on, are all subject to the +5 DC rule.

If you need to find an outside source for the requirements you lack, this FAQ has no reason to exist.

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Murdock Mudeater wrote:
Ed Reppert wrote:
I might have known that it would require a feat — and that there would be one for it. Thanks, folks.

Natural spell works, but there are other ways too.

You can use metamagic feats to remove the components of the spell that you lack in wild shape.

Eschew Materials is also a good option for casting while transformed.

There are also a few druid archetypes that gain additional wild shape forms which would be able to cast normally while transformed (though you'd still need eschew materials because your gear melds into your form). The Naga Aspirant specifically can, while you could make a sound arguement for a Mountain Druid using the giant shape option of her wild shape.

Multi-classing could also yield good results. The Oracle already has some nifty curse options to remove spell component requirements.

Eschew Materials don't remove the need to use Divine Focuses, and a good number of druid spells require them.

Liberty's Edge

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That tiny island has a huge population of extremely gifted spellcasting families.
They are all members of the Do'Urden family?

Liberty's Edge

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CampinCarl9127 wrote:
Imbicatus wrote:
You can make Handle Animal int based with clever wordplay if you wanted to dump CHA.

Oh good. Now I can use handle animal with my druid's oh-so-important intelligence stat.

:P

If you want to dump intelligence and charisma, it is your choice. But it is a bit absurd to lament the consequences.

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Mysterious Stranger wrote:
If something is moving around so much you can’t hit switching to a different tactic is not metagaming that is common sense. In the real world I can actually see how far I missed by and how fast the person is moving. I can also see if I was so far off my aim that he did not even seem to bother with it, or if he moved aside at the last second nimbly avoiding my attack. Unless the GM is giving incredibly detailed in his descriptions there is no way to get this information. Too often I have seen the GM just tell you if you hit or missed. The characters are not blind and neither should the players be.

Very easy to describe without giving away the actual ACs.

You miss the target Touch AC: "you have missed the enemy"
You hit the touch AC but you mis the total AC? "The though hide/armor of the enemy stop your blow."

You know why you have missed, but not by how much.

Mysterious Stranger wrote:


RAW states you know when a person has made the saving throw vs your spell.

Succeeding on a Saving Throw: A creature that successfully saves against a spell that has no obvious physical effects feels a hostile force or a tingle, but cannot deduce the exact nature of the attack. Likewise, if a creature's saving throw succeeds against a targeted spell, you sense that the spell has failed. You do not sense when creatures succeed on saves against effect and area spells.

As to how it happens it could be any number of things. For the reflex save simply seeing them dodge the effect would work. For a will save maybe you sense the spell hitting the persons mind. The point is that magic like many parts of the game is kind of abstract so the best way to let the player know is to simply tell them what...

You know when someone saves against a targeted spell. Not when he saves against area spells and effects.

Technically you wouldn't even know if someone saved or not against disintegrate, as the disintegration ray is an effect not a targeted spell (but the number of damage dice that you roll is a clear indication if the target has saved or not).

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Skylancer4 wrote:
Devilkiller wrote:
I'd say it should work, and I wouldn't expect too much controversy since your blocking the attack with your weapon. I've seen greater doubts when my PC tries to block a touch attack with Crane Wing since people reason that the monster is still coming into contact with him. The fact that shields don't count against touch attacks strikes me as pretty weird. I mean, incorporeal creatures could reach right through them, but it seems like a shield should be able to obstruct a caster with a held charge...oh well...

In general, the game considers gear you wear to be "you." Basically anything you are holding and wearing gets your saves/defenses barring special/specific rules. This also goes the other way, touching "you" is the same as touching your personal body. Be it the shield you are holding, the weapon you attack with, the armor over the clothes you wear, it is "you."

The touch attack doesn't require any real accuracy or force, just the barest contact to unleash its effect. So the game doesn't differentiate between the 3inches of steel on your shoulder or the inch and half of steel your shoving against the opponent to make it difficult to hit you.

Skylancer4 is right.

Note that the held charge wouldn't discharge, if you "parry" with crane wing probably you aren't touching th attacker hand, instead you are hitting his arm to deflect it (don't ask how that work when you are deflecting a dragon bite).

Relevant FAQ:

FAQ CRB wrote:


Deflecting Attacks: Does an attack that is deflected count as a miss?

It depends on the ability that is deflecting the attack.
For example, the Deflect Arrows feat says, "Once per round when you would normally be hit with an attack from a ranged weapon, you may deflect it so that you take no damage from it." It doesn't say the attack is a miss or is treated as a miss--instead, you take no damage from the attack. Because it is not a miss, effects that would trigger on a miss (such as Efreeti Style or Snake Fang from Ultimate Combat) are not triggered.
Likewise, the Crane Wing feat (Ultimate Combat) uses similar language and does not say the deflected attack is a miss or treated as a miss.
Note that the Snatch Arrows feat counts as a deflected attack--you do not take damage if you choose to catch the weapons instead of just deflecting it, and catching the weapon does not mean the attack was a miss.
Update 5/29/13: If the attack is deflected, not only does the target take no damage, but any other effects (ability drain, negative levels, harmful conditions, and so on) associated with that attack do not occur. If the deflected attack is a touch spell or other effect that requires "holding the charge," the charge is not expended. For example, if a ghoul's claw attack is deflected, the target is not subject to the ghoul's paralysis ability from the attack. If a shocking grasp touch attack is deflected, the attacker is still "holding the charge." The Crane Wing feat will be updated in a future printing of Ultimate Combat to clarify these issues.

Please, add some favorite to this thread asking for a FAQ search feature.

Liberty's Edge

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I think that this kind of argument is always missing a key word: "potential".

Spellcasters with 9 levels of spells have a lot of potential narrative power.

But the guy with diplomacy +30 has a lot of narrative power too. Starting with a unfriendly guy he can move it to friendly with a roll of 1 (unless the target has a charisma bonus) and then ask him favors.
The target will reveal an important secret with a die roll of -10
Reveal an important secret DC 10 + creature's Cha modifier +10 or more, so DC 20+
or
Give aid that could result in punishment +15 or more
so a DC of 25+
die roll needed to get that -5!

Why that "potential" narrative is rarely a problem? Because generally applying it require playing time, time in the gaming world and the GM will not allow excessive requests.

Now the "potential" narrative power of spellcaster. Some of that is inapplicable outside of campaigns whit a lot of downtime.
Sure, a spellcaster can create a demiplane spending from 2 to 6 hours casting the appropriate spell. How often that spell was used in your campaign?
He can resurrect a disintegrated friend. Oh, wait, you are suggesting to make that a lower level spell, so I suppose that you feel that forever losing a character to a bad save sucks.
Teleport? You can read my posts in other threads, my opinion is that if you read the spell, even with greater teleport you sill need a reliable description of the destination. knowing that a city called New York exist isn't enough. You need a description of an area of the city.
We can go on for a long list of supposed overpowered options available to spellcasters. Some actually exist, but most of them depend on overly permissive reading of the rules or require a lot of time rarely available in a campaign.

So, my opinion is that you are trying to cure something that mostly isn't related with higher level spells but on GMing and players exploits.

Liberty's Edge

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Pathfinder Design Team wrote:

Answered in FAQ!

FAQ wrote:

Flight and Magical Flight: Can a paralyzed or stunned creature keep flying with magical flight? Does a creature with magical flight not apply bonuses or penalties to Fly checks because it doesn’t have a “natural” fly speed? Does flying make a creature immune to being flat-footed?

No, any creature that loses all actions can’t take an action to attempt a Fly check to hover in place and thus automatically falls. That includes a paralyzed, stunned, or dazed creature. Magical flight doesn’t act any differently, even for paralysis, as it isn’t a purely mental action. A creature with 0 Dexterity can’t fly, and paralysis sets a creature’s Dexterity to 0. Despite the fact that the Fly skill mentions that bonuses and penalties from maneuverability apply to creatures with natural fly speeds, they apply for any fly speed. If they didn’t apply to creatures that gained flight artificially or through magic, then those maneuverabilities (like the listed good maneuverability for the fly spell) would have no game effect. Finally, the statement “You are not considered flat-footed while flying” means that flying (unlike balancing using Acrobatics or climbing) doesn’t automatically make you flat-footed or force you to lose your Dexterity bonus to AC; it doesn’t mean that flying makes you immune to being caught flat-footed.

I suppose you will change the text of the fly skill in the next reprinting of the CRB.

There is a problem with the current text and this FAQ:

PRD wrote:
If you are using wings and you fail a Fly check by 5 or more, you plummet to the ground, taking the appropriate falling damage (see Environment).

That rule seem to imply that if you are not using wings to fly you can fail a fly check by any amount and not fall to the ground.

The FAQ say the exact opposite:
PRD wrote:
No, any creature that loses all actions can’t take an action to attempt a Fly check to hover in place and thus automatically falls.

so the FAQ is an errata to that text.

- * -

Just for the record, if you fail a fly check while using the Fly spell, you don't benefit from the Feather fall effect it give when the spell end, right?

Liberty's Edge

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TheAlicornSage wrote:

A character is considered in combat at any time they expect or are otherwise prepared for combat.

Thus, characters that are ready for a shady meeting to devolve into combat will not be flat footed when some folks start attacking others, because they were prepared for it in combat, and past their first round in combat, even if the round wasn't played out as a structured round of play by the players. Likewise, in an arena or a duel, the characters are in combat before the first attack because they are ready and expecting it.

If I were the GM and you were saying "I enter the meeting ready for combat, so that I can't be surprised" I would give you huge penalties to any attempt at diplomacy (not at intimidate) as you are obviously ready to attack. Even worse if you were using total defense while parleying as someone suggested, that is an active use of an ability, so you are constantly dodging while speaking.

In that kind of tense situation I would call for Sense motive checks (possibly with a bonus) to see if you are surprised or not when violence start.

PRD wrote:

Surprise

...
Determining awareness may call for Perception checks or other checks.

About duels: what kind of duel?

European style with sword where you start at a few feet from each other and salute before beginning?
Initiative start at the salute, it is a standard act, so no surprise.

European style with pistols, move 20 paces, turn and fire?
The initiative start when you start moving.

Cowboy style with pistol and whoever draw fist shoot first?
At least judging from the movies you can get the opponent flat footed.

Japanese style with swords and jajitsu?
The fast draw and attack an opponent that is not ready is the core of the idea.

You can be aware of the existence of the other person, aware that violence can stat at any moment, but the exact second at which it will start isn't always so clear.

Several of the problems I have seen cited before your post (mostly "ready an action before combat begin") are related to setting up an ambush. from what I recall there was a rule about that in the D&D 3 rulebook, but it seem that there isn't one in Pathfinder.

"We are ready to attack anyone bursting through the door"/"We kick down the door and fire our bows/cast our spells against the occupant of the door" are typical ambush situations where, if the ambush work, one side is flatfooted while the other benefit from a surprise round.
That kind of thing require a lot of GM adjudication. What is more important, the orcs in the room waiting for the attackers that have killed their comrades making a lot of noise or the the adventurers thinking that behind the door there will be some hostile creature?
How fast they can analyze what they see and react?

If both sides aspect mayhem and are ready I would have them roll initiative when the door is opened, the order in which they act show who was faster in analyzing the situation and reacting, I wouldn't allow them to say "I have a ready action, so go first automatically!".
In other situations that could be possible, but it would never be "I declare a ready action so I am never surprised".

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Cavall, maybe you should read again that FAQ:

FAQ wrote:


Headband of Vast Intelligence: If I wear this item, do I get retroactive skill ranks for my Int increase in addition to the skill ranks associated with the item?

No. The skill associated with the magic item represents the "retroactive" skill ranks you'd get from the item increasing your Intelligence. You don't get the item's built-in skill ranks and another set to assign however you want.

It don't say that you don't get the retroactive skill ranks, it say that the retroactive skill ranks are determined by the item.

When something give you an increase in intelligence without assigning the newly gained skill ranks you get to spend them normally.

Generally that applies when you get an inherent bonus to intelligence or when you raise it with the increase you get every 4 levels.

Liberty's Edge

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Cavall wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Cavall wrote:

FAQ/Errata

If I wear a headband of vast intelligence, do I get retroactive skill ranks for my Int increase in addition to the skill ranks associated with the item?

No. 

Seems pretty clear.

Last I checked it's still in the rules. There's no exception to the rule called out. So at best the FAQ can tell you the RAI but the rules are still that permanent Int increases grant skill points and the bonus ranks of the Headband are an effect of the headband item.

This is why you have to be careful when writing rules.

Likewise, there are magic items that still work in the traditional sense. For example, there are Ioun stones that just grant bonuses to Int without the extra skill point clause and thus just grants the normal skill points for increasing your Int.

Skill points are granted. They are not retro actively granted.

It's pretty clear. That's why they give you a skill tied to it.

At best the FAQ can tell you it's a frequent question and at best an errata can tell you is the official answer. Making it the rules

Actually, intelligence score increases from advancing in level or getting inherent bonuses increase you total skill bonus, and that is applied retroactively to all your levels.

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Theta Thief wrote:

Wow I'm not gonna lie I love all the discussion this has generated between everyone.

I appreciate everyone's advice and criticisms. I will admit it does look like there are some easy ways for us to get through these locks now. Aid another is so simple a solution we completely overlooked it. Though I do have to ask, since I don't have a rulebook with me. Can you aid another in a skill you have no training or even a skill point in?

As far as the spells the Witch is kinda obviously our main offensive caster so the only non-damaging spell she has is CLW for Emergencies and the Bard can't caste 2nd level magic (i.e. Cat's Grace) until level 4. We are currently level 3. As for guidance as far as I know that is not a bard spell. The Witch might be able to but like I said she hasn't been looking at support spells it may be a suggestion for her next level up.

As for the suggestion of an Archaeologist. I do appreciate the idea but this is the player's first swing at a magic class so we tried to keep it simple for her. Plus the character's main skill is Perform (Dance) and she plays her like a stripper and I honestly don't think anything but the cold hard death of this character will stop her lol. She just loves her to damn much. And no before you guys get all mean about we are not going to kill her character just so she will play one more suited for the AP.

As for the metagaming comment I made earlier I apologize I wasn't trying to be rude or offensive it's just at the time of writing it I interpreted someone else comment about our party composition and are dislike for metagaming as an attack and insult towards us as players. Whether or not that's true doesn't matter I shouldn't have reacted that way and again I apologize. To be clear I don't hate people who metagame or metagaming in of itself all that much it's just not what I and my group like to do. When people tell us to do so and I reply that we don't do that and their reply is non-helpful and or that we are "doing it wrong" it offends me greatly.

PRD wrote:
In cases where the skill restricts who can achieve certain results, such as trying to open a lock using Disable Device, you can't aid another to grant a bonus to a task that your character couldn't achieve alone. The GM might impose further restrictions to aiding another on a case-by-case basis as well.

To use aid another you need to have at least skill point in disable device.

Guidance is a cantrip and the witch know it:

PRD wrote:


A witch's familiar begins play storing all of the 0-level witch spells plus three 1st-level spells of the witch's choice.

CLW is a spell damaging against the undead and a witch has very few useful spells or hex against them.

I hope she has a good patron.

Bard: arcane strike is very useful for them, especially if you have little magic.
In CC 1 our bard saved us several time with a well placed dart and arcane strike, or trowing holy water and magical stones made by the cleric.

Theta Thief wrote:
Matthew Downie wrote:


Most people don't consider what happens during character creation to be metagaming at all - of course you're using out-of-character knowledge, because the character doesn't exist yet, and how else can you ensure your character is appropriate for the campaign ahead? If you call that metagaming, people will be offended.

I guess I can understand that but, that's just not the way we view it. Our characters only belong to one person. The player not the group. When we make them we make them separately (not in front of each other) and while we may not write entire books about them we do make up backstories for them.

Let me put it to you this way. Think of it in real world terms. A cop doesn't choose to become a cop because someone else chose to become a doctor or another person choosing to be a pilot. I understand that we CAN give other reasons why our characters are their classes, but we all (my group not everyone in the world) agreed that it's still metagaming since we are using outside knowledge (the other players classes) as reasons for making decisions about our character and or their actions. Hell we even level up without interference from each other. Sure we can make suggestions (usually in character) but the final decision is up to them.

Maybe that is valid at character creation, but you have fought together against strong foes. It would be only logic to try to maximize your character strengths and cover your weak spots, finding a way to work together to maximize your chance of winning.

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Ryan Casarez wrote:


Now if your saying that once in the game our characters should try to adapt to our lack of lockpick I wholeheartedly agree but as mentioned before our skill monkey the bard can't crack level 30 locks with 4 skill points and MWK Tools. So we are trying but it's still not enough and I don't want our party to die just because we are missing one skill.

4 ranks, +2 from the masterwork tools = +6, take 20: 26

So you need a +4 from dexterity.
Your witch can't cast cat's grace?
If your bard has dexterity 14 or more and she can cast that spell you beat a DC of 30.
The Guidance cantrip give another +1, so he only need a dex of 12. Or if he has a dex of 16 he don't need cat's grace.

Note that a witch is a problematic class in that AP unless she has the right patron and hexes.

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Ryan Casarez wrote:


Diego Rossi: Yes we did loot the tomb but all we received was the siphon haunts, a few potions, and some holy water. If there was anything else there we didn't get it from the DM.

Spoilers.

Spoiler:
I don't know if our GM added stuff, but we did find a few arrows (shortbow and longbow): silver, +1 and even some +1 ghost touch and other stuff.
Fairly useless as none of us had the money for a bow at first /second level.
Maybe that equipment was hidden somewhere in the safe room? I recall that the equipment cache was well concealed.

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MisterSlanky wrote:

Don't forget about the existence of Spear Dancing Reach...

Quote:

You can strike from afar with double weapons.

Prerequisite(s): Dex 17, Spear Dancing Spiral, Spear Dancing Style, Two-Weapon Fighting, Weapon Finesse, Weapon Focus with the chosen weapon.

Benefit(s): While using Spear Dancing Style and making a full attack using the chosen weapon as a double weapon, you can grant the reach special weapon feature to one or both of the weapon's ends until the end of your turn as a swift action.

Now it's a reach weapon...A feat intensive and expensive reach weapon that can only be used in full attacks and uses up your swift action, but a reach weapon.

lemeres wrote:
The only thing that I am left wondering about is whether the weapon's enhancement bonus is applied to both ends (since you normally can't enhance the other end of a spear, since it isn't a double weapon). If that is the case, then this is already giving people a hell of a lot without having to give you reach based TWF (which, for the amount of feats needed to go for that silly path, you might as well grab whips and the feats needed to make those lethal)
This I think is the real question.

It don't work with quartestaff mastery as it say:L

"When you wield it as a one-handed weapon, your other hand is free, and you cannot use the staff as a double weapon.".

- * - * -

alexd1976 wrote:

Phalanx Soldier archetype lets you use spears one handed when using a shield.

A bracer counts as a shield.

You can still use a weapon in the hand that has the bracer on that arm, at a -1 to hit.

Maybe this will help you on your way...

Bracer?

Where you have found a bracer beside the magical bracers, in Pathfinder? And where it say that it work as a shield?

Maybe you mean a buckler.

And:

PRD wrote:


Phalanx Fighting (Ex): At 3rd level, when a phalanx soldier wields a shield, he can use any polearm or spear of his size as a one-handed weapon. This ability replaces armor training 1.

That open the usual can of worms about "wielding" something, but I doubt you can claim that you are wielding a buckler when you are wielding a weapon with that hand.

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You want up to 10d6 damage with a area spell? it is level 3+.

PRD - Designing spells wrote:


Table: Maximum Damage for Arcane Spells
Arcane Spell Level Max Damage (Single Target) Max Damage (Multiple Targets)
1st 5 dice —
2nd 10 dice 5 dice
3rd 10 dice 10 dice
4th 15 dice 10 dice
5th 15 dice 15 dice
6th 20 dice 15 dice
7th 20 dice 20 dice
8th 25 dice 20 dice
9th 25 dice 25 dice

It being a silver piercing weapon generally is an hindrance but against specific enemies it is a benefit, sometime a strong benefit.

I am not fond of the "direct damage conjuration spells aren't subject to spell resistance" trend. That is a big advantage, so unless the damage is really inferior to a equivalent evocation spell it shouldn't be applied.
50% damage against a subset of targets isn't inferior enough to warrant that kind of benefit. (fireball is useless or do inferior damage against a subset of enemies, lightningbolt against a different subset and so on, so it is not something that affect only this spell)

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Scott Wilhelm wrote:


With all due respect to the politeness of your warning, it's not abusing the rules unless you actually try to get infinite attacks. Gaining 1 extra attack each round as a Free Action and still being able to use your shield sure is nifty, but it is far from unreasonable at the cost of a Feat, 5000gp, and a magic item slot.

I think it was fairly clear from my post that I don't have a problem with gaining 1 free attack in a round.

Scott Wilhelm wrote:


If it's a typo, it's on Paizo to fix, and if this is a problem with the rules, it is a problem I discovered: not a problem I created. You're welcome.

There is already a fix in the rules:

PRD wrote:
Free Action: Free actions consume a very small amount of time and effort. You can perform one or more free actions while taking another action normally. However, there are reasonable limits on what you can really do for free, as decided by the GM.
Scott Wilhelm wrote:


If "your table" is in your mother's basement among your friends, then feel free to adjudicate any way you want, and God bless.

Actually it is the sitting room of my house, and this kind of ad hominem attack don't win you points.

Scott Wilhelm wrote:


But we pay money for these rulebooks to play Pathfinder Society, and it is NOT appropriate to persecute paying customers who are obeying the rules. If a GM did this to me, he would get a polite warning before I complained to the store owner that the PFS group is bullying paid customers out of the store. Store owners, especially small business owners like most game store owners, tend to notice customer complaints, especially when customers return their products because customers can't rely on them to work the way they say they work. To my experience, game store owners in particular only too happy to crowd out obnoxious gaming groups to make more room for more Magic the Gathering events. I've seen it happen, and I know why it happens.

LOL, so you would feel that you are bullied because someone would require you to respect the rule I cited above and you would try to bully him appealing to the store owner?

You are aware of how childish it sound?

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I hate the use of the Helpless condition as an effect of a spell.

What is helpless?

PRD wrote:
Helpless: A helpless character is paralyzed, held, bound, sleeping, unconscious, or otherwise completely at an opponent's mercy.

So this spell make you either:

- paralyzed tons of creatures are immune to that
- held FoM make its target immune to that
- bound FoM make its target immune to that
- sleeping tons of creatures are immune to that
- unconscious defined as consequence of having negative hit points or non lethal damage equal to your current hp - sure, unconscious constructs and unedead
- otherwise completely at an opponent's mercy undefined

So you cast Icy Prison against a construct, a dragon or an undead with FoM, what happen?

The dragon is immune to all the items beside the non lethal hp, the undead is immune to those too.

So we are left with "icy prison for some reason deal non lethal hp equal to his hit point to the dragon" and "the construct or undead is helpless because reasons".

It is sloppy rule writing.

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Darksol the Painbringer wrote:
Even if you do it as part of a charge, for free, you're still having to end your movement prematurely because of how performing actions works. You want to charge a guy behind a guy? Fine. You make your Overrun check, and then you end the movement prematurely to where you're supposed to be, because you have to make the check in order to get where you're supposed to be, which stops your movement.

As it is the second or third time you say this, please cite chapter and verse of the rules that say so.

What check stop you from completing your movement?

Not your interpretation of the rules, the actual text saying what checks stop your movement.

Your position seem to be that all checks and actions made while moving stop your movement. Prove it.

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PRD wrote:

The caster can work for up to 8 hours each day.

He cannot rush the process by working longer each day, but the days need not be consecutive, and the caster can use the rest of his time as he sees fit. If the caster is out adventuring, he can devote 4 hours each day to item creation, although he nets only 2 hours' worth of work.

From the text above, the 4 hours when out adventuring are an alternative to the 8 or 4 hours of straight work, not an addition.

Nothing prohibit you from speeding up the work you do during the adventuring days.

The tools bonus is for crafted mundane items, not magic items.
I doubt they work with the valet familiar, but that is an interpretation, the rules are unclear. The text seem to imply that you produce a fixed value of finished items.

Prd wrote:
The wielder may take raw materials with a value equal to half the price of an object to be crafted, and produce a finished object in as little as 1 hour for an item with a final cost of 2,000 gp or less. For objects with a final cost of more than 2,000 gp, the wielder can perform 2,000 gp worth of work in a single hour, but only once each day.

The tools say. "only once each day". That limitation stay even if you hand them to another creature. They can be used once day (read the thread about the pearl of power, there was a guy arguing that they were usable once a day by each character).

6 skill ranks aren't a class feature. UMD hasn't a skill check for emulating them.

Note: your GM can choose to hand wave some of the limits or houserule about emulating a skill (after all it isn't so different as emulating a characteristic or being able to channel positive energy).

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Casual Viking wrote:
CWheezy wrote:
Yeah because armor was never put on animals ever in history right.

REALIZARMS!!!!

I can't put armor on my cat (unless I want to end up in the emergency room), ERGO you can't put armor on your animal companion!!!

Ironic as it come from someone that said this in another thread 5 hours before this post:

Casual Viking wrote:


The problem is, you can be the picture of smiling politeness, and still be a prick. The moderators only moderate bad language, not bad behaviour.

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Jiggy wrote:
stuff

I agree that it would be better to have a way for people to see why they have been moderated, but it don't work when they are still angry or frustrated.

The "simplest" way is to have a extra tab in your personal page:
Your moderated posts accessible only to you.
If you can go back and read them after a time, with a calmer mind, maybe you will be able to see why they have been moderated.
(Simplest for the forum goers, probably it would require a good quantity of work for the forum administrators)

I disagree with you on one point: not only people that are wrong get angry/frustrated. Trolls can get you and push you into making questionable posts and/or sometime we resort to strong posts when the other guy seem totally unable to get the rules, even when presented with rule quotes.

BTW, Paizo forum is well moderated, I have been in way angrier forums.

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Yes to both.

Below are the rules about adding new spells to spellbooks/familiars. Neither version require the spellcaster to be able to cast the spell. You only need to make the spellcraft check.

PRD wrote:


Arcane Magical Writings
...
To decipher an arcane magical writing (such as a single spell in another's spellbook or on a scroll), a character must make a Spellcraft check (DC 20 + the spell's level). If the skill check fails, the character cannot attempt to read that particular spell again until the next day. A read magic spell automatically deciphers magical writing without a skill check. If the person who created the magical writing is on hand to help the reader, success is also automatic.

....

Spells Copied from Another's Spellbook or a Scroll: A wizard can also add a spell to his book whenever he encounters one on a magic scroll or in another wizard's spellbook. No matter what the spell's source, the wizard must first decipher the magical writing (see Arcane Magical Writings). Next, he must spend 1 hour studying the spell. At the end of the hour, he must make a Spellcraft check (DC 15 + spell's level). A wizard who has specialized in a school of spells gains a +2 bonus on the Spellcraft check if the new spell is from his specialty school. If the check succeeds, the wizard understands the spell and can copy it into his spellbook (see Writing a New Spell into a Spellbook). The process leaves a spellbook that was copied from unharmed, but a spell successfully copied from a magic scroll disappears from the parchment.

If the check fails, the wizard cannot understand or copy the spell. He cannot attempt to learn or copy that spell again until one week has passed. If the spell was from a scroll, a failed Spellcraft check does not cause the spell to vanish.

In most cases, wizards charge a fee for the privilege of copying spells from their spellbooks. This fee is usually equal to half the cost to write the spell into a spellbook (see Writing a New Spell into a Spellbook). Rare and unique spells might cost significantly more.

PRD wrote:


Witch's Familiar
Adding Spells to a Witch's Familiar

Witches can add new spells to their familiars through several methods. A witch can only add spells to her familiar if those spells belong to the witch's spell list.
...
Familiar Teaching Familiar: A witch's familiar can learn spells from another witch's familiar. To accomplish this, the familiars must spend one hour per level of the spell being taught in communion with one another. At the end of this time, the witch whose familiar is learning a spell must make a Spellcraft check (DC 15 + spell level). If the check succeeds, the familiar has learned the spell and the witch may utilize it the next time she prepares spells. If the check fails, the familiar has failed to learn the spell and cannot try to learn that spell again until the witch has gained another rank in Spellcraft. Most witches require a spell of equal or greater level in return for this service. If a familiar belongs to a witch that has died, it only retains its knowledge of spells for 24 hours, during which time it is possible to coerce or bribe the familiar into teaching its spells to another, subject to GM discretion.

Learn from a Scroll: A witch can use a scroll to teach her familiar a new spell. This process takes 1 hour per level of the spell to be learned, during which time the scroll is burned and its ashes used to create a special brew or powder that is consumed by the familiar. This process destroys the scroll. At the end of this time, the witch must make a Spellcraft check (DC 15 + spell level). If the check fails, the process went awry in some way and the spell is not learned, although the scroll is still consumed.

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Ravingdork wrote:

Nobody is saying that a +1 arrow doesn't get the +5 enhancement bonus to attacks and damage when fired from a +5 bow.

What people want to know is whether said arrow (when fired from said bow) counts as a +5 arrow for the purposes of bypassing material DR.

To put the FAQ question more simply: Does firing a +1 arrow* from a +5 bow* bypass DR/silver, DR/cold iron, or DR/adamantine?

* Or other form of ammunition
** Or other ranged firing weapon

After it has been fired it is a arrow with a +5 enhancement bonus, what you think it will do?

The rule is very clear:
"Only the higher of the two enhancement bonuses applies."
The arrow benefit from the higher enhancement bonus. Period.

What is the requirement to bypass the DR?

PRD wrote:


Weapons with an enhancement bonus of +3 or greater can ignore some types of damage reduction, regardless of their actual material or alignment. The following table shows what type of enhancement bonus is needed to overcome some common types of damage reduction.
DR Type Weapon Enhancement Bonus Equivalent
cold iron/silver +3
adamantine* +4
alignment-based +5
* Note that this does not give the ability to ignore hardness, like an actual adamantine weapon does

The requirement is to have an enhancement bonus that is high enough. Exactly what the rule cited above say teh arrow get.

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DM_Blake wrote:
FLite wrote:
Quandary wrote:
jimibones83 wrote:
I suppose so [ignoring visual signature aka runes?], otherwise invisibility is useless for those who can cast it themselves.

Useless = Your identity still concealed, Full Concealment still applying and movement needed* to prevent square pin-pointing?

(as Melee need movement to function)
* Although since they don't know if you moved or not, even if you don't, they have no good reason to think you are still in same square.
I guess that depends on one's definition of useless.

Well, it does somewhat neuter the "go invisible, cast summon monsters" tactic.

"Hey guys, he's right there, and he's still casting. I may not know what, but if it takes that long to cast, it is going to be really bad for us, so everyone attack!"

I already answered this a couple pages back.

Your point is valid - if it works this way, then summoning monsters while invisible is a broken tactic.

Except...

The invisibility spell explicitly states that it's a valid tactic that doesn't break invisibility. It would be a huge lack for foresight for the developers to say "Hey, do this, it works" when really what they meant to say was "Hey, DON'T do this, it won't break invisibility but it's still a useless and broken tactic that will get you killed."

So, the only sensible interpretation is that the magic of Invisibility also hides the effects that this FAQ is talking about.

No other interpretation makes sense, unless you think developers are sadistic and duplicitous and want players to fail. I don't, so I will stick with sensible interpretations.

LOL, what?

Summon monster already had "Components V, S, F/DF (a tiny bag and a small candle)", so you were speaking for 1 full round. Noticing the location of the invisible caster has always been easy. I don't see how "using magic is noticeable" change that.

On the other hand being invisible give you a 50% miss chance even if you location has been pinpointed. And pinpointing your location is still difficult.

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Spellcraft is subject to the perception modifiers. Let's say that noticing spellcasting has the same difficulty of "Notice a visible creature DC 0" ans spellcasting that attack someone has the same difficulty of "Hear the sound of battle DC -10".
Those seem reasonable assumption to me.

Invisibility add +20 to the DC, +40 if the spell has no somatic gestures and no components (you have to manipulate the components, so you are moving).

Then you add range and other effects.

That give us some number we can use to perceive a spell when it is cast.

Until we have more precise rules it seem a acceptable solution.

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Seem right.
Limited wish say:
"Undo the harmful effects of many spells, such as geas/quest or insanity."
and
"Duplicate any non-sorcerer/wizard spell of 5th level or lower, provided the spell does not belong to one of your opposition schools."
so it can't duplicate Resurrection, but it can remove part of the harmful effect of disintegrate, the part that turn the body to dust.

After all it can remove the consequences of Insanity, and that is a 7th level spell.

So I think it can remove the "harmful effect 2 of disintegrate, but that alone will not return the character to life, only give you an intact corpse.
Then they can use raise dead.

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Isonaroc wrote:
CampinCarl9127 wrote:
Azten wrote:
Aelryinth wrote:

I've never heard of Smite ever being added to anything that didn't involve a melee roll to hit.

==Aelryinth

In 3.5 Smite Evil could only be used on melee attacks. It was also a cruddy ability. The restriction was removed from Smite Evil in Pathfinder. Now it works for any attack rolls and any damage rolls.
A question I have is whether or not the attack roll buff and damage roll buff are independent. Can you have one without the other, such as making a touch attack to deliver a non-damaging spell or using an auto-hit damaging ability?

As I read it, yes they are independent. It says ALL damage rolls, not damage rolls that are a result of the attack action.

So you would add your paladin level to the damage regardless of whether or not there was an attack roll. Conversely, you could also add your Cha bonus to an attack roll that doesn't result in a damage roll (such as delivering a touch attack as part of a spell).

Here's the real question: do you add your paladin level to ability damage rolls or bleed damage rolls?

Bleed is a condition, not a damage roll, and the paladin isn't rolling it, it is the GM or creature suffering from the bleed effect, so it isn't affected by Smite evil.

Ability damage is more tricky. I would say that the RAI is that it is meant to add only to hp damage, but RAW I don't recall anything limiting it.

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Kudaku wrote:
CampinCarl9127 wrote:

Also, this is not a new question. Try searching previous threads before making a new one.

Previous thread

If you read my original post more closely you'd see I actually spent 20 minutes searching different threads and found no conclusive answers before I posted, asking first Mark for an unofficial answer and then posting here because I think it's a question that would benefit from a FAQ. A particularly memorable thread (and near as I can tell the only staff posts on the subject) was when James Jacobs first argued that the spellcaster would be unable to cast his highest level spells, then sort of changed his mind and suggested they should change it, then James Bulmahn posted, pointed out that apparently everyone in the thread was wrong and locked the thread without actually answering the question. Bonus points since JJ also states that rogues shouldn't lose sneak attack damage progression, which I believe you previously asserted that they do.

Since then there's been a new thread asking the question every couple of months that argues the question back and forth without ever really reaching any kind of conclusion.

Clearly there's confusion on this topic. It'd be nice if it was cleared up, ideally with a FAQ outlining exactly what is and is not affected by Negative levels. If we get a cheat sheet then maybe GMs like yourselves would be more inclined to use that rules section!

First printing of the CRB august 2009, JJ post Jan 14, 2010. The game wasn't even 6 month old and negative levels worked very differently in the 3.5, so it is comprehensible it there was still some doubt in JJ mind on how it worked.

Try to find something more recent to support your position.

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Weirdo wrote:

Yeah, I disagree with CampinCarl9127.

First, I don't think there's good evidence that any ability that scales with level counts as a level-dependent variable except the ability to cast higher level spells. The text says you are "treated as one level lower for the purpose of level-dependent variables (such as spellcasting)," not "such as caster level," which makes broader penalties to spellcasting plausible, even if your spell slots are specifically not touched.

Second, it's horribly unfair.

Many spells are either completely unaffected by caster level (eg Time Stop, Bestow Curse) or minimally affected (minute/level buffs like Shield often are effectively "one combat" buffs). DCs don't care about caster level, just spell level and casting stat. Depending on spell choice, a wizard or sorcerer could be at full or nearly full magical power even after taking multiple negative levels.

A magus, however, is going to have a heck of a time when every negative level strips damage from their bread-and-butter attack spells and reduces both the number of points in their arcane pool and the effect of each point for things like enhancing weapons. And they're much more affected by taking a -1 attack penalty per level when they're not even full BAB.

Similarly, the attack reduction and loss of sneak attack devastates the rogue; paladins suffer from greatly reduced smite damage and lay on hands uses/potency; and the monk is super duper hosed since you lose unarmed strike damage, AC bonus, and fast movement, not to mention the damage to features like Stunning Fist.

So basically, with this interpretation negative levels are terrible for everyone except for buffer/debuffer full casters (eg the God Wizard), the group that least needs its power level protected.

Receiving a negative level don't remove arcane pool point or rage point or perform points. At most it would lower your maximum pool and I doubt it applies to them. If you are already under your maximum value almost certainly you will not suffer a damage on that front.

Level dependent variable are something that is expressed as X*your level and the arcane pool and rounds of rage and perform are acquired when you get a new level, they aren't something that is multiplied by your current level. if you have some effect that change your current level, in a positive way you don't get them, so you don't lose them when there is a effect that lower your current level.
Edit in italics

PRD - CRB wrote:

Energy Drain and Negative Levels

Some spells and a number of undead creatures have the ability to drain away life and energy; this dreadful attack results in "negative levels." These cause a character to take a number of penalties.

For each negative level a creature has, it takes a cumulative –1 penalty on all ability checks, attack rolls, combat maneuver checks, Combat Maneuver Defense, saving throws, and skill checks. In addition, the creature reduces its current and total hit points by 5 for each negative level it possesses. The creature is also treated as one level lower for the purpose of level-dependent variables (such as spellcasting) for each negative level possessed. Spellcasters do not lose any prepared spells or slots as a result of negative levels. If a creature's negative levels equal or exceed its total Hit Dice, it dies.

A creature with temporary negative levels receives a new saving throw to remove the negative level each day. The DC of this save is the same as the effect that caused the negative levels.

Some abilities and spells (such as raise dead) bestow permanent level drain on a creature. These are treated just like temporary negative levels, but they do not allow a new save each day to remove them. Level drain can be removed through spells like restoration. Permanent negative levels remain after a dead creature is restored to life. A creature whose permanent negative levels equal its Hit Dice cannot be brought back to life through spells like raise dead and resurrection without also receiving a restoration spell, cast the round after it is restored to life.

Nothing about losing arcane pool or rage or perform rounds (and the latter two are in the CRB).

About the inability to cast a spell:

PRD wrote:

Caster Level

A spell's power often depends on its caster level, which for most spellcasting characters is equal to her class level in the class she's using to cast the spell.

You can cast a spell at a lower caster level than normal, but the caster level you choose must be high enough for you to cast the spell in question, and all level-dependent features must be based on the same caster level.

Notice how it say "you can" and "you choose". The reduction to level dependent variable isn't something that you chose to do, it is mandatory.

Try to find a rule that say "you may never cast a spell unless your caster level is high enough to cast" or some such. There isn't any.
Actually there is plenty of creatures that cast SLA with a caster level way lower than the minimum needed.

PRD wrote:

Genie, Efreeti

Spell-Like Abilities (CL 11th)
1/day—grant up to 3 wishes (to nongenies only

No CL 17 here, it is 11.

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graystone wrote:
For myself, fluff text the expendable part that can be safely jettisoned for my own fluff.

The problem is that nothing guarantee that what you call "fluff" is the same thing that other people will call fluff when reading the same piece of text.

With feats it is a minor problem, we already have a reasonably clear separation between the description and the mechanics.

With spells? In this forum I have read people define fluff what I consider pieces of the rules and vice versa.
Same for ability descriptions, traits, monster abilities and so on.

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PRD wrote:
When adding new levels of an existing class or adding levels of a new class (see Multiclassing, below), make sure to take the following steps in order. First, select your new class level. You must be able to qualify for this level before any of the following adjustments are made. Second, apply any ability score increases due to gaining a level. Third, integrate all of the level's class abilities and then roll for additional hit points. Finally, add new skills and feats. For more information on when you gain new feats and ability score increases, see Table: Character Advancement and Level-Dependent Bonuses.

When you advance in level you take the skills before taking the feats.

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Doomed Hero wrote:

I seriously hate this pedantic b*+*+!@$.

There is no rules-backed reason not to allow this. It isn't unbalanced. It doesn't create problems in the game. It doesn't break any rules. If a GM wants to disallow it for thematic or style reasons, fine. Lets not pretend the mechanics don't support the idea though. That's nonsense.

Your Human would have Kitsune ancestry. Part of that ancestry is the potential ability to shape shift into a fox, just like a normal Kitsune.

You have the heritage, you are allowed to take the feat, the feat works as listed.

Anyone who says otherwise is being arbitrarily limiting.

Considering that purchasing the feat and saying that it work is based on "pedantic b*+*+!@$" I suppose you hate the OP too.

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My reply will be on the same level of the question.
"Sure, you can, enjoy your life as a fox."
The feat don't give a way to turn back into an human. So you assume fox form and stay in that form forever.

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Quandary cited the right passage, but didn't bolded the most relevant part:

PRD wrote:
Eidolon: A summoner begins play with the ability to summon to his side a powerful outsider called an eidolon. The eidolon forms a link with the summoner, who, forever after, summons an aspect of the same creature. An eidolon has the same alignment as the summoner that calls it and can speak all of his languages. Eidolons are treated as summoned creatures, except that they are not sent back to their home plane until reduced to a number of negative hit points equal to or greater than their Constitution score. In addition, due to its tie to its summoner, an eidolon can touch and attack creatures warded by protection from evil and similar effects that prevent contact with summoned creatures.

The first bolded part is enough: "Eidolons are treated as summoned creatures" is clear enough. AMF make summoned creatures blink out and the eidolons are summoned creatures.

The second bolded passage reiterate that they are summoned creatures explaining that they have a special exemption that other summoned creatures lack.

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Ravingdork wrote:

The orc racial trait needs to be errata'd to a racial bonus as well.

The UC trait is fine as is since it isn't always active (which will be especially true after the above errata). :P

It double the power of stone of good luck, and that is a constant item.

A trait that make a 20K item work as a 80K item. Nice.
Depending on what other abilities you can use at low level it can be a very god trait to take.

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Glord Funkelhand wrote:
Does that mean a witch can draw a wand while cackling?

"Regular move" mean moving, not taking a move action. It is the Move action of the Actions In Combat table, the first you find in the "Move Action" section of the table, not the whole section.

I.e. this:Move

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Gwen Smith wrote:

Surely, though, once something attacks you in the surprise round, you are now aware of it. Can you cry out in pain or do you have to wait for your turn in the first round?

And could you say, "ow, I was hit by a ghoul!" Instead of just "ow, I was hit!" ?

Yes, you can cry in pain, no you can't identify what has hit you. You are seeing stars and clutching you head/hand/whatever in pain.

Why you guys try to metagame this way?

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dumptruckman wrote:

The biggest issue I've seen with it is not allowing knowledge check to identify creatures and warning your party until your turn.

It's already exceedingly clear that the knowledge check can be done instantaneously upon perceiving the creature. It's just that apparently speaking about what I know has to wait until my turn since I'm flat footed.

"Knowledge checks on your turn" is how the majority of my PFS lodge's GMs run it and I am trying to show that this is not RAW.

In my reading of the rules, at worst it is subject to GM interpretation due to flat-footed stating "unable to react normally to the situation." At best, you can speak while flat-footed because there aren't rules saying you can't.

You are flat footed, so you probably have failed your perception check or for some other reason you aren't unaware of the situation. So no, you can't make a knowledge check as you haven't noticed anything, you can't transmit information as you haven't noticed anything.

Until you act you are at the "Duh, what is happening?" stage.

Some people has special training (Uncanny Dodge) and can react by instinct, but they haven't a clear idea of what is happening until they get to act.

So, no shouting a warning while flatfooted, no knowledge check while flat footed.

PRD wrote:


Unaware Combatants: Combatants who are unaware at the start of battle don't get to act in the surprise round. Unaware combatants are flat-footed because they have not acted yet, so they lose any Dexterity bonus to AC.

Unaware people is, you know, unaware.

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Oddman80 wrote:

forget proficiency penalties... even if you take the heavy armor proficiency feat, the fact that your dex is being limited by something you are no longer wearing... your speed is being reduced by something you are no longer wearing... and you are considered encumbered by a an item that you are no longer wearing because it has fully melded into your body and become one with you in your wildshaped form... To me it makes no sense.

If they errata'd the wild special property description to say that wild armor DOES NOT meld into your body per the polymorph rules, but rather it causes the affected armor to change form with you as you wildshape so that it becomes barding of the appropriate size and shape.... well - then i would have no problem with this FAQ ruling of what penalties are maintained.

You get the AC from something you are no longer wearing.

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Casual Viking wrote:

I'm usually the guy who says "F@!% your painstaking discussion of the interpretation of the words, reading takes context, interpret for consistency". But the wording of this spell is completely crystal clear, and absolutely, no doubt about it, allows you to Heighten Mount and trade the horse for a Bearded Devil.

The Bearded Devil might not automatically attack your opponent, though; it might stand around waiting to be saddled. That's less clear. But I notice that the Mount spell doesn't say anything about not going into combat, just "...to serve you as a mount. The steed serves willingly and well." It doesn't have the passus from Summon Monster about "It attacks your opponents to the best of its ability", but if you can communicate with it, I see no reason it wouldn't do what you tell it. As a conjuration(summoning) effect, it obeys orders unless otherwise specified.

If you have the ride skill, you are riding the creatrue and you can make the appropriate skill check he will do what a mount of his type do.

"Fight with a Combat-Trained Mount: If you direct your war-trained mount to attack in battle, you can still make your own attack or attacks normally. This usage is a free action."

I am willing to admit that any monster of the different summon lists is war trained, but riding them is difficult and most of them aren't trained to be ridden.

The effect is the same of a halfling stain on the shoulders of his barbarian friend as pretending to guide him with his knees.

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LazarX wrote:
Dallium wrote:


b) a 9th level Mount is a 9th level spell,
This is where you (and others) make your mistake. Mount is not a 9th level spell, it is a First Level spell heightened to be 9th level for purposes of spell save DC's and interactions with other spells that would block spells based on spell level. In all other aspects it is still that same First level spell.
FAQ wrote:

Heighten Spell is worded poorly and can be confusing. It lets you use a higher-level spell slot for a spell, treating the spell as if it were naturally a higher level spell than the standard version.[/quote+

Sorry, but it seem it is a higher level spell for all purposes. The text of the spell will still limit what it do, but for all uses it is a spell of the new level.

CLW heightened to 9th level is CLW 9th level. It still cure the same of the 1st elvel spell, but it is a 9th elvel spell.

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avr wrote:

If Heightened Mount smells too cheesy there's at least one other spell you could use for this - Eagle Aerie (or Summon Accuser, mentioned in the thread someone linked here.) The eagles will vanish after one fight, the accuser after 10 min/level, but being able to precast your summons is still valuable.

I didn't invent this combo, no.

Same problem:

You summon a flight of giant eagles (one per three caster levels, maximum of six; Bestiary 118) to ferry you and your allies across the skies. The eagles avoid combat if possible but defend themselves if attacked; if the eagles attack, the remaining duration of the spell changes from 1 hour per level to 1 round per level (so if the spell had 5 full hours left, the eagles remain in combat for 5 rounds before the spell ends).

turn into:

You summon a flight of Trumpet archon (one per three caster levels, maximum of six; Bestiary 118) to ferry you and your allies across the skies. The Trumpet archon avoid combat if possible but defend themselves if attacked; if the Trumpet archon attack, the remaining duration of the spell changes from 1 hour per level to 1 round per level (so if the spell had 5 full hours left, the eagles remain in combat for 5 rounds before the spell ends).

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Dallium wrote:
Dave Justus wrote:

I believe you could do this. However, it isn't really very useful. The mount spell makes the creature you summon serve as a mount. That is all that is does. It doesn't attack your foes or do anything but server willingly and well as a mount. Altering the creature summoned doesn't change the base spell.

So if you want to spend two spells to ride an earth elemental, it will do that. But it won't give you an earth elemental that can fight your enemies, use special abilities or obey other commands other than 'be a good mount'.

Where are you getting that? The full text of the Mount spell is:

Mount wrote:


You summon a light horse or a pony (your choice) to serve you as a mount. The steed serves willingly and well. The mount comes with a bit and bridle and a riding saddle.
Regular mounts can attack. Regular mounts can use all special abilities the creature/AC has. There is nothing in the language of the spell to suggest the Mount created by the spell behaves any differently.

Compare:

Mount wrote:
You summon a light horse or a pony (your choice) to serve you as a mount. The steed serves willingly and well. The mount comes with a bit and bridle and a riding saddle.

with

Summon spells wrote:
This spell summons an extraplanar creature (typically an outsider, elemental, or magical beast native to another plane). It appears where you designate and acts immediately, on your turn. It attacks your opponents to the best of its ability. If you can communicate with the creature, you can direct it not to attack, to attack particular enemies, or to perform other actions. The spell conjures one of the creatures from the 1st Level list on Table 10–1. You choose which kind of creature to summon, and you can choose a different one each time you cast the spell.

If you exchange a Trumpet archon for the pony, you get:

You summon a Trumpet archon to serve you as a mount. The steed serves willingly and well. The mount comes with a bit and bridle and a riding saddle.

You summon him to act as a mount. Summons do what the spell say they do. They aren't free to chose what they do and you can't give them orders that go outside the parameters of the spell that summoned them.
So, like a ordinary mount, your archon will defend himself if attacked, but he will not attack someone by his choice, nor you can order him to attack.

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Gabriel Cantrell wrote:
Talon Stormwarden wrote:
Restarting the day count back to 0 is not the same as fulfilling the ' 'died within 1 round' requirement of Breath of Life. This would not work by the rules.
Actually the dust very specifically states that it allows the corpse to "be identified or raised as if it were killed recently". So by the rules then it COULD work. Of course I imagine it would be subject to a GM ruling.

There is a gulf between "killed recently" and "killed in the last 6 seconds".

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Orfamay Quest wrote:
Orfamay Quest wrote:


I don't think the intention was to allow a first-level wizard to take this feat, so I think A is right out, as well. At a minimum, it would need to be A1: Magic jar needs to be on my spell list at a level that I can cast.

Further to previous, I think A1 (as above) trumps B (in my spellbook).

The reason being, feats are eternal, spellbooks are ephemeral.

If I have magic jar in my spellbook, and someone steals it or sunders it or burns it, have I just lost the feat? I would argue no,.... which means not-B.

A.1.1

Magic jar needs to be on my spell list at a level that I can cast and I must have learned it at some point in my career.

A spellcaster can't cast a spell he hasn't learned and the prerequisite is the ability to cast.

And we still have the problem of a sorcerer that has taed it away for another spell after learning the feat. I would say that he lose access to the feat.

Orfamay Quest wrote:


.... which would be very odd/unusual. I can't think of any other magical feats offhand that can be turned off by a sunder maneuver.

Not magical feats, but:

- Power attack when you get strength 13+ thanks to your belt of giant strength
- Combat Expertise when you get intelligence 13+ thanks to your headband of vast intelligence
and a few other feats.

Another corner case:
- a cleric that follow a divinity with a domain that give him magic jar and that change the divinity he follows, or simply retain his domain selection can lose permanently access to the spell and tush to the feat.

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Sgt Spectre wrote:


but basically it lowers a 2nd level spell that has a metamagic feat on it to become two levels lower... so 2nd level minus 2 equals zero... which one would think could be a cantrip or orison.... and thus infinite and not expended....

And that too is wrong. Even if you somehow reduce a spell elvel to 0 it don't become a cantrip. It become a 0 level spell. And there are no spell slots for 0 level spells.

They are 2 different features:

Spells: A wizard [blah, blah, blah]

Several row and bolded sections below that

Cantrips: Wizards can prepare a number of cantrips [blah, blah, blah]

Each bolded section is a different feature or subfeature and cantrips aren't a subfeature of spells.

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I consider more amazing the stats of a fox.
Tiny animal with Str 9.

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Well, a monk wielding a ornate staff, possibly with magical glyphs (arcane mark help there) and flowing robes can be mistaken for a wizard at first glance.

A wizard in an adventurer outfit, without a spell component pouch (a sorcerer is better as he get eschew materials for free), carrying a monk weapon can be mistaken for a monk.

I partially disagree with Claxon. While there is no mandatory look for classes, I am sure there are plenty of traveling comedians that give shows where there are the stereotypical wizard, knight, cleric and so on, so people has a idea of how they look.

To make a modern example, during a public symposium where a a political figures is speaking, the two guys dressed in suits that sit at the back of the room and that are 20 years younger and have 20 kilos of muscle more than the average participant scream security service.
Or the two guys in withe shirts and black dress walking to the supermarket say Mormons.

Even if officially the don't have a specific dress code there are things that pigeonhole people in a group on the basis of their apprentice. And people expert in disguising themselves can benefit from that.

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