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Old Marm

DeathQuaker's page

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8. RPG Superstar 6 Season Star Voter, 7 Season Star Voter, 8 Season Star Voter. 6,838 posts (11,225 including aliases). 5 reviews. 5 lists. 1 wishlist. 17 aliases.


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RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I largely enjoyed Daredevil, although I have my issues with it. Generally speaking, I think most of the plot beats they hit are spot-on and the character development is fantastic--with the noted exception that Matt seemed to grow down rather than up by the end of S2, IMO. However, I really struggle with the pacing, and there are episodes I've fallen asleep in front of but still managed to hit all the plot points. The episodes seem to go "5 minutes amazing character development"-"15 minutes of way too lengthy, gorey fight scene"-"10 minutes of people mumbling in the dark"-"5 minutes awesome plot twist-"10 more minutes of people mumbling in the dark"-"10 minute, too lengthy, gorey fight scene"-"satisfyingly written 5 minute denouement and setup for next episode."

I really want to walk into a scene in Daredevil and shout "WHY ARE YOU ALL WHISPERING????!!!!???"

Karen and Foggy are definitely MVPs, and overall the cast, both character writing wise and the actors who play them, are frikking amazing. I liked Matt in S1 and didn't like him in S2, and everyone else is awesome. I'm excited about Foggy working for Hogarth, and worried for him at the same time, because yes, I have seen Jessica Jones. :) (And I loved it.)

I found Jessica Jones also a tad slow at times (I think another issue is 60 minutes episodes are just too long) but overall better paced, and less plagued by people mumbling in the dark for a third of the episode. It was fantastic, and another show with incredible cast and characters.

Looking forward to Luke Cage 2, although I'd trade it for Jessica Jones Season 2 in a heartbeat.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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Covenant Convalescent Home for Deluded Synths is up and running. (That is Danse and he is wearing an eyebot helmet because I make him wear stupid hats.)

Current occupants are Danse, X6-88, and a random settler. Ada is their provisioner (her homebase is my main HQ at Starlight). I couldn't bring myself to send Curie there, even though it was more for her to look after the others (which is all of course the story in my head and doesn't matter a whit in terms of game effects--but much of the Fallout experience IS the story in your head, so there). I just plan to send a couple more people there to operate the clinic and the cafe. They should be comfortable and safe, and in my head we can use the horrible research done by the original residents to apply to more genteel psychoanalysis of synths in hopes one day they may be able to interact in normal society once more.

I misplaced Deezer. I hacked him to do something for me, and then somehow he followed me when I fast traveled (although the current active command was "stay here") and then when I fast traveled back to Covenant he was gone. Ah well.

I also finished turning Egret Marina into a fully operational crafting and trading center. I really like that place--the standing buildings are quite usable with a bit of work (although irritatingly there's a couple fallen shelves you can't scrap), and it's large. I like that it has a little diner and the dockside scenery is nice. I've maxed out build limit there, although I of course have some extraneous protective walls I could always scrap if I decide to invest more in decorative items. I named the marketplace "Daily Deals" for Phyllis.

I think some of the lighting actually uses up a lot of size count--I guess because the lighting effects take more juice to render.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Bigby FrostFire wrote:
Well..If a Rouge can use Evasion in a Mithrail breast plate I wouldn't see why it would stop a trait.

Most people interpret the rules as a rogue being able to use evasion in mithral armor, but it depends on how flexible your GM is in interpreting the "other limitations" clause in the description of mithral. It might not be popular, but personally, I wouldn't allow it. Especially if the rogue didn't have mithral armor proficiency, which by default it does not (it would be bizarre if the rogue were hindered by its armor class penalty to all Str and Dex checks but could still dodge fireballs without hindrance).

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Fair enough, Scythia!

I think it's hard for me to see unfulfilled potential... but the game's also in its early life and I'm looking forward to DLC and such as well. I don't know if we'll ever see the game as they really envisioned it but there's still stuff to look forward to.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Otherwhere wrote:
DeathQuaker wrote:
But yes it's irksome how buggy it is and it's obviously a half-assed, unfinished version of something they had much grander plans for originally.
You mean, kind of like how The Combat Zone was originally intended for you to be able to do cage fights? There's a ton of recorded dialogue with Tommy Lonegan that's not implemented, but very interesting to hear because it really suggests that the character interactions there were planned to be much more involved.

Yup, and how the Brotherhood plotline was supposed to have a lot more variance and opportunity, like the possibility of becoming Elder yourself, or getting promoted to Sentinel still if you finish the MQ for the Minutemen but remain an active, loyal member of the Brotherhood.

Don't get me wrong, I have put a ridiculous amount of time into this game--more than I have in any other RPG in a long time, and I love RPGs. So obviously it has a lot of appeal to me, and I can't look at my 380+ hours of play--which is a lot for me personally on one game, even if it's not for other people--and go "meh." Obviously I've had buttloads of fun. Fallout 4 in particular has beautiful, varied world with some great characters, and it scratches both my itch to explore and my itch to build and customize very satisfyingly.

But--and I often feel this way about Bethesda games--I also see a lot of failed potential. I have a feeling Bethesda goes big in concept and often bites off more than it can chew (it may make what are considered AAA games but the studio's still relatively small). Rather than build up from small--okay, this is what we MUST have, this is what would be nice to add, and build the "musts" to absolute completion first, then add on the "would be nice" bits one bit of a time--they just try to go all in and then ultimately fail to deliver what they fully intended. Even if they deliver something that is fun, you can see obvious places where they actually failed to meet their OWN expectations, and it's inevitable that failure is going to extend to disappointment by the players. The brilliance of the game is seen in the world itself, and in a lot of amazingly crafted moments here and there... but whoever is running the show, making sure things get prioritized properly and that everything they want to finish gets finished, is falling down on the job repeatedly. Given this has largely been unchanged since prior games (Skyrim and Fallout 3 also had a lot of "oh, I bet this would have been so much cooler if this coding would have been fixed", etc.) they are also moreover not learning from their mistakes, and that is frustrating. They need a new "showrunner" as it were, one who is not overambitious, who can schedule and prioritize development correctly. Ambition is good, but ambition without the ability to follow-through is a road to disaster.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Turin the Mad wrote:
DQ, you should be able to mosey over to the entrance (the sewer on the other side of the lake with the grouchy fisherman) and just start some trouble.

That is what I did; as I noted, I shot the evil doctor and that made everyone hostile. No one was until I attacked though.

Quote:


IIRC, synth infiltrators that are up to no good apparently take a few days to work themselves up to the task. The mill around all day and not, not working, drawing and holstering/sheathing their weapons and generally being annoyingly useless.

I'm presuming by that account that the Concord Five are all synths. ;)

spoiler:

Yes, I know about Sturges

Quote:


Deezer just ... locks into spot and hands out lemonade samples. He's harmless, and doesn't count against Covenant's settlers total.

He gets buggy too, though. I actually hacked him because he runs away from the fight and disappears sometimes, so I hacked him to deactivate him, then reactivated him, and he followed me back to Covenant so hopefully he'll stay there.

Quote:
Covenant is festooned with annoying bugs. The turrets are permanently useless - even if you pop them (and when you place your own turrets, they fire on the pre-existing unhackable turrets, which them fire back, so at least there's a "Turret Duel" to amuse yourself with) their wreckage permanently smoulders and clutters up the place.

I don't mind destroying the old turrets, but it's stupid you can't build new turrets on the same mounts. It's also stupid there isn't a terminal you can use to deactivate the turrets and reprogram them to just be yours.

Quote:


The beds you can't scrap or move or anything else ... and they're the coolest beds in the game .. which you still can't build. The whole place is exacerbating to deal with.

There are a lot of aggravating aspects of Covenant yes (it's why I ignored it for a long time), but being unable to scrap the beds I don't consider a problem (moving the would be nice, and don't get me started on being unable to build your own nice beds [fan mods notwithstanding]). It's also annoying you can't move the sleeping bag that's just laying outside. I might disable/delete that one with the console.

I'm going to use this as a pretty small settlement though (probably around 5 occupants tops--a farmer, a guard, a surgeon, a bartender, and a scavenger) and it should be perfect for my purposes even with its issues. :)

What I like for Covenant is that I don't have to do a lot of building: the structures are more than adequate and the layout pretty good, so it's just a matter of getting furniture and amenities where I want them.

But yes it's irksome how buggy it is and it's obviously a half-assed, unfinished version of something they had much grander plans for originally.

I think in this playthrough the only settlements I haven't obtained yet at this point is Spectacle Island and Croup Manor. There's a number I need to touch up/rebuild/add on to, though. Sanctuary is actually still fairly primitive, and Egret Tours needs to be finished being turned into an upscale (for the Wasteland) trading post.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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There might be a limit on how many given creatures you can have, but I like the idea of the crazy cat person house. Send your dottiest looking settler to it, and trap a bunch of cats, and voila.

Probably one of the actual ramshackle house settlements would be best, like Croup Manor or Taffington Boathouse or Coastal Cottage (you could put all the cat bowls in the garage in that one). Nordhagen would be great but it has preset settlers that I don't think you can send away.

Working on the Covenant Asylum, by the way. Gotta say, it is buggy as heck to get Covenant once you've finished the main quest (not that Covenant isn't buggy beforehand). If you've blown up the Institute, Covenant acts friendly to you--they actually acknowledge you've blown up the Institute and are grateful--but there's no way to make the settlement act allied to you (if you want to ally with the current occupants). But, while the mayor warns you about "Dan," Honest Dan is nowhere to be seen and there's no way to properly start the Human Error quest. I could break into places and still gather information that something clearly sinister is going on there, but even when I went into their facility, no one was hostile. Cool and fine, but when I go talk to the doctor chick, she just barks "I have no regrets!" or something like that and I can't even confront her about the stuff I've seen. You can unlock the captive's cage, but she also just stands there cycling through barkstrings.

Now, narratively, my character has still gathered enough evidence to know these people are torturing synths for no especially good reason, so she has no qualms about shooting them in the head. Shooting the doctor, even from stealth, makes everyone automatically go hostile, even back in the town where they can't possibly know what you've done.

But now I have my asylum for delusional synths. I need to finish setting it up properly, but I'm turning the office into a doctor's office and might turn Penny's store into a cafe/commisary/cafeteria. Keep the other houses as bunk houses. X6-88 who thinks I'm the director of the Institute and that his home isn't a giant smoking hole in the ground will be sent there, as is Danse who still barks "ad Victoriam!" as he singlehandedly shoots down vertibirds and slaughters the Brotherhood occupants inside, and who has never taken off his power armor and I'm sure is more than a little bit rusty and stinky. I'm tempted to send Curie--love her to death and she's much more mentally stable, but sometimes she also she still thinks she's a Ms Nanny and besides, she could care for the other patients and benevolently experiment on them. I have the perk now that lets you see creature resistances, so a couple settlers with unexplained energy resistance might also be sent, just to round things out. Don't know if I'll have settlers or robots run the surgery and cafe.

I left Deezer intact there, but I can't assign him to anything. I might construct Deezer II and have him run the cafe.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

The concrete pieces are very adaptable. They can stack against each other as well as snap in a line making them great for filling in gaps or weird places.

The downside is sometimes the walls are TOO modular. The walls can snap on in a few positions, but there's only one "right" one for getting the roof pieces to line up correctly, so there's a few times where I've had to rearrange pieces, or finish the roof first, to get things right.

Generally they're awesome though.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

On a completely different note:

a) I've learned that since companions gain affinity with you just by your spending lots of time with them, wasting a lot of time building things is a good way to earn affinity with the harder-to-charm companions. Strong idolizes me, I like to think because he's impressed with my hospital-building skills, but probably just because we've been spending a lot of time together (but hey, I am "sharing" all this scrap I've been making him carry).

b) X6-88 is buggy as heck in my game. I got him as a companion and sent him to guard Warwick... then proceeded to finish the MQ for the Railroad. So X6-88 is programmed to leave you if you get "banished by the Institute" -- much like Danse will leave you if you become hated by the Brotherhood...

Danse is stupid:

Even though they want him dead and go aggro on you and him even if you ARE otherwise friends with them

-- but the thing is in the Railroad Ending, you actually never properly get "banished by the Institute" -- that particular status doesn't trigger. You are allies with them until the moment you start the rebellion, and while post end-of-MQ, synth NPCs and the like will appropriately attack you, the "banished by the Institute" flag doesn't go off. So X6 still considers you an ally.

And the thing is, I went to see what his status was in Warwick, and I can not only still travel with him as a companion (and gain his affinity up to idolized) but he also continually tells me what an amazing director he thinks I'll be and how glad he is to have completed "the mission" and how glad he is I'm on the Institute's side. He also barks of his disdain for the surface and how the Institute is the "only way forward" and I'm like dude, your "only way forward" is a smoking radioactive hole. I took him to Trinity Tower (on my way to picking up Strong) and we get a really great view of the giant crater that was CIT, still nothing from him. I've wondered what would happen if I physically took him to the crater, but I expect nothing.

Really weird they did not think to program this better. Not unexpected--it is Bethesda after all, the great overlords of overlooking/ignoring details--but odd. He comes off as kind of very sadly delusional (same as Danse with his dialogue) and I find myself feeling really sorry for him. I think I may need to set up a settlement as a mental asylum for synths suffering from nervous breakdowns and delusions, and send X6 and Danse there.

Oooh, I haven't conquered Covenant yet.... that would be hilarious....

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I'm glad in this game I hadn't extensively worked on Sanctuary. It was cleared out with all the necessities in place but I hadn't built it up much. I'm going to build a nice concrete-walled shopping area and turn the central yellow workshop house into a power plant/workshop. "My" house I think I'm going to turn into a recreational building, using some of the fancy lights to jazz it up (in my first playthrough, my Sole Survivor clung to the house as the last vestige of what she had, but this SS would rather move on, and if something she had can be turned into a source of fun for the survivors of the first Minutemen, all the better.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Otherwhere wrote:

Wasteland Workshop DLC review

Whew, man! There's a lot of not so happy reviews out there on the WW dlc!

What are your impressions?

It seems to be chic to hate on Wasteland Workshop on the net (although there have been positive reviews as well). I'm not sure what some folks were expecting for five dollars.

Me, I like it. I do think the DLC could have included a little more polish and items---FOR $5, yes, I think we should have gotten just a little more stuff in the way of snappable steel letters, nice beds (like you get in Covenant), weapon acks,jukeboxes that play somethng other than classical music, and dressable mannequins.

But I'm also delighted by what IS there, and am especially impressed by the very complex and modular concrete building objects (supplemented by vendors selling a lo more of the stuff). The traps, lighting, etc. all great too. Worth the cost of a single commuter train ticket, certainly.

It ain't perfect but it was exactly as advertised and they didn't overcharge for it,so I'm good!

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Otherwhere wrote:
DeathQuaker wrote:
Otherwhere wrote:
Scythia wrote:

I've heard that if you put a teddy bear or comfy pillow onto a bed the game considers it marked by you, and so doesn't assign settlers to it.

Haven't had a chance to test that though, my current character only has robots living in her base.

I've tried the comfy pillow thing and it hasn't stopped NPCs from using my bed.

Since I'm on console, I can't use commands to "lock" the ownership.

Again, just make sure settlers are assigned to their own bed.

The challenge to that approach is the new settlers who arrive while I'm off saving the Commonwealth. They show up and find an "unassigned" bed and think: "Hey! I'll take this one! No one else seems to be using it, and it's got a comfy pillow!" Ingrates.

Not a huge issue because I'm seldom there. But it would be nice if I could assign a bed to myself so I don't have to hassle with making sure each and every settler has their own personal one.

It would be nice yes, but I a) only reserve myself a bed in a settlement without an active recruitment beacon, and b) if a settler shows up in my bed, they're the one I have to reassign.

If in doubt, though, I can ring the bell and just reassign everybody.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Otherwhere wrote:
Scythia wrote:

I've heard that if you put a teddy bear or comfy pillow onto a bed the game considers it marked by you, and so doesn't assign settlers to it.

Haven't had a chance to test that though, my current character only has robots living in her base.

I've tried the comfy pillow thing and it hasn't stopped NPCs from using my bed.

Since I'm on console, I can't use commands to "lock" the ownership.

Again, just make sure settlers are assigned to their own bed.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Sharoth wrote:
DeathQuaker wrote:

I value fun incredibly, but I could use better time management skills. ;)

But I appreciate the point.

As for Cricket, I'm surprised she didn't thank you for it.

What is this "Time Management" that you speak of?

A sub-skill governed by a thing called "Executive Function" which is also alien to me.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Sharoth wrote:

~looks at the settler at my settlement~ Yes. There IS something you can do to help me out. GET THE HELL OUT OF MY BED!!!

~shakes my head~ Why? Why couldn't Bethesda make it to where you can assign a bed to yourself? Why?

While it's annoying/time consuming, just make sure "your" bed is an EXTRA beyond what's needed, and make sure all settlers are assigned to their own bed, and it shouldn't happen.

On PC, player.setownership should also work.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I value fun incredibly, but I could use better time management skills. ;)

But I appreciate the point.

As for Cricket, I'm surprised she didn't thank you for it.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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Scythia wrote:
Was anybody else annoyed when they cleared out Breakheart Banks and couldn't find a workshop?

Yes. Also West Everett Estates.

I was supposed to be getting work done in my real life home today. Of course I was wasting time instead getting my Coastal Cottage up and running. Used new concrete to build usable living quarters above/around the shell of the ruined cottage, with the hole in the ground as a utility basement holding a power generator and water pump (also cookstove, because reasons). The tiny bit of the cottage with the door got walled in, spruced up and named "The Love Shack," which is of course a cozy couch space filled with kitten pictures (what else would it be?). (Although, upstairs on the roof patio there is a jukebox to which you can hurry up and bring your money.)

And then I HAD to (had to, mind, this was way more important than cleaning house or doing laundry) clear out Kingsport Lighthouse so I could waste precious, precious steel solely to make this sign.

I will note it is annoying and odd that the lettering does not snap the way the neon letters do, and also that they didn't think to provide us arrow signs.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

In other news, can't remember if I said this earlier, but the BOS kacked poor Revere. He's been replaced by a high-end assaultron named Betsy.

Needed a resilient provisioner for up north, made a reinforced protectron with sentrybot legs. Painted it yellow and named it "The Bus."

Trying to turn Coastal Cottage into an actually buildable habitable area. Wasteland Workshop's concrete items are helping a lot.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I found a staggering assault rifle; haven't used it but it's a pretty cool weapon.

Weirdly, lately all I get for drops are melee weapons (and usually basic ones, like lead pipes and boards) and leather armor (not sturdy or heavy either). I'm level 70. I honestly am really happy with what I've got for weapons and armor so I don't need more stuff, but it's frustrating to get this unscrappable loot that normally isn't even special enough to equip to companions or guard minions.

I can think of five good legendaries I've gotten in my level 70 game, including the staggering rifle. The others were an explosive shotgun, a plasma-throwing combat shotgun, an irradiating flamer (more interesting than powerful; I named it "Marie's Revenge" and gave it to Curie), and a freezing gauss rifle. This last one is the only one I actually personally use; I am carrying it alongside the Alien Blaster, Wazer Wifle and Deliverer (which is still my MVP weapon even at this level, though the gauss rifle is best for certain tough enemies). I also have Shem Drowne's sword as a backup melee weapon, but this character almost never uses a melee weapon (unlike my prior character who generally answered every problem with a super sledge).

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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FFIX was the only Final Fantasy game I ever played from start to finish. I've played a number and certainly appreciate why the franchise is so popular and beloved by many gamers, but there was something particular about the kind of grind and certain overused tropes---or occasionally, a boss battle I just didn't have the patience to beat---that didn't appeal to me personally, so most of the games I dropped part way through without finishing. Even though FFIX also certainly had its grindyness and nearly impossible boss fights and such, there was something to its pacing that worked better for me. Not to mention, I found it charming in a way that grabbed me and compelled me to finish, a quality I did not see as much in some of its brother and sister games.

So I'm really glad to see this game get a resurgence, and not just give older fans a chance to relive it on a playable system (my poor PS2 is giving up its ghost) but also a new audience to enjoy it. It sounds like it hasn't aged too poorly. Even though I don't replay a lot of JRPGs (even the ones I have finished take a LONG time to get through and I have fortresses to build in Fallout 4) I may have to pick it up and run through it a bit.

Now, if we could just get the Suikoden series (yes, every single one) ported to PC... but Konami sucks these days and would never do something so cool or nice.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I believe GECK is officially to come out, with console support not far behind. Last I heard was "soon," whatever that means.

And FWIW, I sort of feel your pain. While I'm on PC, I'm not using mods at least until the GECK comes out and likely not until after a few more patches/DLC are released; patches and DLC can often disable early mods and/or non-GECK created mods tend to be a little more risky. So I'd rather wait till it's safer to use mods. Which means even if it's by choice for me, I don't have the option either.

NOW, I know there are fine folks here that are using PC mods. This statement is not a judgement upon you. I'm sure you've used mods happily and without incident. It's about what I'm personally willing to risk/go through/bother to download/install for myself only.

On the upside, my game apparently reads the boards because I just killed a raider that helped me complete another T-51 suit. :)

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I've gotten a LOT of stuff like that. All right legs or arms, etc. In trying to collect a suit of heavy combat armor, I could find everything EXCEPT a right arm for ages. I really wanted a full suit of T-51 so I could have Railroad armor (which only is available for the T-51) and every single damned suit was missing a left leg (eventually I found one, but it took a ridiculously long time. After some dedicated collection, I've got two full suits of T-51 [but a metric asston of the supposedly rare T-60 because the Brotherhood wears it; I even have more X-01 armor--which is supposed to be a post-war rarity--than I do T-51]).

Rather than have a "legendary item" that is a random drop or even a purchasable item (most of the "unique" weapons and armor are legendaries with unique names), I wish they had created hard-to-find, unique item mods. They could still drop, to an extent, randomly (but once you find one, you don't get another). So rather than be like, "Well, I really want to switch to combat armor, but this metal leg boosts my Str," and are the kind of anal weirdo like myself who needs her armor to match, you could just swap out the mod you want to the stuff you want to wear (but are still limited to what you can find and probably that you could use only one unique mod per item).

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Otherwhere wrote:
Hindsight is always better, but: I wish that settlement building actually had an effect in game.

If we don't see some of this (remembering this the first time they've tried settlements) in Fallout 4 DLC, hopefully they will consider it for Fallout 5.

Quote:


In the new Survival Mode, yes - they have a purpose. But I'm talking about an actual effect in terms of: take this settlement from that group of Raiders, and less Raiders spawn in that region (unless & until they take it back);

Hell to the yes. Tho I also want less respawning in general. I don't care about loot resets, I'd rather a cleared area stay cleared; as it is I feel like I can never truly accomplish anything.

Quote:


this settlement has a good spot for mining iron; this settlement has a rich supply of concrete; and so on.

That would be AWESOME. Especially as, say, some settlements are near things that would be good resources. For example, in the Finch Farm quest, you have to clear Saugus. Why not have Finch overtake Saugus and become a source of steel? (also Saugus is one of those places that cell-resets WAAAAAAAY too f%*!ing often).

Sanctuary is near a quarry, it could be a source of concrete. An area near a forest could be a source of wood. Etc.

Quote:


It would have added to the factions as well. Taking a settlement away from another faction could be as useful as taking one for a faction, and deprive them of needed resources.

Yeah. It would be interesting for example if you do Proctor Teagan's quests to extort settlements (which puts the settlement as affiliated with the BOS) and it weakens the Minutemen (outside of depriving the player of a controllable settlement) and vice versa.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

One of the whole points of my sort of completionist playthrough I've been on for awhile was that I largely ignored the Minutemen for the first part of the game. I established a couple settlements (one just for me, one for minions to start a glue farm) but focused on the main quest and other quests I wanted to do first. Then after I did the main quest, I rescued Preston's sorry ass and started doing the Minutemen proper, having no further pressing personal business to take care of. Feels a LOT better this way.

On the other hand, the "Defend the Castle" scenario still happens post-MQ if you don't side with the Minutemen during the MQ. Since I sided with the Railroad in the MQ and blew up the BOS, the Brotherhood attacked the Castle. Since I'm level 68, the enemies were leveled accordingly, and DAMN was that a tough fight! And I didn't even get a chance to loot all the bodies before they disappeared (lost some Legendaries, but given 99% of Legendaries give me troubleshooters switchblades and poisoners leather legs, I don't really give a s@#@ about Legendary drops anymore). The bastards killed one of my provisioners and a few of my Minutemen. On the upshot, with the Prydwen already gone and now all of those Paladin Commanders and Knight Commanders dead, there can't be much in the way of Brotherhood leadership left in the Commonwealth.

I put up neon signage in the Castle to help note what certain areas do, very historically accurate, along of course with the fusion generator (the Castle's a great place to stick one of these since it's already well-wired up and decreases generator clutter).

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Exactly.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I haven't tried it yet, but I've read that both the Mechanist's Lair and the Boston Airport still restrict resource building of things like food sources. I am really unclear on why they restricted it. For the Mechanist's Lair, I can see the reasoning that it's indoors, so you have no sunlight to grow plants (although that could be easily fixed with a sun lamp), but that doesn't apply to the airport. Especially when yes, you can build water pumps.

The planters should still show up in the Misc Resources menu elsewhere.

OMG yes. I got really unnecessarily excited about candles last night. I love the new electric lights too (what's up, strings of lights?), but I also like having lighting sources that I don't need a power source for. Especially since I'm pretty sure that even as resource limited as it is, the wasteland is not in short supply of tallow.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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Building... addiction... starting all... over... must... go... to bed.....

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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Aralicia wrote:
DeathQuaker wrote:
- Likewise, I wouldn't homebrew with folks new to the game. Again, I think it's important to know the rules before changing them. I've been screwed up myself by playing games where a GM homebrewed tons and then joining another GM's game to realize I totally didn't know how to play at all. Or at the very least, it's important if teaching rules to someone, to be clear on what are the rules-as-written and what's homebrew.
On this point, one of my friends did a great job with a "learning curve" homebrew, where he started his players on a light version of the game (for example, without AoO or Concentration checks), and reintroducing removed mechanics one at a time (usually with a specially crafted encounter) until the players got to the full unmodified ruleset around level 3.

Certainly there will be exceptions to almost anything I pointed out. If the purpose of the homebrew is rules-teaching in an easy manner, obviously that covers the part of being clear about what are the rules-as-written. :)

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Very much looking forward to this. Is it weird I'm excited about the signs and neon lettering? Because I very much am.

The concrete walls and the like look awesome too. I think the intent is to build jails and the like but obviously massive fortresses are coming.

And I'm totally gettin' me a kitty cat.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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Good to see you too, Tac! I've been staying quiet on most threads (outside the Fallout 4 forum and PBPs), but this looked interesting to me. :)

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

They're supposed to be very gaunt looking, like living shadow puppets. I'd look for humanoid figures with very slender forms, perhaps even undead creatures, and paint with the right coloration to make them look the way you want. If you do miniature conversion it might help--get a bony undead creature and smooth out some of the edges with putty so they don't actually look undead, but still has that weird slenderman look wayangs have.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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My couple or few cents:

Before you begin world design, think about the game you're running. What rulebooks are you using? You want to be sure your world supports the rules of the game, and vice versa. For example, if the world uses magic, but the rules don't have a magic system, you've run into a problem.

Think about ahead of time the rulebooks you're allowing and any exceptions to any rules-as-written you're willing to make. I will also note, based on personal experience, it is easier to design a world for rules-as-written than both change rules AND design a world--certain parameters are set for you which can actually make things easier. This doesn't mean homebrewing rules as well as world design isn't bad, but I wouldn't recommend it until you've got some world design experience under your belt. (So your first world might look fairly standard, but your second one you start playing with new races, etc.)

For a Pathfinder (or similar) game utilizing the core rulebook, where we are assuming you are not changing any rules, you know you need:

- A world that contains as common races all of the core races (plus any additional races you are including).

- A world that accommodates the existence of all the classes in the core rulebook. It's easy to accommodate for, say, rogues or fighters, but what about clerics and wizards? There are bards, so how are they trained? Are barbarians simply a type of warrior you find anywhere, or are they exclusively the result of a stereotypical tribal warrior clan? And so on. Think about not only where and how the classes exist, but how they are perceived by society, trained, etc.

- Along with this, you need a source of divine magic, such as deities or other forces that can be represented by domains, divine magic, etc.
--- This means you will have to design a religion as well. For a most-traditional fantasy game built with Pathfinder, this means you'll be designing multiple gods, each of whom possess at least 3-4 cleric domains, as well as possibly accommodate oracle mysteries. There should be enough gods of different alignments that a cleric of any alignment can be possible.

- You may also want to consider where arcane magic comes from, and how commonly it may be accessed and/or manipulated. How common are wizards, sorcerers, bards, etc.

- You need to have a planar cosmology that supports the rules as well: there needs to be a shadow plane and an ethereal plane, or various shadow spells won't work, nor will incorporeality. You need dimensions that Outsiders come from, some of which are dominated by concepts good, evil, or neutrality, both for the purpose of summoning spells as well as possible enemies, allies, etc. (You can decide these things don't exist, but then you're going to have to adjust some rules or rules explanations... and that's where things can get more complicated than you expect. I'm pointing this out because I tried once to make a "simplified" world that eliminated certain planes and the like, and realized I had actually made it harder for myself rather than easier as I had to eliminate certain mechanics or re-explain how certain things worked, which made a lot more work for me).

- Think about where monsters dwell, which are common where, who might be the most to least common threats, etc. This can also affect the geography you come up with--if you want to emphasize the existence of creatures who dwell in forests, your world may be heavily forested, etc. The Bestiaries also feature a lot of underground and Darklands creatures so your world may need a complex underworld as well.

Once you've done this, you can get into things like building your world proper, coming up with the land, nation, geography, etc.

This part is a lot more variable--and gets into a lot of "what works for you territory" (although ALL of it goes ultimately into "what works for you territory"). Others in the thread have discussed starting small vs. starting big. You might start with a single town and nearby dungeon, and add on whatever it is you need for your party.

Or you might build a whole world with gajillions of nations, politics, religions, societies, etc. Just note, as someone else did, your players need to keep track of things too. Too much too fast can get overwhelming (although a good world-builder/GM can introduce bits by bits at a time).

In addition to other advice (and I know I'm repeating stuff said elsewhere, bear with me), here's some questions you can try to answer as you build your world:

- Is your world very civilized, or is it mostly untamed wilderness with only a few bastions of safety? Somewhere in between?

- Who are three most powerful NPCs in your world and what do they do?

- What are the three most important historical events in the last 100 years in your world?

- Is there one nation everyone lives in, or many? How does character race tie into nation and culture--in other words, is there one nation per race (dwarf nation, elf nation, etc.) or are there nations where some or all races are citizens? A bit of both? Likewise is there one ethnic group per nation or several? Is there an easy way to tell them apart and/or is it important? How many languages are spoken in a given area? Does everyone get along or are there a lot of rivalries?

- Are the dangers people face mostly political and social (war, intrigue, politics), or mostly outside supernatural threats (corruption from evil outsiders, dragons eating peasants, orcs raiding the countryside)?

- Bearing in mind the existence of magic can improve standards of living, how "advanced" is the world? Are there major strides in agriculture, cottage industry, and engineering? Or is most of the world in a veritable dark age, where maybe magic only makes the lives of the rich and powerful easier?

- How does trade occur, and what impedes trade? What commodities are valuable? Who trades what?

Just some thoughts to get one started.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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Sorry to reawaken a thread that fell asleep a week ago, but I just found this and had some thoughts:

- Most of today's professional game designers started by homebrewing. People upthread called Pathfinder a "homebrew of Dungeons and Dragons 3.5"; likewise Dungeons and Dragons itself in its original form was a homebrew system building on the game Chainmail, and I'm fairly sure Chainmail started with people messing around with rules for more traditional wargames (IIRC the term "Armor Class" was borrowed from a naval term for the quality of armor on a battleship). How you practice game design and tweak and adjust for your group, and so on, is by homebrewing. So basically, without encouraging homebrewing, we don't get new game designers, and the industry dies.

-- So, at the risk of sounding terribly dramatic (I'm not trying to be), if homebrew is a dirty word, and we discourage it, we destroy our hobby. So I'd say, no, it shouldn't be a dirty word in the least.

-- Does this mean all homebrew is inherently good? Of course not. Part of the point of homebrew is we're testing, building, trying new things, seeing where rules boundaries do and should lie. As part of this process, we're going to come up with stuff that's crap.

-- But, ideally, we process through the crap to eventually achieve the good stuff. Hack homebrewers might make broken stuff just in hopes of cheating or making things break for the fun of it. OTOH, talented homebrewers with the potential to become tomorrow's game designer solicit feedback on their homebrewed items and tweak it constantly to make it work right.

- So we need homebrew, and talented homebrewers should be encouraged to develop and improve their skills.... BUUUUT this does not mean we must homebrew everywhere, all the time. There is a time and place for it: namely, in my opinion, in the hands of relatively experienced players who are already familiar with the rules-as-written. I favor this advice in many arenas, RPGs included: learn the rules before you break them. I've seen in my days, that in RPGs, what you see on paper often plays out differently in practice. If you homebrew or houserule what you think MIGHT be a problem before trying it, you could be fixing something that isn't broken--and breaking it in the process. Learn how things play out, then change to fit the needs of your group, etc.

-- Of course organized play is not a good place for homebrew. The point of that is total strangers come in to play with each other, and you need in that specific environment therefore consistency of rules. But just because organized play is not a homebrew-friendly environment, doesn't mean either organized play or homebrew is bad. There's just different times and places for each of them. People who want to do both may have to find separate opportunities for each.

-- Likewise, I wouldn't homebrew with folks new to the game. Again, I think it's important to know the rules before changing them. I've been screwed up myself by playing games where a GM homebrewed tons and then joining another GM's game to realize I totally didn't know how to play at all. Or at the very least, it's important if teaching rules to someone, to be clear on what are the rules-as-written and what's homebrew.

-- And also likewise, every gamer is different, and every gaming group is different. Some are really going to want to play with things, wiggle stuff around, adapt the game to their style; these folks can hardly play without homebrewing. Others really are comfortable working within boundaries others provide them or want to spend time really just playing, not experimenting or testing stuff that could turn out to be crap. Does it mean it's "dirty"? Of course not. It's just right for some and not for others. Yes, there are always going to be vocal members of the WrongBadFun brigade who declare whatever it is they don't do is horrible and anathema and people are wrong and stupid to do that thing. How dare people have fun wrong!

But just ignore the WrongBadFun Brigade and just play the way that is most fun for you with good people who appreciate a similar play style.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I'd also suggest contacting your local game store. They may be better about informing you about upcoming events, and then of course you know what's happening closest to you.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

As the subject line, please cancel my subscription (I think I'm getting the next one as a contributor copy). Thank you!

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Yes, water of course--I knew I forgot something! 'Course most settlements with adequate water supplies should produce a reasonable surplus of that as well.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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The easiest thing is to make vegetable starch, worth 5 adhesive--you make it at the cooking station out of tatoes, mutfruit, and corn iirc. If you have settlements that farm these you should have an abundance.

In a pinch, Percy, the nighttime junk vendor in Diamond City, sells shipments of it.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

With rubber, if you're desperate, you can grab (with the grab key, not put in your inventory) tires and traffic cones lying around the landscape and carry them to settlements and then scrap them. (There's some other grabbable objects too, like traffic barriers which you can get wood from.)

For example, I needed rubber in Warwick Homestead to build them a purifier. That place is oddly devoid of rubber, but just outside the settlement are crashed cars and piles of tires. The piles you can't do anything with (they are a single solid object you can't pick up), but any single tires you can carry over to Warwick's borders and then scrap.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Thanks!

On the upside, generators are fairly cheap to repair and will eventually be re-repaired on their own eventually.

Also, I think some property damage is simply more calculated in than the result of a specific type of attack. Since settlers can't be killed (except by you), it's the only way to show the effects of an attack.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I'm delighted about the release date because I'll have just turned in some freelance work and will be due a long play session. :)

I'm excited about taming some animals, but couldn't care less about the arena. (But am glad other folks are psyched for it--I'm sure it's something a lot of people wanted.)

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I was always excited for Wasteland Workshop for the letters and nixi lights, but the trailer's got me more psyched--and not that far away. I was hoping to turn Egret Tours into a nice little trading center and I think it'll be a good spot to build my stuff.

And yes! It looks like the planters will make it possible to have food at Boston, as well as set up food more easily at places like Hangman's Alley. (I may have to totally redo Hangman's...)

...

Good god, I'm going to be playing this game all year, aren't I?

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Should I feel bad I did okay with the Mechanist on the first try? I'm normally not that good at combat...

... But I am stupidly high level (66). That probably accounts for a lot of it.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

What difficulty are you guys playing on?

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Your honesty is much appreciated, Reckless--GMs who are clear about their commitments, including being able to openly say when they can't keep them, are the kind of GMs we need, and the kind I am likely to play with again down the road. We all hit rough patches, and while I'm sorry to see the game end (again) I hope this leaves you time to attend to your priorities and that things go well for you.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I managed the fight in the Shroud armor, but I've got a stealth build and managed to snipe most of the bots before they could really deal with me. I'm also playing on normal difficulty. But yes, you only really need the armor for the dialogue options.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Doc Anderson is the one you can send to a settlement (pop 20 requirement I believe). Doc Weathers is the roving one that looks like John Waters (and whose caravan guards were wandering around in their underwear for awhile, which contributed to my associating him with John Waters).

I think the issue with some of the settlers pre-set at certain locations is they will have unique dialog with each other.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Regarding the disappearing merchants, I think the problem is that they actually DON'T walk to the settlement, the way, say, settlers do when you move them. They effectively "fast travel." Except half the time, they get teleported into an NPC test cell rather than arrive correctly at their destination.

Typing their prid, then "disable", then "enable", then "moveto player" while you're in the correct settlement. Smiling Larry I also had to make him assignable with extra devconsole commands. Rylee and Doc Anderson were assignable as soon as they showed up.

I also built Doc Anderson a nice little surgery center with a hospital bed and chem station and decent lighting. And an obligatory kitten picture.

Let me know if you can relocate the child at Nordhagen--you usually can't do anything with child characters.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

No, Sheffield and the VTR made it. It was the others who didn't. The doctor was RIGHT near Oberland Station when I sent her there. While I stood there, she just wouldn't move (I was thinking of escorting her, but she wouldn't leave) and when I left and came back she never showed up. I DOUBT she was attacked within the short distance she had to travel... they just disappear for some reason. In fact, exact same thing happened in my other playthrough--I encountered her very close to Croup Manor and sent her there, but she never made it.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Professor Feelgood just literally disappears in most people's games. He's just buggy--it's not raiders or attacks. I've heard the best thing to do is to let him "just be" but even then most of the time he just disappears. Folks who have looked into the code have found him in a disabled state, and if you re-enable him with console commands he comes back.

If you send him for maintenance he'll be at one of the repair shops in town (I think Hester's but I'm not sure).

Too bad you can't cannibalize Curie's old body if you've transferred her to the new one.

Settlers who start out at a settlement can't leave (Abernathys stay at Abernathy farm), and the same goes for the Sanctuary settlers. I think even in some cases unnamed ones get stuck (e.g. the family at Nordhagen Beach, but it just might be the little boy who can't be moved). I've tried sending Marcy Long to live out her days alone at an undeveloped settlement and it doesn't work. (You can of course relocate Preston because he's a companion.)

I keep getting that bug where wandering traders you send to settlements just disappear (but still show up in your population total). I've lost Smiling Larry, the doctor lady, and Rylee that way. I managed to get Smiling Larry back with console commands, but for some reason he auto-assigned himself to vegetable tending and I can't reassign him to tend a shop instead (that too can be fixed with console commands, but I haven't gotten around to it). The only people I've successfully relocated and assigned are Sheffield and the Vault-Tec Rep, and their dialogue gets buggy sometimes.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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quibblemuch wrote:
DeathQuaker wrote:
Seriously, can someone explain this to me?

But someone is having fun wrong! How is this NOT a crisis?

TO THE INTERNET!

I'm sorry, what was I thinking. You are of course right as usual, quibblemuch. :)

Otherwhere: Also, yes, I expect they have some kind of sense of competition except they don't realize no one's competing with them and there's no prizes.

Besides, I get to win. Always. ;p

In other news, since of course you have to kill the Minutemen's old sentrybot during Old Guns, I made them a new robot guardian. I named him Revere.

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