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Half-Orc

Davor's page

1,450 posts. Pathfinder Society character for Manijin.


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Osirion

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I DM for a character with a Black Blade that talks out loud, usually berating him when he misses an attack, and giving himself credit when he hits.

Because screw the rules. My Black Blade has personality, dangit.

Osirion

Deity's adjective body-part/equipment. There ya go. Bonus points if it makes NO sense.

"By Iomedae's bushy cheesegrater!"

Osirion

Pendagast wrote:
Heymitch wrote:
Succubi are always redeemable. They just need snuggling.

you say snuggling, I say motor boating…

Potato , Potatoe.

PotatOH MY...

Osirion

Ha.

Osirion

Physically Unfeasible wrote:

Note both reference some concept of law. In this, murder is conceptually a legal, not a moral concept. From this, I would assume we ask can killing ever be justified? Unless you are deontological in ethics to an extreme, an answer would be yes.

But in any case, assuming the the alignment system is deontological. Saying killing is evil would make almost all PCs evil. Which isn't the case. So we can dismiss that idea. Indeed, PCs typically plan encounters with sentient beings with the aim of killing them - so premeditated killing is clearly not evil by system assumptions. Obeying the law is handled by a different alignment axis. Drawing the above definitions, murder is not an evil act in the game system. Let alone redeemable or no.
Assuming it's consequential; killed someone and it saved lives? Good on you and of you.

That ramble was quite fun, actually.

Actually, I'm going to disagree with that just a bit. The game indicates that a majority of persons, PCs or otherwise, are neutral in alignment, and alignment is, itself, a representation of the overall attitudes of an individual. A person might kill an evil creature, but he also helps the needed and oppressed. A person who regularly kills creatures, but also helps those in need, would be neutral.

Basically, you don't become evil-aligned just by performing evil acts. You become evil-aligned when the majority of the actions you perform can be classified as evil.

Osirion

If I were to join a game starting at level 4/5-ish, I'd probably like a character like this. He's basically a spellcaster... without the spells. It just takes SO long to get good...

Osirion

I don't know how pertinent this info may seem, but I've been playing a bit of D&D Next lately, a system where certain weapons have the option to be use Dexterity for Attack and Damage rolls as a baseline. The system ALSO eliminates the 1.5x Str. damage bonus for two-handing a weapon.

What we're left with is that Strength really only contributes to strength checks, a few skills, and damage with weapons that really only add 1-2 points of extra damage.

I'm finding more and more that it's difficult to choose a strength-based character. The armor options end up making AC about even across the board for many classes at early levels, and bounded accuracy means that a high-dexterity literally has NO downsides, save for the above mentioned things.

I think that's basically what would happen if Dex could be applied to hit and damage liberally and easily. True, you'd lose out on some damage, but the added survivability you get from the extra AC and reflex saves far outweighs the minor damage loss.

Imagine a monk that could add dexterity to attacks and damage. It'd be crazy at low levels, and he'd have high AC AND decent attack and damage bonuses. Two-weapon fighting would be way more effective, as would archery (oh gosh.... archery), and all of these characters would have great defenses to boot.

It works... alright in D&D 5th, but I can't see it working in Pathfinder.

Osirion

Well, you'll need to pump Wisdom through the freakin' roof. You'll probably want to pick up at least one elemental-style feat or two so you can expend those Elemental Fist uses for something more useful. You should consider picking up a monk reach weapon or finding a way to increase reach so you can use Aid Other to help your allies when you can't use your other abilities, or when you need to conserve your uses and don't need a standard action that turn.

Snake Style also helps because with a sky-high Wisdom, your Sense Motive check will be really good.

Osirion

Brown Dragons are my favorites... right after blues, of course.

Osirion

You should check out the ALL bard party.

Arcane Duelist
Thundercaller
Arcane Healer
Magician

Osirion

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'm gonna answer something that nobody really touched: Alignment doesn't work that way. A character's alignment is defined by the regularly occurring actions that character performs. It's why you can have characters with flaws and such; the ways in which they don't follow their alignment aren't representative of your alignment as a whole.

Now, should you kill another player's character? No. Never. If you ever reach a point where you think it's a good idea for ANY reason, just stop, because you're wrong. This is a cooperative game, and that's what it's meant to be. It doesn't matter whose fault it was that there is conflict in-game. Your goal is to resolve that conflict whilst keeping the party intact. As we don't have specifics regarding the lives of the people you game with, or the ability to know exactly what your game is like, you need to figure out how to make this happen. The truth is, for all the advice that we give, we can't tell you how to solve this problem. The only thing I can say, is that if you decided to kill him, you would regret it, because nothing sours a group quite like "alignment-justified" murder.

Osirion

There are lots of weapon enchantments that are pretty situational (ghost touch comes to mind). This strikes me as one of them. It's worth the cost of enchantment, but is the kind of thing that varies depending on the campaign.

Osirion

I think that Ranger is worth mentioning not as the critter, but as the crit receiver. Take look at the Freebooter archetype. Instead of favored enemy, you get Freebooter's bane, which will boost the accuracy and damage of both you AND your crit-fisher buddy on your selected target, that you will be focus-firing anyways.

Osirion

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I rolled up a character with an interesting backstory and put time and effort into his name, character, and class/race choice.

Osirion

Alex Mack wrote:

This thread should be about the awesomeness that is the inquisitor and not about menacing shenaigans.

Anyways I'm happy about the sacred huntsmaster cause now I can finally build a single class Amplified Rager...

Also I agree with those arguing that Sneak attack is merely a free gimick for the sanctified slayer. Studied target while not quite judgement seems a fair replacement.

Huh. I hadn't thought about it, but that archetype is actually better than I thought it was.

Not only do you get a bunch of cool things that come along with your companion, but you get Share Spells, which means you can cast things like Divine Power... on your animal companion. Hm...

Osirion

It depends on your Intelligence modifier. Yes, for the most part, EVERYONE will choose their one class as their favored class, and get to choose between a single hit point or skill rank as a bonus at every level.

Characters that wish to multiclass, however, or plan on taking a prestige class, don't get this benefit. An Eldritch Knight will only get that benefit for his caster or martial levels, unless he's a half-elf, in which case he gets it for both, but not his prestige class levels.

Osirion

Inquisitor is one of those glorious classes that can be built as anything, is loaded with flavor, including it's archetypes, all of which are effective whilst being flavorful. It balances versatility with power, utility with combat readiness, and skill with durability. You could potentially build a full-caster Inquisitor and have him remain an effective member of the party, depending on your archetype and focus.

Inquisitor, much like the Bard, is the paragon of what a class should be able to do solo, as well as with a group.

Osirion

Well, there are several archetypes that might have helped with that at some point, but we're likely past that. Just pick up a bow or crossbow and hope that the few blasty spells you get will suffice.

If your DM allows it, consider picking up the Wordstriker or Thundercaller archetypes.

Osirion

Tels wrote:

Dwarf Favored Class Bonus: Oracle: Reduce the penalty for not being proficient with one weapon by 1. When the nonproficiency penalty for a weapon becomes 0 because of this ability, the oracle is treated as having the appropriate Martial or Exotic Weapon Proficiency feat with that weapon.

Pretty sure he posted an alternative Dwarf build on the first page. As it stands, the reasoning for proficiency is that even the proficiency feats (Simple, Martial, Exotic Weapon Proficiency) don't actually grant proficiency, they just remove the non-proficiency penalty. Logically, this means if you don't take the non-proficiency penalty, you are considered proficient.

That makes sense. Best argument I've heard for it. Cool. Have fun, rock throwers.

Osirion

Bigdaddyjug wrote:
Davor wrote:

I hate to burst people's bubbles, but you can't take Weapon Focus: Rock.

Stone Giants have a special ability that lets them attack with rocks, but the rules explicitly state that monsters are proficient with any weapons in their stat blocks, regardless of what those weapons may be. It's why Skeletons are proficient with Scimitars despite nothing about them granting proficiency.

Sorry if that was brought up already, but it's late, and I'm too sleepy to read 5 pages of posts.

That conjecture was brought up and debunked many times already.

I went and read everything, and I don't really see how. You COULD take Weapon Focus: Rock if you picked up two levels of Ranger, or picked any class that got you weapon focus regardless of prerequisites, and you can take Catch Off Guard to ignore non-proficiency penalties, but you still don't have proficiency with rocks.

This means that you can't take weapon specialization. Heck, you can't even throw sling bullets because, by their description, they're made of metal and can't be made of stone. You'd have to get the weird kind of sling bullets that have stone in the middle and cloth on the outside. >_>

Don't get me wrong. I love this idea and would like it to work by RAW, but there is not a thing I can see that grants actual proficiency. But then, that really only matters for the purpose of taking Weapon Specialization, so... yeah.

Osirion

I hate to burst people's bubbles, but you can't take Weapon Focus: Rock.

Stone Giants have a special ability that lets them attack with rocks, but the rules explicitly state that monsters are proficient with any weapons in their stat blocks, regardless of what those weapons may be. It's why Skeletons are proficient with Scimitars despite nothing about them granting proficiency.

Sorry if that was brought up already, but it's late, and I'm too sleepy to read 5 pages of posts.

Osirion

Well, he's a fire beetle. That just SCREAMS sorcerer with the Elemental (Fire) bloodline. Most beetles just get glowy butts. Squish shoots EXPLODING DEATH BALLS AND SCORCHING RAYS out of his.

The only problem is that Squish likely has terrible Charisma, which means that the Sage bloodline is probably the only one he could viably take. You could make him kind of a Light sorcerer: Taking spells that banish darkness, provide light for the party, etc. Maybe even a few illusion spells (I mean, Glitterdust is practically MADE for this guy. Yeah, it's Conjuration, but still).

Osirion

2 people marked this as a favorite.

You don't even need words to sing in the first place. A language dependent effect depends on you needing a language, which singing doesn't.

Someone who has spent their life mastering singing to make it into music could certainly weave their spells into their music. Heck, I can speak in recitative spontaneously if I feel like it. I imagine some mythological figure that represents the magic of music could absolutely pull that kind of thing off.

Osirion

1 person marked this as a favorite.

There's a Fighter archetype that does that.

Osirion

It's also worth mentioning that there are several bard archetypes that address some of these issues. The Flame Dancer adds several standard damage nukes to the bard spell list, and the Thundercaller can use Bardic Performance to cast Sound Burst, an AoE minor damage/stun with added scaling damage, unique to the bard.

Osirion

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Bards are the best.

You're just jealous because they don't need you anymore. /all bard party

Osirion

3 people marked this as a favorite.

OH MY GOSH.

Less QQ, More PewPew.

Why don't you just play the character you want to play and not worry about someone else being a tad more powerful? An extra +1 here or there is NOT the end of the world. It's 5% extra success rate. Just play your character, and optimize your concept within the confines of the system. Don't feel bad because Johnny Munchkin-boots occasionally puts out a few extra points of damage.

Osirion

Meh. People make a big deal about Tieflings and Aasimars being OP, but the truth is that the bonuses you get from the races are so minute that they're likely to not make enough of a difference to matter. True, they have some unique racial stat bonuses, but that's hardly grounds for decrying them.

5 race points, in the grand scheme of things, assuming they're not spent in a power-gamey, silly fashion, will not make any difference AT ALL at the table. Don't worry about it.

Osirion

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I may echo what Psion-Psycho said, but he's right. If your idea of tanking is protecting your squishies from the bad guys, then without an aggro mechanic you need to either: A) Make your allies unhittable (through buffs, etc.) or B) Prevent the enemy from reaching your allies, or acting at all.

This means that classes with easy access to stuns and short-term crowd control (Command Spell, Sound Burst Spell, etc.) can work quite well, but they tend to have limited resources.

On the other hand, you can substitute ANY attack for certain Combat Maneuvers, specifically trip. This is why the Reach Fighter is usually considered the best party defender (I don't necessarily mean the class Fighter, just any Reach weapon-using martial character).

Let's look at something like a Human Lore Warden archetype Fighter, for example.

With a reach weapon and Armor Spikes (or unarmed strikes if you feel like taking the feat), you threaten a 10' area around yourself. That's pretty big, and can get even bigger if an ally can bump you up to Large size (a 20' area!). In addition, you get Combat Expertise for free (awesome), so you can focus on having high Strength and Dexterity for your maneuvers, which get further boosted by taking obvious feats like Improved Trip and Improved Dirty Trick. These ensure that, while enemies may not FOCUS on you, they sure can't get to anyone else.

There are a number of other ways to do it, some much more effective than I've listed, but my point is that this is the best way to keep your allies safe aside from playing a magical buffer or crowd controller. It's about the closest approximation to a traditional "tank" that you can get.

Osirion

People care WAY too much about a cavalier's mount.

One of the first cavalier's I ever played was a halfling dual-wielder with a small-cat mount. He was awesome. Don't worry about all that silly mounted combat stuff. Consider it a small bonus to an otherwise versatile and awesome class.

Osirion

Actually, I don't think that you add your Strength Modifier to the damage roll. I realize that that's more of a RAI than RAW thing, but the spell specifically mentions that you add your Caster Level to the damage rolls, which seems to be in place of the Ability Modifier. That's actually pretty legit, as it means you'd be getting roughly 8-10 damage from caster level alone per hit. I may have to take a look at this spell in the future.

Osirion

Fun fact: This puts your average running speed at about ~133 MPH.

Osirion

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I will say this: The options you choose for your character feel like they carry a LOT of weight. I have a group I'm running right now with two rogues: A thief and an Assassin, and they're vastly different in terms of abilities, both in combat and outside of it, while still retaining the core feel of the rogue. I REALLY like that aspect of D&D next.

Osirion

I think what you're forgetting, OP, is that any item's price is based off of the materials required to make it. This is reflected if you look at the rules for crafting, as the time required to craft is based on the rarity and value of the materials.

A cold iron Horsechopper, when reduced to its base components, will produce about 10 GP worth of bits, including, but not limited to, Cold Iron.

Osirion

Well, I've never had a city like this before, but it's certainly not out of the question. First of all, if wizards exist in this world, it would make sense for guards to check for a spellbook or familiar. Barring that, I would imagine that most of the guards in this town might carry an item that allows them to detect magic in a person (a unique variant of the Detect Magic spell), which "pings" someone as a spellcaster, at which point said person could be issued an armband or something with an anti-magic field on it. That's just off the top of my head, though.

Osirion

If a paladin lies, he falls.

Is lying evil? It doesn't really matter what we think. He falls.

Should a paladin lie? I think not, and not under any circumstances, but I have a very black/white philosophy when it comes to the nature of good and evil, and really that's all that this thread is about.

If you believe lying is evil, you'll probably go with the side that believes that Paladins don't lie, or they fall if they do. If you don't believe lying is evil, you probably are okay with all but the most blatant, obvious lies against the code.

That's really, I think, all it boils down to. >_>

Osirion

OP, you need to stop scrubbing up when it comes to bard. NOBODY I've EVER met plays a bard like that. Look at the class design: Decent weapon/armor proficiencies, medium BAB, best buffs in the freaking game, good at skills, good at spells, good at EVERYTHING. While the fighter is being torn limb from limb in the front lines, I'm making him better at fighting while chopping a guy in half with my OWN greatsword, then I walk over and disable a trap, stun a group of enemies with a bit of magic THUNDER, turn the party invisible, and then bring the fighter back from the brink of death, all while looking FABULOUS.

On that note, I hate fighters. They have a bit of versatility, but they're mostly just boring to me, and typically have NO utility outside of "I hit it really hard with the pointy end of the stick".

Osirion

4 people marked this as a favorite.

I just got to read my PHB for 5e today, and I have to say that I'm pretty pleased. The classes all feel pretty unique, with Clerics, Bards, and Monks jumping out as having some pretty cool stuff they can do, though everyone feels pretty unique. The rules are REALLY simple, and I like that. I don't have to go online and look up the EXACT rules for how distance factors into perception and stealth checks, how X works in Y circumstance, but not in others. It's all highly simplified and up to DM interpretation, and it's about dang time.

I haven't played yet, but just looking over the book it seems solid, simple, and fun.

Osirion

Golarion will always be my favorite campaign setting, and I can imagine myself setting many a 5e game there.

Osirion

Which is basically all I've said anyways. Actions = Alignment.

Osirion

I'll try tackling this from a slightly different perspective.

In order for a person to be diagnosed with, or otherwise suffering from, a personality disorder, the disorder must be negatively affecting the person enough to cause extreme difficulty or inability to function in normal society.

For example, I'm considered borderline ADHD. One of the primary factors in my non-diagnosis is the fact that my symptoms do not compromise my ability to function normally. The same would hold true for this imagined character.

Let's say you want to make a "sociopathic" Paladin. IF the condition is strong enough that the symptoms of sociopathy are prevalent to the point of making the Paladin unable to function normally in society, that means he is regularly committing acts which would likely go against the Paladin code, and thus would probably never attain Paladinhood in the first place.

On the other hand, if the character in question has some measure of control of his own actions, and regularly decides against his own thoughts and towards better actions for good, he is overcoming his disability and is acting as a Paladin should, which means that he isn't really a ""sociopath", because it hasn't prevented him from functioning normally. He might have those kinds of thoughts, but so long as he decides to be a Paladin IN SPITE of them, he should be fine.

Osirion

Bacon666 wrote:

Sure you can... You need to:

1. Define what you call sociopath
2. Define LG alignment
3. Combine the 2.

I could see a LG char as the lawful stupid paladin, who see evil, and then kill it. He doesn't understand that his own action is evil, but deem every body else stupid because they cannot understand that he's right

He does follow his own code religiosly (lawful)
He does try to do good by eradicating evil (good)
He's definitely a sociopath
He doesn't work well in any group!

It doesn't matter what the Paladin thinks is good, or whether or not he's "trying". Good is good. If he isn't, he falls.

Osirion

True. I said that because the character in question was becoming an elemental, and elementals can take on a variety of viable spellcasting forms and retain the ability to speak.

Osirion

Yup. Polymorph effects only affect equipment. You keep spellcasting, BAB, etc. It's pretty darn sweet.

Osirion

Davor wrote:

One thing that's important to remember is that there isn't really any such thing as a "neutral" action in Pathfinder. The alignment system hinges on a rigid good/evil and lawful/chaotic spectrum, where Neutral characters are characters that regularly exhibit the behaviors of the different alignments. A Neutral character doesn't take predominantly neutral actions; he takes a relatively even split between good and evil actions. He may lie from time to time, but he exhibits kindness towards strangers. He would sacrifice his life for his friends and family at the drop of a hat, but also has a pattern of ruthlessness regarding those that threaten these same people.

This is what neutrality is. Desecrating a corpse is evil, but a person's alignment is determined by more than one action. This is also why most adventurers tend to fall towards neutral: They regularly kill other humanoids, but also tend to protect the innocent and help the needy. Hence the neutrality. You don't look at an alignment and say that all the actions performed by a subset of these creatures must, therefore, be of that alignment: You look at an alignment and say that the actions, good and evil both, performed by the creatures are the cause of the alignment.

Osirion

One thing that's important to remember is that there isn't really any such thing as a "neutral" action in Pathfinder. The alignment system hinges on a rigid good/evil and lawful/chaotic spectrum, where Neutral characters are characters that regularly exhibit the behaviors of the different alignments. A Neutral character doesn't take predominantly neutral actions; he takes a relatively even split between good and evil actions. He may lie from time to time, but he exhibits kindness towards strangers. He would sacrifice his life for his friends and family at the drop of a hat, but also has a pattern of ruthlessness regarding those that threaten these same people.

This is what neutrality is. Desecrating a corpse is evil, but a person's alignment is determined by more than one action. This is also why most adventurers tend to fall towards neutral: They regularly kill other humanoids, but also tend to protect the innocent and help the needy. Hence the neutrality. You don't look at an alignment and say that all the actions performed by a subset of these creatures must, therefore, be of that alignment: You look at an alignment and say that the actions, good and evil both, performed by the creatures are the cause of the alignment.

Osirion

I forgot to mention the fact that the single level in Cleric also gets you access to some 1st level spells and domain abilities, which could potentially be great. Shield of faith is an awesome first level spell for giving yourself more staying power, and you can pre-cast it so it will definitely last an encounter. Protection from Evil or Chaos would likewise be an excellent choice, and there are a whole slew of situational spells (Marid's Mastery, Murderous Command, Forbid Action, Sanctuary, Weapons Against Evil) that could be potential beneficial throughout multiple levels of gaming, some even through the mid levels.

Osirion

Well, with rolls like that, you could build basically ANYTHING and succeed. It really depends on what you want to do, and the order you select.

If you wanted to be an all-out offensive beast, you could go with a single two-handed weapon, pick the Order of the Cockatrice, 18 Strength, 18 Constitution, other stats wherever, and just wreck things.

Alternatively, you could take a slightly different route and go for a single big turn, dual-wielding strategy. 18 Strength, 18 Charisma, 15 Dexterity, two-weapon fighting, Order of the Lion. Challenge grants bonus damage, and the Order of the Lion abilities are AWESOME if you have high Charisma.

Even MORE alternatively, if you're feeling particularly creative, you could take two levels in Paladin or one level in Cleric, put the 18s in Strength and Charisma again, and take the Order of the Star to get continual progression in Lay on Hands or Channel Positive Energy. It's not the best offensive option, but with those stats you'll still hit like a truck, and you'll have a little bit of party support. If you can deal with the Paladin code, you also get to Smite Evil 1/day (which is AWESOME), super-boost your saving throws, and can even heal yourself as a swift action, all while still being primarily a Samurai.

I recommend taking the Sword Saint archetype for all of these options, btw. Mounts can be tricky to use, and if you're a new player you may want to minimize the complexity of your character. Sword Saint gets rid of all that mount stuff in favor of better early damage, so the trade-off is pretty obvious.

Osirion

DrDeth wrote:
Kudaku wrote:
DrDeth wrote:
(...)However, if there's already a tank in the party, the melee cleric player should discuss his role with the party.
...Why is there a problem to have a battle cleric in a party that already has a melee character?

Roles. The ideal 4 member party has a tank, a arcane caster (battlefield control is best but...) a divine caster and a skilled person.

Having multiple tanks usually means one of the other roles isn't filled.

But that doesn't mean you could not have a melee cleric as your tank and still a another martial class:
Melee cleric (tank), archer ranger, Life oracle, Wizard: is a nice combo.

If I had a melee cleric I'd want another class that could do some back up buff/healing, like a bard, inquisitor or alchemist.

The idea of roles is precisely why tabletop RPG's are better than video games RPG's in every way: WE DON'T NEED THEM.

The most successful games I've ever seen have defied role constraints, mostly because the players built their characters to be good at things, not to fill niche roles. You can build the tankiest fighter there is, but that doesn't make it a strong character: a strong character contributes to the party on a number of fronts, not just one. This is why you see classes like Cleric, Bard, Ranger, Druid, Wizard, etc. succeed so frequently at the hands of a skilled player: they have versatility built into them that allows the to succeed in a variety of circumstances.

Filling a single role in a 4-man party is silly. Being the absolute best possible person in your role means you suck at everything else, which means you're just going to drag your group down when it comes to other tasks. Don't be a "tank": be the frontline expert with tactical military knowledge and a bit of a scout's eye. Don't be a "divine spellcaster/healer": be a party face, combat support, field medic all rolled into one. The second you start putting people in roles, you get 4e syndrome, where you start reducing character options to fit iconic standards.

Osirion

Bard is absolutely OP. I'm just surprised more people don't see it. Decent proficiencies in armor/weapons, medium BAB, best party buffing in the game (save maybe an Evangelist Cleric... maybe), excellent selection of skills which can be made even broader, a solid spell list which includes a mixture of support, utility, and even damage and crowd control spells.

If the name of the game is to be good at things, then the bard is the best, because while he may not be the best at one thing, he's good at everything.

Also, regarding the Weird Words thing: If it didn't require a standard action, it would almost be acceptable written that way, it's APPALLING.

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