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Caineach's page

RPG Superstar 2013 Star Voter. Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 4,644 posts (4,649 including aliases). 1 review. No lists. No wishlists. 1 alias.


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OldSkoolRPG wrote:
Kelarith wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
But ignoring the evil aspects of his church is not following the teachings of his church, don't you see? Ignoring half of Asmodeus's teachings is a chaotic act. By remaining good aligned and trying to worship Asmodeus, you are behaving chaotically. You might still be able to call yourself a worshiper of Asmodeus in this case (and you would likely be consigning yourself to punishment in the afterlife, but that's a different story)... but you would NOT be acting in a lawful manner by doing so, and thus would drift away from lawful good toward neutral good or neutral. And when you did, you wouldn't be a paladin.

By this argument you cannot have chaotic followers of deities, because they either A) aren't actually following them, or B) are lawful. Likewise, you'd not be able to be a member of a church unless you 100% matched up with the deity in question.

Meanwhile, in Wrath of the Righteous pt 4, it mentions Nocticula is often worshiped by heretics who aren't into the whole evil stuff, but worship her more positive aspects such as being a patron of outcasts, artistry, and the glories of midnight; suggesting that they even come into conflict with the more mainstream believers; and they still get spells.

Not everyone is going to have the same outlook on faith, and some people are just strait up blind to certain aspects of it. Asmodeous for example is orderly, assisted in the binding of the god of destruction, and even after his vengeance for what he saw as his brother's betrayal, had sympathy and allowed mortals to remain with free will.

A Paladin could very easily cling to towards the positive aspects of Asmodean faith, such as the strength of order and the consistency that it provides, their activities in caring for orphans, or the fact that for an evil god he certain hands out more healing spells to his clerics than they normally have available. He's a bad guy, but not all of his faith revolves around hurting people.

It

...

Actually, the rules don't say that you can fall from associates, only that you should seek atonement occasionally during missions where you are working with them for a prolonged period of time.

Paladin Code wrote:

Code of Conduct: A paladin must be of lawful good alignment and loses all class features except proficiencies if she ever willingly commits an evil act.

Additionally, a paladin's code requires that she respect legitimate authority, act with honor (not lying, not cheating, not using poison, and so forth), help those in need (provided they do not use the help for evil or chaotic ends), and punish those who harm or threaten innocents.

Associates: While she may adventure with good or neutral allies, a paladin avoids working with evil characters or with anyone who consistently offends her moral code. Under exceptional circumstances, a paladin can ally with evil associates, but only to defeat what she believes to be a greater evil. A paladin should seek an atonement spell periodically during such an unusual alliance, and should end the alliance immediately should she feel it is doing more harm than good. A paladin may accept only henchmen, followers, or cohorts who are lawful good.

And yes, the associate rule specifically talks about people who violate the Paladin's moral code. If they don't do it where he can see it (and he isn't intentionally turning a blind eye), there is nothing that would make him fall from working with evil people.


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Weirdo wrote:

This storyline doesn't require that the paladin be terribly stupid, just raised in a specific environment and hesitant to give up on what they've been told their entire life to believe. They can even train Knowledge (Religion) and just decide from an RP point of view that everything they know is biased.

Imagine you are a child in a LN village in Cheliax. You display superior athleticism and leadership from an early age, and so the stern but fair local priest of Asmodeus takes you under his wing. He teaches you that Asmodeus encourages his worshippers to be disciplined, keep their oaths, respect authority, achieve power through self-control, and fight against demons and other creatures of chaos (all of this is out of Faiths of Corruption and is acceptable to paladins). You are told to pray to him as the Prince of Law. The priest does not tell you that Asmodeus also calls for brutal punishment and taking advantage of the less fortunate, since he does not himself favour these parts of Asmodean worship, and you are told about Hell only as a place of perfect order (which is enough since you're not training Knowledge Planes). You read theological texts by LN worshippers of Asmodeus. You are taught a little about other deities, but mostly about how they are savage (eg Rovagug), uncivilized (eg Cayden), or else powerless against savagery without the aid of Asmodeus. You are trained in Religion, but your worldview is heavily biased - as indeed would be the worldview of any person raised in a single faith.

You find your calling as a paladin and because you have been taught that law is of the utmost importance, you take the Oath against Chaos. You are dedicated to fighting back the followers of Rovagug and Lamashtu, and the demons of the Worldwound, in the name of Asmodeus.

Of course, as you leave your town you encounter more and more worshippers of Asmodeus, and while the Oath against Chaos means that you can't conclusively identify them as Evil (you detect Chaos), they are certainly oppressing the weak and generally doing evil things. While you are aware that Asmodeus gives his followers permission to use his gift of power to a number of ends, you have always felt that it was best used to provide stability for all and defend mortals against the predations of demons and similar creatures. Seeing others "abuse" the gift for selfish ends saddens you, and you seek to lead by example, to show others that virtue is also a path to power and that power can be used for the benefit of all rather than only to benefit the powerful.

Perhaps you meet another LN Asmodean who seeks to use you against his LE rivals, and he is able to use you not because you are particularly stupid or gullible, but because he is a very keen manipulator and you want to believe him rather than turn your back on the religion you learned to love for the first two decades of your life. Perhaps you fall when forced to choose between obedience to Asmodeus and dedication to Good. Perhaps you become a Hellknight, realizing that you cannot be fully devoted to Asmodeus and adopting more of the teachings of Iomedae, but without fully abandoning your respect for the Prince of Law. Maybe you head out to the Worldwound to lose your moral confusion (and perhaps your life) in the simple fight against demons that originally drew you to Asmodeus.

In any case, it's a story of struggle, of morality, of identity, of faith. It's a tragic hero, doomed to failure in one way or another. It's a hard role to play, and some people might legitimately not want it in their game. That doesn't mean it's ridiculous or an abomination.

I know many people who would enjoy playing this character, including myself. Some have tried similar things. This is the type of character I try to get from casting applications when I do oneshot larps.


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Nocte ex Mortis wrote:

Y'know, I really have to assume that many of you are simply playing Devil's Advocate here, because otherwise..

You do understand that you're stating that it would be perfectly acceptable for a Chaotic Evil Antipaladin to worship Irori under your twisted logic that being used here, right?

Paladins are Lawful AND Good. Neither of these two things are less important than the other. Asmodeus is antithetical to the cause of Good, breaks the Associates clause in the Paladin class, and stands in direct defiance of the Paladin class being called the 'Champions of Law AND Good.'

Yeah, so? What is your point?

1. No one expects anti-paladins to be entirely sane.
2. The diety they worship does not need to be the one granting him powers.
3. It is more likely for an anti-paladin to do his work in the name of a good god than the reverse, since it would sow discord.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
Bitter Thorn wrote:
And no, your experiences do not ring true with me. I had far greater such problems living in the city.

Interesting. At the risk of further derailment, I've lived and worked in cities, suburbs, deserts, swamps, coal towns, and everything in between, and in the balance I've had far fewer problems in cities. Ten years in Houston, I was never once held at gunpoint -- it was way out near San Angelo that I was first able to "enjoy" that experience Texas-style. In Troy, NY -- known for its ubiquitous and very visible drug crime -- I never had a problem with drug dealers; they were generally too busy making money to harrass random citizens. It was in the marshes of rural Virgina that my crackhead neighbor was an issue. And so on.

Granted, personal anecdotes are in no way statistical data; just wanted to throw mine into the pot.

Troy is becoming hipster, at least downtown. One of the biggest dive bars, The Ruck, has 35 craft beers on tap.


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Going from 15 to 20 point buy isn't that big a deal. You basically get a +1 modifier in a primary stat or +2 modifiers to other stats. You probably wont notice that difference in the game.


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Don Juan de Doodlebug wrote:

You know, I don't know what's wrong with me. I don't know why I can never accentuate the positive, why I am always drawn to the worst, ugliest aspects of you disgusting pinkskins.

But in my spare time from acting as a propagandist for Hamas, Putin, and international proletarian socialist revolution, I've been doing some disturbing reading on wikipedia.

Bride kidnapping

Apparently, there is a theory, true or not I couldn't say, that the ritual of the honeymoon comes bride kidnapping.

You pinkskins really are disgusting.

What I have heard is that the honeymoon is from the new couple being given a barrel of mead and sent away so that any child born was guaranteed to be the husband's.


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GreyWolfLord wrote:
Snorri Nosebiter wrote:
it's deadpool?

Exactly.

It's exactly the type of movie that should probably need an R/PG-18 rating.

Of course, with that type of rating, it will probably not cater to the teenie audience that is so vital (in the studio's eyes) for the success of the superhero films.

I really don't think you understand the "teenie" audience. People bring 10 year olds to R movies ALL THE TIME. I have never seen a theater card.


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Alex Martin wrote:
Cornielius wrote:

And we're up!

Linkified!

I thought the "Low Self-Esteem" Haley Action Figure was nice touch.
I like the Bandana character, but it does have the "upgraded from basic NPC" status like Rich did with Katzumi and Daigo maybe.

Does he have a name?


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Tinkergoth wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
Im sorry, tinker. It can be damn frustrating. I do know that SOME ps3 games in the jrpg/jsrpg spectrum are scaled down and edited versions of more adult computer games, not sure where the atlier series falls there. I do have at least one acquaintance who was unable to play disgaea due to religious principle and his mom got a lynch mob together demanding the game not be sold to children when she discovered the religious aspects of the game- but that was many years ago now...

Yeah, that was actually my first thought when I saw it. Thought that maybe the original versions had been really adult and the remake kept that. Looked into it a bit, entire series is really just a bunch of cutesy alchemy based JRPGs for kids. Nah, this is just a straight up case of the classification board having a spontaneous mass logic breakdown. Possibly someone cast Mind Fog on them.

Disgaea's a weird one for me. I feel like it's a game I should enjoy, but I just can't get into it. Might be due to my frustration with the PS3 games where I'd put the disc in on day of release and get hit with gigabytes worth of updates. Kind of soured me on it before I even started. So I didn't really get far enough into it to get a feel for the religious aspects of it, I was always under the impression that it was just a game with generic devils and demons, not any real connection to real world religion.

The entire game puts demons in the right.

Spoiler:
The end of the game is you convincing an angel to rebel against heaven and killing an archangel who is convinced of how right he is in trying to kill you for the greater good.

I played it when it first came out on the PS2. I think I put 400 hours into it and never got everything unlocked. I know some people who dropped out of college because of it.


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Barrett Krieger wrote:
Kildaere wrote:

On the atrocious litany return...It is actually more like:

1d8+1d6(acid)+2d6(holy) +14 (x FOUR ATTACKS) (x double damage)
so more like (for 1 round):
8d8+24d6+112 (assuming they all hit..etc..but against ogres, they are all going to hit.)

Ok, but unless you are using 25 point buy or this guy has like a 7 con, those numbers are with Judgement, Bane, and Litany up... so this isn't happening before round 3 because they are all swift action activations. What where the ogres doing in the first 2 rounds? They can take cover or disarm the archer before he ramps everything up. Also, even if this does all go off, he has blown 2 of his 8 rounds of bane, 1 of his 3 judgements, and 1 of his 3 level 3 spells (assuming 16 wis). Also, with the double damage, he might have killed the one enemy that was affected by the litany in less than a full attack and not even gotten a full round of benefit out of that spell, especially if it isn't happening until the 3rd round of the combat (if there is still an undamaged enemy on the 3rd round, sounds like that's good for you giving them a challenge). Again, the full trick is limited to 3 rounds per day against 3 specific enemies and leaves him unable to use judgement in other combats that day and only 2 other rounds worth of bane damage.

And, by my back of the envelope math...
6 BAB + 6 Dex + 3 Enhancement (2 from bane) + 2 sacred (judgement) + 1 PBS -2 rapid shot -2deadly aim = +14... after TWO rounds of buffing with limited use abilities

He's looking at about +14 (two arrows) / +14 (one arrow)/ +9 (one arrow) with judgement, bane, deadly aim, rapid shot, and point blank shot in play, given the weapon you described and assuming 22 dex. If the ogres have cover, he is shooting against 21 AC... hardly automatic, but why waste that much power on a CR3... if they are hill giants with cover, then that is AC25... an even 50/50 to hit.

The rest of those combats he is +12 (2arrows) / +12 / +7 for 1d8+1d6+12.... not awful for a level 9 character, but not...

While the inquisitor in my game is melee, I have a similar experience with them. They are extremely good a few rounds a day, middle of the road a few more, and fall off sharply after that. Extending encounters with things like enemy reinforcements, maxing enemy HP per hit die rather than using the average, and having enemies take full cover can drain party resources fast. Also, do not let the players have a 5 minute adventuring day.


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Fergurg wrote:
thejeff wrote:
You're right that the best answer is to separate health care from employment entirely, but you do that by turning to government, putting everyone into one big insurance pool and financing the thing with taxes, not premiums. Because that works.
Worked wonders for the VA, hasn't it?

The VA has better quality of care on average for lower costs than the general population. It falls behind on experimental and cutting edge treatments that are more expensive, but handily beats traditional hospitals elsewhere, even with the existing scandals. There is a reason every veteran I know goes to VA hospitals even if they have top tier insurance through current jobs.


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Jiggy wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Jiggy wrote:
Caineach wrote:
utterly fail optimization tests
And ultimately, the only "optimization test" that matters is whether you meaningfully contribute in actual gameplay. I've seen builds/strategies that were dismissed online but passed this test, and I've seen other builds that truly did fail this test. About 50/50 between the two, if memory serves.
I have seen characters who's only mechanical contribution was healing spells standard to their level contribute meaningfully to gameplay. I've seen characters who cowered in the corner whenever combat started, with no meaningful way of actually avoiding notice, contribute meaningfully to gameplay. I have seen optimized melee builds that can't do a damn thing in the game. It depends entirely on the type of game the GM is running.
Note that I said "contribute meaningfully in actual gameplay", not just "in actual combat". So when I say I've seen PCs that failed that test, well... :/

Yeah, mechanical contributions, theoretical mechanical contributions, and actual gameplay contributions can be 3 totally different beasts :)

As long as you know what your GM is doing, all is good.

That being said, for something like Pathfinder Society (which I have never played) I would always bring a mechanically efficient character. Not necessarily peak optimization, but definitely a solid build. It is just polite to the other players who you don't know. In home games you can mess around with inefficiency, but when you play with the public you should at least meet the other player's expectations.


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Melkiador wrote:

I think people have an odd idea about what a low stat is. The average npc stat value would be 10.5. So for example, having a 10 to 11 intelligence would would basically be having an IQ of 100. From that point, having an 8 or even a 7 would be far from mentally challenged.

Or consider a 7 in strength. With that stat you would still be able to lift an up to 140 lb object off the ground and move it, albeit awkwardly.

So, you can consider "dump" stats to be "gamey", but you have to remember that having a low stat is far from being a wimp or a dullard. It's just being a little below average. Honestly, max stats should feel way more gamey. A person with a 20 in a stat is basically a freak.

If you are discouraging 7s and 8s, I don't see why you would allow 14 through 20 either.

I honestly know way more people who can't lift 140 lbs off the ground than can lift 400 (str 15)


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zauriel56 wrote:
Durngrun Stonebreaker wrote:
zauriel56 wrote:
I disagree with the stance of the business but not the ruling. Why should rights be infringed upon because they own a business?
Why should a employee's rights be infringed upon because they have a job?

As someone previously stated you don't have to have sex. So women have a right to not get pregnant right? You know how you can do that? Don't have sex. If you want your cake and to eat it too you're gonna have to pay. Why is it there job to pay for something elective?

Look I'm a libertarian. I believe individual rights are paramount and I believe people should be allowed to do whatever they want so long as it does not infinite on another's rights. And glad to provide some diversity.

Right, you don't think contraceptive coverage should be covered. But the government disagreed with you and said it needs to be covered in basic medical coverage. Why should it be a religious exemption when everyone else has to cover it?


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Jiggy wrote:
Caineach wrote:
utterly fail optimization tests
And ultimately, the only "optimization test" that matters is whether you meaningfully contribute in actual gameplay. I've seen builds/strategies that were dismissed online but passed this test, and I've seen other builds that truly did fail this test. About 50/50 between the two, if memory serves.

I have seen characters who's only mechanical contribution was healing spells standard to their level contribute meaningfully to gameplay. I've seen characters who cowered in the corner whenever combat started, with no meaningful way of actually avoiding notice, contribute meaningfully to gameplay. I have seen optimized melee builds that can't do a damn thing in the game. It depends entirely on the type of game the GM is running.


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thejeff wrote:
Mike Bohlmann wrote:

You can make any character interesting to role-play. There's no limitation in the rules about how you role-play or what you do with your character.

You can't make every character that was built to be interesting by introducing flaws or using sub-optimal builds into an effective combat character.

The former is an easier objective and doesn't screw over the other members of your community as they expend resources trying to keep you alive in difficult encounters. It's like the bard that ran away from every fight that someone described in a similar thread a while back. That player probably thought the role-play was awesome. The rest of his table probably thought he was an a*~!$*+.

Even more directly, you can make any character interesting to roleplay, regardless of optimization level.

That's the usual claim of the Stormwind Fallacy.

You can't however take any roleplaying based character concept and optimize it to the desired power level. Some concepts inevitably won't work if held to a high enough performance standard.
That's a point of view often overlooked by those who shout Stormwind Fallacy in every one of these discussions. It depends on the starting point. If you start with the mechanical build, you're likely to see no conflict. If you start with the roleplaying concept, you'll often run into characters that just don't work, no matter how much you like the idea. More so, the higher the necessary performance is.

It's one reason I prefer a lower level of challenge. It leaves more character concept space.

Thank you for this. I was trying to put it into words, but was failing. I have seen many character concepts that have been wonderful additions to a campaign that would utterly fail optimization tests. That being said, they were all played in homebrew campaigns. Know your GM and what type of game s/he is running, then come up with your character concept. Or if your a GM, let your players know ahead of time so they can build characters that work well together.


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zauriel56 wrote:
I disagree with the stance of the business but not the ruling. Why should rights be infringed upon because they own a business?

Why should an employer be able to pay his employees less because he is religious?


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Jiggy wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Nothing you say contradicts me. In fact, it supports my statements.
Your statements wrote:
and ~18% had 8 or 9
So only about 18% of the NPCs populating your world use the standard arrays?

"In any given stat"

So 1 in 6 people would assign the 8 to that stat, or ~16% of people. Another 16% would have a 9. My assumption is 16% would have below 8 and 18% would have an 8 or 9. In the end, the standard array is a little more forgiving than my assumptions, but basically amounts to a +1 in the stats. That is nothing compared to the overall generalizations that go on with stats.
Edit: and the standard array probably makes for a better game balance wise.


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Jiggy wrote:
Caineach wrote:
It really depends on how you view stat points. I consider every 2 points to be 1 standard deviation. Therefore, 16% of the population has lower than an 8, and ~18% had 8 or 9, in any given stat.

Make sure you communicate that prior to character creation, because that's not what someone would get just from reading the Core Rulebook:

Core Rulebook wrote:

Basic NPCs: The ability scores for a basic NPC are: 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, and 8.

Heroic NPCs: The ability scores for a heroic NPC are: 15, 14, 13, 12, 10, and 8.

So in default Pathfinder, the bulk of the population of the planet (i.e., anyone not unique enough to be custom-statted by the GM), just about everyone, has an 8 somewhere.

A normal person is someone whose stats (before race) range from 8 to 13. A heroic person is someone whose stats range from 8 to 15.

8 is normal.

This also means that, if you assume random/even distribution of these scores and start looking at racial adjustments, then...

Fully one-sixth of dwarves have 6 CHA. Somewhere between half and two thirds (depending on the basic/heroic ratio in the population) have CHA somewhere in the single digits.

They still function as a society.

Same goes for halflings' STR, nagaji's INT, etc.

For humans, an 8 is normal. For certain races, even a 6 can be normal in certain stats.

Anyone who wants stats to be different than that in their game world needs to communicate their preferences to their players in advance, and not judge those whose characters would have matched the default world prior to that clarification.

Nothing you say contradicts me. In fact, it supports my statements.


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John-Andre wrote:
Low attributes are, indeed, only going to bite you in the ass, and a skilled GM knows how to create obstacles subtly but definitely to show players that they maybe shouldn't have given their character a low attribute, unless they're willing to roleplay that lowered attribute and accept penalties for it, so long as the penalties are explained beforehand ("Your lowered Intelligence will prevent you from using my rules on Advanced Fighting Styles. Are you sure?").

Ok, so I just get my 8 cha and play myself.

It really depends on how you view stat points. I consider every 2 points to be 1 standard deviation. Therefore, 16% of the population has lower than an 8, and ~18% had 8 or 9, in any given stat.

As far as discouraging dump stats goes, just make sure that everyone has to be involved and pays attention. Encumbrance is a thing that often gets ignored (note str damage does not actually affect encumbrance in Pathfinder), and just making people waste resources to succeed DC10 climb checks makes them think twice a lot of times. Dex, just introduce stealth situations or any of the many skill checks, not to mention combat issues. Low Con has its own disadvantages that come up a lot with HP. Int kills skill points, so making skill checks relevant for different characters usually prevents people dumping it. Wisdom is usually too important for will saves and perception to be dumped. With Charisma, just don't allow the party face to roll for interactions other people have and have NPCs talk to everyone in the party. If you can't rely on your friends diplomacy check to cover your behavior, suddenly people wont dump it, or it will result in a fun evening.


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Rynjin wrote:

Man I was gonna go buy a copy of FF Legend 3 to see if I liked it as much as 2 (I lost my copy a while back) but apparently they cost like $150 now for some reason.

Have I ever mentioned how much I hate collectors?

Really? They were good games, and my favorite to play while stuck in the car, but definitely not worth that much.

Also, the game was originally out for regular gameboy.


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Usagi Yojimbo wrote:
Andrew R wrote:
I say we reexamine the dog's proposal bit. a small efficient house on a few acres outside the city and a bit of education on agriculture is better than packing the city full of crime and full dependence. Might be far better off delivering a regular ration than a blank check to waste on overpriced junk. But once again it would make the corporate masters unhappy so it cannot be.

A) Farming isn't as easy as you think it is.

B) There isn't a lot of farmland waiting around to be discovered, the frontier is closed.

and, most importantly,

C) Your plan is basically a reenactment of what the Khmer Rouge did in Cambodia. Even you should be able to figure out the likely results of trying it again.

Not to mention small scale farmers are selling off their land because it is worth more to housing developers than they can bring in through proceeds by farming.


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Squeakmaan wrote:
No, seriously many jobs do. VoIP calls from my home were a required part of my lab tech job, my boss lived in Japan, I worked in Virginia. In any kind of STEM job it's essentially a non-stated job requirement.

I can't even apply for a job in my field without high speed internet,


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ShadowcatX wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
ShadowcatX wrote:
Coriat wrote:
Andrew R wrote:
Anyone caught selling a card should be cut off for life. that is just stealing from tax payer, worthless filth
Countryman, "worthless filth" is an ugly thing to call a human being, thief or no.
It may be an ugly thing, but that does not make it inaccurate.
once you get to an area where you are asking people to accept name calling in the name of accuracy, any sort of dialog is officially over.
Dialogue ended when your side insisted that filling out forms to get benefits was a job.

I don't think you understand english if you think that is what was said.


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
whats this whole forgetting thing?

Oversimplified version: The EU ruled that a google search of someone's name constitutes a personal profile, and that users have a right to remove data from their personal profile. Search engines have to allow users the ability to remove links (with a review process, so not just any link can be removed. Only ones deemed "no longer relevant").

Google got lots of requests. No one cared what Bing results were.


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thejeff wrote:
Caineach wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Andrew R wrote:
A $240,000 house is not cheap, not something you just jump into without stable employment.

Compared to the median price of a home in any area that's in better health than Detroit? That's dirt cheap. 240k is only expensive if your base of comparison is a self-built log cabin somewhere in the sticks of Alaska.

The average price of a house in Jersey City is around three times that amount.

Here in upstate NY, that amount will get you a decent sized house in suburbia. If you are willing to live in any of the metropolitan areas near Albany, you can get single family starter homes in good shape for 85 to 120K, and houses sell for as low as 45K.

Housing markets vary greatly by area. I told my buddy from Boston a few years ago my parents were hoping to get 100K for their house, and he looked at me cross eyed. He has been in their house, and told me he would expect it to fetch at least 400K. I responded "Its in Troy," and slowly it dawned on him what that meant.

Remember also that price was in early 2008, at the height of the housing bubble. And in CT, which isn't cheap. After the crash it was worth $150K according to the story, which sounds like an exageration for CT, but possible in some markets.

Oh I understand that. I was more pointing out the extreme variations in markets and the differences in perceptions that can cause. Another instance, up here housing prices were remarkably stable and only fell like 10% with the crash. That was because prices stayed relatively stable during the boom. Meanwhile, in other markets houses lost over 50% or more of their value in a very short time. SO to me, I have to actively look for people who were negatively affected by that aspect of the crash, while for other people their entire neighborhood was destroyed.


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LazarX wrote:
Andrew R wrote:
A $240,000 house is not cheap, not something you just jump into without stable employment.

Compared to the median price of a home in any area that's in better health than Detroit? That's dirt cheap. 240k is only expensive if your base of comparison is a self-built log cabin somewhere in the sticks of Alaska.

The average price of a house in Jersey City is around three times that amount.

Here in upstate NY, that amount will get you a decent sized house in suburbia. If you are willing to live in any of the metropolitan areas near Albany, you can get single family starter homes in good shape for 85 to 120K, and houses sell for as low as 45K.

Housing markets vary greatly by area. I told my buddy from Boston a few years ago my parents were hoping to get 100K for their house, and he looked at me cross eyed. He has been in their house, and told me he would expect it to fetch at least 400K. I responded "Its in Troy," and slowly it dawned on him what that meant.


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As a chaotic good character I killed my fellow party member, a Paladin. To this day, I argue with the other player that no alignment shift would have been necessary if the campaign continued - it died that night with over half the party. An argument erupted (in character) over whether it was right to release an evil entity to save a nation and help us fight another evil entity. The party member from that nation started implementing the plan to save his people, and the Paladin attacked him. I responded to the Paladin's violence in kind.

The Paladin was very much a Scourge of Evil character - there was no negotiation, only execution if they failed to immediately repent. I was Ends Justify the Means, and was trying to get demonic help to kill my primary enemy, who was successfully taking over the world. Different origin stories create different priorities and those priorities can come into conflict. Not everything can be resolved in a manner satisfactory to everyone.


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Kickstarter campaign for a new Robotech pilot episode


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This is why I think all rating systems should be destroyed.


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I was 12 when I got a computer in my room in 96. I don't have kids now, but I see no reason not to trust them with one at that age.


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at least not all hope is lost.


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Electric Wizard wrote:

When Google released its web form on May 30, it received about 12,000

requests within the first 24 hours. Microsoft is thought to have received
fewer than 20 requests that day.

It appears Microsoft's biggest concern in Europe may instead be it has
been forgotten by Europeans.

I wonder how many request Paizo has received from Europeans.

.

i saw a stat that Google makes up 90% of Europe's search market. Not sure if it is true, but if it is it explains a lot.


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MagusJanus wrote:
Caineach wrote:
MagusJanus wrote:
Caineach wrote:
MagusJanus wrote:
thejeff wrote:
MagusJanus wrote:

Apparently, there is now effort to make a law to go around the SCOTUS decision

I hope they succeed.

They won't. At least not in this session. If the Democrats hold the Senate and take back the House, then it's likely in the next session.

So Vote.

I don't think they'll necessarily end up staying in office. There's a lot of people burned by Obamacare who may be willing to toss women's healthcare under the bus just to be rid of the program. Including a surprising number of women, from what I've seen.
You may want to check where your getting your figures. Current front page of the HuPo (so admittedly massively biased) - more than 3/4 of Republicans who have enrolled in Obamacare are in favor of their new coverage.

I checked my numbers before posting.

The data is a little old, but still current enough.

So yours is coming from a massively biased republican source and involves asking people conceptually about the law, and finds at best 51% opposed. Mine is from a massively democratically biased source looking at what people thought after getting new insurance and found people were generally happy. In the end, like pretty much every other benefit program, people are going to care more about it making them happy than conceptually being opposed to what it does.

Edit: I can see republicans banking on anti-obamacare backfiring as it becomes more popular and works better in bluer states.

...

Right, so, if I'm reading it right, the 13% of the marketplace that was forced to switch plans shows a ~50-60% dissatisfaction rate with their new plan. That is hardly surprising or showing of general disapproval with the law.


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MagusJanus wrote:
Caineach wrote:
MagusJanus wrote:
thejeff wrote:
MagusJanus wrote:

Apparently, there is now effort to make a law to go around the SCOTUS decision

I hope they succeed.

They won't. At least not in this session. If the Democrats hold the Senate and take back the House, then it's likely in the next session.

So Vote.

I don't think they'll necessarily end up staying in office. There's a lot of people burned by Obamacare who may be willing to toss women's healthcare under the bus just to be rid of the program. Including a surprising number of women, from what I've seen.
You may want to check where your getting your figures. Current front page of the HuPo (so admittedly massively biased) - more than 3/4 of Republicans who have enrolled in Obamacare are in favor of their new coverage.

I checked my numbers before posting.

The data is a little old, but still current enough.

So yours is coming from a massively biased republican source and involves asking people conceptually about the law, and finds at best 51% opposed. Mine is from a massively democratically biased source looking at what people thought after getting new insurance and found people were generally happy. In the end, like pretty much every other benefit program, people are going to care more about it making them happy than conceptually being opposed to what it does.

Edit: I can see republicans banking on anti-obamacare backfiring as it becomes more popular and works better in bluer states.


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MagusJanus wrote:
thejeff wrote:
MagusJanus wrote:

Apparently, there is now effort to make a law to go around the SCOTUS decision

I hope they succeed.

They won't. At least not in this session. If the Democrats hold the Senate and take back the House, then it's likely in the next session.

So Vote.

I don't think they'll necessarily end up staying in office. There's a lot of people burned by Obamacare who may be willing to toss women's healthcare under the bus just to be rid of the program. Including a surprising number of women, from what I've seen.

You may want to check where your getting your figures. Current front page of the HuPo (so admittedly massively biased) - more than 3/4 of Republicans who have enrolled in Obamacare are in favor of their new coverage.


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thejeff wrote:
Ratpick wrote:
Incidentally, Jenna Moran of Nobilis fame recently managed to Kickstart another diceless RPG that apparently uses the same rules set as Nobilis, called Chuubo's Marvelous Wish-Granting Engine. I didn't back the Kickstarter, but from the sounds of it it's basically heart-warming pastoral fantasy with a focus on slice-of-life play. I've been on a huge Golden Sky Stories kick recently and the two games sound very similar conceptually, so I'm definitely going to be checking this out when it comes out.
That sounds pretty awesome. I'll have to check it out.

I backed it but haven't gotten around to reading the pdfs yet.


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Threeshades wrote:
World of Darkness and Shadowrun can both be played just fine with an emphasis away from combat.

I have a feeling Shadowrun isn't going to be what he is looking for. Lets face it, you design your characters in it to survive when s+@+ hits the fan, and it isn't as much fun if s%@+ doesn't hit the fan at least every other run. The players will still min-max as much, or more, in my experience with shadowrun, even if they rarely get into combat.

Combat does tend to be more interesting when slaughtering all opponents isn't the answer to your problems though.


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Laurefindel wrote:

I haven't played much Reve de Dragon, but I don't recall any combat for my character.

Ars Magica, any of the World of Darkness series (except of Werewolf perhaps) and 7th Sea all have great potential for combat-lite games without feeling like 2/3 of the game's engine is lost.

I had a friend regale me with how much he loved 7th Sea, but never managed to get a game going. I would love to try it some time. Something about the making actions more ridiculous decreasing their difficulty is just fun. You don't just disarm the guy, you send his sword into the nearby bush while carving a Z on his chest so you get bonuses to the rolls.


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Don Juan de Doodlebug wrote:

I can't believe I've never heard of a "Boston marriage."

I'm guessing it is mostly a southern term.


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Hawktitan wrote:
Was a bit crazy. The US had the prefect opportunity to end it as it was approaching the 90 minute mark, if they didn't screw that up it would be the US advancing. And the whole US team owes a huge dept to Tim Howard for keeping them in the game as long as they did.

Apparently, for a bit of time Tim Howard was the Secretary of Defense according to Wikipedia. And we all know its true if Wikipedia says it is.


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Honestly, Pathfinder isn't the system to use. They all work really well as low level Exalts.


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Fromper wrote:
strayshift wrote:

"I'll go... uh... check on Mr Scruffy."

Sinister?

Yeah, that struck me as a bluff check, where nobody was paying enough attention to bother making a sense motive roll. Guaranteed he's stalking the vampire.

it struck me as "the best way I can help is by being out of the way"


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Nobilis is one of my favorite systems, and it is hard to decide to bother with combat when starting characters can get immortality for less than half their point buy and for less than a 5th they can survive a nuke on their face. I also love it when English doesn't have proper tenses for what you need to say. "There once will have never been evolution" is still one of my favorite phrases to come out of a game.


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That was an exciting finish.


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I think we would be more likely to see hotswapping batteries in the near future.


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Disgaea


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Another thing to consider - in my parents schools no one played soccer. At my school, soccer was the most played sport, and soccer didn't really get big until a few years before me. It has grown since I was a student. I'm 30 now, the average age of a professional soccer player. US soccer is on the rise because kids started playing it 25 years ago, and before that it wasn't a big thing.


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So, some other thoughts on ways these could be useful. For instance, in pay parking lots:
determine how long a car has been there (pay parking lots would like this, as would short term parking in business areas)
identify poorly parked people and develop a response (redraw lines to accommodate, send a parking official to ticket, send a tow truck) - also helps with large/nonstandard vehicles
determine if anyone is loitering and develop a response (send a security guard to do a sweep, turn lights on)
direct cars to the nearest parking space

There are certainly others.


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Scott Wilhelm wrote:

Go for it. Come up with stats for Grunts, officers, noncoms, and maybe some clerics and wizards.

Give them a mix of weapons, and give them a personality. Are these well-martialed, well-drilled soldiers with sophisticated tactics, forming shield walls backed by pike lines backed by net throwers backed by archers, backed by catapult crews? Or are they an intimidated rabble, ready to run? Or are they something in between: a horde of goblins with no courage, but no fear, either? Most DMs and PFS Module designers blanche at large mini battles, so I'd love to hear from somebody take it on.

Depending on the sophistication of the tactics and order of battle, and depending on the configuration of the characters, this might be a serious battle. I can see a platoon or Orogs all with Scent and Blind Fighting chip in to buy an Eversmoking Bottle giving a party of any level a very hard time. I can see walls of heavily armored soldiers hunkering behind Tower Shields holding the party in 1 position long enough for trebuchet crews to rain acid-filled clay pots on the squares the party occupies. They could arrange for some crews to hold their fire until the spotters see your wizard start spellcasting, then let fly. I can see companies of archers waiting for someone to try to flying. While this is going on, the army could have sappers undermining the ground under the party, ready to drop them in a pit that they have to climb out of while the rim is lined with pikemen and archers raining feathered steel.

They blanche at large mini battles for a reason. They are hell on the DM, take forever, and aren't very much fun. While all your ideas are cinematic, they aren't practical. The end result is that the wizard casts a single spell like protection from arrows and protection from energy and then ignores all those enemies as he casts a spell that pretty much wipes out the entire enemy defense line (wall of fire is a nice one) and the melee characters walk up and mow down the rest over the course of the next few hours. It uses fewer party resources than you expect and is not half as fun as it sounds in your head. Hell, by level 8 I have had parties destroy 100 enemies at once with little planning or forethought.

Much better is to run a few cinematic battles against higher level opponents or unique combat squads that are interspersed in the enemy line.

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