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Caineach's page

RPG Superstar 2013 Star Voter. Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 4,776 posts (4,781 including aliases). 1 review. No lists. No wishlists. 1 alias.


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I am Groot.


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Krensky wrote:
Kelsey Arwen MacAilbert wrote:
Krensky wrote:
Gun mounted cameras too.
Vest cameras will do fine. Adding a gun camera just puts more bulk on the weapon while not giving any information a vest camera wouldn't give.
They're tiny, smaller than a laser or flashlight and provide a picture of what the gun was pointed at and was happening when the gun was fired. They also remove the the camera lead came out in a struggle or while running excuse.

For an example of this excuse, see the comrade's link above where a cop shot someone after his camera "malfunctioned". Suprisingly, he has a history of complaints following his camera "malfunctions" [/sarcasm].


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thejeff wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Love the attitude that when police abuse their powers we should just give in.

Post right above yours. Give in at the moment, as you are in personal danger. Document exactly what happened. Report it and publicize it once you're safe.

Too many people think that "in the moment" confrontation is the best path.

It rarely is.

I'm skeptical of the results of your approach, but I'll add, if you're going to do this: Document it. Record the encounter, audio at least, video if you can do it without further inciting the officer. Or do so if the officer is harassing someone else.

Because if something does go down, it's your word against his and the jury and everyone else in the system will believe him. And the bad cops lie.

Considering that less than 10% of complaints are investigated, I highly doubt the results this would get as well.


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NobodysHome wrote:

After posting and deleting several times, I think I'll be "daring" enough to post my experiences with police. Having been stopped at least 30 times as a youth, at least once at gunpoint, I feel that I have ample experience being "stopped for looking the wrong way". On the other hand, I am vanilla white; if you are a minority, you might have experienced extremely different things than me.


  • Police are people, too. My overwhelming experience: If you treat officers with courtesy and respect, they will reciprocate. I always told the police what I was doing, let them search my bags or car, etc. Because I *knew* that I looked 'suspicious'. I was an upper-middle-class white kid acting out. I guarantee there are half a dozen minority posters on this board who will cite examples of "driving (or shopping) while black" as the reason they got stopped. Yet once you're stopped, the outcome seems predetermined: If you're friendly, polite, and cooperative, they let you go. If you're confrontational and want to argue and demand their badge number, the name of their captain, tell them they have no right to look in your car, etc., you're going to have trouble. You may be morally "right", but you're going to have trouble.
    My friends constantly complained about our "abusive, neo-nazi police force", and how they'd been cuffed, beaten, and/or arrested. And yet every time I was with them, it was *THEY* who started it by being uncooperative and abusive. I was cooperative. I never got cuffed, hit, arrested, or shot. My friends had scars from where police had hit them.
    And you know what? When I was with them when we got arrested, I *never* blamed the police.
    Heck, the one time I was held at gunpoint I was sure my friend was going to get shot right in front of me. And he totally deserved it. Ignoring their orders, keeping his hands in his pockets, hiding what he was doing from them. He did his utmost to force them to shoot an unarmed kid. It was damned scary.
  • Both sides are guilty of escalation. One
...

Love the attitude that when police abuse their powers we should just give in.


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thejeff wrote:
DM Barcas wrote:
Debate all you want, but you should stay in the realm of reality. Life is not a movie. People try to kill the cops (about 10% chance per officer per year of being assaulted, 2% with a deadly weapon). If there is a reasonable risk that I will be killed, I will do whatever it takes to prevent that. I won't rely on a technique that has the possibility of me not succeeding and getting killed. I will pick the most reliable method of protecting myself.

While I'm not going to debate the merits of various disarming techniques, I'm not comfortable with the "Cop's safety first, at any cost" attitude. It's not even always the best for long-term safety. Increasing militarization and shoot first attitudes might make you safer in the moment, but if they alienate the population and the community you're working in, that leads to a more hostile environment and likely more attacks, which justifies more defensive measures, creating more hostility, etc.

And frankly, despite the anecdotes, policing isn't an extremely dangerous occupation.

More likely to be attacked and injured on the job working retail than as a cop.


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CalebTGordan wrote:

I am going to have to change focus on this. I did do some of the work myself but I think I may not have approached this the right way. I am still going to do my paper on race in gaming but I am going to open it up to video games. There are far more available studies and information for me to use once I do that.

I know that feeling. Always a disappointment to realize there isn't enough information out there for you to do a decent project on what you want to do. Good luck.

Too bad I just got rid of all my old books, or I would help.


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Harem anime usually revolve around the women vying for affections of the main character and competing in some way with each other. Molly and Murphy are the only 2 that really fit in with traditional harem anime tropes, and the fact that he has hooked up with any of them defies harem anime tropes. Not to mention they are rarely love interests at the same time. You have to remember that there is generally a year between books in world, and most of his relationships don't last more than 2 books.


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Muad'Dib wrote:
The Dresdin books are akin to Harem Anime when you think about it.

I can only assume you watch pretty much no harem anime.


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Pan wrote:
For me there seems to always be this compressed electronic buzz with MP3s. I'm not saying MP3 is god awful don't ever listen to them however, I often listen to MP3 myself. I just prefer vinyl if I can have it. By extension the newest receivers are plastic aluminum junk as well.

And a lot of younger people find that music without that buzz is like food without salt. Your brain picks up on things it is used to.

I'm not saying one is better than the other btw. Just pointing out that the brain is weird.


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They actually did a study a number of years ago and found that younger people preferred the audio quality of mp3s while older people found the audio quality poor and prefered albums. Apparently it has a lot to do with what a person's ears have grown accustomed to.


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Krensky wrote:

You completely reject that a SWAT or ESU unit has need for an APC? That a EOD unit doesn't need an armored truck? That HAZMAT or Airport fire fighters don't need armored attack vehicles?

Truly the mind boggles.

Read up on SWAT operations. The North Hollywood shootout is an example. The LAPD had to commandeer armored cash trucks to use as ambulances. The original B.E.A.R. was designed to transport SWAT officers and other personnel, extract civilians and injured people, serve as a moving shield, a self mobile ladder and a battering ram. The BearCat in question is a smaller version of the same truck.

Also: Bearcat Survived Standoff; Police Cars Did Not

What the hell are airport firefighters going to do with assault vehicles? Or Hazmat?

In the handlfull of situations like this across the country over the course of the year that might warrant gear like this, the local national guard could be called in. And if your most recent example is from 1997, that is a lot of expense to justify a freak occurrence.

The vast majority of swat operations are to serve non-violent drug offenders warrants. They don't need this gear.


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thejeff wrote:

Planning to be arrested is a common protest activity. A lot of people don't do it because they can't afford to be arrested. Assuming it's organized and planned and not because the arrestee was being violent or something, it's generally considered positive by the protesters. If the people protesting in Ferguson don't think he's an ass for doing so, why do you have to?

Him being there and getting arrested helps them get those headlines you want them to have.

The headline "dude no one outside of protest circles has heard of get arrested" doesn't help them, especially when the article talks about how he went there to get arrested. It will just as likely drive people away from their cause as help it.

For a similar reason, if I were among the protesters I would ask Al Sharpton to shut up and go away, since he is a more divisive figure than anything else.


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Irontruth wrote:

You basically just defined protesting. You are now saying that ALL protests are just a%!!*+&s, regardless of what they're protesting. Protesting is showing up and causing a scene to call attention to an issue.

Do you think that police brutality, corruption and abuse of power is something we should accept quietly? Or do you think people should stand up to them and call attention to their wrong doings?

The other aspect of what he did is help lend his voice to what other people were already doing. He didn't start that protest or was the sole organizer. He showed up to lend his voice and credentials, to show support for the locals and help magnify their cause.

Some random guy gets arrested in a protest in Ferguson, it just gets lumped in with the numbers. Cornel West, a former Harvard professor gets arrested, you get additional art and column space nationally, helping maintain a higher profile for the situation.

Really what I get from you is that the people of Ferguson should shut up and accept their lot in life. That people outside of Ferguson should stop thinking about the topic and let it go away. That's what I get from you when you say "this isn't newsworthy". You might not intend that, but that's how it comes across.

The vast majority of protesters did not go there with the intent of being arrested. Thousands of people showed up. A couple dozen got arrested. That one of those guys is remotely famous is not special news, any more than the dozens of other people getting arrested is news. That he went specifically to get arrested is what makes him a jerk.

I'm all for them protesting. I love the fact that they are going to public venues like baseball games to disrupt normal life. That should be front and center headlines. One guy in the protest, even if famous, is filler.


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Irontruth wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Gaberlunzie wrote:
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

The reports you saw are at variance with the ones I saw. Any links?

Also, do you think Martin Luther King, Jr. was an asshat?

And Rosa Parks. And Emma Goldman. And like a bazillion other people.

Relevant change has never been gotten without people consciously breaking the law. When it's even nonviolent crimes it's just idiotic to talk about them as "asshats" - unless it's their cause, like "stop police from shooting unarmed kids", you are against.

Not having heard of Emma Goldman before, but looking at her wikipedia page now, I wouldn't say the label is inappropriate for someone who supported assassination.

In Rosa Parks's initial confrontation she did not travel with the intent to get arrested in a distant protest.

Lots of people are asshats.

Yes, she did.

Some facts about her arrest:

1) She was the secretary of the Montgomery NAACP
2) She attended the Highlander Folk School, a training center for activists
3) Parks' own words

Rosa Parks wrote:
People always say that I didn't give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn't true. I was not tired physically, or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. I was not old, although some people have an image of me as being old then. I was forty-two. No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in.

4) Other similar refusal's to move had been committed, with the intention to press law suits to force change through the courts.

5) Prior to her incident it was believed that the specifics of her attempt would be the most likely to succeed in a court case (it wasn't).

The point of civil disobedience, when protesting what a person thinks is an unjust law, is to force legal action by the state to highlight that the law is unjust.

Cornel West wanted to go into the police headquarters and arrange a meeting with the Ferguson police chief. He wasn't charged with refusal to disperse. He was charged with assaulting a police officer. Why? Because he wanted to walk past the police line to go talk to the police chief.

[sarcasm] You're right, it's Cornel West who is the asshat, not the police.[/sarcasm]

Thanks for educating me on Rosa Parks. (not sarcasm) Schools do a really s~%@ty job at teaching anything about her.

As for West, your account is significantly different from the early reporting on it. It actually answers my initial question - "why should I care?" It doesn't change the fact that he is an asshat - he went to a set of protests with the intention of causing a scene and getting arrested. It just shows that the police are also even bigger asshats than I thought (which is actually difficult here).

As Krensky says, asshattery is not mutually exclusive. In fact, they have a way of multiplying themselves.


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Gaberlunzie wrote:
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

The reports you saw are at variance with the ones I saw. Any links?

Also, do you think Martin Luther King, Jr. was an asshat?

And Rosa Parks. And Emma Goldman. And like a bazillion other people.

Relevant change has never been gotten without people consciously breaking the law. When it's even nonviolent crimes it's just idiotic to talk about them as "asshats" - unless it's their cause, like "stop police from shooting unarmed kids", you are against.

Not having heard of Emma Goldman before, but looking at her wikipedia page now, I wouldn't say the label is inappropriate for someone who supported assassination.

In Rosa Parks's initial confrontation she did not travel with the intent to get arrested in a distant protest.

Lots of people are asshats.


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Irontruth wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Irontruth wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Cornel West Arrested in Ferguson
I really don't see how a guy going out to get arrested at a protest getting arrested is news.
I'm kind of curious exactly what about this situation you think isn't news worthy.
You have hundreds or thousands of protesters, most of whom are peaceful and not violating the law. One (or I believe a total of 17 IIRC) guy desides to go out and intentionally violate the law so he gets arrested. The story there isn't the handfull of asshats who don't matter in the grand scheme of things getting themselves arrested, it is in the hundreds of peacefully protesting people. The fact that one of these people is well known for getting arrested doesn't matter.

You make a lot of claims and assumptions in this post. By your post, it doesn't even seem like you know WHY he was arrested.

It also seems like you completely miss what the concept of civil disobedience is.

According to the reports I saw, he was arrested with a small group for failure to disperse after the vast majority of the protest he was with dispersed. He talked about intentionally going out to get arrested. That pretty much defines a&~!#%* in my book.


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Irontruth wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Cornel West Arrested in Ferguson
I really don't see how a guy going out to get arrested at a protest getting arrested is news.
I'm kind of curious exactly what about this situation you think isn't news worthy.

You have hundreds or thousands of protesters, most of whom are peaceful and not violating the law. One (or I believe a total of 17 IIRC) guy desides to go out and intentionally violate the law so he gets arrested. The story there isn't the handfull of asshats who don't matter in the grand scheme of things getting themselves arrested, it is in the hundreds of peacefully protesting people. The fact that one of these people is well known for getting arrested doesn't matter.


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Muad'Dib wrote:
Alex Martin wrote:


The problem is the level of sincerity and viability in its application to this case. To simply add a minority or minority team for the sake of inclusion smacks of financial political correctness and lack of artistic integrity.

If your central argument is that you question Marvel's sincerity then Alex you need to prove that they are being insincere.

Marvel has more female writers and practice more diverse hiring then they ever have. To me this shows a concerted effort to make their product more diverse without resorting to tokenism.

He provided a list of examples from previous times they have done similar things and said they are probably doing the same thing. What other evidence could he possibly supply to back up his point that would be more credible?


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Irontruth wrote:
phantom1592 wrote:

I'm generally the odd one out that says diversity is overrated and claiming a need for it should be considered offensive.

Seriously, lets look at this statement some more.

That is hatred. It might be unintended hatred, but it is hatred none the less. Being opposed to diversity is being opposed to people who are different. That's all sorts of bad "isms".

It doesn't matter who is making a call for diversity, they're in a minority or a majority. In fact, people in the majority have a responsibility to make those calls, because it means we recognize that there are problems and they need to be corrected.

And yes, I do shut down. I don't apologize for it. I don't care what arguments people have to back up hatred. It's still hatred.

I hate reporting this stuff, because that just white-washes the issue and makes it seem to disappear, on both sides. People sit in their little bubbles and assume that they're right.

People pointing out patterns of racism/sexism/etc is not offensive. Anyone making such a claim is at worst unknowningly supporting said racism/sexism/etc.

Please counter this and tell my why black people shouldn't be allowed in comics.

And this is why people get turned off by social justice.


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We are also arguing that when the dominant character traits when discussing a character are ethnic or gender based, the character is probably going to suck.


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Orfamay Quest wrote:
Ross Byers wrote:


(Also, my point isn't that fusion can't provide those things or isn't a good way to provide those things, or wouldn't be orders of magnitude cheaper than conventional alternatives. Just that I was objecting to the way the original article present them as things that would somehow be magically unlocked by having the ability to generate electricity from fusion.)
But I think it's fair to say that they would be magically unlocked by a truck-scale power plant. I don't think it's necessarily the fusion that would be magic (although I don't see how you'd get the necessary power density out of genetically engineered hamsters), but the idea of running the whole damn village off something parked in Abd'Allah's garage.

Actually looking into power generation, I'm finding 100mw generators that appear to be roughly the same size. I think the bigger thing here is actually the fuel distribution network. Comes preloaded with a year of fuel is a big deal compared to trying to constantly ship in coal or oil.


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GregH wrote:
Caineach wrote:
A much better article on it
Its behind a paywall...

It is? I wonder if my work just auto-logs in.


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A much better article on it


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KarlBob wrote:
Okay, if we're gonna play Social Science Study Bingo, here's the first thing I found with the keywords "study percentage female gamers". Study: More women than teenage boys are gamers Washington Post, August 22, 2014. Most relevant paragraph:
Gail Sullivan wrote:
Men still make up 52 percent of the game-playing population, but women, now 48 percent of the gaming population compared with just 40 percent in 2010, are closing in. The rising popularity of mobile gaming is one reason why.

Which study did they use? In fact, "The rising popularity of mobile gaming is one reason why." supports my claim. Most people within the gaming community, and many people outside of it, do not consider those people gamers IME. A problem is the term is being used by different groups to mean different things.


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Xeen wrote:
Proxima Sin of Brighthaven wrote:
Like dudebro, who even is this "the man" whose fault it isn't?

Like no way girl, no u dittent!!

Seriously though, you know what I was saying.

Most of those games are targeted at men, because most gamers are men. As I said, I think its nonsense. Its all about money just like most comercials on TV are about a woman telling a man what to do, or a woman telling another woman what to do, or a woman talking about how great something is. That target audience is women for a reason.

All about the cash and who it flows from. Nothing else matters.

I do applaud GW for not falling into that. (in this case)

Actually, I think besides being awesome people who like to see things like good representation in gaming, they also recognized that they have a niche product and a large part of their target audience is in a counterculture that supports these types of things, so it also makes sense financially.

When you aren't trying to appeal to mainstream with the core of your product, you have more freedom to try to court non-mainstream people with other aspects of it.


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Proxima Sin of Brighthaven wrote:
Xeen wrote:
Most of those games are targeted at men, because most gamers are men.

And THAT sentence is PURE sexism.

Now get me on this, you personally are not trying to be prejudiced against women. But you ARE receiving that idea directly from sexism and reinforcing sexism by expressing that gender-assumption as fact. The difference between personal prejudice (the "I have a friend" defense) and systemic sexism is the the major thing that many, many people don't get when talking about equality.

The fact is 40-50% of gamers are girls and women, and it's easy to assume more would be if they had a safe and accepting place to be a gamer with real products built for them (not a bow and lipstick slapped onto regular Pac-Man).

Xeen wrote:
All about the cash and who it flows from. Nothing else matters.
You're also touching on the chicken:egg issue in gaming and entertainment more broadly. Are women not interested in gaming because their ovaries said so, or are they not interested in games built specifically to be looked at by stereotypical hyper-masculine-emulating dudes?

And the fact is that the studies that reflect more than 40% gamers to be female use different definitions of gamer than most people within the gamer community. For instance, playing 10 minutes of candy crush a week constitutes people as a gamer by some of the studies. Men are significantly more likely to play more than 20 hours of video games a week, on the order of about 4 to 1. They make up about 60% of gamers who play between 5 and 20 hours. There are enough women in the category of less than 5 hours a week in some of the studies to skew the gender ratio in favor of women despite very few people in that group self-identifying as a gamer.

As a side note, I have heard females currently make up more than 50% of active WoW accounts.


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I would be willing to bet that the first 8.5 pages of that is a standard form letter with fill in the blanks. Nothing about this seems out of the ordinary.


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LazarX wrote:
thejeff wrote:

While the term was coined for Difference Engine, it doesn't limit the genre quite that much. Modern steampunk is more about the trappings, the retro-tech, than it's about analytical engines and the manipulation of society with information.

If you stuck with that, there would really only be a few works of steampunk and we'd need another name for the rest.:).
Which I've already supplied. :)

It is not uncommon for early works in a field, or the works that coin a term, to not fit into what that term eventually means.

Sherlock Holmes is a good example. It is generally credited with inventing the Mystery genre, but by modern standards would not fit in. It doesn't really follow any of the conventions that make up the genre. - most notably by the fact that the reader is not given critical information to be able to solve the mystery before the big reveal.


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Aubrey the Malformed wrote:

What you are talking about is bad science. But that is in no way a sole feature of steampunk. A classic example for me was in The Matrix, where humans were supposedly used as batteries to fuel the evil supercomputer through body heat. That was such garbage. The amount of energy that needed to be expended to feed the humans would be less - much less - than that generated by their body heat. The supercomputer would have been better off, y'know, with a normal battery (and it would still have to charge it). And that certainly affected my interest in the story once this Big Reveal was made in the film.

But I don't think quoting examples of shoddy understanding of some basic physics invalidates the steampunk genre. There's good and bad steampunk. I think you are mistaking crap writing for a feature of the genre. Instead, I suggest you consider reading some of the good stuff (well, better, anyway).

Original idea was that they were wired together and used as a giant supercomputer, but that got thrown out because most of the audience wouldn't understand it when it came out.


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Purple Dragon Knight wrote:
Kthulhu wrote:

Depending on the timeline, I suppose The Defenders might be changing that.

Plus, I was looking forward to more Cap and Bucky.

Word on the Defenders! I can see them shacked up in Strange's weird mansion, like the New Avengers hid during Civil War! :)

Also, I fully expect Bucky to show up again... either in his own movie, series or throughout various Marvel movies.

Isn't he signed on for 4 more movies?


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Arnwyn wrote:

1. I see the CW is continuing with its fine tradition of having at least one female character (in this case Iris) be a complete idiot, annoying, useless in almost every way, and an actual detriment to the quality of the show. She hurts the show in every scene she's in.

2. I also see that the CW continues to like to have emotion and irrationality rule their arguments/disagreements, instead of of normal rational behavior:

The CW (wrong) way: "You're not my dad! You're not the boss of me!"

The rational (right) way: "You know, I think it's probably a good idea if I really do save a little 9 year old girl from horribly dying in flames. Do you actually disagree with that?"

Obviously you don't understand people.

People aren't rational.


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Comrade Anklebiter wrote:
Cornel West Arrested in Ferguson

I really don't see how a guy going out to get arrested at a protest getting arrested is news.


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I was getting the drug dealer no longer living in the house baby getting flashbanged story confused with the no drugs ever in the house cops shoot guy through the wall. In the later story cops used a tip from the guy who stole their car to get the warrant.

These swat team assaults on innocents are hard to keep straight.


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Rynjin wrote:
Durngrun Stonebreaker wrote:
Do you mean the incompetence of raiding a house when you have no idea of who or what is in there?

This was a SWAT team. They work with the information they are given. SWAT teams are not meant to investigate, that's what the regular police force is for.

I mean, I know it's hip and edgy to hate the police and all, but please.

Now, we can go into how the regular police force dropped the ball here by not confirming any info, but these particular officers hold no blame here, as everyone seems to assume they do.

The SWAT team, made up of 6 or 7 officers (the department wont say exactly how many) from the local sheriff and police departments. Apparently getting assigned to a special team means you get to ignore the rest of your duties as an officer.

Not to mention other articles say the person they were looking for no longer lived in the home


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Rynjin wrote:
I like how everyone is blaming the police instead of the scumbag methheads using their child's playpen to barricade the door.

You mean the children's playpen that was looking out the window (crazy place for it, I know) of the family where no drugs were found?


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Former prosecutor describes grand juries.
Basically, there are 2 types of grand juries. Fergie described one kind. The other kind is what is being used here.


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thejeff wrote:

The discussion's moved on (and exploded) while I was away, but I'll add a couple of points back towards the start.

When I said the "reality of the day" I wasn't talking about when you (or I) were nerds in school, whenever that was, but back to the earliest roots of computer gaming. Back to that ad for the arcade game with the model in the transparent dress and back beyond that to the first hackers writing games on the old time share machines.
Women weren't involved back then to any noticeable degree, not because women just didn't happen to be interested in computer games, but because there was tremendous social pressure against women in any kind of hard science, including computers. This was back in the very early days of second wave feminism. I would hope that even those who deny sexism today will admit it existed back then.

For your response to the second point: it doesn't really matter whether I think it's a correct reaction or not. It's going to happen. Women are coming into gaming culture and gaming culture is going to change. You can fight back, but it can't be stopped, short of changes in the status of women in the outside world.

This isn't true. Like comics, women were actively involved at the beginning and then left. Look at 70s art and advertising instead of 80s. It was the 80s where gender stereotypes started being used. I suspect it was a large part of the cultural shift that encompassed a lot of other things too.


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Kobold Cleaver wrote:
Mythic Evil Lincoln wrote:

*selfbackpat*

yeah, we're so cool.

Especially me.

Anyways, my opinion on inclusiveness in media is that it's "amoral", so I guess that's fair. I think it's good and adds a lot of flavor, but I don't automatically assume immorality when there's a movie like Frozen with almost all white people.

Though I do think it's something of a shame that they used so many great elements of Sami culture and still went with an all-white cast. Still, it was a nice touch. And kids' animation overall has a kinda complicated history on non-white or female leads, Not just Disney—Pixar and Dreamworks are also big offenders. In fact, you could argue Disney is one of the best thanks to its very frequent female leads, while Dreamworks only has a few, like "Monsters Vs. Aliens" and the upcoming "Home".

I'm really looking forward to Moana, by the way. Polynesian princess who sails the sea and goes up against gods and is a kickass navigator? HELL YEAH.

Similarly, we have The Last Airbender movie (that I know many of you would like to forget). The source material is highly influenced and stylized by different Asian cultures, but for the casting call they specified everyone had to be white, except for the villains, who are all middle eastern.

Edit to clarify - this is an example of them doing something bad, whitewashing.


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An interesting poll. Particularly pages 35-37.

Do you consider yourself to be a feminist:
25% yes 75% no

Do you consider feminist an insult:
14% No, 26% Yes, 60% neutral

One dictionary definition of a feminist is someone who believes in the social, political and economic equality of the sexes. As you think about that definition, do you
think of yourself as a feminist or not?
60% yes 40% no

The survey I found linked to from this Huffington Post article on feminism.


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Albatoonoe wrote:
That's not what I was getting at, Kobold. "Gay" and "Homosexual" are both different words that homosexuals use. That are actual words to describe this. Social Justice Warrior is a term invented to entirely undermine a good thing. It has no basis in anything. It has no good connotation. If you are going to have a good discourse, ditch the word and say things that are actually descriptive of things. Hell, "the other side of the issue" would be better and more descriptive.

SJW is a term I have heard many progressives use to describe rabid members of their own community. I have even heard people self-identify that way. I encountered it first used by someone using it to positively describe themselves.


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Mythic Evil Lincoln wrote:
Kobold Cleaver wrote:
"Privilege" and "Social Justice Warriors" are both negative terms, and both sometimes valid, real, and easy to overlook. I don't see any meaningful difference.

To make them truly equivalent, you'd need to change the latter to be "overenthusiastic advocate of social justice" I think.

But as time wears on, "privilege" is acquiring more and more baggage which threatens its very usefulness.

Privilege started with the baggage. People who have never heard the term start hostile to it.

Personally, I think there is a really simple line between social justice advocates and social justice warriors. If your rhetoric actively turns moderates away from your cause, your a warrior.

Pretty much every person below 25 I have met who actively advocates for a cause goes through a phase of SJW. Most of them grow out of it.


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Simon Legrande wrote:
Caineach wrote:

As to whether or not this is good for the industry - I would argue that it isn't good for either books or television.

Between GRRM and Firefly, I have mostly given up on consuming media unless it is finished. In fact, a growing group of people now binge watch tv, which ish why Netflix stopped trying to slowly release its series in favor of releasing them all at once after examining user data. I bet you can look at finished series and see significant upticks in sales when they are done. There is a reason they package completed series together to buy all at once.

This to me says that people are less likely to consume small doses, like the first book in a series. That will mean poor sales/ratings, and a feedback loop of people not willing to trust a project will be completed.

The only problem is, there still has to be a one or two book/show introduction to get people interested. It costs a lot more money to put out an entire series that nobody reads/watches than it does to start with an introduction.

In general, I agree with your point though.

Yeah. And since enough things have started violating the social contract to finish what they start, people are getting fed up. People don't like becoming emotionally invested in things that end up being disappointments. Which is one reason why violating the social contract is a bad thing in this regard. When energetic fans are defeatist about the long term prospects of your project before it even begins, you have a problem.


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As to whether or not this is good for the industry - I would argue that it isn't good for either books or television.

Between GRRM and Firefly, I have mostly given up on consuming media unless it is finished. In fact, a growing group of people now binge watch tv, which is why Netflix stopped trying to slowly release its series in favor of releasing them all at once after examining user data. I bet you can look at finished series and see significant upticks in sales when they are done. There is a reason they package completed series together to buy all at once.

This to me says that people are less likely to consume small doses, like the first book in a series. That will mean poor sales/ratings, and a feedback loop of people not willing to trust a project will be completed.


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Damon Griffin wrote:

Although I am watching and very much enjoying Games of Thrones on HBO, I haven't read any of Martin's books and don't know that I will. I'll have to consider other authors and what, if anything, they "owe" me.

I feel that if an author begins a multi-book story, he does owe his readers a conclusion. Based on the TV show and what Martin has apparently told its producers about future plot development, it sounds like it is meant to be one epic story rather than just a series novels that share a universe and some characters. I'd say Martin absolutely owes his readers a conclusion to that story, given the millions of dollars generated off their investment in it. [Sadly for fans] he isn't obliged to complete it by any particular date, but he needn't be an ass about it.

Jim Butcher may have a grand metaplot in mind for his Harry Dresden books, but that series doesn't depend on one. Despite excellent character development, it's largely episodic. He could stop at any time and not be in violation of any perceived contract with the reader. That's my rational brain speaking. My irrational brain says he owes me complete focus on the Dresden series, forgetting about his other projects, because I don't read any of those.

I consider Laurell K. Hamilton to have been in contract violation with me for a number of years now, because of a major change in the focus of the Anita Blake series of books. The first several involved Blake as a supernatural investigator. She raised zombies for a living, killed vampires when necessary, and consulted with local cops on the supernatural. As the series "progressed" (if you can call this progress) it became less and less about Blake's zombie/vampire/consulting work, more and more about how many different sexual partners she could juggle per day. That's not the character I signed up for, nor the character originally presented. Hamilton turned "my" urban supernatural series into silly kink-porn. I don't appreciate the drawn out bait-and-switch.

Regarding Jim Butcher - I would have agreed with you up until a certain point. Now though, he has introduced too many continuous plots over time where the informal contract grew. If he stopped after a few books, I would have been fine. The threads hadn't been woven together yet. So for me, I guess it has a lot to do with how many and what type of unresolved things there are left in the story.


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Aranna wrote:

But the real question is are the people who have to pay for that pay increase cool with it? Because the middle class are the ones we should ask if this is ok. They are the ones who will pay higher prices without an increase in wages.

Being solidly middle class and not dependent on minimum wage at all, I would vote for a hike every time. So would the majority of Americans for that matter.


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Readerbreeder wrote:
Calex wrote:
On a related note...

That's a good point, actually. To draw a sports analogy, Major League Baseball was racially integrated in 1947 with Jackie Robinson, and players come from the ends of the earth now, but to this day they're having trouble getting minorities in "management" positions (manager, general manager, director of baseball operations, etc.).

I was just reading this article that has some interesting things to say in the 2nd half about converting players to DMs. WotC (and TSR before them) has relied far too much on "word of mouth" to do that. That goes double for female GM's. If only a small percentage of RPGers are GMs, and only a small percentage of RPGers are female, some simple math should tell you that the intersection of those two sets is ridiculously small. If we want more female players, it stands to reason that more female GMs is a step in the right direction, GMs being the ones who usually proselytize the games, organize groups, and so on.

I would love playing in a game headed by a female GM, but I haven't had the good fortune to come across one yet. Maybe I'm just looking in the wrong places.

Thinking about it, I have been in a number of games and know a lot more that are at least 50% female, but can only think of 2 female I know who have GMed, and have not played with either.


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Simon Legrande wrote:
Sebastrd wrote:
Mark Moreland wrote:
I only played Minecraft briefly when it first came out on Xbox, but I found the lack of story led to boredom, despite having complete creative freedom and ultimately the ability to build whatever the heck I wanted.
I felt the same way. My children, however, play it like electronic Legos. They'll spend hours creating some pretty cool and incredible (for their ages) stuff. It massively encourages and inspires their creativity. It is literally the best "kid" game I've ever seen.
Exactly. My kids get on together and can spend a couple hours goofing off and building random junk. My son built a chicken ranch once and spent all his time capturing chickens. I tried it, lasted about 15 minutes.

I enjoyed the game for a number of months after I joined a friend's server and built a few monuments there. I drifted away when the world started expanding to a point where everyone was so far away from eachother that we all had our own thing no one else ever saw. The community projects were the most fun. I cannot get into single player mode at all.


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I would like to point out the Seoni is a power fantasy for many women. In fact, every female roleplayer I have shown the book to has had a noticeably favorable reaction to her, to the point of 2 of them saying almost instantaneously "ooh I want to play her". None of the other iconics have had such a strong positive reaction.


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Orthos wrote:

Long story short, IMO at least, Pacific Rim is one of those movies that gets less fun the more you know about how certain things work in real life, unless you're the kind of person who can turn off that "work brain" part of your analytic psyche when it comes time for entertainment.

If MST3K/Rifftrax'ing it up is the way you get the best fun out of it, by all means, have at it.

Just don't be a douche and do so in the theatre, though.

Having watched it with a group of mechanical engineers and physics majors, I can say that it is most likely you. Tons of technically minded people have no issue with giant robots killing giant monsters. The movie did not pretend it was about anything else.


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John Oliver on Scottish independence

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