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Feiya

Caineach's page

RPG Superstar 2013 Star Voter. Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 4,487 posts (4,492 including aliases). 1 review. No lists. No wishlists. 1 alias.


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Personally, one of the best changes I think LoL did over the WC3 DotA was removing denial. I thought it was a terrible mechanic then and still do, for many of the reasons Irontruth mentioned. In addition, I dislike how it favors characters with fast attack animations.


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The character got a name. Of course Felix will live.


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Irontruth wrote:

I do like the rune (and mastery) mechanic though. Runes and masteries affect low level play mostly, I set things up different for the same champion depending on what I'm planning to do. Plus I like the added layer of theorycrafting: are these runes better than those runes and for which champ, etc.

After a couple levels though, runes become largely irrelevant to the outcome of fights, they're just too minor in stats. For example, I can have all my seals be bonus health (9 seals, +8 hp per) for 72 bonus HP. If I'm a squishy carry, late game without those seals I'll have 1800-2000 hp. Those 72 HP aren't nothing, but they're pretty small. If I'm playing a tank I'll likely have around 3500-4000 HP.

Also, you can't buy runes directly with money. You have to play. You can buy a boost, so that you earn points faster to buy runes, but you still have to play to get the runes.

It is a valid complaint though and it takes a bit of grind to get everything you might want.

You can buy a starter set of runes in a bundle with a bunch of champs and skins. It has tier 3 runes I believe, so it is better than you could buy before rank 20. AFAIK that is the only stat-affecting thing you can buy with actual money.

That being said, runes affect early game a lot. For instance, a few points of defense on mid is huge for how much they can be bullied by their opponent with auto attacks at level 1-3. I get mana regen runes on a lot of characters so I don't have to buy items to do it.


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MMCJawa wrote:
Kairos Dawnfury wrote:
Shadowborn wrote:
Kairos Dawnfury wrote:
Now I just need to hold out hope that Fox releases its ownership of Fantastic 4, Spider-man and X-men so Disney can add them into the cross overs!
Don't hold your breath. I predict that the latter two are going to make their respective companies bundles of money. FF...not so much.

They're actually rebooting Fantastic 4, all though from what I've heard, even less respect for the source material than before...

Sorry for the derail, I actually love this movie, this is the first time Falcon has actually been cool. The cast was great and the OP hit some many good points I agree on. I'm really excited to see how they build on the plot points left over.

Marvel is never ever getting X-men back, or at least they won't until Super heroes are no longer profitable. Which is kind of the same thing

Sony has also said they will never ever sell Spiderman, although my understanding is that Sony Pictures has been having some financial difficulties, So I suppose Disney just up and BUYING Sony isn't impossible, and presumably they would hand over Spiderman rights to Marvel.

Fantastic Four (and Namor..wtf) are pretty much the only series I could imagine might get sold back, and that probably depends on if the next movie is a failure or not.

Personally, F4 is the one I would most like seeing added to the movie universe continuity. Mutants cause a problem if they try to keep continuity as you have old mutants who have been public for years added to a universe that to this point has shown very little knowledge of their existence. Spiderman doesn't have any issues, but he is doing well over in his own world.


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thejeff wrote:
Ninja in the Rye wrote:
Purple Dragon Knight wrote:

Yes, they have written off the Asgardians as beings from another dimension with different body density, strength, etc. i.e. explained by tech/science.

Although Loki / Enchantress / Lorelei could definitely have sorcery. Actually MAoS had Sif confirm that Lorelei uses sorcery...

They establish in Thor that Asgardian science and magic are one and the same.

They did? I must have missed that. Though I remember an awful lot of people online insisting the Asgardians have always been super high-tech aliens.

Now, they might have established that some kinds of Asgardian magic are detectable by scientific equipment, but that's not quite the same thing.

What does it even mean to say that Odin's powers (or Loki's) are scientific? Or Mjolnir's for that matter.

Well, in Thor they did have a conversation where Jane saw Asguardian equipment and then asked if it was <insert random technobable here>, the Asguardian saying no, Jane asking if it did x, the Asguardian replying yes, and then Jane asserting they were the same thing to the displeasure of the Asguardian.


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Matthew Koelbl wrote:
Caineach wrote:
So, overall I really liked the movie, but did anyone else have an issue with the fact that all of the intelligence they had came from a bad guy deciding he would tell Captain A his evil plot just before he was killed?

It bothered me for a moment, but once I considered it, I realized it wasn't really a problem.

** spoiler omitted **

Spoiler:
Yes, and that is precisely why I wish Zola didn't spill the beans. If he just gave a little bit about how he survived, and then Cap and Black Widow pieced together the plan now that they know its Hydra, it would have come across as them outsmarting the enemy instead of them being clueless and getting handed the info. They could have highlighted the heroes instead of using cheesy outdated gloating that makes the villain look dumb. This would have been especially useful for Black Widow, who is supposed to be a super spy and information gatherer.

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RainyDayNinja wrote:
Caineach wrote:

So, overall I really liked the movie, but did anyone else have an issue with the fact that all of the intelligence they had came from a bad guy deciding he would tell Captain A his evil plot just before he was killed? ** spoiler omitted **

I hate when plot critical elements rely on intelligent characters being insanely dumb, like villains gloating.

** spoiler omitted **

Spoiler:
He could have easily stalled them with lies and not told them about the missile.

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So, overall I really liked the movie, but did anyone else have an issue with the fact that all of the intelligence they had came from a bad guy deciding he would tell Captain A his evil plot just before he was killed?

plot spoiler:
If all they found was an old facility and the AI kept his mouth shut, they would have never guessed Hydra they would have been to late to do anything after that.

I hate when plot critical elements rely on intelligent characters being insanely dumb, like villains gloating.


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Doug's Workshop wrote:
Davick wrote:


You are receiving the same help, whether you care to admit it or not. Not everyone necessarily uses every part of the system...

No, I will not leave. You're welcome to try and use that "point of the gun" thing to enforce your desire, though.

I'm not against taxes, and never said I was. But thanks for "strawmanning" for me.

The ACA is not good for everyone. It punishes some to subsidize others. It forces me to pay for a product I don't need nor want, which makes it an inefficient use of scarce resources.

And no, America doesn't have "moral" authority over any of its citizens.

I do have compassion for those who are downtrodden, but I don't force you to perform the same charitable acts I do. I don't have such an aggrandized view of my own moral superiority that I feel the need to impose my will upon others.

Roads punish some to help others.

Law enforcement punishes some to help others.
Environmental protections punish some to help others.
Education punishes some to help others.

Nothing the government does hurts no-one. Not everyone benefits from everything.


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He posted a Demo and some gameplay videos on his blog.


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So a good buddy of mine and former GM for many a game recently released a kickstarter for Slower Than Light. It is a 4X game where you build a space empire, but unlike similar games of the genre light speed is a hard cap on movement and communications. Build your space empire as the time delay between instructions and action increases. Who knows what your outer colonies are doing today?


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pres man wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
Don Juan de Doodlebug wrote:

No, it appears that the head of the Diversity and Equity Center wanted to discuss race issues without whitey butting in. According to the pretty far right Washington Times it was cancelled and apologized for "within minutes."

Sounds like political correctness is really runnin amok over there at South Puget Sound Community College

Then they're pretty stupid.
Perhaps not surprisingly it appears (from the video) to be a white person who thinks this kind of thing is appropriate.

Having a meeting that is persons of color talking about issues between themselves is perfectly fine. Advertising it to everyone and explicitly saying only PoC will be allowed in is offensive, and making jokes of it the way the memo does is even worse. Adding the implication that white people are not only not interested in expanding diversity but only interested in actively fighting against it is even more insulting.

They could have done and exclusive meeting in a way that isn't offensive. Instead, they came across the same way the white frat boys celebrating MLK day with fried chicken and watermelons.


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NobodysHome wrote:


(3) Hospitals are required by law to provide urgent care without regards to whether or not a patient can pay, vastly increasing their costs as people who cannot afford health insurance simply wait until they're sick enough to justify a trip to the emergency room, at which point they're most likely sick enough to require fairly expensive care. *BUT* hospitals are very, very good at tracking down your assets post-care. If you have any money and you go in for care, they're going to find it and squeeze it out of you. But if you go to the emergency room, day or night, in all likelihood the majority of the patients there are going to be people who cannot afford "regular" health care.

"Obamacare" is designed to hopefully alleviate this. Emergency care is the most expensive part of our system, and by insuring everyone there is a hope that people will use preventative care instead and drop the price. People will use less expensive treatments and free up the emergency care.

Unfortunately, the insurance plans and co-pays are ultimately too expensive for many of the people that use emergency rooms, so their behavior probably wont change much. We will have to wait to see.


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Is dogecoin the one made up by 4chan, or is that something else?


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Freehold DM wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:

Warningshot: Old florida indian word for crossed eyed shooter.

Florida will tolerate many things, but not a bad shot.

This lady misses ,0% shooting average she gets 20 years.

The guy in the gas station hits 1/4 25% , gets 5 years.

Zimmerman hits 1/1, 100% gets off with nothing.

Florida isn't racist, it just believes that gun control means hitting your target!

Last time I checked Dunn was facing sixty years. Has this changed?

She was facing 20 years until her appeal threw out the conviction for a new trial, where she now faces 3 charges of what she was convicted with prior.


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Personally, my problem with AA is that it uses race to treat a symptom that is driven more by economic class. While the 2 things are correlated, they are not equal, and the disparity causes noticeable animosity based on race. A lot of similar programs suffer the same issue, using race as a quick and dirty substitute.

Also, AA programs should never be used for promotions. After 2 people have been in the same position for a similar period of time, it should be based solely on their qualifications and skill set. At that point, saying that someone didn't score as well on a test because of their race is wrong.


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Now that I'm thinking it over more, I think WoW gold may be a more valid currency than bitcoin. It has a wider user base, probably has more demand, and it actually has a governing body that requires its use.


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MagusJanus wrote:

This is the same system where they're considering what kinds of video game currencies are taxable income and where politicians bring the entire government to a screeching halt out of pure ego. The fact corporations are ruled as persons just is part of the absurdity that the entire American government has become.

It frustrates me. But it is the system in place, and the one we have to deal with.

Oh, and a favorite, since I can't disagree with what you said.

Honestly, video game currencies being taxable is not entirely unreasonable. They have exchange rates with physical monies, and, for a couple years, WoW gold was one of the most stable currencies in the world. The only thing that really prevents them from being a commodity you can produce is the fact that the exchange for gold into cash is against the Terms of Service.


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MagusJanus wrote:


Except the Bitcoin offers the potential service of, if it is accepted enough, being a unified currency accepted anywhere; this is part of the same rationale that led to the Euro.

So does the US dollar, or the Euro. The only new thing Bitcoin offers is anonymity, and even that is not as true as you might think. And there is no demand for Bitcoin among most people because anonymity is not valuable. You argue that if it becomes accepted it becomes valuable, but there is no reason for the average person to accept bitcoin. Its value is only what other people are willing to pay for them in goods, services, or other currencies and your average person is not willing to give them for bitcoins because the people around them they need to trade with also don't care about bitcoins. They have to convert them through an intermediary, they have to spend effort to set up the ability to receive them, and very few are going to want to do that unless they see there is demand for them to.

So, there is no demand for their uniqueness, and therefore people wont use them. Because people don't use them, businesses wont spend the effort to support them. Because businesses wont support them, people wont care about them, leading us back to the beginning.


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Slaunyeh wrote:
Scott Betts wrote:
I am seeing two main positions among the handful of people opposed to tipping, in this thread. The first is that tipping is a form of "hand-out" and that tipped servers don't deserve or haven't earned those tips. Obviously false. The second is that tipping represents an immoral abuse of the working class. I'm not seeing much in the way of support for that idea, either; while minimum wage ought to be higher, it cannot be said that service workers would bring home more money if tipping was done away with. The latter position is less odious, however, because people who hold to it still see tipping as the right thing to do when it's an expected part of the worker's earnings.

I've been loathe to comment on this thread since the OP specifically asked me not to, but aside from position #1 (being a douche) and position #2 (hyperbole) there's really also a third reason one might be opposed to the custom of "forced" tipping: Transparency.

I don't like secret, invisible fees tacked onto my bill. I'd much rather pay $100 for a meal if I know that's the price up front, than to get a $50 meal and oh, yeah, the bill is $75.

In fact, this has been my experience every time I've been in the US. Nothing ever costs what people say it does. I hate that.

I realize this is a cultural thing, and it doesn't hurt my brain to go "I guess while in NY I should just add 20% to everything", but when you're unfamiliar with the concept, it still feels pretty uncomfortable.

My uncle was hosting a Russian exchange student who barely spoke English. When he went shopping with them, he started getting into an argument with the cashier after she told him the total, arguing over the price. My uncle didn't notice until both were starting to get upset. It took him 5 minutes to try to explain taxes being added on after the fact, but he didn't know the word "taxes". They eventually got him to understand telling him it went to the "state".


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4 officers arrested in California for impounding Hispanic people's cars without reason and selling them when they couldn't pay. It includes the former chief and acting chief.


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This idea is dumb on so many levels. Why would you even consider it? What possible advantages could it have?


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markofbane wrote:

What? Someone hacked the unhackable code and stole millions?But- But- It was FoolProof!

That did take as long as I expected. Not only will this kill Bitcoin, but it will (thankfully) kill any corporate created/owned/sponsored monetary system for decades to come.

I think what I find most amusing about this story is the fact that it is the Magic the Gathering Online Exchange.


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Kazaan wrote:

If you're walking a tightrope, you should be able to take 10 on the Acrobatics check. However, while you're crossing, whether or not you take 10 on the check, you cannot take 10 on some other check like Bluff, Knowledge, Diplomacy, etc. while putting your whole focus on walking the tightrope.

Another example, say you're climbing up a cliff, taking 10 on your Climb check. Sure, a fall would kill you, but nothing is distracting you "from climbing". But you couldn't take 10 on a Stealth check to avoid being noticed because you're distracted from being stealthy by trying to climb up a dangerous cliff face, whether or not you're taking 10 on the Climb check.

There is no reason you can't take 10 on multiple things simultaneously, so long as you have the actions for it.


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On the cop pay upthread:
I personally think cops are paid at the right level, but that it only seems high because everyone else's wages have stagnated and the good police unions have kept their pay where it should be. Cop pay stayed level while everyone else dropped around them, so now people think cops are overpaid.


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MagusJanus wrote:

The massive problem with the Zimmerman case? The cops and prosecutor initially said that there wasn't enough evidence to disprove Zimmerman's claims and they doubted they would get a conviction.

What did the jury say? There wasn't enough evidence to disprove Zimmerman's claims and they weren't going to convict.

Then the prosecutor ended up being investigated for prosecutorial misconduct.

All the case did was create a new racial rift, prove the initial prosecutor actually knew what he was talking about when he refused to prosecute, and created a case for ongoing racial problems that will likely keep echoing into the future.

Or it proved the prosecutor was bad. They didn't have the evidence, but did they try? I have seen multiple prosecutors and some defense attorneys say that from what they could tell both the police work and prosecutorial work was shotty. Which goes to add to the argument that the cops were racist.


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pres man wrote:
One thing I think that we could get out of the Martin-Zimmerman situation and the discussion of police is that if Martin had felt like he could have trusted the police, he could have called them instead of talking to his girlfriend about some creepy a**-*****er following him. I can't say if it is the police's fault for not being trustworthy or the people's fault who influenced Martin. I would ask that if you have contact with underage folk, whether your own kids or ones you know, you don't instill in them a sense of fear from the police so that when they are in danger they don't feel like they can seek help from them.

Be careful what you wish for.

Guy calls cops because son went on a joyride. Cops shoot son to death


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Yeah, in practice it tends to be more the difference between a written or verbal warning and an actual ticket once the stop has been made.
I've never gotten a "verbal warning"; only tickets. Is that really a thing? Cause I'm about the safest Mayberry-looking white boy you've ever seen.

I've gotten 2 verbal warnings, mostly because I think they were looking for DUIs and I was sober. One of the times the guy was obviously pissed after he flashed the lights in my eyes and my pupils didn't dilate like he was expecting. I had another cop drop a ticket from going 22 over to generic unspecified traffic violation.

I've been in the car with a woman who managed to get the cop to drop the ticket by showing some cleavage.


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Sissyl wrote:


So, if the cops got a rule in their book saying something like "if EVERYONE in the area is driving like a complete friggin moron, book the first ten you see and let the others go", there would be an objective basis for it. Again, if the cops FOLLOW THE RULES, there would be no problem with the method. But again, that seems utterly beyond the pale, so everyone draws the conclusion that you need all sorts of special cases, exceptions, paragraphs, and so on to handle it. It's sad to see that people are so stuck in how they perceive things.

Well yes. The only way to tell if cops are following the rules is to get some kind of measurement. And we can't assume cops will follow the rules because doing so would be horribly negligent given the amount of data we have of them not following them. Your rule leaves it entirely up to the cops to decide what they want to do and would do nothing to eliminate discrimination. They would just claim they didn't see anyone prior to the 9 black people they pulled over.


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MagusJanus wrote:
Caineach wrote:
The black raven wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:
Magus Janus wrote:
So people who are not part of the white culture cannot be children of judges?

Reverse it and remove the binary.

Children of judges tend to be part of white culture.

People that stick around and call the cops tend to be part of white culture

Individually the list runs from good to meh. Collectively they make a very strong case.

BNW, I read your recent posts like suggesting that only people who are "part of the white culture", whatever that means, can be racists.

I guess that I am likely reading something wrong (not a native speaker of English). What do you mean with this "white culture" thing ?

He is saying that in the case, just because the person, Zimmerman, has a Latino mother that it does not mean that he was raised in or currently has Latino culture. The fact that on appearance many can't tell that he is Latino implies that he may very well "pass" as white, in that he may not receive the negative racial stigmas associated with Latinos and instead receives ones associated with white people.

White culture would be people raised with typical He isn't saying only people part of white culture can be racist, but that the type of racism that Zimmerman exhibitted is more common with white on black interactions than Latino on black ones. A lot of that has to do with Zimmerman being middle class and living in a fairly white neighborhood instead of poor Latino one. The US has a lot of segregation within its communities.

His mother is hispanic, not latino. There's a bit of a cultural difference; not enough for most people outside of those two cultures, but enough within them that it ticks some people in them off if you confuse them.

In general, hispanics are the more wide-spread culture and the one most people are familiar with.

Incidentally, one of the articles I posted earlier (the one on which race Zimmerman claims) describes the people he...

Honestly can't say I have ever heard them used anything but interchangeably.


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The black raven wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:
Magus Janus wrote:
So people who are not part of the white culture cannot be children of judges?

Reverse it and remove the binary.

Children of judges tend to be part of white culture.

People that stick around and call the cops tend to be part of white culture

Individually the list runs from good to meh. Collectively they make a very strong case.

BNW, I read your recent posts like suggesting that only people who are "part of the white culture", whatever that means, can be racists.

I guess that I am likely reading something wrong (not a native speaker of English). What do you mean with this "white culture" thing ?

He is saying that in the case, just because the person, Zimmerman, has a Latino mother that it does not mean that he was raised in or currently has Latino culture. The fact that on appearance many can't tell that he is Latino implies that he may very well "pass" as white, in that he may not receive the negative racial stigmas associated with Latinos and instead receives ones associated with white people.

White culture would be people raised with typical He isn't saying only people part of white culture can be racist, but that the type of racism that Zimmerman exhibitted is more common with white on black interactions than Latino on black ones. A lot of that has to do with Zimmerman being middle class and living in a fairly white neighborhood instead of poor Latino one. The US has a lot of segregation within its communities.


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Fabius Maximus wrote:
pres man wrote:
@FAbius, I think you are purposefully not seeing the forest for the trees.

I think it's the other way around. The point is that denigrating a certain group of people because of a perceived shared attribute like phenotype, descent or religion is hostile. Pure and simple.

The label "race" is part of the problem because it is simply incorrect in relation to people. It's not even used in biology anymore.

If you keep on using "race", you're making it easier for people to denigrate people based on that term.

Scientific accuracy and common usage are not the same thing.


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Sissyl wrote:

If the cops follow the books on how to act, beat people up when appropriate and don't beat people up when not appropriate, then it doesn't matter how many of the people they beat up are race X or race Y, that is my thinking. Unless the books specify differences for various races, of course, but that should be a rather rare problem. Do you disagree with this?

As for hiring people, with anonymous procedures, different races should get representative chances at interviews. Your objection is that that isn't how it's done. You could perfectly well send the evaluations of said interviews to a neutral third party for a recommendation, again, without showing names, which would go a long way toward solving the problem. But, no, the current situation is the only one you are willing to see. No wonder you only see the current solutions.

How are you going to make hiring anonymous? They have proven that ethnic names on the tops or resumes receive different treatment than traditional "white" names. Females get fewer call backs and are offered lower salaries based solely on the name on the resume. So unless you remove pretty much all identifiers before it makes it to the decision makers on whether or not to interview, you cannot remove that bias.

And even if you do that, when they meet the people for the interview, the bias will come in when they go to offer jobs to people. And no one is going to hire people without meeting them.


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NBC requires you to have a cable subscription to stream more than 30 minutes of live or replay off their site... Considering the big reason to stream is to get rid of cable it is pretty annoying.


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Freehold DM wrote:
Caineach wrote:

Black and white guy both try to break into the same car.

White guy sets off the alarm for 30 minutes straight, cop drives by.
Black guy has 2 officers on him in 2 minutes and over 6 cops show up.
There were a few things wrong with the experiment, as it was two different neighborhoods and the police were called for the black guy due to a bystander. I want to see it redone in the same neighborhood with no police being actively called.

Yes, it is completely non-scientific. But at the same time, the cops initial reaction to the situation is violent.


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Black and white guy both try to break into the same car.
White guy sets off the alarm for 30 minutes straight, cop drives by.
Black guy has 2 officers on him in 2 minutes and over 6 cops show up.


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DM Barcas wrote:

I'm not wild about cameras because I find them creepy. They do wildly dissuade frivolous complaints, which is nice. (You know, I've looked for years for an exhaustive and comprehensive study about false complaints against officers, but none exists in any of the scholarly literature. I suspect the number is fairly high, based on anecdotal observations.) Camera policies need to be crafted to account for human error. I don't have any particular philosophical opposition, though. Just the creepy factor.

You won't find me defending the current state of asset forfeiture. I feel it ought to sit in escrow until a conviction is secured. It is a big hole in the law.

BNW, you have made your claim. Let me ask you a hypothetical: an officer observes a suspicious behavior related to burglary. He goes and does a Terry stop based on articulable factors. He gets the guy's info but finds no contraband in a frisk. The suspicious person is released and the stop gets documented. By your standard, this is unreasonable? What exactly should he find? A signed note tucked in his waistband saying that he intends to commit a burglary? Not all crimes or suspicious behavior patterns have weapons or contraband related.

First you need to define suspicious behavior related to burglary. What is that? If you cannot define specific actions, then you have no cause for the search and anything you find should be inadmissible.

Second any search needs to have an idea of what it will find. If you cannot identify what a successful search is, you have no place performing a search in the first place.

Third, the things you expect to find need to actually be illegal. Catching someone before he commits a crime is a deterent, but unless you can identify what crime he was planning on committing it doesn't matter what you find. For example, BNW's B&E kit contains no contraband and therefore unless you have reason to suspect the person of a crime already committed, he should be let go.


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How about a new one:
Police beat a deaf man unconcious after tasering him 3 times because he was trying to use sign language. Police chief says no new training is needed and cops acted as trained.


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Ah I finally found one of the stories I was looking for. Asset forfeiture laws are another big reason why cops should never be trusted.


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DM Barcas wrote:

Witnesses frequently survive or don't get shot themselves. Sometimes suspects confess. Sometimes it is recorded.

My most recent murder case (MLK Day 2014) involved that statement. That guy who made it actually lived, and his sister-in-law was killed in the ensuing fracas.

BNW, I hold that Stop and Frisk is merely the formalized program of conducting Terry stops based on reasonable suspicion and documenting the results. It does take away officer discretion and likely pushes them towards acting on suspicion when he may otherwise not. Correct me if I am wrong, but you seem to be saying that you believe that people are being stopped without reasonable suspicion (or that the police are making up the justification ex nihilo). I think we can agree that Terry stops are reasonable police function, and that an officer should be able to articulate their reasonable suspicion before making a stop. As long as reasonable suspicion exists and no bias drives the individual actions, I see nothing wrong with disparate impact when the actions are viewed in aggregate.

You have thrown the 10% number down a few times, which I should adress. First, the function of a Terry stop is not to search. Any frisk or resulting search is secondary to the purpose of the detention, which is to learn more about the suspicious person and their behavior. Oftentimes, this will explain suspicious behavior without leading to an arrest.

Caineach, with half a million police officers, you will have some bad actions. But there is no pervasive, structural problem with integrity in police work. If there were, I would be unable to stay in it.

I find it sad that you think the things I pulled out were bad apples, because they were just basic examples nof everyday occurrences. I didn't even get into instances of officers shooting dogs (those dangerous attack chiwawas) - 1 in the country every 100 minutes by conservative estimates.

When police officers stop refusing to have their behavior video taped, stop harassing, threaten prosecution, or shooting in some cases people who do video tape them, and stop losing the video tapes of evidence against them, then I may consider them more reliable witnesses. Until then, I will tell the jury selectors that I will take the criminals word over the cops every time.

Maybe once they stop using swat teams to serve warrants for minor violations, frequently killing innocent bystanders, and then sometimes having the department unable to identify even the officers involved in the raid - maybe then I would start to believe that cops don't condone when a fellow officer murders someone. Of course they would have to stop raiding the wrong homes first, or at least stop searching once they realize they are in the wrong place.

Maybe when all of the horrible stories I read about police behavior stop ending in no charges being filed against the police officers and no disciplinary actions taken, maybe then I will believe that there are no structural problems.

Instead, I get to read articles about police commissioners talking about how police are too slow to resolve situations with violence.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
Andrew R wrote:
every person i have ever met with the "the man is out to get me"mentality are law breakers. They do drugs, ignore traffic laws, etc.

Background: I'm a short-haired, middle-aged, law-abiding white professional. No drugs; I get tested regularly (standard practice in my industry, not targeted at me, btw). I'm clean-shaven (can't wear a respirator, if needed, if scruffy). I very carefully obey the speed limits (company policy is probation up to instant termination for a motor vehicle citation).

True story:

A few years back, I was driving back through rural TX from a job, saw a sign ahead: "Entering [REDACTED] Town Limits; Speed Limit 55." I slowed to 55. My partner said, "good thing you slowed down -- they're pulling someone over." Turns out it was me they were pulling over.

Me: "Good day, officer. May I ask why you're pulling me over? Is the vehicle damaged?"
Officer: "License and registration, sir."
(Checks computer and writes a ticket)
Me: "Sir, what's this about?"
Officer: "I clocked you at 53 in 45 zone."
Me: "Officer, I don't mean to contradict you, but the sign is right there. It says 'Speed Limit 55.'"
Officer: "Well, I'm tellin' you it's forty-five now, boy."

Good thing, as a law-abiding citizen, I had absolutely nothing to worry about. Although it was easily cleared up -- it just cost me about $500 and a plea of 'no contest.' The town was so far from work I'd have had to take several days off to contest it in court -- which the cop knew, as he could clearly see the rental sticker on the vehicle.

At least you weren't in one of the many jurisdictions of Texas in the news for using any traffic violation as cause for confiscating all your valuables because they were involved in "drug trafficking," despite no charges against any of the people or drugs found.


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I have both games.

Sentinels of the Multiverse is one of the best multiplayer coop games I have ever played. I have been at conventions where people have raved about it when they saw it in the game room, and it is probably the most popular game right now at multiple game clubs I have been to. The variability in it gives it huge replay value and it scales well with players. 1 base set can even play multiple games simultaneously.

Zombicide is a fairly standard game that is pretty mediocre. It is fun to play a few times, but suffers greatly from single player syndrome that a lot of coop games do, where 1 player can effectively tell everyone at the table what to do and devise an optimal strategy. Honestly, I have a hard time getting hardcore boardgamers to decide to play a second game, though I think more casual players would still enjoy it.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:

"Crime exists. Ergo, we should treat all people like criminals."

There is a reason I consider cops to be the most untrustworthy profession.


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Drock11 wrote:
I'm surprised as genre savvy as many of the characters are that nobody has cast commune or a similar spell yet and just asked the gods what The Snarl is. You would think they would be even more forthcoming than usual with the fact existence is hanging in the balance and all.

Have you paid attention to how much effort Thor actually puts in when he responds? You think they will get anything reliable out of him?


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
DM Barcas wrote:
A frisk is not a search in the probable cause sense,

You told us to look at terry vs. Ohio. You need to take your own advice.

And it is nothing less than sheer torture of the English language to suggest that a careful exploration of the outer surfaces of a person's clothing all over his or her body in an attempt to find weapons is not a "search." - Chief justice warren

Quote:
just like a detention is not an arrest

It is quite plain that the Fourth Amendment governs "seizures" of the person which do not eventuate in a trip to the stationhouse and prosecution for crime -- "arrests" in traditional terminology. It must be recognized that, whenever a police officer accosts an individual and restrains his freedom to walk away, he has "seized" that person.

Again, the chief justice of the united states supreme court, on the constitution you say you swore to uphold, debunking your argument.

Not to mention some of the other great quotes like:

In this case, for example, the Ohio Court of Appeals stated that 'we must be careful to distinguish that the "frisk" authorized herein includes only a "frisk" for a dangerous weapon. It by no means authorizes a search for contraband, evidentiary material, or anything else in the absence of reasonable grounds to arrest. Such a search is controlled by the requirements of the Fourth Amendment, and probable cause is essential

and

it is simply fantastic to urge that such a procedure performed in public by a policeman while the citizen stands helpless, perhaps facing a wall with his hands raised, is a 'petty indignity.' It is a serious intrusion upon the sanctity of the person, which may inflict great indignity and arouse strong resentment, and it is not to be undertaken lightly.

This tells me that drugs found from stop and frisk should be inadmissible in most circumstances.


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Freehold DM wrote:
YOU don't. Around here, we do. You don't see traffic cops after the second week of the month, ditto with Highway patrol (I live off the belt Parkway) in the summer.

I'm in upstate NY. Its typically the end of the month that you see obvious speed traps and blanket DUI checks.


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ShadowcatX wrote:

I normally try and tip at or around 20%, it is a bit more generous than my local area's standard and so keeps me in server's good graces. You do not want a wait staff to dislike you.

However, I do believe in making my displeasure with a server known through not tipping and have refused to tip on several occasions. One such was when the server started to rub my shoulders as I ate, not only did I not tip, I left immediately and never went back.

the couple waitresses I've had do that to me usually got higher tips because of it and got me going back. It really depends on the customer and the atmosphere of the resturaunt. If your a regular at some place it can change over time too.


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Upstate NY here. My roommate fielded a call yesterday from some federal agency asking what the emergency plans were for their facility. He laughed at them saying "even if this facility wasn't built to nuclear safety regulations, a foot of snow is standard here."

Snow didn't start until this morning, and honestly it isn't coming down that hard. I feel sorry for all you down south where they don't know how to use your bumper as a plow.

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