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Feiya

Caineach's page

RPG Superstar 6 Season Star Voter. Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 5,326 posts (5,331 including aliases). 1 review. No lists. No wishlists. 1 alias.


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Well, didn't he fulfill "bring death and destruction" by representing Hell? She is the goddess of both.


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Lord Snow wrote:

1.I am inclined to believe there have been "slate voting" occurrences in the past, simply because there are group with vested interest in the award and some of them probably did something like this some of the time. However, there is a question of style and tone. Politely suggesting a reading list while knowing you have a following that is likely to be affected by your recommendations is one thing. Trumpeting your frontal assault on the convention and the people who usually attend it, insulting them and blaming them for conspiring the rule fandom with their liberal cabals, and summoning a horde of angry friends to game the system - that's another. Consider a gentler route that the puppies could have taken - if they truly care and truly believe the numbers are at their side, they could have just encouraged more people to join the convention (It's an awesome place where you can meet authors, talk with other friends and have a good time!) and support the voting process. They could even publish a "alternate reading list" for works they think are being unfairly neglected. Funnel all that energy to somewhere constructive, as in "hey guys, we are not part of this process even though we care about it, so let's change that". If the numbers are truly at their side, they might have nominated the works they wanted anyway, or at least some of them, and could have tried to integrate into the convention. Instead, the seething rage and open hostility just made their entire movement an attack on the convention. It created a turf war against a territory that used to have open borders.

2. As I said, given the way in which the puppies went about their business, it is easy to understand why worldcon goers perceived them as a direct threat. When your home is under attack, you rise to defend it. It is no surprise, to me, that worldconrs were even more eager to rally and push back than the puppies have been to rally and push forward.

Sad Puppies took that gentler route 2 years in a row. They got lambasted, insulted, and had the exact same insults thrown at them when they got a handful things total nominated as they did this year when the slates dominated. The only difference was that it didn't hit mainstream as much because there was still other stuff to vote for. You don't actually get any change by being nice and playing in their box. Pretty much any protest movement ever can tell you that.


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thejeff wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Yes, but the award doesn't advertise itself as favorite of a niche group. It advertises itself as favorite of all of fandom. Until they resolve that disconnect, they are going to have problems.

"Fandom" is a specific term. It's not "anyone who likes SF/F"

Fandom has no fixed definition, which is a huge part of the problem. Everyone has a different idea of what constitutes fandom.


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thejeff wrote:

Both Correia and Torgersen were nominated for the Campbell (which is done by the same clique as the Hugos). Torgersen had been nominated for a Hugo as well. All before the Puppies started.

WorldCon is a small clique in the larger SF/F world, but not so much in an exclusive sense.

And as Correia routinely points out, Torgersen was nominated after already being a multiple time NYT best sellers, while many of the nominees are virtually unheard of by the public. As this has routinely been advertised as a fan favorite award, why are top grossing works with the largest fanbases not making the cut?


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Zhangar wrote:

Actually, what Scalzi advocated was voting voting your conscience.

Scalzi himself voted for a number of the Puppy nominees - as he noted elsewhere, just because someone's a complete jerk doesn't exclude them from having good taste in books.

That being said, the voting represents Correia provoking a massive backlash, and it's not shocking at all that it did.

I do wonder if the Sad Puppies would've done much better if they'd been smart enough to distance themselves from Vox Day. But they weren't.

They did try to distance themselves. Many, many times. In fact, they brought it up in practically everything I saw from them. You can't distance yourself when your opposition is actively tying you together so that they can attack you as one.


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Zhangar wrote:

Correia declares over 3,000 voters to be "allied useful idiots" and "snide exclusive a$#~#@*s."

Correia is attacking everyone that voted against the Puppies.

Scalzi's pointing out that Correia and the rest of the Puppy leadership are jerks, and they got voted down for pissing people off.

Correia's slate got rejected because of Correia's own conduct, and he's doing his damnedest to shift the blame on to others.

Edit: for rephrasing my last line.

Correia actually provides evidence and reasoning for all of his comments. Correia is pissed because the voting public didn't insult him, they insulted the people he thought were good, many of whom had nothing to do with Sad Puppies.

Scalzi provides none, and instead just relies on him calling them jerks with no supporting evidence. Scalzi advocates for spurning and insulting deserving people because a jerk likes them.

In my mind, Scalzi is lightyears worse than Correia.


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thejeff wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Krensky wrote:

Because they're not the first to bring up the issues.

They're not even the first to game the system on a large scale (that would be Locus).
They are the first to cast it as a political and culture war issue and then throw a hissy fit over it.
LIke I said, out loud. They caught the publics attention. Before them, there was barely even acknowledgement of the problem by the groups voting, and yet a bunch of authors are now saying "yeah, this has been the case for years". Sometimes you need an a&&*#!% with a blowhorn to call attention to a problem.
What do you think the problem is? What do you think the authors outside the Puppies are agreeing with?

That there has been a divergence between what the Hugo awards say they are (A popularity fan award) and what they actually are (an award by a niche club for people in their club). Its pretty much exactly what Breitbart and G.R.R. Martin have said.

What both of them fail to acknowledge is that that club is strongly liberal to a point where conservatives feel actively unwelcome. Now, I can't speak to whether or not it is true, I'm not a member of that community, but conservatives are saying it is. Dismissing it because you don't feel it, like Breitbart does, is wrong. Hell, this year's Sad Puppies was made without acknowledgement of author's political beliefs (the first Sad Puppies the political beliefs were a major factor because they were trying to prove a political point), but some of the authors on the list were harassed for being associated with the group. Annie Bellet dropped out because of the harassment, which is a shame because her story was awesome, and she is anything but closely related to the politics of Sad Puppies.

As a center-left liberal in with ties to the New England con circuit, I can say that I find those communities to often be too close mindedly liberal for my tastes, so I can't see active conservatives feeling particularly welcome in sharing their views. The one libertarian I know active in the community gets by by making a self-deprecating joke when politics comes up and then diverting the conversation, but he has also been a staple in the community for a long time and not someone just trying to join. Someone with his political views just joining would probably leave for a group he felt more welcomed in instead of trying to stick with the group. Unfortunately, there is no equivalent group in the case of Worldcon, since there is only one Hugo award. So instead you just have a bunch of people who have felt ostracized by the clique saying they are tired of it and organizing supporters.


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thejeff wrote:
Caineach wrote:
TimD wrote:

... or you could read about it from the guy that started Sad Puppies, here.

EDIT:

Lord Snow wrote:
Incredible articles. I think there is no need to read any further than them about the subject. Thanks for the links.

I find it useful to see how one side speaks about itself rather than relying on their opposition to speak for them.

-TimD

I have done both, and I have to say these articles are probably the best ones I've seen from opposition actually acknowledging what the problems are, even if they don't properly attribute Sad Puppies to actually saying these problems out loud first, which they have, a lot.

Except that, according to Flint, the Puppies completely mistake the problem. They blame it all on SJWs and conspiracies, when it's just the field outgrowing the awards. There are plenty of damn good authors of all political bents who aren't winning awards. Nor are all the awards won by SJWs.

They see a real problem, but they misunderstand it's nature completely.

Or you could actually read Sad Puppies stuff and realize that they acknowledge that there are multiple problems that are interconnected.


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thejeff wrote:
Caineach wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Caineach wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Personally, I think this destroys all integrity of the Hugo awards. It pretty much says that because good works were nominated by people not in the in crowd that the in crowd gets to throw a tantrum and say those people's opinions don't matter. I can't think of a worse result.

Well, I read them. I voted. And I didn't think they were good works. Or at least not award worthy.

I can definitely think of a worse result. Vox Day deciding, from now on, which works are nominated for Hugos.

Have you read through the nominees? Now that the awards are out, we can make a good stab at what would have been nominated without the puppies. Take a read through that, particularly the short fiction, and tell me the nominees really were better.

I read only a few from both. What I read on the puppies list I really enjoyed. Most of what I read that failed to make it I thought was terrible and I couldn't make it through.

Personally, I think we are seeing a clash in styles of writing where one side is asking for their style to be considered and the other side is responding by calling them names.

And Vox isn't calling people names? Please.

It's not a clash of writing styles. It's a determined attack on what he considers SJWs.
Except it has been going on for 2 years before he even got into the ring, so you can't blame it on him.
But he's taken over. Whatever Correia and Torgersen say, all the evidence suggests the Rabid Puppies were the key to taking over the nominations this year. Unlike last year, where they only managed to get a couple of nominations and got ignored with little fanfare.

Except they didn't get ignored with little fanfare. There were dozens of articles about how they were sexist/misogynists/racist/homophobes last year as well. Of course I have yet to see any actual supporting evidence for calling either man that.


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Personally, I think this destroys all integrity of the Hugo awards. It pretty much says that because good works were nominated by people not in the in crowd that the in crowd gets to throw a tantrum and say those people's opinions don't matter. I can't think of a worse result.


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Alex Martin wrote:
Rynjin wrote:
And only about 5 months to wait.
You could always pass the time with new Fallout Vault App. Have determined yet if this is going to be a case of pay to play to do anything. Or just something to keep up interest.

For those interested, this is now on android


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The Green Tea Gamer wrote:

Nah. Well, maybe a coffee might have an earthy flavor.

On another note, I have hereby decided it is my new policy as a player to ALWAYS, 100% of the time answer any GM who asks "are you sure" with "absolutely I am!"

Not only is it proper roleplaying, as in real life time doesn't stop and rewind when you do something idiodic, it's a guarantee of a great story, and probably an awesome session...and isn't that why we play? To get a good interactive story, not "to win"!

Whenever I ask 'are you sure' of my players, I generally remind them about a thing their character should know that likely came up in a different session.


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GreyWolfLord wrote:
Kthulhu wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Yes, they must destroy and rebuild it all from scratch... Following the same winning strategy that WOTC did when they moved beyond 3.5.
Of course you ignore that they also used that strategy when they transitioned from 2e to 3.0.

Ninja'd on this already.

Obviously, changing the underlying system does not mean failure or bad sales necessarily when seeing these items.

On the otherhand, I think PF might actually LOSE a LOT of players if they did something like this.

Honestly, a lot of the issues the system now has can be traced back to them not faithfully converting spells from 2e to 3e. They took out the drawbacks that reigned in the spam casting of a lot of spells, like haste aging you a year. This made sense from the perspective of people want to actually be able to use their toys, and made the game a lot more fun for casters. But they didn't pay enough attention to how those limitations affected the spell's perceived power. Most of the spells that are considered broken today either had expensive material components that are now trivial to find because of reworks to the economy or metagame drawbacks to reduce their usage.


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Matthias Naelaron wrote:
Can someone explain to me why Burning the Rainbow Flag is a Hate Crime and you get arrested, yet you are allowed to do whatever you want with the US Flag? Seems to me a double standard. Either they are both hate crimes or they are both protests. My opinion, individual though it is, the only flag in this country that should matter, is the US Flag, with all others being completely irrelevant. YMMV.

Burning someone else's American flag on their lawn is also a crime.


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Rynjin wrote:

Fantasy literature has largely changed in style over the years as well.

Authors like Brandon Sanderson, Jim Butcher, and Brent Weeks are the norm now, and Rule of Cool takes a bit more of a center stage than some of the more grounded series of the past.

It's kind of interesting conceptually. Currently the norm for fantasy is closer to where ancient legends were thousands of years ago. Gilgamesh and Hercules could feel right at home on the pages of some of Sanderson's works, with the deeds they perform.

Right now a lot of focus seems to be on more legendary figures as far as deeds, though generally with more character development than the ancient myths.

Likewise, many anime, cartoons, and video games have followed this style as well, though longer since in some cases (and especially in the case of comic books and manga).

You can really see this with The Name of the Wind. I try to tell people that Kvothe isn't supposed to seem balanced. For his world, he is a living Gilgamesh. He is literally a figure myths are made of. Its how they introduce him. Why are people surprised when he is good at everything?


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Terquem wrote:

You know the whole shopping thing is a topic unto itself. I don't remember anyone going "shopping" in the Hobbit, or in The Sword of Shanarra (two books I read when I was young) and in my first campaign, shopping was a very small part of the game, and no magic shopping of any kind was ever available.

I imagine that games like DragonQuest, DragonWarrior, and Final Fantasy (though I am sure they were not the first) were big parts of introducing the necessity of going shopping to constantly upgrade equipment (as an aside, my first campaign, my sister played a Cleric and he wore the same armor from level 1 through level 5, when he finally broke down and bought better armor, and it was non magical, and he wore that until he retired at level 11).

I wonder if there is a researched examination on the introduction of "shopping" in Video Games.

Not really. Shopping became a thing with the conversion from 2E to 3E. Instead of randomly priced, eccentric magic items mostly detailed in non-mainline sources (look at the Magic Item Encyclopedia), they introduced standardized rules and prices for magic items, combined with rules for player crafting, in the core rules. The introduction of the CR system and wealth by level also partially codified expected gear players were assumed to have by certain levels. I think most of this came from wanting to empower GMs with more knowledge of how to do good encounter and campaign design, but it ended up with some strong drawbacks.


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Ooh good question.

I'm 31, grew up in the 90s, and started playing d&d some time in the mid 90s when I was 10-12. I didn't really start coming up with good character concepts until later though.

For me, the Nintendo and Super Nintendo JRPGs (Japanese style RPGS), like Final Fantasy (I started with 4, and absolutely loved 6), Dragon Warrior (particularly 4), and Chrono Trigger are the most memorable and probably the most influencial. To this day if you give me a character based off of Locke, Cyan, or Frog I will love it.

I read the Hobbit in elementary school. I enjoyed it, but can't really say I remember it. The Chronicles of Narnia were much more defining for me, and I absolutely love them. I was also facinated in elementary school by Greek myths, but never actually got into actual books of them, just children's summaries.
At some point in middle school I tried to read LotR. I got through the first 2 books, but just could never finish it, and have never bothered to try to read them again. I remember reading a few other things in high school, particularly The Waterborn and The Blackgod by Gregory Keyes, and Gates of Fire by Steven Pressfield, the later mostly because my brother read it and ran a campaign in Ancient Greece. I never really read for fun until I got into college.

In high school, I got into anime. Rurouni Kenshin in particular influenced me a lot. I had some terrible rips of Flame of Recca that I loved, though I probably wouldn't recommend the series now, especially with how disappointed I was that the show ends abruptly mid plot arc.

As for movies, Princess Bride, Labyrinth, Dragonheart, and especially Willow. Hercules and Xena were on TV, and I wouldn't miss them.

After I got into college in the early 2000's, things got a lot more complicated.


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Oly wrote:
Bandw2 wrote:

not true, as mentioned, the disparity is between the abilities capable of changing a story. a wizard can teleport and warn of an impending invasion, the martials simply have to walk back. If they say had a class choice to gain some kind of extra quick mount or other ability (maybe a rogue can have trained pidgeons to move items or messages about) to effect world changing plots.

Now, that part is true. Magic is fun, because of out of combat uses. When I started playing some time back, I was more thinking about survivability and gravitated toward martials.

I've come to see magic as more fun, and am much more likely to play casters now.

But because those I've played with (including when I GM) have intelligent NPC's usually target those easily identifiable as casters, I certainly feel more vulnerable when playing arcane casters (divine casters are less vulnerable, but that's balanced by making their spells weaker than arcane spells). I've died as casters (and eventually been resurrected), and never died in combat as a martial.

Maybe I need to use Mirror Image more, but I think people are ignoring relative danger, partially because many GM's don't have intelligent NPC's target the squishies.

As far as fun, to me that's the tradeoff: Less danger (as a martial) for less cool stuff vs. the opposite. And if you think casters are both very much stronger characters and (really to the point) more fun to play, then just play them....

I find a lot of people also don't bother to look at what percentage of their resources they are spending just to stay alive. They talk about having mirror image up, but that takes a turn to activate, wont even last you a full combat, and spends a spell slot. That's not something you want to invest in before about 7th level, and even then you can't rely on it every time.


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Kobold Cleaver wrote:
DM_Blake wrote:


In Star Wars, Han Solo is a really good "martial", even with a ranged attack, but Luke could defeat him in the blink of an eye even after training with Ben Kenobi for only the length of a single trip from Tatooine to Alderaan (where Luke learned to deflect blasters with the Force).

You know, I hear people mention Jedi a lot in these sorts of threads, and it makes me wonder if they've really thought the comparison out.

The Jedi (and Sith) focus primarily on their lightsaber duels. That's what we regard as "awesome" about them. Sure, their reflexes and stuff are enhanced by the midichlorians, blah blah blah, but that's all flavor text for things lots of action movies would just handwave because it looks cool. Jedi are martials with some spell-like abilities. Luke hardly ever uses the Force, save for the odd enchantment effect (only on the weak-minded) or a bit of telekinetics. Basically, he's a monk with one or two levels in sorcerer psychic.

With the exception of Yoda and Palpatine (and one scene where Darth Vader deflected blaster shots with his hand), the "martial" aspect of the force-users is always the side that ends battles (hell, Palpatine was undone with a grapple check). I could easily argue that Mace Windu, Obi-Wan, Darth Maul and Luke are great examples of martials done right—sure, the monks have a few showy magic tricks, but they're always melee fighters first and foremost. Why can't paladins and fighters get some of that action? ;D

This X1000

Just look at any medium to high powered fantasy and you see the martials being awesome. At best, they are some hybrid gish, but they almost always favor the martial aspects. The fact that they are more or less impossible to build in d&d style games is one reason why I'm looking at other systems.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
I understand the love for Pratchett, but don't share it. He relies on the same general brand of humor as Douglas Adams (whose novels I also didn't like) and, to some extent, Monte Python (whom I also don't think are all that funny).

You are not alone.


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Zhangar wrote:

I'm pretty sure Molly's not, actually. She's almost certainly harder to kill, but she's not functionally a goddess like Mab is.

@ Peter - yeah, Senior Council. And that's interesting.

No, Molly fully inherited the mantle of the Winter Lady. It has a different purview and power level from Mab's, but she is just as much a goddess. Maeve could only be killed special ways, and Molly got all of that.

I wouldn't pit any of the senior council against any of the fae court and expect them to come out alive, even on Halloween.


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Sissyl wrote:
Oh really? Well, your opinion is noted, thejeff. That doesn't make it valid, nor does your referring to an AGW propaganda site exactly infuse your opinion with rightness. Propaganda will be propaganda. By the way, the explanation given in your precious site is inconclusive.

The site offers a clear description of what was being talked about in the emails, offers public sources for its discussion dating back more than a decade before the controversy, and you want me to believe you because you say it is propaganda while offering no counterdata?


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Sissyl wrote:

AGW may well be real, though what has gotten out about it into mainstream information is too riddled with weasel-talk, idiot soundbites and screaming nastiness to tell. Lots of people have done a miserable job at communicating it. They have also strayed from proper scientific methods, as shown by their ideas about consensus relaying truth.

So, what is needed is INDEPENDENT research. After a serious investigation of the manners of research in the current climatology field and some serious transparency work, the field could start producing interesting results again.

These people demand the ages old dreams of the environmentalist mindset, which is a) a truly massive cost, b) won't solve the problem and c) will not get popular support. All of these mean it won't happen. Humanity is as it is, and it is possible we can't deal with this. Throwing out the good things we do have won't improve anything.

If the IPCC stopped throwing uncountable billions at the ghost of CO2 PPMs, which have not helped, and put a massive effort into developing the entire fissile cycle of uranium and fusion plants, the problem would be far more likely to be treatable. Solar and wind is cute, not a cure.

What exactly would qualify as independent research if hundreds of unrelated papers corroborating eachother using different methods wont satisfy you?


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Sissyl wrote:
So, thejeff, since you're the resident inquisitor of AGW here: What do you ACTUALLY suggest we do? Your above post makes no concrete claims to anything: You say that shutting down all fossil fuel use would be a good start, of course moderated by the fact that the consequences would be too drastic. You say we should move "much harder than we are" from fossil fuels. What does that mean? How should it be implemented? If we accept everything the AGW preachers say, you know the emission cuts needed are rather massive. At the very least, FAR more than you will EVER get people to agree to voluntarily. So, do you support forcible, massive cuts of emissions, at the individual level?

Changes shouldn't happen on the individual level. They are worthless there. They need to happen at the societal level, and the only way to do that is through government.

1. Encourage municipalities to invest in solar and wind infrastructure to replace aging coal and oil. Encourage local governmental takeover of power grids. This has drastically reduced electric costs pretty much everywhere it has been implemented and cut down on greenhouse gasses.
2. Invest in controls software to optimize power production efficiency. Some areas that have done this have decreased redundant power from fossil plants that are more reliable by as much as half.
2a. Replace oil and coal backup power plants with natural gas ones, since they have drastically lower emissions but maintain the reliability.
3. Invest in nuclear power. Tell people worried about radiation to STFU, because they have no idea what they are talking about.
4. Invest heavily in electric passenger cars. Re-institute the manditory electric vehicle requirements California had on car manufacturers to force them to start investing and developing the technology. Accept that the vehicles are still a few years away from profitability.
5. Implement a tax on emissions from large industry. Corporations will optimize to reduce costs. Right now they can ignore carbon emissions because there is no cost associated with them. Implementing a cost for destroying the environment allows us to invest in remediation techniques or encourage them to find other methods to do what they need to do.
6. Don't charge a flat rate for electric costs. Make the first X watt hours have a lower cost than the next y. Users who use more electricity get charged increasingly higher costs. Scale this also off of when power is consumed to discourage use at peak times.

Just a few ideas.


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Benchak the Nightstalker wrote:

At least in the first half, it's less stupidity and more hubris (which is thematically appropriate for a Jurassic Park movie).

They think they know what they're doing.
They think their weapons and security measures will keep the animal contained.
They think they have control.

IMO, It's only when the paramilitary dudes show up later that people start throwing around the idiot ball.

** spoiler omitted **

...
Spoiler:
Quote:

The sophisticated network of hi-tech infrared cameras told them there wasn't anything in the paddock. The cameras seemed to be in working order, and were deployed so as to cover the entire enclosure. Plus, again, the thing sticks out like a sore thumb, and they couldn't see it through the windows or on any of the cameras.

Remember, these people don't realize they're in a monster movie.

Of course they only have thermal imaging. They don't have any motion censors on the walls. No one saw or heard the monster jump over the fence... You would feel the thing landing. They have no video recording to play back to see how long it has been missing. No. These idiots first thought is to go into the paddock to examine scratches. Not to mention the only door out is dinosaur sized and they don't have a convenient human sized door right next to or in it.

But that isn't the only terrible safety design in this park. Lets not forget those gyrospheres. No automated control for the park to take over driving. What do they do when an idiot decides to start ramming the dinosaurs in their "impenetrable" ball? No invisible fence to shut the thing off if it goes out of range, to prevent people from doing stupid stuff like the kids do.

Quote:
Tranquilizers would be tough to deliver, thanks to its thick, tough hide, and on a creature that size will be slow to take effect, giving it time to eat the shooter. Shooting it with tranq snipers from helicopter is going to be difficult thanks to the jungle canopy. Overwhelming application of tasers and nets should bring the creature down (hey, it probably works on other dinosaurs).

Well, even if tranquilizers take time, delivering some from range is a hell of a lot better than trying to melee the thing. Sure, you might need something that could cause permanent damage in order to actually deliver the dose, but that is a lot better than the alternative. They let the thing run rampant for most of the day. Not to mention they could have given air support to their ground team. These are the types of situations they should be training their team to handle.

Then there is the matter of their guns. They have 1 gun on site that can even harm a t-rex from what this movie shows. That is just dumb. You should have enough that you can outfit multiple teams, at minimum. For every 5 men, you should have a specialist with an anti-tank armament.


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Sissyl wrote:

But you know... what if... what the climate scientists want to do is not make molto dinero, but have grants enough to work, travel to interesting places, and have people listen to them? What if there are certain people who want massive international influence and do want the dineros? Isn't that enough profit to motivate people to toe the official line? And as for climatologists... from what I understand, it's a case of "If you want to publish a paper on squirrels, you can forget it, unless you write about how squirrels are impacted by MAN-MADE GLOBAL WARMING". Enough subversion of scientific journal boards would quite effectively strip any possibility of even publishing a dissenting account, and indeed make sure those who did not agree with the official line do not work as climatologists. And of course, the strategy of infiltrating and taking over boards of journals that do not follow the official line was confirmed in the Climategate emails. They called it "redefining the peer-review process", IIRC. And the obedient climatologists do get their grants today. And the certain people do have massive international influence today. And a dissenting opinion is impossible, because a) there are no journals left that would publish anything that questions the official line, and b) nobody remains working in climatology that doesn't toe the official line. I find 3% dissenting is a VERY high figure, given the above.

Very neat. And hey, it doesn't even require a massive global conspiracy, just a bit of tomfoolery through the climatology field's infrastructure. The scientists support the doomsayings and grabs of influence of the certain people, and the certain people provide for grants for the scientists, through various state administrations.

It can happen to a field. It has happened before. Call it a circle-jerk or a club of reciprocal admiration, it is what happens when no other lines are allowed. For examples, consider the field of Racial biology. If someone wasn't a racial biologist, they were of course not...

Except for the fact that the people with the most disposable money are those with a vested interest in disproving global warming, and the only people they can find to publish refutations also worked on tobacco studies for cigarette companies.


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Snorb wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

Spoiler:
Don't forget the velociraptor riding the T-Rex to fight the velociraptor-T-Rex Hybrid

Overall, the kids were decent actors that didn't make me want to strangle them, Chris Pratt played Dinosaur Lord, and the female lead was forgettable. So better than I expected.

I just wish the movie didn't revolve around everyone being a complete moron to actually get the situations set up. The first movie was at least sabotage causing the major failure. Here, pretty much everyone in any semblance of charge was an idiot. I mean, whoever set up the security and safety measures could not have been more incompetent.


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JoelF847 wrote:
We also don't know Durkon's father is technically dead. He could have come back as an undead himself buried under that rock. No body = not necessarily dead.

hell, with a troll he has infinite food supply :)


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She didn't just kill Immortan Joe. She humiliated him by stealing his wives, defeating 3 war parties, then driving back in his car. She didn't just kill god. She destroyed him.


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MeanDM wrote:

I think that having a non-voiced character has always felt like a means of immersion for me. It allowed me to project as I wanted onto the character. I Hope they don't change that. Won't be a deal breaker though.

I'm the opposite. I always find it annoying when everyone in the game is talking except the main character.


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Honestly, I felt like the original trailer from the kickstarter was better than the final version.


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Kajehase wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:
Monks are always Tea related, name a Monk that doesn't drink Tea, go ahead I'll wait the little guy is test driving big wheels at toys r us, so I have all damn day:-p

I'll name two! (For a given value of monk.)

Brother Cadfael
Friar Tuck

Cadfael makes plenty of herbal teas in the TV show


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The black raven wrote:

When overly frustrated, undead in Oots have a tendency to insult mortals by referring to exactly the features the undead themselves are lacking :

Durkula "you pulsing bloodsack" in 985.

Xykon "you sickening pouches of warm goo" in 661.

I wonder if it shows an envy (veiled by scorn) of what the living mortals are and have.

And I am now left wondering whether Liches follow the same "inhabited by an evil spirit" case as Vampires do.

Not that the mortal Xykon was a goody-two-shoes to begin with, mind you (as seen in Start of Darkness).

Or it is because the undead have transcended beyond those things and look down on those without.


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thegreenteagamer wrote:
Caineach wrote:
thegreenteagamer wrote:
Yeah, green tea frozen yogurt is pretty frickin' amazing.
There is a Japanese restaurant near me that deep fries green tea ice cream. So delicious.

I keep hearing about fried iced cream. How is this a thing? Physics/chemistry-wise, I mean...How do you not have liquid goop before there's any actual frying occurred?

Also, holy crap, how fat do you have to be where iced cream isn't enough, you need to fry that?! Apparently me I am, because I want it!

Physics is your friend. There is a rate that heat will transfer across and through something. Just like how you can burn a rare steak. In that time, you can fully fry the batter you use to make an outer shell of ice cream, while the ice cream is mostly unaffected. That shell becomes an insulating barrier for the rest of the ice cream. When you break into it, there is a layer that is molten goop and delicious, and you have a really interesting temperature gradient throughout. You should also do it with very cold ice cream.


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thegreenteagamer wrote:
Yeah, green tea frozen yogurt is pretty frickin' amazing.

There is a Japanese restaurant near me that deep fries green tea ice cream. So delicious.


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my god I hated the science. Run at a hydrogen particle... Seriously... SO MUCH DUMB


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captain yesterday wrote:

If I ever get to play in Kingmaker other then running it for 11 year old girls playing Brave I mean, I'm making a Cavalier that rides a miniature Horse and sinks all his starting cash into a nice tea set as well as other tea related fopperies:-D

Honestly tho I'll make him for any campaign

You mean like Harsk?


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Ceaser Slaad wrote:

To each their own. Maybe you have something of an allergy to alcohol. And depending on the brew in question some of them are acquired tastes. I drink occasionally, usually beer when I do. I'm partial to Sam Adams, but l'll drink just about anything.

Alas, with the exception of a few microbrews, if you want really good beer here in America you have to go for an import. Probably true for tea as well. I don't know if they actually grow any here. I know it was originally all imported, but that could have changed since the Revolutionary War. :-) Perhaps I should get out more ... ;-)

If you think there are only a few microbrews in the US making good beer, you need to move to a more hipster area. Even when you get past the ridiculous number of overhopped beers, there are good craft breweries all over the place. Name a style, and you can find a good one made in the US that has distribution in at least a few states.


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Watched Devil is a Part Timer last night. It has an interesting mix of seriousness and comedy that made it way more enjoyable than I was expecting.


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thesenchagamer wrote:

Green Tea Original Lemon from Pickwick, cooled down overnight and served in a glass of ice cubes.

(I am nowhere near my sencha, so flavoured green tea is a thing again)

Wait... I could pour tea in an ice cube mold and have tea ice cubes that won't dilute my tea as it melts...

Growing up we used to do it with water that we boiled mint in. Went fantastic in lemonade and the cheap iced tea we had then.


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I just finished off a blended Yunnan tea. Man I want another cup.


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Lord Fyre wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Lord Fyre wrote:

Actually, I a surprised that Freehold DM didn't point out the rather massive Chickification of Black Widow in this film.

And from a self-professed Feminist of all people.

Funny, I didn't interpret anything that happened to BW to be chickification. Apparently showing that characters have broad ranges of emotions is frown upon?

Not at all.

But the way she was "calling herself a monster" implies that she feels that she is one because she cannot have children. This has to do with the scene with Banner in the farmhouse. (Note: calling herself a "monster" because of the evil deeds she is trying to atone for would have been quite different.)

Also, the scenes would have been FAR less damaging in a larger Black Widow movie, but in an AVENGERS film (where screentime is limited) this tends to stand out more.

If that is how you interpret that scene, that is how you interpret it. Your wrong though. She is calling herself a monster because she is talking about how easy it is for her to kill people and how it helped her to not care.


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Lord Fyre wrote:

Actually, I a surprised that Freehold DM didn't point out the rather massive Chickification of Black Widow in this film.

And from a self-professed Feminist of all people.

Funny, I didn't interpret anything that happened to BW to be chickification. Apparently showing that characters have broad ranges of emotions is frown upon?


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Lord Foul II wrote:
Ross Byers wrote:

I forgot he had prestige class levels. He mentions planning to swap a 4th level spell for Cure Critical, but he's still not allowed to swap 4th level spells until he has 6th level spells, so that's only at 17th (or I guess 20th) level of Bard.

And since he mentions learning two new 5th level spells, that panel occurred just after gaining 13 levels in bard (with some unknown number of Dashing Swordsman).

Two possible conclusions here:

1) Elan is at least 17th level of bard, plus some of Dashing Swordsman (possibly making the party 20th level, nearing the end game), and we should see 9th level spells immiently.

2) Burlew forgot/deliberately ignored the rule about bard swapping spells only two or more levels below their highest spell level and Elan swapped at 14 levels of bard, making the party as a whole somewhere in the neighborhood of 15-17th level.

he has at least 16 levels of bard plus an unknown number of levels of dashing swordsman

We know this because he used song of freedom, a bardic class feature gained at level 16 near the end of the desert arc

Do we know what dashing swordsman gets for class features? I t could get song of freedom early. I was under the impression that they were only 15th-16th level. We haven't seen a 9th level spell yet that I know of.


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Rynjin wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
This thread is evidence that the riots ARE accomplishing something. Without them, it would be business as usual; another African American youth murdered by police, no notice at all by anyone except his immediate family/associates. After the riots, the whole country knows what happened yet again, especially following so soon after the unrest in Ferguson, for the same reason. Get enough of these riots back-to-back, in different cities, and at some point it will penetrate even the thickest of skulls that there is a real problem somewhere.
It seemed to be getting pretty solid coverage just from the protests already.

They were getting s!!$ coverage before the riots. Even after the riots, the coverage has been crap, but at least there.


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Hama wrote:
Old Clash of the Titans. Those skeletons were awesome.

For me, it is the old Jason and the Argonauts. The Children of the Hydras Teeth were awesome.


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Kalshane wrote:
While I love the Arkham games, I've never been a fan of their character designs. They always felt like they were trying too hard to be "dark and gritty".

Have you seen the previews for DCs new movies? They are trying to out grimdark 40K


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Interestingly, I've noticed that Arizona iced tea and sweet tea contain the same amount of calories from sugar.


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Amazing Red wrote:
I just saw it. Hawkeye is my new favorite avenger. Between him and Thor are some of the best lines.

Hawkeye easily stole the show.


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Rynjin wrote:

Obviously we're going to have to agree to disagree on this.

I think the protection of other people's property (and welfare, though as of YET nobody has been hurt) is more important than you being able to continue protesting all through the night.

I certainly think it's a better alternative than coming in with teargas and billy clubs to arrest large groups of people at once.

You disagree.

S@~@ can be rebuilt. Freedom is much harder to repair.

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