Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Feiya

Caineach's page

RPG Superstar 2013 Star Voter. Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 4,487 posts (4,492 including aliases). 1 review. No lists. No wishlists. 1 alias.


1 to 50 of 227 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | next > last >>

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The character got a name. Of course Felix will live.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
MagusJanus wrote:


Except the Bitcoin offers the potential service of, if it is accepted enough, being a unified currency accepted anywhere; this is part of the same rationale that led to the Euro.

So does the US dollar, or the Euro. The only new thing Bitcoin offers is anonymity, and even that is not as true as you might think. And there is no demand for Bitcoin among most people because anonymity is not valuable. You argue that if it becomes accepted it becomes valuable, but there is no reason for the average person to accept bitcoin. Its value is only what other people are willing to pay for them in goods, services, or other currencies and your average person is not willing to give them for bitcoins because the people around them they need to trade with also don't care about bitcoins. They have to convert them through an intermediary, they have to spend effort to set up the ability to receive them, and very few are going to want to do that unless they see there is demand for them to.

So, there is no demand for their uniqueness, and therefore people wont use them. Because people don't use them, businesses wont spend the effort to support them. Because businesses wont support them, people wont care about them, leading us back to the beginning.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Sissyl wrote:


So, if the cops got a rule in their book saying something like "if EVERYONE in the area is driving like a complete friggin moron, book the first ten you see and let the others go", there would be an objective basis for it. Again, if the cops FOLLOW THE RULES, there would be no problem with the method. But again, that seems utterly beyond the pale, so everyone draws the conclusion that you need all sorts of special cases, exceptions, paragraphs, and so on to handle it. It's sad to see that people are so stuck in how they perceive things.

Well yes. The only way to tell if cops are following the rules is to get some kind of measurement. And we can't assume cops will follow the rules because doing so would be horribly negligent given the amount of data we have of them not following them. Your rule leaves it entirely up to the cops to decide what they want to do and would do nothing to eliminate discrimination. They would just claim they didn't see anyone prior to the 9 black people they pulled over.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
The black raven wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:
Magus Janus wrote:
So people who are not part of the white culture cannot be children of judges?

Reverse it and remove the binary.

Children of judges tend to be part of white culture.

People that stick around and call the cops tend to be part of white culture

Individually the list runs from good to meh. Collectively they make a very strong case.

BNW, I read your recent posts like suggesting that only people who are "part of the white culture", whatever that means, can be racists.

I guess that I am likely reading something wrong (not a native speaker of English). What do you mean with this "white culture" thing ?

He is saying that in the case, just because the person, Zimmerman, has a Latino mother that it does not mean that he was raised in or currently has Latino culture. The fact that on appearance many can't tell that he is Latino implies that he may very well "pass" as white, in that he may not receive the negative racial stigmas associated with Latinos and instead receives ones associated with white people.

White culture would be people raised with typical He isn't saying only people part of white culture can be racist, but that the type of racism that Zimmerman exhibitted is more common with white on black interactions than Latino on black ones. A lot of that has to do with Zimmerman being middle class and living in a fairly white neighborhood instead of poor Latino one. The US has a lot of segregation within its communities.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

NBC requires you to have a cable subscription to stream more than 30 minutes of live or replay off their site... Considering the big reason to stream is to get rid of cable it is pretty annoying.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Kirth Gersen wrote:
Andrew R wrote:
every person i have ever met with the "the man is out to get me"mentality are law breakers. They do drugs, ignore traffic laws, etc.

Background: I'm a short-haired, middle-aged, law-abiding white professional. No drugs; I get tested regularly (standard practice in my industry, not targeted at me, btw). I'm clean-shaven (can't wear a respirator, if needed, if scruffy). I very carefully obey the speed limits (company policy is probation up to instant termination for a motor vehicle citation).

True story:

A few years back, I was driving back through rural TX from a job, saw a sign ahead: "Entering [REDACTED] Town Limits; Speed Limit 55." I slowed to 55. My partner said, "good thing you slowed down -- they're pulling someone over." Turns out it was me they were pulling over.

Me: "Good day, officer. May I ask why you're pulling me over? Is the vehicle damaged?"
Officer: "License and registration, sir."
(Checks computer and writes a ticket)
Me: "Sir, what's this about?"
Officer: "I clocked you at 53 in 45 zone."
Me: "Officer, I don't mean to contradict you, but the sign is right there. It says 'Speed Limit 55.'"
Officer: "Well, I'm tellin' you it's forty-five now, boy."

Good thing, as a law-abiding citizen, I had absolutely nothing to worry about. Although it was easily cleared up -- it just cost me about $500 and a plea of 'no contest.' The town was so far from work I'd have had to take several days off to contest it in court -- which the cop knew, as he could clearly see the rental sticker on the vehicle.

At least you weren't in one of the many jurisdictions of Texas in the news for using any traffic violation as cause for confiscating all your valuables because they were involved in "drug trafficking," despite no charges against any of the people or drugs found.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Kirth Gersen wrote:

"Crime exists. Ergo, we should treat all people like criminals."

There is a reason I consider cops to be the most untrustworthy profession.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Drock11 wrote:
I'm surprised as genre savvy as many of the characters are that nobody has cast commune or a similar spell yet and just asked the gods what The Snarl is. You would think they would be even more forthcoming than usual with the fact existence is hanging in the balance and all.

Have you paid attention to how much effort Thor actually puts in when he responds? You think they will get anything reliable out of him?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
BigNorseWolf wrote:
DM Barcas wrote:
A frisk is not a search in the probable cause sense,

You told us to look at terry vs. Ohio. You need to take your own advice.

And it is nothing less than sheer torture of the English language to suggest that a careful exploration of the outer surfaces of a person's clothing all over his or her body in an attempt to find weapons is not a "search." - Chief justice warren

Quote:
just like a detention is not an arrest

It is quite plain that the Fourth Amendment governs "seizures" of the person which do not eventuate in a trip to the stationhouse and prosecution for crime -- "arrests" in traditional terminology. It must be recognized that, whenever a police officer accosts an individual and restrains his freedom to walk away, he has "seized" that person.

Again, the chief justice of the united states supreme court, on the constitution you say you swore to uphold, debunking your argument.

Not to mention some of the other great quotes like:

In this case, for example, the Ohio Court of Appeals stated that 'we must be careful to distinguish that the "frisk" authorized herein includes only a "frisk" for a dangerous weapon. It by no means authorizes a search for contraband, evidentiary material, or anything else in the absence of reasonable grounds to arrest. Such a search is controlled by the requirements of the Fourth Amendment, and probable cause is essential

and

it is simply fantastic to urge that such a procedure performed in public by a policeman while the citizen stands helpless, perhaps facing a wall with his hands raised, is a 'petty indignity.' It is a serious intrusion upon the sanctity of the person, which may inflict great indignity and arouse strong resentment, and it is not to be undertaken lightly.

This tells me that drugs found from stop and frisk should be inadmissible in most circumstances.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Kirth Gersen wrote:

BTW, my favorite Ken Ham quote:

Ken Ham wrote:
Scientists, like everyone else, are sinners. Because of this, they don’t want to believe. It has nothing to do with evidence.
How do you debate that sort of inanity?

You don't. You pull it out into the public eye where people who haven't thought about creationism much or solidified their views hear it and dout his message. You put it side by side with people who demonstratedly reveal its hypocracy. You accept that those he already has converted will stick with him, but they aren't your audience and who you need to convince. You need to reach the high school students who are starting to question their parrent's teachings. If he is a political candidate, you need to hit the people who don't think their vote matters and give them a reason to go out. You do the same thing people who fight bigotry, racism and sexism do to advance their causes.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

You know, re-reading this thread before going to work, I was struck by this comment of Citizen Buri's which appears to have been entirely overlooked:

"I tend to not tip but not out of douchebaggery. I want the wait staff to be angry. I want them to complain to their boss. They deserve a guaranteed fair wage and shouldn't feel like they have to kiss ass to get one nor do I think customers should feel they have to bribe someone to not f+~@ with their food or give them poor service. This whole exchange is inherently antagonistic and is unnecessary. I'd gladly pay more for eating out if this were remedied.

"When I do tip I tip well even upwards of 50-75% if you really impressed me with your service. I make good money." (Emphasis added)

So, all you 15%ers, who's the cheapskate now?

He is. He outright says he makes good money but feels it is his right to not pay for services rendered to him and have the other people at the resturant subsidize his meal.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Midnight_Angel wrote:

Playing Devil's Advocate...

The classification of cheapskate, and coward; I can agree with. The classification of thief, not so much.
I am aware that acting this way may actually cost the server money.
Yet, I fail to see the legal definition of stealing being fulfilled...

You are getting services you refuse to pay for.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
LazarX wrote:
Caineach wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Hama wrote:
Well, then that person should be irrelevant.
Sadly, he helps spearhead a movement that is gaining traction and affecting public policy.
And unfortunately all Bill Nye accomplished in that debate, was to give him more of what he craves... publicity. It is very unlikely that Nye converted a single creationist in his widespread audience. On the other hand, Ham got to rally the troops and show them front and center the "Anti-Godness" of science by keeping it a Nye vs. God's account approach. He framed his approach that to reject Creationism is to reject the ONE Witness who matters, the big G-Man.

I disagree. Nye made Ham sound like an idiot. While the Creationists may use it as a rally cry, the people in the center saw a well reasoned, energetic person up against a close minded fool. If people don't call creationism out and actually address it's stupidity, then it will only gain momentum as it has for the past decade.

I think it would be better if it was a Christian scientist who debated Ham so that he couldn't use the anti-god angle, but Nye is a well respected face who knows how to be in front of a camera. Scientists need more of those.

You make the same classic mistake that everyone who's ever debated a Creationist has made, including Nye. That this is a battle that's going to be fought on logic. It has been fought AND LOST over more primal drives. The urge to worship a deity is something that's written to our genes almost as strongly as sex. You might as well try to argue the logical reasons for abstinence.

I have been reading a number of arguments giving reasons both for and against Nye debating. The argument of giving it legitamecy falls flat. They already have it in the US where it matters - the public eye and political realms. We need to take it away, and you can't do that by closing your eyes and pretending they aren't there. You need to drag them out into the light for everyone to see and realise they are talking out their ass. The diehards are never going to change, but Nye did that for people in the center. And as the center shifts, the diehards are going to have a harder time becoming mainstream, and their less diehard base will slowly errode into the former center. This wont happen if we stay quiet.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
LazarX wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Hama wrote:
Well, then that person should be irrelevant.
Sadly, he helps spearhead a movement that is gaining traction and affecting public policy.
And unfortunately all Bill Nye accomplished in that debate, was to give him more of what he craves... publicity. It is very unlikely that Nye converted a single creationist in his widespread audience. On the other hand, Ham got to rally the troops and show them front and center the "Anti-Godness" of science by keeping it a Nye vs. God's account approach. He framed his approach that to reject Creationism is to reject the ONE Witness who matters, the big G-Man.

I disagree. Nye made Ham sound like an idiot. While the Creationists may use it as a rally cry, the people in the center saw a well reasoned, energetic person up against a close minded fool. If people don't call creationism out and actually address it's stupidity, then it will only gain momentum as it has for the past decade.

I think it would be better if it was a Christian scientist who debated Ham so that he couldn't use the anti-god angle, but Nye is a well respected face who knows how to be in front of a camera. Scientists need more of those.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Hama wrote:
Well, then that person should be irrelevant.

Sadly, he helps spearhead a movement that is gaining traction and affecting public policy.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Kryzbyn wrote:

Creationism itself is not toxic.

When it's used to lead people to ignorance, or as a justification for horrible things, it can be. But that's much more up to the intentions of the person using it.
I can believe God created the universe, and not believe He did it 6000 years ago. I can believe in evolution, and believe it's an inherent mechanism of nature He built into the system.
I do not believe the Bible is meant to be taken literally, or to be used as a history book. It's meant as a guide book, with anecdotes and allegory of things that have come before, to help how you choose to live your life. Is it divinely inspired? Yes, I think so. But like so many other things left to humans, it can be corrupted to serve as a means to oppress or subjugate people. How much power you give someone else over you is your decision, though. Think for yourself.
I imagine sometimes that God's forehead is red from all the facepalming.

TL;DR People are a*~$%@%s. They can do mean crap to other people, intentionaly or otherwise. The tools they use to do so aren't at fault, or inherently bad or toxic because of this.

Wikipedia has a bunch of different types of creationism. The US has 40% of the population refusing to believe that humans evolved from primates, with annother 20% unsure. Sure, 1 of the types listed is perfectly compatible with science, but a larger percent of the US population believes the versions that outright reject science - the versions that are toxic. When people complain about creationism, they aren't talking about theistic evolution, which is what you belive. Heck, the second most compatible with science wants to include magic in the scientic method.


7 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Lord Snow wrote:
Dreadwave wrote:

toxic ideology

Creationism isn't "toxic" and I'm sure for the most part the intention is not to harm anyone. It's merely crazy.

I would argue that it is very toxic. It intentionally puts people against science. It intentionally trains people to go against what humanity has learned about how the world actually works. That makes them significantly less productive members of society and decreases our collective ability to make advances in technology. It causes people to doubt experts and believe those talking out of their ass. It puts quackerty on the same level as actual science. It helps other anti-science movements like anti-vax and anti-global warming to grow and gain legitamecy when the evidence clearly shows they are wrong. This affects political policy and our ability to respond to growing epidemics. It affects how competative we are in the buisness world, since science and technology is one of the few areas the US is still a leader in.

YEC breeds an anti-science culture which is one of the biggest problems facing our country right now.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Am I the only one upset that this is about the Walking Dead and not the most beloved comic book character?


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Ross Byers wrote:

Julio is smart about taking a vacation. He's genre aware enough to know if he hangs around he's gonna die. Loan Elan the +X anarchic rapier and get the hell out of the way.

Edit: If his chaos sabre is better than a +3 keen rapier (what he gave to Elan last time), that's a heck of a sword.

They are going on level 15 or so. A +3 Keen just doesn't cut it anymore.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Scott Betts wrote:
Sissyl wrote:
Heh. I think it's great. After all, the whole IP system is completely insane, and the more visible abuses it leads to, the sooner it can be scrapped in favour of something better. Sad about people getting forced out of business because someone used the system to trademark something like that, but, c'est la vie. Insane systems bring suffering needlessly.

A) This is the trademark system. It's the one side of our IP law setup that isn't completely insane. In fact, it generally works fine.

B) No one is being forced out of business. At all. The "Candy" mark doesn't destroy anyone's livelihood. The "Saga" mark isn't going to have any effect on the Banner Saga whatsoever.

C) People "trademark something like that" all the time. All the time. It happens constantly. No one bats an eye. The only reason anyone is getting upset is because a lot of gamers don't like Candy Crush because they view it as hypercasual trash, a couple of irresponsible news outlets covered the story without doing their homework, and gamers really, really love having strong opinions on topics they know very little about.

Except the Saga mark has already had an affect on The Banner Saga, as their trademark registration has been delayed multiple times because of King's objection. King may now be backpeddling on it (or possibly just saying they are), but they did first try to use their muscle, and their objection to The Banner Saga at the trademark office remains, to my knowledge.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Looking forward to SquareEnix getting involved. The 7th Saga and Saga Frontier have something to tell King.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Drock11 wrote:
So I take it by Rich's comments that things like undead and maybe evil outsiders are just like any other evil creature, and aren't nigh unredeemable creatures practically and spiritually composed of and fueled by evil. That's pretty different than most fantasy type settings that have undead.

This is how most GMs I have played with in the past decade have treated intelligent undead and outsiders. Heck, Planescape introduced outsiders of alignments other than their natural one at least 20 years ago.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I would just like to remind everyone of this comic

edit: man, I forgot about the kilonazis


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Sarcasmancer wrote:

Some cultures have "taking the best of what other cultures have to offer" as a cultural value. And some have the exact opposite. So I think you will eventually have a large sea of largely inter-compatible cultures (united more by technology than language, unless everybody adopts Esperanto or something) with islands of isolationist culture.

I would take issue with your specific example being indicative of any larger trend because Disney probably intended it to have crossover appeal. A lot of big-studio entertainment is made with an eye as to how well it plays in foreign markets.

Also influence of art in film, graphic novels, etc. is just a tiny part of "culture". If American animation and graphic design are including some Japanese influence I don't think that says much about "culture" per se.

Well, if Disney is intentionally using foreign culteral references to get crossover appeal, then those references will slowly become commonplace and gain cultural value in the starting country. That bleed, over time, will tend to make cultures more similar.

That being said, we still have regional differences with cities. So while at high level I see us becoming more similar, it really depends on the granularity you want to go down to.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Sissyl wrote:
Is nobody concerned about the guy saying "this is a faith-based state"?

It has become such common rhetoric among the Republican party that most of us more or less tune it out.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
wicked cool wrote:
For those of you who want abortion on demand is there a point where you cant have an abortion past this month? Do you have any problem with having an abortion based on the idea they wanted a boy but got a girl? If they find out the child will only have 1 leg? Wanted blonde hair but got red?

I can honestly say I have no problems with a woman getting an abortion for whatever reason she chooses.

Quote:


Some of you argue that a better civilization requires that society bears the burden. But at the same time you state society has no say and that an elected official/judge makes the decision regardless of belief/age/anything. Bear the burden and shut up is what i'm hearing. In fact society should be saying have the baby and we will help with the burden. I would argue that that type of society is a better model of Utopia that you should be striving for. A stronger society sticks together and says we will gather the neighborhood and help you raise your child. Isnt this done in other countries?

Yeah, this would be a fine argument if the people pushing anti-abortion laws weren't also pushing harmful sex ed practices (abstinence does not work), cutting state support for people who cannot afford children, and reducing aid to the governmental bodies that take care of the children.

Quote:


I bet theres some of you who get more upset over how Peter Jackson treats the Hobbit then the killing of healthy unborn babies. Its very clear that society cares more about dogs then it does unborn babies.

I'm blessed that i have children and i didnt have to make that choice. I was careful as a teenager and educated/afraid of having a baby when i wasnt ready. Consequences are part of life.

For many women/men an abortion is a do over for a mistake.How many do-vers do you get? unlimited? I take the side of Rush and say fine you made the mistake but why should i pay for it. The costs for birth control are low ($9 dollars a month).

The rape/incest is a small portion and i'm not opposed to it and i feel a law against it is barbaric. However if she waits until a certian point then its barbaric on her part.

Shouldnt every effort be made to try and convince the mother (except rape) to have the baby/then give up the baby for adoption and at the same time make the rules for adoption so that its harder to the mother to reconsider once shes had the baby and given it up for adoption. I ad a friend who got a...

No. It costs society more to force her to cary it to term, and honestly I don't care about the potential of what is still a useless parrasite.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The only good thing that has come out of the anti-vax movement is the large sums of money that have been funneled into autism research as a result. Large sums of money that have found absolutely no correlation between autism and vaccination.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Hama wrote:
I'd rather have someone say "i draw their attention on me" then "i tank".

I was using tank in RPGs long before I ever heard it in video game context.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Andostre wrote:
Varsuvius wrote:
I believe Xykon is feeling chilly today.
Any of my fighter-types would have replied, "I don't know what that means," in a no-nonsense serious voice and then charged whatever target I wanted, leaving the player running the strategist PC to throw their hands up in exasperation.

Luckily, Roy didn't dump his Int or Wis, and has decent ranks in sense motive.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Oh yeah, I forgot about fixing social security.
1. Eliminate the cap on SS tax. Done. Social security becomes viable indefinetely.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I really curious how much of an exponential growth we will see tomorrow when the remind me later emails get sent out.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Sissyl wrote:

I am saying: Given the current system with its complete focus on producing huge masses of well-known Stuff, America will not be able to compete with low-wage countries for holding that production. The expected salaries (and the necessary salaries to survive) are far too high to compete with countries where living expenses are lower to an order of magnitude. That is an equation that has no solution. If you were to try, you would just find yourself in the race to the bottom that you describe.

The high tech approach is not all of my suggestion. You also need to focus on SMALL SCALE ENTERPRISE. It's not a bad time to do so, either. The ancient corporate megastructure is dying, surviving only because they metamorphose into gigantic law firms and make money through patent trolling, stock speculation, lobbying, and many of a thousand different and above all non-core proficiency areas. Huge corporations lack flexibility, and focus too much influence in too few places. To keep surviving, they do all they can to prevent change they can't adapt to due to far oversized organizations. Business of tomorrow is relatively smaller, adaptable, far more tied to knowledge and research, and so on. It is an interesting fact that an increase in government budgets provides a few new jobs, but the increased taxes to pay their salaries usually kill off more jobs in the private sector. Increased money to big corporations means few or no new jobs, for similar reasons. If you get more money to small private enterprise, however, you actually get more jobs. All that is needed is to say farewell to the corporations. The government doesn't like this, because it forces them to negotiate with far more people if they want to influence things in the private sector.

Emphasis added: Do you have any actual evidence to back up this claim, because all of the ecconomic studies I have seen have shown increased buisness taxes actually cause an increase in both jobs and pay. This is because money invested in personel isn't taxed (its an expense), so the companies spend more on them when the return on money they keep is lower. 50 cents on the dollar, or lower, isn't worth fighting your employees over when 80 cents or more is.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Not to mention that the democrats compromised already by accepting the GOP funding levels and not pushing for pre-sequester levels, or higher, like they want to.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Skeletal Steve wrote:
I'll just end up paying the penalty in my state. Buying even the lowest amount per month looks like it would easily take 1/3 of my take home pay or more per month. I'll just eat the penalty like most people. Just more tax I have to pay.

Or since that means you are likely taking home less than ~10K anually, you will easily qualify for the subsidies that can completely pay for health insurance.

edit: heck, looking at some of the numbers you may qualify for medicaid, if you are under 15K


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I agree with BNW. This entire thread is people intentionally reading confusion into an area where there isn't any.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Dragon78 wrote:

First anime I ever saw(subtitled and unedited) was Project A-ko. Does anyone remember there first anime?

Ninja Scroll. I watched it at a friends house. It was also the first R rated thing I remember seeing. I was 12.

I don't remember if I watched Cowboy Bebop on Adult Swim or if I got my hands on Kenshin first, as the first thing I watched for myself.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
CapeCodRPGer wrote:
Wow, between this and the fact DC fired the Batwoman writers so they wouldn't have Batwoman marry her girlfriend, makes me wonder what they are smoking over there.

DC didn't fire the Batwoman writers. The writers left on their own after being too frustrated with DC preventing them from showing the marriage, among other things.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Try looking for some bard minis maybe? Or perhaps a pirate or steam punk?
Here is one from Reaper
Freebooter miniatures


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Kolokotroni wrote:
Caineach wrote:

Why should an online petition filled with clueless people and unknowledgable kickstarter executives be able to decide what the "responsible" thing is? If no laws were being violated, why is this rule necessary? And why not talk to the people running the campaign about concerns before changing your policy?

Nothing about this shows responsibility to me. I see a group of scared people who don't know science trying to avoid creating a scene with even more ignorant people.

Law and ethics rarely intersect now adays. There are no where close to enough laws on the subject, and the law should not be the only presiding guidelines in our lives. Common sense should be. The law is lagging behind technology as it always does, and as usual it will require a disaster for anything to actually get done in legislature.

In the mean time, its up to individuals to make good descisions. And sending seeds around the world is OBJECTIVELY DANGEROUS. If this was a new breed of daisy made in someones greenhouse, it would still be dangerous and scientifically unethical.

Its not about creating a scene, its about something that is potentially destructive. Sure the risk is small, but the consequences of those risks are very very dire. As zylphryx stated, there are tons of cases where the introduction of foreign plants and animals have had devastating effects on the local environment. A GMO, should be treated as a foreign organism literally everywhere. Because by design it has at least some characteristics different from every single other organism on the planet. The same reason someone should not have brought asian chesnuts to north america is the reason one should not be mailing modified plant seeds around the world.

I doesnt matter what the motives behind the petition are, or what kickstarter execs know or dont know about the science of gmos, the dangers of introducing foreign organisms into new ecosystems should be evident to ANYONE, especially scientists. And as far as I can tell,...

People breed new varieties of plants and sell them online all the time. There are new breeds of daisies, custom lilies, and all sorts of things done with traditional splicing. We ship custom plants for home gardens accross the globe routinely, and have dones so for decades. In elementary school I sold some through mail order catalogs for a school fundraiser. No one complains when those are shipped. There are existing laws governing it. Just because someone wants to add actual science based off modern research does not mean this is a new field. Treating it differently is ignorant.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
sanwah68 wrote:
Caineach wrote:
GeraintElberion wrote:

Interesting that Reaper have posted a bunch of self-justifying stuff which tells us nothing on the Kickstarter comments and then locked the thread about it on their own boards.

The we-think-our-customers-should-shut-up-and-be-grateful approach to Customer Service is a real shocker.

When comparing it to the CS at Paizo or the quality of communication from the Frog God KickStarter, Reaper look well below industry standard on communications.

My own experience of individual communications with Reaper have been excellent, with top-notch customer service. They really need to transfer this to their mass communications.

It seems like they're just tuning customers out now: sad.

When did they close the thread? They may have had to because they are going to Gencon and they may not be able to moderate it or respond to anyone while there.

I don't think that is the reason, as they haven't been responding to anything anyway.

That thread has multiple comments from reaper, followed by people jumping down their throats with accusations that they are lieing and random speculation about the "real" reason things are late. They locked it down because it was a useless b!*~~ fest of people who don't actually want to hear the answers.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

My friend has left a bottle of fabreeze on the counter before.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I would like to add since I haven't seen anyone comment on them, I thought the human fight scenese were well done too.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Andrew R wrote:
Icyshadow wrote:
I wonder how different the whole Zimmerman scenario would have been if Trayvon was white, or jewish...
We never would have heard about it, the race machine cares only for blacks and rarely hispanics and only if the "aggressor" is white. i use the quotations because even in clear self defense cases it is whitey's fault. And all of the black on black crime in chicago, NYC and detroit is meaningless to the media whores like sharpton and jackson

I cannot fathom the world you live in.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Dr Grecko wrote:
ciretose wrote:
Dr Grecko wrote:
Also Anzyr you could add this to help mitigate he STR damage from the spell

"...and those who are immune to Strength damage (such as undead spellcasters) cannot use blood money to create valuable material components."

I guess we can move the argument here if you like, the last one didn't go well.

You could FAQ it?

Nothing about that ring makes you immune to str damage.. it lessens the amount you take by up to 6 points max.

RAW vs RAI. Any GM worth their salt will notice the obvious cheese and put the kibosh on it. If they don't they are intentionally looking for overpowered rediculousness or so inexperienced that they will have other problems long before this point.

There is a reason the game has an intelligent thinking person and not a table or computer to arbitrate things.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Trace Coburn wrote:

I got out of seeing Pacific Rim in 3D a little over six hours ago. I’M STILL HYPER! I would’ve stayed to see it again, like people did with A New Hope back in 1977, but I couldn't get cover for more than half my work-day. The fight in Hong Kong is... I haven’t clutched my seat in excitement like that EVER.

** spoiler omitted **
About the only thing that bothered me about the actors’ performances was the fact that while they tried gamely enough, the actors playing the Hansens sounded about as Australian as Sly Stallone. (Which is a shame, since Max Martini is otherwise a stone-cold badass as always, and Kazinsky delivers a note-perfect conceited young hot-shot.)

For those who’ve already seen it, a couple of characterisation points have occurred to me since I left the theatre.

** spoiler omitted **...

Saw it last night. Probably wont see it again this weekend, but I plan to go see it at least 1 more time.

I have no idea why I saw some reviews complaining about the lack of good shots of the giant mechs. I loved the cinemetography. I do have the complaint that we don't get a good daytime fight scene, with the major battles happening at night in the rain. The acting falls a little flat at times, but rarely enough that its not really a detraction. It wasn't what you go to this movie to see. They deliver on the action sequences.

Spoiler:
Have to completely agree with you on Crimson Typhoon and Cherno Alpha. I would have really liked see some more of them in their hayday. The movie was a little too main character focused in the fights, which wouldn't have been as much of a problem if the other mechs weren't cooler than him.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Why not?
Its a better justification for adventuring than half the characters I've seen, and if the GM is on board from the start could lead to a very amusing Montey Haul game, where the players don't get to keep the loot after the dungeon.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
"Devil's Advocate" wrote:
Belief in the bill or not, Im not sure that respect is the right attribute for someone that basically sounds like they just used a technicallity to get what they wanted when it would have been the opposite otherwise. Comes off as pretty immature and childish from what it sounds, not heroic, regardless of if you are for or against abortion.

A technicality that has been left in specifically for its ability to protect minorities.

1 to 50 of 227 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | next > last >>

©2002–2014 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.