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Feiya

Caineach's page

RPG Superstar 2013 Star Voter. Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 4,654 posts (4,659 including aliases). 1 review. No lists. No wishlists. 1 alias.


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I have to agree with Kirth. Cap 1 was pretty non-memorable for me. I didn't remember Bucky's death scene or the mad scientist until the flashbacks in WS. In the first movie, my reaction to Bucky's death was a "oh no, main character's friend dies predictably to develop main character," and I promptly didn't give a s!%* at Cap's predictable reaction. I could tell you Red Skull was the villian, but honestly don't remember anything about his plot other than has tessaract and evil nazi, and the tessaract is only important because of its ties in with Avengers. I remember thinking the skin over Red Skull was done well, but only after it was mentioned a few posts ago. Cap 1 was an easily forgettable film.


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thejeff wrote:
phantom1592 wrote:
SAMAS wrote:

No, not even them. Remember, we're talking about people, not just powersets.

You don't monitor anybody who doesn't give you an actual reason to. By which I mean something they actually do or are caught planning. Not just because of something they might do.

That kind of stuff tends to breed...

Nice in sentiment, but not really something I would be behind in real life.

In comics, I LIKE secret IDs and the tropes that make comic heroes what they are...

In real life, if there is a threat, I would want it monitored. You don't round them up in camps based on things they 'could' do... but if you know they can kill with a thought and just let them be till AFTER they accidentally murder people... then that's the governments fault. It's like handing a toddler a machine gun and saying we're going to wait till he gives us a reason to take it away...

What do you think about Prof X? Sitting in his chair, monitoring all new mutants that show up and then trying to draft them into his school for training?

That's pretty much immoral monitoring... but since he's not 'government' he's seen as the good guy?

Frankly they would be such a unique and special subset of people with unique and specialized needs... they SHOULD be looked for. There should be all sorts of programs set up to make sure they CAN live ordinary and simple lives.

Yeah, that's pretty much it. The government would be doing exactly what Professor X has been doing for mutants since the earliest issues of the X-Man. Monitoring for their appearance. Trying to recruit and train them. Stopping the ones who get out of line - which would include the vigilantes.

They'd be doing it on a larger scale and more effectively, that's all.
Of course, in the comic book world that's better left to individuals since they can be trusted while the government can't, but mostly because that makes for better stories.

I would absolutely love to see a story that follows a mutant-accepting civilian police force dealing with everyday things, like high school students suddenly realizing they can kill everyone they know by not closing their eyes.


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Nocte ex Mortis wrote:

Y'know, I really have to assume that many of you are simply playing Devil's Advocate here, because otherwise..

You do understand that you're stating that it would be perfectly acceptable for a Chaotic Evil Antipaladin to worship Irori under your twisted logic that being used here, right?

Paladins are Lawful AND Good. Neither of these two things are less important than the other. Asmodeus is antithetical to the cause of Good, breaks the Associates clause in the Paladin class, and stands in direct defiance of the Paladin class being called the 'Champions of Law AND Good.'

Yeah, so? What is your point?

1. No one expects anti-paladins to be entirely sane.
2. The diety they worship does not need to be the one granting him powers.
3. It is more likely for an anti-paladin to do his work in the name of a good god than the reverse, since it would sow discord.


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Going from 15 to 20 point buy isn't that big a deal. You basically get a +1 modifier in a primary stat or +2 modifiers to other stats. You probably wont notice that difference in the game.


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zauriel56 wrote:
I disagree with the stance of the business but not the ruling. Why should rights be infringed upon because they own a business?

Why should an employer be able to pay his employees less because he is religious?


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Squeakmaan wrote:
No, seriously many jobs do. VoIP calls from my home were a required part of my lab tech job, my boss lived in Japan, I worked in Virginia. In any kind of STEM job it's essentially a non-stated job requirement.

I can't even apply for a job in my field without high speed internet,


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This is why I think all rating systems should be destroyed.


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MagusJanus wrote:
thejeff wrote:
MagusJanus wrote:

Apparently, there is now effort to make a law to go around the SCOTUS decision

I hope they succeed.

They won't. At least not in this session. If the Democrats hold the Senate and take back the House, then it's likely in the next session.

So Vote.

I don't think they'll necessarily end up staying in office. There's a lot of people burned by Obamacare who may be willing to toss women's healthcare under the bus just to be rid of the program. Including a surprising number of women, from what I've seen.

You may want to check where your getting your figures. Current front page of the HuPo (so admittedly massively biased) - more than 3/4 of Republicans who have enrolled in Obamacare are in favor of their new coverage.


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So, some other thoughts on ways these could be useful. For instance, in pay parking lots:
determine how long a car has been there (pay parking lots would like this, as would short term parking in business areas)
identify poorly parked people and develop a response (redraw lines to accommodate, send a parking official to ticket, send a tow truck) - also helps with large/nonstandard vehicles
determine if anyone is loitering and develop a response (send a security guard to do a sweep, turn lights on)
direct cars to the nearest parking space

There are certainly others.


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MagusJanus wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
MagusJanus wrote:
The problem with Occam's Razor is that it produces a false logical path. Specifically, it does with the idea that the simplest answer is the correct one.
As others have alluded, that's a problem only with the crippled, twisted version that you're presenting. Occam's Razor states that the simplest explanation that still takes into account all of the evidence is more likely to be correct. Note the evidence part, and the part about probability vs. certainty.

Which does not refute anything I said. Just because a hypothesis takes into account all of the evidence does not mean that it best fits all of the evidence; evolution is an example of that. There are other hypotheses besides evolution that take into account the evidence and which are simpler, but they do not fit the evidence the best. Which is why Occam's Razor is not applied. And also why it is that science does not hold the Razor as irrefutable.

Also, that bit about assumptions is pretty commonly accepted.

Also, note that science does not operate on certainty. So the idea of certainty does not apply to science unless you are slipping outside of scientific standard.

I did not use the Razor incorrectly or some twisted version of it. I just used it in a way most people are not familiar with and pointed out that an essential assumption about it isn't actually true.

I would like to hear a single other hypotheses that takes in all the evidence that supports evolution.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
Caineach wrote:
A big turn off for me is not reciprocating physical contact. I've been described as a teddy bear, and when someone is aloof, distant, or pissed with things like hugs or massages its disappointing.
For some people, growing up, getting grabbed didn't mean they were going to be hugged and cuddled -- it meant they were going to be hurt. In those cases, one can sort of understand why they'd be reluctant as adults. It's not necessarily personal against you.

Yeah, but it doesn't mean I want to date those people. If they can't be comfortable with my personality, it wont work out anyway. I also wont push anyone. If they don't want it, that is up to them entirely. But I will be less attracted to them for it.


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MagusJanus wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Vod Canockers wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Looking back at the FAQ, it says they used 75MW per hex heaters in the test for their 4 square foot systems and found they were overkill. One of their tests...

Except that while it is snowing, they won't be generating any electricity, and even at 5 watts per sq ft (20 watts per tile) that is 20% of Illinois electrical generation capacity just for Chicago.

By the 1990s, the Chicago metropolitan area had 54,600 miles of streets and roads, including 2,500 miles of expressways, 17,300 miles of highways and arterial streets, and 34,800 miles of local streets. Almost 80 percent of all commuting was done by automobile.
So the Chicago Metro area has 54,600 miles of roads, at 25 feet wide average (which is just counting them all as wide 2 lane roads) that is 7,207,200,000 square feet of roadway. At 1 watt per square foot, their test was 18 watts per square foot, that is 7.21 Gigawatts of electricity, Illinois produced 16.2 Gigawatts in Feb of this year. So at 1 watt per square foot, the Chicago metro area uses almost half of Illinois' electrical capacity. That doesn't include sidewalks, parking lots, or any of the other places that would have these.

You don't have to assume they turn the entire system on at once. You can phase it on, roads at a time, so that your peak load is not as high. As solar panels come back on, you can increase the number you have on. You can phase them on over the course of 2-3 days and it would still be faster than most northern cities can clear all of their streets.

So assuming it takes about 2 hours to clear the panels, and you have 72 hours to do it, you can divide the load by 36.
Now you are looking at 200 Megawatts/hour. You're still dedicating a few traditional turbines to it, so it is overkill. At the same time, you're talking about a 10 gigawatt system, so something that would satisfy more than half of Illinois power needs.
I'm looking for better data, I can only find annual consumption. I
...

First, where did I say this would replace plows? I have said it may be able to replace salt, but never replace plows. In fact, I talked about how in large snowfall regions like the ones that get constant lake effect this would probably not help. They may be able to reduce the need for plows, but it will always be more efficient to just move large quantities of snow over melting them.

Second, plows can leave about a half inch of snow after they pass that is still dangerous. Depending on the road conditions prior to snowfall, that layer may have significant patches of ice. If these can clear that up, that is huge.

Third, the road in front of my house doesn't get plowed until day 3 after a storm. It's not uncommon for plows to take days to clear a city, even in regions that are prepared for snow.

Finally, not every idea is good for every region. Snow removal technology that works in one area may be bad for another. Different places have different types and quantities of snowfall. It very well may turn out to not be cost effective in a lot of regions. That doesn't mean it is stupid, just that it should not be considered a feature for those places when doing cost estimates.


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Spanky the Leprechaun wrote:
I'm quoting them verbatim, I don't see what the problem is.

Your mocking them as stupid for using a rhetorical flourish and then acting like your special and creative.


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Spanky the Leprechaun wrote:

I will be pleasantly surprised if they will be able to make these Tron roads with their hexagonal glass tiles which will be able to make the equivalent of LCD screens that light up when a moose steps on them and says "danger ahead," even through the usual amount of grime, oil, dirt, what have you which collects on the typical roadway, but I have a sneaky suspicion that that number of brake light equivalent LED's will be prohibitively expensive over such a vast stretch of roadway, not to mention the power cost.

I assume that the brake lights on your car work due to the alternator being on. If you left them on with just the battery, they would soon run out of power. I may be wrong, but I seriously doubt an array of solar hexagons is going to generate enough stored power to run a lane division line the whole length of the roadways of the United States overnight while the sun is not shining.

Possibly this is why they just went with the embedded Christmas lights, or possibly it is because the array of brake light equivalent LED's capable of creating LCD screen type road displays would get in the way of the solar panels, but I smell a fish. I think it begs the question: why, indeed, did this engineer make this claim without rigging up powerful LED's to create lane lines during the day on the scale of his experimental parking lot? I'd like to see him run it over with a tractor. I think it's also going to cost in the 6 figures to create this for just a parking lot, which over the roadways of the US will bring it into the territory of way too much money.

I think that an actual video of this amazing technology in action would sell a whole lot better than "artist's renditions" showing blinking hexagons under the feet of a moose.

I mean, I cringe every time I have to buy a brake light for my car and all, but it's invariably not even a $200 investment.

I know I have some flashlights that powerful that have lasted overnight off 2 D batteries. The whole point of LEDs, and the reason they are being thrown in everything, is that they have practically no energy signature. The only reason these don't have a more powerful LED is that he bought ones that were slightly cheaper without knowing it would be an issue, then discovered it when he actually started building it. It doesn't change the proof of concept to admit your prototype has issues. I would be more concerned if they said everything worked as intended.


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Spanky the Leprechaun wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Spanky the Leprechaun wrote:

new vid from Thunderfoot

Well, considering he starts the video showing his ignorance in the first 30 seconds, why should I take a single thing he says after it seriously?

All he said was glass is not harder than asphalt, and then rubbed a chunk of asphalt on a glass coffee container.

Yeah, which shows he knows nothing about modern glasses and is willing to shout and mock on the internet about things he has no knowledge of. He loses all credibility when he shows himself talking out his ass ignorantly.


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Spanky the Leprechaun wrote:

new vid from Thunderfoot

"Imagine being able to put “eyes and ears” on the ground anywhere in the world without putting human lives in danger. Drop a Solar Road Panel into the hills of Afghanistan via parachute. The parachute detaches upon impact and is retracted beneath the panel. Camera modules open and aim in every direction. A satellite dish configures itself for communications to anywhere in the world. Marines at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina control the direction of the infrared cameras and watch the images on their computer screens and call in strikes when needed.

Unlike a conventional generator, the Solar Road Panel makes no noise and leaves no thermal footprint for the enemy combatants to detect. No refueling is ever needed, keeping our troops out of harm’s way."

Yeah; it's in its infantile stages.

I think we should send yellowdingo $2 million to start his megacity on Antarctica. It just needs some r&d money.

Retractable parachutes.....heh heh.

Well, considering he starts the video showing his ignorance in the first 30 seconds, why should I take a single thing he says after it seriously?


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I don't get why people say these systems will be significantly affected by cars. Roads are not primarily used during the day. They are primarily used between 7-9:30 and 4 to 6:30. For most of peak time people are at work, parked in office building parking lots that would be dumb to cover. But during this time many businesses are empty, like malls and grocery stores, where this technology would be great.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Caineach wrote:
It costs my parents $200 a snowfall to get a plow to clear their driveway, and it may not come by for a few days.
Speaking as someone who used to plow driveways for a (partial) living, they're getting ripped off.

That depends on how many people are in their area who can plow and how big their driveway is. When you are a few miles down a dirt road that starts in the middle of nowhere, your options get limited.


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Sissyl wrote:
It's more of an issue that the solar roads need to a) be able to store energy, or b) carry power, in order to melt snow when there isn't any real solar generation (snow generally happens when it's pretty overcast...) and it seems to me that both will be prohibitively expensive and dangerous to boot. I mean... for the insulation on those cables to be known to work, there would have to be some pretty extreme testing done. After the first people responding to an accident get electrocuted by damaged high voltage cables in the road itself, do you think opinion on the solar road might, shall we say, swing a little?

We bury high voltage lines under roads all the time. They go through a lot of our sewer systems, which run under a lot of our roads. How is an adjacent trench funneling rainwater significantly different than a sewer line? The fact that this one is designed for to protect the cables as its primary purpose instead of being re-purposed for it decades after the sewer went in makes these safer in my opinion.


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As to the people who argue this would be a bad thing for parking lots because they have too many cars on them during the day:
Have you ever been to a mall during the day? How about a grocery store?
10-4 is dead. During the peak hours for solar activity, you have huge lots that are empty. Those buildings are still using just as much, if not more, energy during them than at other times.

Sure, this may be a bad idea for office buildings, though you could probably still line the traveling parts of the lot with them.

I also really like the idea of parks/basketball courts using these. The small scale stuff is where these are more interesting.

I think these are a terrible idea for most highways. One of the few good points Thunderf00t's video is the power distribution issues that would happen. Far too much of our highway system is designed to not be close to our cities.


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Vod Canockers wrote:

IIRC, about 50 degrees Fahrenheit. They want the surface of the road to be about 34, and car defrosters are up above 80 degrees.

Have you seen a blizzard? (not the DQ treat) Snow can and does fall heavy and fast, plus like I mentioned, it has to deal with sleet and ice storms. Yep it's an extreme, but can the road deal with this?, and again records. I think that Florida is workable, I doubt that Georgetown, CO is though.

BTW did they plan on covering the dirt and gravel roads too?

I live in upstate New York. I have seen systems that can keep porches clear all winter. If you continuously melt the snow as it is falling, you can do it. No one is saying that it would fully replace the need for plowing, but plows get sent out for 2 inches of snow, which this system could easily be designed to handle, way more frequently than you have feet in a day. My guess is you could easily design a system that can handle an inch an hour, which deals with the vast majority of things salt trucks get sent out for. Most areas that get regular, non-lake effect snowfall don't see storms exceeding that more than a few days out of the year. Not to mention this would help eliminate that final layer of snow the plows can't get to.

Sleet and ice storms would be easier than snowfall, as they happen in warmer weather and a mild temperature difference is enough to prevent buildup. These would handle them better than salt, which tends to wash away in the more liquidy partially frozen precipitation.


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Kryzbyn wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Kryzbyn wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:
Kryzbyn , right now what happens is your electricity meter runs backwards, and the electric company pays you money if you generate more than you use.
Seriously?
If you've got solar installed and you're on the grid? Absolutely. It's rarely enough to make a net profit (and the billing may not allow it), but it's sure better than getting batteries to store the power for when you do need it.

Hmm I will consider this.

If it doesn't take too long for it to pay itself off, why not?

Check your local laws. Some states do not require the electric companies to pay you back.

Also, there are companies that will rent your roof and own/maintain the solar panels for you. A company I have heard of local to me will guarantee a static cost per KW for 10 years (as opposed to the 5% annual increase the electric companies get) in exchange for you allowing them to put them up.


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Buying out sucks if you give high value items to the party. Give the players an item a level or 2 ahead of the curve and suddenly no one has the cash to pay the rest of the party.


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MagusJanus wrote:
Caineach wrote:
Its called iterative design. We revisit every issue every ten years or so. New technology makes improvements viable that weren't before. Saying an improvement shouldn't be explored because it doesn't go far enough before it has even been explored is moronic.

Welcome to infrastructure projects. The one area where iterative design is not welcome.

A lot of the problem with iterative design when it comes to infrastructure is that a lot of infrastructure (including roads) is not designed to be replaced every ten years. In fact, with the U.S., it's not even possible to do so. Part of the reason is how difficult some of the infrastructure is to get to, how disruptive some of it is to upgrade on a regular basis, and how some of it is out in the middle of nowhere. Roads are one area that are often two or even all three of those at once. That's part of why they solve problems with some roads by simply building new roads in other locations.

Also, this is a project where nationwide implementation will probably take twenty or thirty years. Changing design halfway through implementation because you found a problem is not something that will be considered acceptable; more than likely, they would just scrap the entire project as a waste of money and go back to asphalt roads.

Iterative design is a constant, even in infrastructure projects. New traffic patterns are being experimented with constantly. There are hundreds of different types of asphalt to deal with conditions in different areas, not counting other road materials like concrete, with new ones being formulated every year. You have experiments with anti-rust coatings on guardrails, new paints, traffic light designs. Sometimes these aren't fully vetted before being implemented, like the issues with high efficiency light bulbs in street lights not melting snow and causing northern cities that wanted to save energy a headache. Just because something takes years for an iteration doesn't mean that iterative design is not used.

I think your estimates on nationwide implementation are generous at best. It will be at least 20 years before we see the first major roads starting to use this technology, if it ever is used large scale. Hell, it will probably take them 5 years just to get production up to a point that they can be fully commercially viable after they finalize their design. It will be private industries experimenting with it in low risk zones like parking lots for years until it has proven its long term viability. As you said, no one wants to put in a road that will only last a decade.

You're saying early R&D shouldn't happen because it wont be implemented in the near future and we can't change the infrastructure instantly. This technology can be implemented gradually over time, with improvements being made along the way. They aren't pushing for instantaneous adoption.


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Sissyl wrote:
Well, a skeleton is thirty pounds of bones without muscles to produce force... they aren't the scariest things available. At least with zombies, they still have the stuff they used to move in life. A skeleton is more like a discarded shell at the beach.

Obviously you have never seen Jason and the Argonauts


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Kydeem de'Morcaine wrote:
I love it when Belker is right for the wrong reason. =)

Is it the wrong reason? When was the last time he had a non-healing spell prepared at the right time?


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Lincoln Hills wrote:

The day that "Mega-Bag-Lady*" sells as well as "Contortia the Belly-Button Hypnotist vs. The Leather Baroness", sexism will be dead. (Either that or all the teenaged boys will be.) But I don't think any of us will live long enough to see that day.

* For the record, I think a bag lady who uses her super-powers to save the Earth and then gets hassled by the cops for sleeping under an overpass is much more interesting than Clark Kent.

Have you read the Dresden Files?


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NobodysHome wrote:

Unfortunately, I qualify as a complete non-hacker (never tried) with only a few years of coding experience and I could write a bot that's doing this stuff. Just spend a few minutes as a human setting up an account, then turn the bot loose to spam the account.

On the other hand, that's a few minutes of someone's time every day which would make it a personal assault.

Far more likely they've figured out a way to have the bot create an account. That's what captchas (the strangely distorted characters when you create an account) are supposed to stop.

But at this point bots can solve captchas better than people.


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A YD post I love. What is the world coming to?


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RCW wrote:

Here's another point that I'm surprised I haven't seen yet: Minimum wage jobs aren't intended to provided living wages. They are at best entry level jobs.

Another point to consider is this: If I own a burger place and am forced to increase my minimum wages I have a few options to consider -

1 - Pay the new wages and absorb the cost myself (good for the workes, bad for my giants sacks of money in my vault).

2 - Fire a few people and make the remaining staff work harder for their new wages (no cost to me).

3 - Close the business entirely (no more jobs, but I still have my original profits).

4 - Start thinking about automation, customers punch their order into a screen and my robots make their order and call it Robo-Burger (all profit, no pesky workers). This idea was totally borrowed from radio host Andrew Wilkow.

Responding to your other points:

1. Yes. This is actually what usually happens. The profits shrink, and that comes out of the bottom line of the owners profits. Small business owners will feel this the most, but if they aren't already making more than minimum

2. Most businesses can't afford to do this. They can't afford to lose the efficiency, and the demand for their product will be increasing so they will more likely need to hire more people.

3. Any business that can't afford to pay its employees salaries they can live off of probably is so financially unstable it doesn't have long for this world anyway.

4. Some businesses may. Though you also have to consider some interesting things, like the fact that McDonald's has found that automation of some jobs (particularly cashiers) caused them to lose customers. Most people prefer to go to checkout lines with a cashier over self serve in grocery stores. Companies know that too much automation can lose them business, and the jobs that are at risk of loss the most are automated out anyway. This just shifts company cost estimates for when it becomes profitable to make the switch by a year or two.


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RCW wrote:

Here's another point that I'm surprised I haven't seen yet: Minimum wage jobs aren't intended to provided living wages. They are at best entry level jobs.

Another point to consider is this: If I own a burger place and am forced to increase my minimum wages I have a few options to consider -

1 - Pay the new wages and absorb the cost myself (good for the workes, bad for my giants sacks of money in my vault).

2 - Fire a few people and make the remaining staff work harder for their new wages (no cost to me).

3 - Close the business entirely (no more jobs, but I still have my original profits).

4 - Start thinking about automation, customers punch their order into a screen and my robots make their order and call it Robo-Burger (all profit, no pesky workers). This idea was totally borrowed from radio host Andrew Wilkow.

Considering the majority of people working minimum wage are trying to support a family off of it, why shouldn't they provide a living wage?


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houstonderek wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:

They may get their taxes back but they will not have them weekly.

$350 all bills paid is pretty phenomenal. After searching several apartment aggregate sites the cheapest apt rent I can find in Houston is $400, which includes water only. Cheapest I could find all bills is $645.

Regardless, even at 350 all bills paid, you would need $1250 a month to afford the other things on the list which I consider the basest of human needs which someone working full-time should reasonably expect to afford.

Rent + Utilities - $350
Car - $200
Car insurance - $100 (liability + collision)
Gasoline - $200
Health insurance - $100
Renters insurance - $25
Internet/phone - $50
Food - $200
Clothes - $25

That leaves you roughly $25 for saving, paying debt, going to the doctor, prescriptions, social life, and soap.

I never said you would be homeless, but you are far from "making it." If you are providing full-time service for a company or person you should not have to worry about being able to afford the most basic of lifestyle.

Let's look at that list. Some of those are luxuries. For $40 a month I can take a bus to work and back (saves $440). Health insurance? Try a Gold Card and eating the $95 fine (which just comes out of the tax return, and poor people who make it learn to take the maximum deductions allowed, knowing there's not going to be a tax bill after the EITC. So, now I have a hundy a week for incidentals, not $25. If you're going to play poor, think poor. Also, being in Houston, we have a TON of construction work, and it doesn't take much to become a helper at $10 per, starting, just the ability to get off your ass and look.

I've been VERY poor. I can tell you that most people on these board have no idea what it's like to be poor and get creative. Coupons still exist. At minimum wage, you qualify for a bunch of programs (food stamps, Gold Card, bill assistance, etc). All you have to do is get off your ass and apply for them. I never did, but I've always had...

HD, I think you are missing the point of BigDTBone's argument. He isn't listing what he considers to be how you would budget if you were living off that much. He is starting with the minimum he considers an acceptable lifestyle that someone working full time should be able to afford. If you are on a limited budget you make cuts, and it is certainly possibly to trim a lot of fat out of budgets. He is arguing that if your working full time you shouldn't have to make significant cuts and should be able to live fairly comfortably, barring extraneous expenses.


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Spanky the Leprechaun wrote:
I guess, when you say "hook," I'm perplexed by the inference that there is one? Or, is Sterling a unique and special case because......meh? When did the NBA begin worrying about their image? Last Thursday?

When multiple large sponsors pulled out.


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For those who might be interested, there is at least 1 group funding movies through Kickstarter. Currently, they are looking for money for Mythica, starting Kevin Sorbo.


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Andrew R wrote:
I just find it funny that players can be rapists, drug dealers, gang members, commit gun crimes etc without such viscous backlash

There is a reason some of us already boycott professional sports.


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GreyWolfLord wrote:

Let's put this in another way. We all (well, I do at least) play Pathfinder.

Let's take the D&D moral panic of the early to mid 80s and apply it today. Let's say that they went a step further and decided that they would kick us out of their communities, fire us from our jobs, and not do business with us (inclusive of no buying food, water, or anything else) because they consider us all devil-worshippers.

They feel the social contract we have with society is violated, and because of the shunning, of course no one wants to do business or let us near them.

Is this right?

How about if it spread to those not on these forums who haven't really said anything. What if it was also to those who were LGBT, for simply being that...they were ostracized (real situation, it has already happened)...is that right?

How about if you were a Christian, or Muslim, or other religion and were told you could not be hired or have a job and they didn't want to do business with you (true story too, has happened in the past and is happening in some nations today)...is that right?

It doesn't matter if you made it public or not, you stated it in a private conversation...and hence had to pay the societal costs of it because something that you never told anyone publically, was made public by someone attempting to make your life hell.

Is this right?

You can say...ah...that's a far extreme...but really...it doesn't take much to slowly inch along that deadly post until it affects you, me, and many others.

That's what's concerning about this...this is why some have called it a slippery slope.

It's what has happened before...when they came for our fellow businessmen we said nothing, because we didn't like them...when they came for our neighbors...we said nothing...because it was not us and we didn't like them...and then they came for us...

There IS a point where free speech and freedom is protected by the government whether or not it is by the government or someone else trying to take something due to that....

We could always shrink your argument down into a smaller ones.

If a guy learns that his girlfriend is cheating on him because his girlfriend told someone who then told him, is it not socially acceptable for him to dump her because of her expectation of privacy? What if he listened to a voicemail on her phone that she left around?


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This is no different than a home owners association throwing someone out for violating their contract. They do that all the time.


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Misroi wrote:
Hulk no want to be called Incredible any longer. People no take Hulk seriously. From now on, Hulk want to be called The Credible Hulk.

Credible Hulk Tumblr


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houstonderek wrote:
meatrace wrote:
Mike Franke wrote:
Unfortunately, despite what some people believe nothing is actually free. In the U.S. healthcare is 100% free for people who don't have money.

It's only free in the sense that you can refuse to pay for it. They still send you the bill, and they'll still go through collections to get their money, and they'll still garnish your wages if you continue to refuse to pay. Not being able to turn someone away is not the same as giving it away for free.

Heck, by this logic food is free. Just go to a restaurant and skip out on the bill!

Um, not so much. I still owe Memorial Herman $1000 for an emergency room visit five years ago (for a muscle relaxer and that's it, not tests, no doctor, just a PA that never touched me), and have had zero phone calls, no bill collectors, and no wage garnishment. Furthermore, medical stuff doesn't go on your credit record. What happens is the costs are passed on to the insurance companies in the form of extremely inflated charges for meds and procedures.

Must be a Wisconsin thing you're talking about. Never seen it in NY, NJ, Florida, or Texas.

I had a 10 dollar bill I didn't realize wasn't covered by my insurance and was sent to an old address go on my credit history. I'm in NY.


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The character got a name. Of course Felix will live.


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MagusJanus wrote:


Except the Bitcoin offers the potential service of, if it is accepted enough, being a unified currency accepted anywhere; this is part of the same rationale that led to the Euro.

So does the US dollar, or the Euro. The only new thing Bitcoin offers is anonymity, and even that is not as true as you might think. And there is no demand for Bitcoin among most people because anonymity is not valuable. You argue that if it becomes accepted it becomes valuable, but there is no reason for the average person to accept bitcoin. Its value is only what other people are willing to pay for them in goods, services, or other currencies and your average person is not willing to give them for bitcoins because the people around them they need to trade with also don't care about bitcoins. They have to convert them through an intermediary, they have to spend effort to set up the ability to receive them, and very few are going to want to do that unless they see there is demand for them to.

So, there is no demand for their uniqueness, and therefore people wont use them. Because people don't use them, businesses wont spend the effort to support them. Because businesses wont support them, people wont care about them, leading us back to the beginning.


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Sissyl wrote:


So, if the cops got a rule in their book saying something like "if EVERYONE in the area is driving like a complete friggin moron, book the first ten you see and let the others go", there would be an objective basis for it. Again, if the cops FOLLOW THE RULES, there would be no problem with the method. But again, that seems utterly beyond the pale, so everyone draws the conclusion that you need all sorts of special cases, exceptions, paragraphs, and so on to handle it. It's sad to see that people are so stuck in how they perceive things.

Well yes. The only way to tell if cops are following the rules is to get some kind of measurement. And we can't assume cops will follow the rules because doing so would be horribly negligent given the amount of data we have of them not following them. Your rule leaves it entirely up to the cops to decide what they want to do and would do nothing to eliminate discrimination. They would just claim they didn't see anyone prior to the 9 black people they pulled over.


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The black raven wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:
Magus Janus wrote:
So people who are not part of the white culture cannot be children of judges?

Reverse it and remove the binary.

Children of judges tend to be part of white culture.

People that stick around and call the cops tend to be part of white culture

Individually the list runs from good to meh. Collectively they make a very strong case.

BNW, I read your recent posts like suggesting that only people who are "part of the white culture", whatever that means, can be racists.

I guess that I am likely reading something wrong (not a native speaker of English). What do you mean with this "white culture" thing ?

He is saying that in the case, just because the person, Zimmerman, has a Latino mother that it does not mean that he was raised in or currently has Latino culture. The fact that on appearance many can't tell that he is Latino implies that he may very well "pass" as white, in that he may not receive the negative racial stigmas associated with Latinos and instead receives ones associated with white people.

White culture would be people raised with typical He isn't saying only people part of white culture can be racist, but that the type of racism that Zimmerman exhibitted is more common with white on black interactions than Latino on black ones. A lot of that has to do with Zimmerman being middle class and living in a fairly white neighborhood instead of poor Latino one. The US has a lot of segregation within its communities.


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NBC requires you to have a cable subscription to stream more than 30 minutes of live or replay off their site... Considering the big reason to stream is to get rid of cable it is pretty annoying.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
Andrew R wrote:
every person i have ever met with the "the man is out to get me"mentality are law breakers. They do drugs, ignore traffic laws, etc.

Background: I'm a short-haired, middle-aged, law-abiding white professional. No drugs; I get tested regularly (standard practice in my industry, not targeted at me, btw). I'm clean-shaven (can't wear a respirator, if needed, if scruffy). I very carefully obey the speed limits (company policy is probation up to instant termination for a motor vehicle citation).

True story:

A few years back, I was driving back through rural TX from a job, saw a sign ahead: "Entering [REDACTED] Town Limits; Speed Limit 55." I slowed to 55. My partner said, "good thing you slowed down -- they're pulling someone over." Turns out it was me they were pulling over.

Me: "Good day, officer. May I ask why you're pulling me over? Is the vehicle damaged?"
Officer: "License and registration, sir."
(Checks computer and writes a ticket)
Me: "Sir, what's this about?"
Officer: "I clocked you at 53 in 45 zone."
Me: "Officer, I don't mean to contradict you, but the sign is right there. It says 'Speed Limit 55.'"
Officer: "Well, I'm tellin' you it's forty-five now, boy."

Good thing, as a law-abiding citizen, I had absolutely nothing to worry about. Although it was easily cleared up -- it just cost me about $500 and a plea of 'no contest.' The town was so far from work I'd have had to take several days off to contest it in court -- which the cop knew, as he could clearly see the rental sticker on the vehicle.

At least you weren't in one of the many jurisdictions of Texas in the news for using any traffic violation as cause for confiscating all your valuables because they were involved in "drug trafficking," despite no charges against any of the people or drugs found.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:

"Crime exists. Ergo, we should treat all people like criminals."

There is a reason I consider cops to be the most untrustworthy profession.


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Drock11 wrote:
I'm surprised as genre savvy as many of the characters are that nobody has cast commune or a similar spell yet and just asked the gods what The Snarl is. You would think they would be even more forthcoming than usual with the fact existence is hanging in the balance and all.

Have you paid attention to how much effort Thor actually puts in when he responds? You think they will get anything reliable out of him?


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
DM Barcas wrote:
A frisk is not a search in the probable cause sense,

You told us to look at terry vs. Ohio. You need to take your own advice.

And it is nothing less than sheer torture of the English language to suggest that a careful exploration of the outer surfaces of a person's clothing all over his or her body in an attempt to find weapons is not a "search." - Chief justice warren

Quote:
just like a detention is not an arrest

It is quite plain that the Fourth Amendment governs "seizures" of the person which do not eventuate in a trip to the stationhouse and prosecution for crime -- "arrests" in traditional terminology. It must be recognized that, whenever a police officer accosts an individual and restrains his freedom to walk away, he has "seized" that person.

Again, the chief justice of the united states supreme court, on the constitution you say you swore to uphold, debunking your argument.

Not to mention some of the other great quotes like:

In this case, for example, the Ohio Court of Appeals stated that 'we must be careful to distinguish that the "frisk" authorized herein includes only a "frisk" for a dangerous weapon. It by no means authorizes a search for contraband, evidentiary material, or anything else in the absence of reasonable grounds to arrest. Such a search is controlled by the requirements of the Fourth Amendment, and probable cause is essential

and

it is simply fantastic to urge that such a procedure performed in public by a policeman while the citizen stands helpless, perhaps facing a wall with his hands raised, is a 'petty indignity.' It is a serious intrusion upon the sanctity of the person, which may inflict great indignity and arouse strong resentment, and it is not to be undertaken lightly.

This tells me that drugs found from stop and frisk should be inadmissible in most circumstances.

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