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Guy in a fez with a monkey

Brandon Hodge's page

Contributor. RPG Superstar 2013 Star Voter, 2015 Star Voter. Pathfinder Society Member. 912 posts (978 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 1 Pathfinder Society character. 1 alias.


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Brandon Hodge wrote:
Please please pretty please folks can we move the deep mechanical kineticist discussions over to the Kineticist Preview Thread as we asked previously? Thanks!

Is there really just no hope of you folks taking the deep mechanical kineticist talk and build breakdowns elsewhere? Follow the link above and argue to your hearts' content. Start a new thread. Please just do something other than arguing with one another over the deeper intricacies of the kineticist class. It is a significant and undoubtedly popular part of this book, but also only a fraction of the content. Your argument has dominated the discussion and drowned out other topics of interest, and there are other avenues and forums on these boards to have those debates. Please. Mark will answer you there as well as he has here. He promises! :-)

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Please please pretty please folks can we move the deep mechanical kineticist discussions over to the Kineticist Preview Thread as we asked previously? Thanks!

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Fourshadow wrote:
Brandon, Stephen and you actually did some design/development of this book here in Tulsa?!

We most certainly did! We became cellar dwellers for several days and hashed out a lot of the concepts from the initial outline Erik and I had put together, and took the first steps toward making a thick stack of wild esoteric ideas a developmental reality. We had a blast camping out with the material and brainstorming, and that Tulsa trip was a high point of my creative endeavors thus far!

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See? Speak of the devil and he appears!

(Ben likely has a ritual for that, too)

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Jack of Dust wrote:
Brew Bird wrote:
So a bad-touch class that uses ectoplasmic tentacles to deliver said bad touch? Ok. Just making sure I'm understanding that right.
the Succubus thread is gonna have a field day with this....

Ooooo crap. What have I created??? *facepalm*

The Ectoplasmatist started life as a full base class meant to fill two niches in the book: our soulknife equivalent, and the rogue/cleric equivalent to the magus' fighter/wizard makeup. I handed that class document over to Stephen in Tulsa last year, in the dark corner of a seedy tavern where we sat drinking beers and discussing the occult. Over time, the original concept got pulled apart into two entities, with a few of its abilities drawn into what's now the Spiritualist, and the rest landing as an archetype for that class more in line with the original concept of this raw ectoplasm-wielder. And I think both work beautifully!

Shadow_Charlatan wrote:

Any hints on the type of rituals that are available in OA ?

Do they mostly just provide personal effects or do they range to something like Guards and Wards where they protect large areas ?

What determines the power level of rituals ?

I think there was discussion of this upthread already, but there are 14 occult rituals plus rules for running and creating them. Effects include warding areas and structures, creating a gate to the dream realm, a séance, community blessings (healthy crops, bonus to saves and healing, etc), creating a magic circle for trapping outsiders, creating a rift to the Ethereal, channeling the voice of spirit to commune with it, a blood-brothers type bonding/binding ritual for groups that provides some neat bonuses to draw upon, a ritual that opens the third eye to provide psychic abilities to all involved casters, group bonuses versus psychic effects, an exorcism, a ritual that allows you to visit the Astral, and one for summoning incorporeal undead servants.

The power level is determined by its assigned level, which is like a spell.

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Mark Seifter wrote:
I was able to put together an occult one-shot for Paizocon that even Brandon thought was super-cool. So that's one testimonial from a former hadn't-run-occult GM: This section helped me run an awesome occult game!

That wasn't a game, Mark--that was a frikkin' work of art.

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QuidEst, I want to play a magus-like character that channels spells through weapons in new and interesting ways. What are the pros and cons of the mindblade magus archetype versus the ectoplasmatist spiritualist archetype?

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Is there any way this conversation can maybe be moved over to the Kineticist Preview Thread, Goblinsauraus (and other folks)? I love a good in-depth mechanical discussion as much as the next guy, but the kineticist talk has already far outweighed any other topic in this thread, and there are now some other forum options for you folks to discuss the intricacies of the class now without drowning out the more general discussion of Occult Adventures in this thread. Please?

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Dexion1619 wrote:

I hate the fact I have to indirectly choose between buying this book right away and getting broken fingers. Can't get the book and armored gloves this month.

Is that what you want Mark? Do you want my fingers broken in a terrible sword fighting accedent? I see now you're really a terrible person.

We specifically discussed this scenario during development in hopes of forcing these hard decisions. Our channels of power with Oress grow with each broken digit.

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Devilkiller wrote:
If troops can't be just a template I hope that Paizo not only provides some easy to use rules for building your own troops but includes lots of different pre-built troops in some future products.

I have been trying to persuade the powers-that-be at Paizo to pull the trigger on the Armies of Golarion book for at least a couple of years now, and lobbied hard for their inclusion in some of the bestiaries. There is certainly interest, so keep beating the war drums and voicing your support if you want to see it happen, because I'm ready!

Hint hint: GenCon makes for the perfect venue to voice such support for future products!

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QuidEst wrote:
Anybody (devs too if they want!) feel like sharing stuff they really loved?

Mr. Brookes already covered one of the most awesome aspects of this book, and that was the unparalleled collaboration between all the teams. We had a blast talking about real-world mysticism and debating esoteric topics, and putting our heads together to bring those concepts to the gametable. Erik and I had about a year of bouncing this totally bizarre, gonzo stuff between us that we obsess over in real-life, wondering how in the world all this was going to manifest in a hardcover. But finally bringing the developers in was like watching the slo-mo walk of career badasses in Reservoir Dogs--they arrived to get. it. done. Then they called in the freelancers they knew got what we were doing and it was just about the most crack operation I've seen in RPG publishing.

But you're talking about materials, aren't you? =-)

I'm primarily an adventure writer, so being able to indulge in some class design was awesome. I mentioned upthread, but I'm really proud of the ectoplasmatist, which started life as a base class but works even better as a spiritualist archetype. Being able to apply esoteric concepts I research in the real world, like phrenology, and figuring out how to apply them to classes like bards (with the phrenologist archetype) was a ball. And as someone who spends a *lot* of time researching fraudulent mediums, figuring out how rogues could pull off all those crazy seance tricks with the fraudulent medium archetype was a lot of fun.

When the promethean alchemist and tome eater and reanimated medium archetypes came to the table from the others, I was floored. They're so cool.

Similarly, bringing real-world spells to life was awesome. Ben McFarland is the master of incantations, and I think you guys are going to love his rituals section, and they are sure to get your PCs in all kinds of trouble. Rituals you can perform without having to be a spellcaster-as-a-prerequisite is a design space that was sorely needed in our game. We also got to play around a lot with ectoplasm, and making sure those spells were more than just "he slimed me" was an important goal for this book, and I'm pretty pleased with the results.

I'm THRILLED with the new possession rules/spell/abilities. I always had big issues with magic jar and the design team knocked this one out of the park.

The haunts section is going to clarify a LOT of questions people have had on the threads for the last few years, and give them some new goodies to play with as well, so I was glad to see that stuff make it into a hardcover.

Personally, the Occult Skill Unlocks are one of my prouder moments. I had conceived of those well before similar concept sprang up in Unchained and was scared to death things wouldn't be compatible, but they totally made the cut, and really open up these strange esoteric concepts to any PC, at a relatively low costs, so it's one of those things that I'm really proud to have brought to the table so players can experience this stuff even if they aren't totally on board running a psychic or mesmerist or something.

And lastly, I know these chapters don't get much love compared to sexy new classes and nifty new magic items and spells, but the Running an Occult Campaign chapter is essential reading for those interested in introducing these concepts into their games in a satisfying and properly-thematic way. I am really proud of the work Steven Townshend, Thomas Reid, Thursty, and myself did on that chapter, and I hope its lessons don't go unrecognized in the glare of all the new bright-and-shiny stuff in other chapters.

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Chad Hale wrote:
So, how is Rivani doing what she does in the artwork?

I'd like to note that Rivani's backstory already accounts for the psychic being capable of feats well beyond her established abilities, as the events of the Trial of the White Lotus revealed. According to the 1st-level statblock, she can't read the most guarded thoughts of a court chamber packed with monks and advisers either.

In other news for the non-PFS crowd, there's always this 0-level 3PP spell that will be right at home on the psychic spell list, and help bring this ability to life.

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QuidEst wrote:
What do the different Archmage spirits do? What sort of Trickster options are there? Just some stand-out cool stuff- I'm very curious.

The archmage spirit provides an expanded arcane spell list and casting ability to the medium, and a boon to increase damage of offensive spells. You become more frail, but can trade points of influence to cast spells without expending slots as you grow in power.

The trickster provides delicious bonuses to Dex-based abilities and skills, even while you become something of a loner that is harder to target with spells as an ally. You gain the ability to deal precision damage, and as you gain in power you can steal spells affecting other creatures, modify d20 rolls, and even change form to mimic someone else!

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Mar Nakrum wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
Mar Nakrum wrote:
Brandon Hodge wrote:


King is not one of Erasmus' 6 spirits.
And yet, the flavor text on page 9 of OA would suggest otherwise.
In fact, a medium can contact many spirits of each legend (unless they are a relic channeler), so I think what Brandon means is that King isn't one of Erasmus's "first contact" spirits for any of the six legends.
True, it was his seventh!

Yeah--sorry! What I meant by that comment was King was not part of Erasmus's "original suite" of six spirits, who were all represented by deceased family members in the background. Particularly since the story was written with that flavor text in mind!

If it hasn't already been noted, notice how the original six not only conform to the 6 spirit types as far as classes and abilities, but also how the locations of their deaths correspond to the seance locations in the class abilities!

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Rothmog wrote:
Anyone able to give a general overview of the Relic Hunter archetype for the inquisitor? What it gives up and what it gets in return.

One of mine!

The relic hunter archetype represents a major thematic shift for the Inquisitor, with a hefty trade-in of abilities. The Relic Hunter swaps judgments to gain the ability to draw power from holy relics, essentially gaining the Occultist implements class feature with a more limited level progression. This also limits their usual spellcasting abilities to the schools of magics tied to their chosen class of relics.

They also trade in their domain and bane abilities to gain the Occultist's mental focus and focus power class abilities, so all those delicious new class abilities work right!

If you want to be that guy who hoists aloft the skull of your god's most revered saint while blasting your enemies with power, wades through combat with a blessed and smoking censer to grant your allies new power, or draw from the holiness of a tattered shroud emblazoned with the scorched image of your deity to protect yourself from harm, this is the class for you!

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Even though I know this book inside and out and spent the weekend with a physical copy last month, watching everyone's excitement as they discover what's inside is really awesome and immensely entertaining!

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Dragon78 wrote:
Is there any reason they called the spirit "King"?

While noting to readers that "they" here refers to the real-world Spiritualists noted in my comment above, and not specifically Erasmus's mysterious friend from a nearby asylum cell:

Historically, "King" was "King No. 1": the head spirit of a band of similarly-named spirits (King No. 1, King No. 2, etc) who initially appeared at the seances held in the Koons spirit room in the 1850s, it eventually came out that "King No. 1" was actually the ghost of a spirit calling himself John King, who was in life actually named Henry Owen Morgan: aka Captain Morgan, the Welsh buccaneer who later loaned his name to a popular brand of rum.

From the Koons spirit room, John King would go on to have an incredibly busy afterlife, serving as a spirit guide to famous mediums such as the Davenport Brothers, Mrs. Guppy, William Eglinton, Nelson Holmes, Georgina Houghton, W.T. Stead, and one of my favorite spirit trumpet mediums, Etta Wriedt.

Famously, Eusapia Paladino made much use of King, Madame Blavatsky was well-acquainted with him (and some Theosophists suggested the famous Master Mahatma Koot Hoomi was a guise of King) and, above all, the medium Florence Cook summoned not only John King, but even more famously, his daughter Katie King, in a series of manifestations séances presided over by the famed scientist Sir William Crookes, in what are perhaps some of the most sensational and well-documented physical séances in history (if ever there was a real-life example of the Spiritualist class!).

Less famously, famed pirate-themed restaurant and nightclub owner (and the man credited with inventing the modern "night club") Don Dickerson, who owned clubs with Bod Hope, Errol Flynn, and other Hollywood luminaries, AND who consulted the Ouija board daily, communicated with John King regularly. You may or may not be surprised to learn that I own the original séance transcripts of Don Dickerson, where he carries on the tradition of communion with the spirit of John King over the course of several decades of his life.

If there's ever a spirit that needed its own biography...

Now, does all that have ANYTHING to do with Erasmus? Probably not, but what do you think?

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Not a bad theory!

It is interesting to note that spirits named "King" have a long and storied history in Modern American Spiritualism, from his first appearance in Koons' "Spirit Room" in the 1850s in Ohio, to the Davenport Brothers, Florence Cook, Helena Blavatsky, and beyond.

Shout out, or something deeper? I'll let you guys keep pondering. =-)

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The black raven wrote:

Is the King named Harum ? ;-)

Erasmus' 6 spirits :

- King ??? = Guardian ?

King is not one of Erasmus' 6 spirits. The Guardian is his deceased cousin, who was protecting his uncle when he died.

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Barachiel Shina wrote:
Would love to play a Soulknife in it one day.

You're going to want to keep an eye out for the Ectoplasmatist archetype...

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the xiao wrote:
Are his eyes yellow!?!?!?

Well he's possessed, you see...

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Cthulhudrew wrote:
I kind of find it amusing that- given some of the commentary about the iconics always having tragic family backgrounds- Erasmus' story takes it to the extreme. :D

Several of the comments for Rivani's background were like "Oh finally an iconic with a pretty positive background that isn't a tragic setup for vengeance or redemption!" and all I could do was loosen my tie and these "Sheeeeesh wait until you see the dark places I went with Erasmus!"

Thanks for the kind words, folks! This one wraps up my tenure on iconics for this book, and I was honored and thrilled to not only have that opportunity, but to help bring Wayne's amazing art and Jason, Mark, Logan, and Stephen's incredible new classes to life!

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ShepherdGunn wrote:

My wife is in the process of making a game where the focus is the apotheosis of one of the players becoming a new god of dreams in the campaign world. I noticed there's talk about the Dream Realm. Do we know if there is going to be anything like a Dream, Occult, or Psychic domain for clerics? Also, I found the occult mystery, is there going to be a dream mystery, or similar for both the oracle and shaman?

I have convinced my wife to hold off running the game, until the OA book comes out. I just can't wait for this book.

You might want to wait a little longer until House on Hook Street comes out, too!

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Miracle spell works miracles.

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Pair the Dancing Girl with the spectre from Heroes & Monsters, an air or water elemental from the Shattered Star series, or the promotional shadowfire elemental and you have yourself a world-class pairing of a spiritualist with her ectoplasmic phantom companion!

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Heh. You know, I *keep trying* to get the base troop statblock into a Bestiary. I think you guys need to show up en masse at GenCon with torches and pitchforks and corner the powers-that-be if you want to see it!

Right now, you can build the statblock from scratch using the monster creation charts in the bestiaries, just like you're building any other creature. Don't get hung up on the fact that it's a group of smaller creatures--just build the creature appropriate for CR, like you're building a giant or something, and use the RMD statblock as a guide to give it abilities like ranged attacks, etc. Keep in mind that the sum is almost always LESS than the total of its parts. After all, if you actually individually rolled attacks and damage for a thousand rat statblocks that are actually in a swarm instead of relying on the adjusted numbers from the swarm statblock, you'd turn a 10th-level PC into a bloody skeleton in a single round. Just roll with the numbers right of the monster creation charts, and apply the subtype when you're done! =-)

Most troops of regular humanoid type creatures are in the 8-12 hit dice range. I haven't really branched out into statblocks of creatures more powerful than, say, humans, goblins, orcs, skeletons, zombies, and lemures, but you could do it for anything, really. It just scales up quick, so I try to reserve it for lower-CR basic creatures to keep them relevant at higher levels as groups of mooks.

ALSO: My friend Charlie Bell wrote several troop statblocks for his "Armies of Cheliax" article in Wayfinder #11. Look it up--he rocked it. I had a chance to review it when he was working on it, and he absolutely nailed it. That gives you a few more statblocks at your disposal.

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That's incorrect, DMW. Due to a class with 54 spirits taking up a huge chunk of the book's wordcount, the number of spirits was scaled down to 6, which each one representing an embodiment of classic heroic archetypes (small "a") which correspond to the six mythic tiers. Jason stated they promise to find a home for the 54 in a future product!

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For the sake of clarity here, I was actually the one that uttered the Occult Bestiary "spoiler" at that seminar, and I was in fact referring to a book that had already been announced: Occult Bestiary, which will be harboring a lot of the creatures cut from Occult Adventures.

Erik and Jason just forgot the book had already been announced, thus the initial confusion...

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So glad to see you join the fold, Amanda!

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Hey folks!

Since the update, it appears the keyword search for the PRD has stopped functioning, and the only search results it returns is "Your search didn't match any items." The result is the same regardless of which part of the site the search is initiated from.

Just letting you know!

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There ya go Marc just volunteered! ;-)

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TriOmegaZero wrote:
Richard, how exactly does one vocalize the noise "m'nar"?

It starts with more of a capital, stentorian "M," short and clipped and popped off the lips with a slightly elevated pitch, followed by a sleazy, drawling exhalation of the "aaaaaaaaaaaaaaar!" (rhymes with car), all done in a 'where the hell is the British backwater this is guy from anyway?' accent.

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Excited to see you join the crew, Linda!!!

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Show them your wreath, Thursty! I mean "WRATH." Yes. Wrath. Not "wreath." That would just be ridiculous.

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Jcat wrote:
He's going to be playing an American Gunslinger. Thank you for your help guys. :)

If he's playing a gunslinger from Earth, I think a magic item shortage for the PC is the last of your problems. The adventure is lousy with machine guns, mortars, grenades, flamethrowers, and practically unlimited ammunition. Jus' sayin'. =-)

PS: But just to review, the pale snipers in G1 have 3 +1 rifles and one has a sniper's helmet, the four C3 locations each have a Maxim of suppressive fire, Lavrenti in E2 has 6 dimensional grenades, a +2 Nagant M1895 revolver, a belt of incredible dexterity +4 , and some other goodies. There is PLENTY in there to outfit an enterprising gunslinger.

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Ashram wrote:
And even then, with your spreadsheets you STILL get math wrong that the players have to fix. Sometimes automating something isn't always a good thing. >.>

Are you suggesting it would be *better* if Paizo didn't have those checks and safeguards in place? Because if you think you've got problems now...

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From a freelancer's perspective, it's actually quite the opposite, and a far cry from "slap a class, rinse and repeat" or "less involved" than our usual Bestiary work.

In fact, I know myself and many freelancers prefer to build from the ground up.

That's because building a monster with NPC classes is actually twice the effort. Even pre-existing monsters have to be plugged into the in-house Paizo statblock spreadsheet, so you essentially have to rebuild the monster from the ground up anyway, even if the info is already published in the base statblock.

Then you have to apply NPC levels, and make sure you use all the proper advancement rules and get the right Key Classes and, in the case of monsters with pre-existing spellcasting abilities, make sure that everything lines up and gels just so. Skills are always confusing, too. It's actually one of the less pleasant freelancing tasks, and I much prefer to build a monster from the ground up than modify an existing one. And it's twice the workload on the development side, too--the developers have to make sure the freelancer plugged in the base monster correctly, AND applied the class levels properly.

I know that's not how we all do it at home, but when you're building a book to be published, from both the freelancer and design team perspective, it's hardly a matter of 'just slapping a few class levels on 'em' and sending them off to the printer.

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I was wrong. It's more of an art than a skill, really.

Think of it this way, folks.

It's as if Paizo announced a book called "Victorian Pulp Adventures," and a thread pops up proclaiming "Steampunk Coming to Pathfinder!"

Despite the designer's best efforts to clarify that the book isn't, in fact, drawing from the steampunk genre: "We won't be doing clockwork men, but you might get Frankenstein. Steam-power and gears won't really be a thing, but vril might! You won't be seeing monocled villains in gear-festoooned top hats and soot-covered goggles with crazy steam cannons in airships, but you might get some From Hell-inspired secret society intrigue!" people still persist:

"So, steampunk, right?"

And no. That would not be accurate. To really push down this yellow brick road, "psionics" are analogous to "steampunk" in this conception (it's a later sci-fi interpretation of a previous historical period's beliefs), and we're going the other way, thanks, and hopscotching one genre to get at the root. *Not that there's anything wrong with steampunk or psionics, mind you.*

Related genres? Yes? Some of the same basic elements, used different ways? Yes. Two different wellsprings of inspiration, even if one is inspired by the other? Yes. Yes. Yes. Exactly.

***Please note this is an analogy, and this analogy should not be overly-construed to mean that Occult Adventures is Paizo's "Victorian Pulp" hardcover. It is not. Wellsprings of information translated into fantasy realms, folks. =-)

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pickin_grinnin wrote:
I still don't understand why they are using the term "Occult" when the book is about psionics.

It's because the book isn't about "psionics." I invite you and others to read my previous post on the historical use of that term and why what we're doing isn't that.

In short, this book is drawing from a different wellspring of inspiration, particularly the Victorian occult revival as embodied by the Golden Dawn, Theosophy, Freemasonry, A∴A∴, Hermeticism, and Modern Spiritualism. As you'll find on the other side of that link,"psionics" is a loaded term with the baggage of not only a later 20th-century age more characterized by the New Age movement, Neo-paganism, and period sci-fi, but also the 3.5 era of living crystals, blurred disciplines, and other themes that just didn't strike us as the sorts of topics we wanted to tackle in this book. And another publisher already did a stand-up job adapting material using those themes, so we're opening up entirely new realms of possibilities here.

And 8th Dwarf--while we can never discount the insane scribblings and twisted ambitions of my listed peers, I know of no such plans at the moment for such a setting, though whispered vows would strike me dead if I did, and shared. =-)

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Sorry, Icehawk--you're just the second poster on this page alone that's jumped to the mistaken conclusion that this book is a "transfer" or "copy/paste" (see here) of 3.5/DSP psionic rules. Which, to be fair, started with this thread's mistaken assumption in its title.

You can catch up on the actual content of this book in any number of announcement threads. (EDIT: or review Tels' ninja'ed overview, above)

Or even kick in your own ideas of what you'd like to see!

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*facepalm*

Reading comprehension, folks. It truly is an invaluable skill.

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137ben wrote:
In this case though they are't actually developing a system, they are copy/pasting a system that is 14 years old. While the mythic rules needed more playtesting before they put out an adventure, these rules have been 'play-tested' for a long time already.

If you have paid the *least* of attention to any single announcement regarding this book, then you'll realize how blatantly mistaken this comment is.

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Awful lot of assumptions in your posts here, Barachiel. Maybe this post will help?

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Nice! Deep Magic takes those vril concepts introduced in Sunken Empires and really explores not only the energy itself, but its utilization by PCs, which is why its so heavy on archetypes and bloodlines and absent of the items that filled Sunken Empires. And I stayed pretty pure to the core of vril's concept, which means most classes indulge in the conversion of arcane energy into the more primitive vril energy, gain some psychic sensitivity, and ultimately sacrifice versatility for blasting power.

Which, ultimately, is why it was hard for us to re-conceptualize vril for Occult Adventures. Vril isn't the most versatile of psychic energies--it's a pretty raw esoteric substance that you can use to blast things, or heal things. Once you take those concepts to their design limits without delving into territory never hinted or explored by Bulwer-Lytton, its hard to revisit without either being unnecessarily redundant or indulging in inaccurate extrapolation. And there's no lack of pulpy concepts for this book to explore--like tulpas, maybe?--that we just deferred to my previous work on vril and moved on to other topics. That's unfortunate for those that might like to have explored it for PFS characters or in games where GMs defer to Paizo-exclusive content, but beyond that, the material's not only there, but written by the same guy who would have written it for Occult Adventures. =-)

I will say this, though--you're certainly on the right track for envisioning the sort of concepts this book explores.

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Ravingdork wrote:
So they are giving it a fantasy vibe rather than a sci-fi vibe? A car made to look like a banana is still a car.

If historic heroics of the Second World War are directly synonymous with Superman saving Metropolis from superpowered alien threats, then sure.

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Ravingdork wrote:

psionic

adjective
pertaining to the telepathic, psychic, or paranormal

psychic
adjective
of or pertaining to the human soul or mind; mental OR outside of natural or scientific knowledge; spiritual OR sensitive to influences or forces of a nonphysical or supernatural nature

They are synonyms. Psychic = Psionic. Ergo, psionics is indeed coming to Pathfinder.

No intended combativeness here, RD, but it is a good chance for me to illustrate the design approach of this book via the syntax differences you illustrate.

Occult Adventures aims to capture a different mood and zeitgeist of a previous age of occult disciplines than did 3.5-era psionics. To confirm 8th Dwarf's inquiry above, I'm serving on this book both as a freelancer and in a high-level design capacity; we haven't yet settled on whether I'll be credited as "creative consultant" or "spirit guide," but you get the idea. =-)

One easy way for me to represent the difference in "psychic" and "psionic" is through one of my professional historical avenues. I'm a board member of a society called IAPSOP: the International Association for the Preservation of Spiritualist and Occult Periodicals. This is a massive online database--an archive of several million pages of digital pdfs of important and historical esoteric works, from weekly Spiritualist newspapers to rare Theosophical books, from the 18th-century right up to the copyright threshold of about the 1950s. Here's a keyword search of that database for the term "psionic." For those of you who don't feel like clicking, there are no hits in a database of millions of hardcore esoteric pages from for the term "psionic".

And that's because that term wasn't coined until 1952, and gained little to no footage among actual practitioners, but instead gained traction with science fiction writers. And that period of esoteric thought and science fiction influences is something that 1E-3.5 era psionics drew from readily, and by default, DSP.

But that's not our wellspring of inspiration with this book. We're plumbing darker depths of historic mysticisms and doctrines. And, as much as that matters, "psychic" and "occult" are the appropriate and correct descriptive buzzwords, and not terms that we view as synonymous with "psionics", the difference of which in fact serve as fantastic separators between the design intentions of this book, and what's already been explored by legacy products and DSP.

For what's it's worth, and for those reasons, there are significant differences, and they're important and distinct to the nature of this tome.

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DrDeth responded to the Vancian concerns pretty well up there^^^.

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Orthos wrote:
I've seen it used by people on the forums, but always in lowercase - thus, at least I presumed, not indicative of an actual name, just a descriptor. I couldn't tell you if it was by a dev or not though, and I'm too lazy to go look it up.
Wicked Woodpecker of the West wrote:
Psychic Mage - I have no idea, but you definitely should rename him, folk. I mean those two part base class names are just... wrong. Definitely wrong. Thank gods they changed Favoured Soul to Invoker.

Would have been more appropriate to have aimed for WotW's post from earlier in the thread. Still very early in the class design phase--we really want to hear what everyone wants to see in this book, but let's not jump to too many conclusions about what's set in stone when we haven't even poured the concrete yet.

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Set wrote:
This has been weirdly understated. I've seen a few references to it, but this is the first link to / direct statement I've seen. Thanks for finding it RD!

There are at least four threads that have been talking about this over the last week.

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