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Lord Soth

Beckett's page

RPG Superstar 2013 Star Voter. FullStar Pathfinder Society GM. 4,822 posts (11,755 including aliases). 25 reviews. 1 list. 1 wishlist. 21 Pathfinder Society characters. 5 aliases.



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Less a players guide to the people of the sands and more of a primer for a handful of locations with little but their general climate in common. Particularly Rahadoum kind of felt out of place (and again. . .?), but with little new ground. It also seems to paint a different picture of Rahadoum than other sources?

I really hate the format (still) and especially in this book those dang Roles. And while it is not a copy/paste, there is little here outside of what has already been presented (multiple times at that) in other books such as the Inner Sea World Guide. There are two Prestige Classes, the reprinted/updated Living Monolith, (meh in my opinion) and the Thuvian Alchemist, (sort of a healer alchemist). Yet another Sorcerer Bloodline (looks like it could make a nasty NPC) and Oracle Archtype (just kind of seems thrown in here). Something I would have liked instead would be options for "desert-based" clerics, cavaliers, paladins, and other classes that are normally more Western European themed. Archtypes to help allow divine casters to be able to play in Rahadoum, or more things along those lines and usefulness.

There are a few items presented, and I'm pretty happy with those, and very surprisingly, the majority of it is actually in the price range that it might be used before Epic Level, too. The highest priced item in the book is the Flying Carpet/Tent @ 90,000 which is actually pretty dang cool, the +5 version of the Ring of the Meh coming in at 50,000, and otherwise the next highest priced gear is the oddly cool signpost at 10,000. Armor Vents are great, as is the little personal heater (burner).

A small selection of spells (mostly reprints I think, but not sure). The centerfold map is kind of cool, but at the same time, I was kind of hoping for something similar to the People of the North, with tis for surviving and playing in that climate. Something this book sadly lacks pretty entirely, and was a large part of what I was hoping for from such a book. All in all, I liked it better than People of the North, but it shares many of the same flaws.


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Interesting, but not very play friendly

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I'm not sure how to rate this. I like reading through it, so in that aspect more like a 4 star. Some of the material I'm not sure about, so in that aspect I'm thinking like a 2 star. I like some of the items and ideas, so maybe a 3 star, but then (with the stuff that follows), I'm finding it hard to go above 3, and that's kind of pushing it. Not because its a poor book, just one I am not sure I will ever really use, (to the point of needing a book for it).

The book mostly focuses on shops that are one of two things mainly; A.) a place to buy things of a certain theme or B.) a place to go that can teach some classes things like Feats or Bard Masterpieces. They are generally both Class and Concept specific, so the Mendev Sarenrae shop is pretty much focused on Inquisitors (and the proprietor, a Cleric, can teach Inquisitors new Inquisitions, . . . wait, what?), and will have basic stuff for divine classes, but no more than any other random shop. Some of them work, some are kind of odd.

All in all, it's one of those sorts of books that I'll probably never ever use, (possibly an item or two later on), but if it ever did come up in a game, it's probably only going to be a single time. It's a bit too specific (for me) to actually use for play, and so in the end was kind of a waste of money. I don't mean that to be harsh, and it is an interesting book, but I just don't use or want a bunch of mini magic marts in game, and I'm thinking that even on the rare occasion where I might use it, much of the fluff and flavor will be wasted on the players.

I was hoping for a little bit more of an Adventure's Armory than an NPC book about magical shops. Some of the material is, (and this greatly depends on what you like in your game), along the same lines as the elephant in the room Gunslingers and the like. Not really for me, but I'm not against others liking it, so I'm mostly neutral on that for this review. One think I would have liked is a lot more 1,000 - 5,000 gp prices gear, both magic and nonmagical. So, so much of the gear in here is more at the 20,000+ range that again it's just never going to be used, and if so, not often enough to warrant buying the book for it. That's how it feels anyway, that could change.

I am really not sure why this is a Player's Companion, and would really have been best placed as a small aside or chapter in a DM related product, (Ult Campaign for example) more than anything, possibly splitting up the gear into something else. It really suffers for being a small book of a bunch of mostly unrelated concepts, and really needs to be bigger and have included more. Another Adventure's Armory or mini Ult Equipment I would have found many times more useful, and much more in line of being a Player's Companion. More shops offering spells (only one does and they, well kind of suck) would have been fantastic. Great concept, but the two included are meh. Would be a great way to implement how to include spells from other similar products though, rather than just throwing them in wholesale.

One last thing I kind of hated about this book (and the more recent Companions) is the set up. It's annoying as all get out that everything is listed all over the place. It makes sense that Alchemists shop would have related gear, but at the same time I would have been so much better to just place everything together in one are. All magic weapons ere, all magic armor there, all feats back there, etc. . . and the individual shops indicating which they have access to. It would both look so much better and also be much more convenient. Visually, the way it is now is kind of tacky/ugly.


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Was ok

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I played a combat focused class, and the vast majority of the time I felt like I had absolutely no effect on things whatsoever. Combats where basically pointless, with the meat of the scenario being all about skills and railroaded around a bit.

The end choice also left the party basically split and nearly led to PvP over what we would do with <redacted>. I've heard some good things from others, but all in all I was not terribly impressed. I pretty much sat there like a 5th wheel the majority of the time, unable to really contribute and generally rolling poorly even to just Aid Another. Meh.


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Easily one of my top 3

*****

<I must apologize I forgot to review it after playing and just now getting to it.>

Amazing scenario, and one that I really hope that all future scenarios try to learn form. The basic story is great, and can honestly be run in a lot of ways, from a basic dungeon delve, to a sort of psychological mystery, to a babysitting expedition similar to the Frostfur Captives, but over a shorter time period. It has two interesting twists, both in your captive and in why they are the way they are, with plenty of promise of reoccurring NPC's, enemies and allies, the promise of a truly epic quest to be completed down the road, access to a truly unique and worthy item, and something very different than the norm. Oh, and after maybe 10 or more scenarios, it is honestly the first I didn't want to do the world a favor and murder Sheila Hiedmarch. Or any VC stooge for that matter. Best part is, it is actually not even a job for Pathfinders, but leads pretty strongly into Season 5. If I could, I would say 6 out of 5 stars, as it truly is a league above, best of the best.
Dragon, check.
Interesting "encounters", check. And a combat or two also. :)
Cool Undead horde. Check.
Super Demon, check.
Awesome angelic maiden ally, check.
Cool epic level magic with subtle world altering ramifications, sure, why not.
Amazing chronicle Sheet. . . Check, check, check.


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I'm not sure I get it

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As much as it does seem to hit the mark, it likewise seems to not just as often. Perhaps Philosophies of the Unfaithful might have been a more appropriate name, as that's what it mostly seems to hit up on.

I see that Paizo also couldn't resisted focusing on the Bard as one of the big four classes covered, but this time I really just don't get it. Why would they focus on Bards, or Monks for that matter, in a book specifically about religions (and anti-religions) and philosophical/spiritual orders?

Typical of many of the Player's Guides, it tends me leave me feeling "that's it?", wishing that certain areas where expanded more, particularly beyond the already published material or flavor, but just not going far enough into the subject. Less Player's Guide material and more almost a brief summary of multiple topics. F&P goes along the same route, retreading Razmiran and Rahadoum without going too much further into other "atheists". I kind of felt the Feats in the particular section are pretty heavy handed. Not entirely sure it's a good idea to undermine some classes main features so strongly. SR 11+ Level for 2 Feats, even if only against Divine and most Outsiders is kind of ridiculous, A feat that can make a Cleric or Paladin doubt themselves and maybe force them to actively Save from even spells they cast on themselves, likewise not cool. Back to Evil getting the good toys.

We have a PFS legal Juju thing, but it's pretty watered down, kind of a Oracle flavored to be a druid/shaman, or a Voodoo analogue.

I'm curious about the point or intent of the centerfold portion. It seems to me an attempt to mock some real world sorts of things, except well in game, it's pretty much entirely correct. Bubblers and Liespinners (Razmiran, most non-divine healing and "cures", and similar things are generally very evil, or at best neutral). There's exceptions, but they generally ARE uncommon exceptions. Atheists and Deniers pretty much are ignorant and blind, but also notably intentionally "bad guys" in the setting (Rahadoum and Razmiran obviously, but the Whispering Way and the River Kingdoms as well).

Spells and Items, in my opinion where kind of "meh". I wished for some more info on Pantheonism, especially the much needed mechanics for it for non-Oracles divine characters, as well as a look at some new, not rehashed Faiths and Philosophies, and religious schisms.


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