Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Owl

Ascalaphus's page

FullStarFullStar Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden. 7,238 posts (7,278 including aliases). 89 reviews. No lists. 1 wishlist. 10 Pathfinder Society characters. 1 alias.


RSS

1 to 50 of 7,238 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Sovereign Court

Arachnofiend wrote:
Ascalaphus wrote:
I'm actually surprised with how rarely this pops up in PFS. 90% of the adventures involve the PCs being in some sort of hurry to get their thing done before enemies get away or finish their scheme. The odd adventure where you actually refresh "dailies" between encounters is a refreshing change of pace.
At the same time very few scenarios actually have that many combat encounters though. Lord knows my Kineticist has had a ton of scenarios where she just sits on her burn for a whole day of adventuring until the obvious final boss shows up and she automatically explodes them. I think I've had exactly one scenario where there were enough encounters of high enough difficulty that I had to manage my resources carefully (Labyrinth of Hungry Ghosts, if you haven't played it you should do so, it's awesome).

I ran Labyrinth last saturday... it was okay, I guess. Not wild about it. Liked the premise and flavour, not so much the exact monsters, stats and tactics chosen to do it.

Most adventures tend to fall neatly into 3-4 encounters with an obvious Boss Room Door, that's true. Though I'm usually too cautious with expending resources anyway. I rather dig scenarios where I go through more than 70% of my prepared spells but they're unusual. The low point was Ghennett Manor Gauntlet where due to overeager barbarians I still have about 70% of my spells un-cast but we had two dead and one melted. It was just me and the Ninja/Paladin looking at each other and we decided that since all the impulsive people were decommissioned, now was the time to do the rest of he stuff properly careful. So I ended that scenario with 4 L4 and 4 L3 spells uncast...

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

James McTeague wrote:
For people who are having trouble with the prep work - would it be helpful if there were a series of short videos/audio files that walked through how to GM a kineticist/occultist/mesmerist/swashbuckler/etc.?

It might be interesting, even if it isn't immediately useful. I've seen occultists and mediums be very effective, but I have no idea what's going on under the hood.

Sovereign Court

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ascalaphus wrote:
DocShock wrote:
The vast majority of animals, aberrations, constructs, magical beasts, fey, dragons, elementals, etc, will never wield an axe or don a suit of plate. There are typically plenty of humanoids in APs, but if someone took power attack and two sunder feats, I certainly wouldn't fault them for making use of it. If your group is sundering spell component pouches and holy symbols too much, well... wizard's convert into arcane sorcerers so easily. And have you noticed how many clerics and oracles have birthmarks these days?
You realized you're posting in the PFS forum right?

Oh, wait, this got shuffled to Advice.

Sovereign Court

DocShock wrote:
The vast majority of animals, aberrations, constructs, magical beasts, fey, dragons, elementals, etc, will never wield an axe or don a suit of plate. There are typically plenty of humanoids in APs, but if someone took power attack and two sunder feats, I certainly wouldn't fault them for making use of it. If your group is sundering spell component pouches and holy symbols too much, well... wizard's convert into arcane sorcerers so easily. And have you noticed how many clerics and oracles have birthmarks these days?

You realized you're posting in the PFS forum right?

Sovereign Court

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Nostrus wrote:
When this is a legitimate tactic permitted by the rules, why would anyone feel it was an exploit or cheating?

It's not cheating, because it's allowed by the rules. It's a bit of an exploit however because most NPCs are so absurdly vulnerable to it. Not because it's hard to protect against, but because NPC statblocks are kept small for page count reasons.

Any somewhat experienced (say, L3+) NPC with pretensions of being an adventurer or mercenary should have invested 5GP in a backup spell component pouch and an 1GP wooden holy symbol to spare. And any warrior should have a backup dagger or two in case he loses his sword. Just like all the PCs do. But they don't, not for realism reasons but for meta reasons (page count, trying to keep statblocks simple, poor writing).

Sovereign Court

People without darkvision, when looking at an enemy in dim light, experience concealment. Concealment causes 20% miss chance.

The ability is written annoyingly, as if everyone got a miss chance from dim light itself, while in reality darkvision is quite common.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

I can say for sure that the sessions where the teamwork really worked have been among my favourite. Where everyone is working together as a well-oiled adventure-stomping machine. Everyone stepping up to aid and cover.

Conversely, sometimes you play with people who constantly get in the way, or are eager to open another day while you want to take a second to sort out the previous one. While one player's excessive caution shouldn't hold a table hostage or slow it to a crawl, neither should another player constantly rob the rest of a chance to buff up or digest what the GM just told them.

So finding a good balance in which there's a bit of give and take and everyone is looking at how to really fit their characters together, it's glorious.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

Andrew Roberts wrote:
Lau Bannenberg wrote:
To Judge a Soul 1 was an awful railroad, especially because you're scripted to fail even if you do everything right, because that's needed for part 2. Hated that. The adventure should never be run separately because it's just a huge downer; it's a little less bad if you run them back to back but even so it's just sour.

(Bolded emphasis mine)

Not sure I entirely agree that the Society should always "win" everything they do. Sure, you can successfully complete a scenario, but that doesn't mean every single factor went according to plan.

The issue I have with it is that there are some things likely to go wrong, but if you prevent those, some out of the blue accident happens to make sure they go wrong all the same for different reasons.

To Judge a Soul 1:
The fight at the dam has a chance to destroy the dam. If you see that coming from a mile away and take steps to prevent it, after the fight the NPC breaks the dam taking out a hidden MacGuffin.

The elven court is a pretty sick place, but if you prevent all the fights from breaking out in which the mirror is supposed to get bumped, then some faceless no-name NPCs do it anyway.

Andrew Roberts wrote:
Lau Bannenberg wrote:
My bigger gripe is with how complicated they are to prep as GM. TJaS2 has an insane end encounter where you need to know class abilities from a different class every round, and Labyrinth of Hungry Ghosts saw me collecting a nearly 20 page statblock/rules summary. For what is really a linear dungeon story-wise.

I don't know anything about Labyrinth, but I have noticed this trend as well. In some ways it is good and in some ways it is bad. I have been loving Season 7's attempt to try new things and honestly love a lot of the outcomes of it (But I love subsystems and mini-games a lot). At the same time, it's hard to run anything from Season 7 cold, which could be an issue.

This is coming from someone who is a huge fan of Season 7's content. I think it is some of the best we've had.

I really like the Indiana Jonesy vibe of smart adventurers that need to be fast, smooth and clever in addition to kicking ass.

As for Labyrinth, I've put my prep on the PFSPREP site and that should save people a lot of work.

Sovereign Court

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I think Threatening Illusion is a case of a feat in a softcover "causing rules" that otherwise wouldn't exist.

CRB > Combat wrote:
Threatened Squares: You threaten all squares into which you can make a melee attack, even when it is not your turn. Generally, that means everything in all squares adjacent to your space (including diagonally). An enemy that takes certain actions while in a threatened square provokes an attack of opportunity from you. If you're unarmed, you don't normally threaten any squares and thus can't make attacks of opportunity.

If illusions can make attacks - regardless of whether those attacks are effective - they can threaten.

CRB > Magic > Illusion wrote:

Figment: A figment spell creates a false sensation. Those who perceive the figment perceive the same thing, not their own slightly different versions of the figment. It is not a personalized mental impression. Figments cannot make something seem to be something else. A figment that includes audible effects cannot duplicate intelligible speech unless the spell description specifically says it can. If intelligible speech is possible, it must be in a language you can speak. If you try to duplicate a language you cannot speak, the figment produces gibberish. Likewise, you cannot make a visual copy of something unless you know what it looks like (or copy another sense exactly unless you have experienced it).

Because figments and glamers are unreal, they cannot produce real effects the way that other types of illusions can. Figments and glamers cannot cause damage to objects or creatures, support weight, provide nutrition, or provide protection from the elements. Consequently, these spells are useful for confounding foes, but useless for attacking them directly.

A figment's AC is equal to 10 + its size modifier.

The way I'm reading this, figments can attack, just that they don't do any damage themselves. They're useless for attacking directly.

Sovereign Court

How does Overrun work?

How does mounted combat work (where do you charge to, where do you stop, what about if your mount has different reach than you)

They're sort of slow-burning; they've remained unclarified for so long that people have given up actually using these things, so the number of questions also goes down.

Sovereign Court

Piccolo wrote:

Gotta question for you guys. For the longest time now, my group has played the Protection From spells like this:

If you are Evil aligned, anyone with the Protection From Evil spell gets the benefits of that spell against you.

Is that correct?

Yes.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

1 person marked this as a favorite.

To Judge a Soul 1 was an awful railroad, especially because you're scripted to fail even if you do everything right, because that's needed for part 2. Hated that. The adventure should never be run separately because it's just a huge downer; it's a little less bad if you run them back to back but even so it's just sour.

Other than that I haven't felt overly railroaded - not anymore than usual, given that these scenarios have to be reasonably straightforward just to make sure most groups can fumble their way to the same ending.

My bigger gripe is with how complicated they are to prep as GM. TJaS2 has an insane end encounter where you need to know class abilities from a different class every round, and Labyrinth of Hungry Ghosts saw me collecting a nearly 20 page statblock/rules summary. For what is really a linear dungeon story-wise.

Sovereign Court

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I kind of agree with "sunder is exploit" in general. While it's something that you could easily protect against as a wizard or cleric by carrying a spare symbol/bag, they rarely do, probably for simplicity or page count reasons. While most players (after seeing it happen once) probably patch over this horrible glaring weakness for a few GP. It's really a case of the enemies having a huge weakness that could be patched for just 10GP - that includes a dagger so they have a backup if their first weapon is sundered.

It just looks like taking advantage of the NPS's statblock being small for page count reasons.

Disclosure: I too have done this. When an enemy starts using quickened true strike/disintegrate, the gloves come off. Then it's time to start sundering everything until you also destroy the bonded item.

Now, bonded items, those do look like a genuine honest sunder target; those were clearly written with weakness in mind. As shown by the serious rules for it. No 5gp backup. And if they're magical, they might have enough HP that you actually need to have some skill at sundering to do it, rather than just "he's a wizard with a dagger, his AoO isn't going to stop me".

Sovereign Court

claudekennilol wrote:
Finlanderboy wrote:
Lau Bannenberg wrote:


- Holy Symbol: stops some spellcasting, stops channel energy. Some priests have tattoos or birthmarks though.

.

in one game we were getting ripped apart by the channel cleric. So I sundered her symbol, and the Dm said she had another one. So my buddy sundered that. Then he shouts "where's your god now!"

I tried that in a certain season 0 level 3 negative channeler vs low tier and the GM basically just said "no" because that wasn't fun for him. I didn't want to kill the NPC and knew that would be the equivalent of incapacitating them. I was playing a barb and knew I could just hit them so I ended up doing that. So I ended up taking away both our fun because he disallowed my action and I killed his NPC. Luckily no one died or it would have mattered.

Just a note. Season 0 clerics don't get channel energy, since they use 3.5 rules.

Sovereign Court

I'm actually surprised with how rarely this pops up in PFS. 90% of the adventures involve the PCs being in some sort of hurry to get their thing done before enemies get away or finish their scheme. The odd adventure where you actually refresh "dailies" between encounters is a refreshing change of pace.

Sovereign Court

Grandlounge wrote:
Admixture vial is something you may want to look in to.

It's never been quite clear to me how that one works: do you keep the extract in the vial after mixing it, or can you pour it over into a disposable one?

If you can't and you have to keep it in the magic vial, that makes it rather inconvenient. You probably need both hands in combat, and just dropping a "simple-looking glass vial" on the floor probably breaks it. If you have to stow it away again you're not gaining that much speed anymore.

Sovereign Court

Try to find some room for Combined Extracts discovery in the future. The ability to activate buffs like Longarm, Shield and Enlarge Person two at a time is really worthwhile.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

I've rarely felt any need for this. Only occasionally when talking with an NPC, it'd be nice if the PCs pick a spokesman who doesn't get overshouted by eager other people while making a more cautious point.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

The improved statblocks are up.

Sovereign Court

Armor is the last possible thing to sunder. Greater Sunder can even be a way to get at someone's HP if their AC far outpaces their CMD.

Instead, the following are great targets:
- Weapon; many NPCs don't carry a backup or are totally specialized in this one.
- Spell component pouch: can have the GM flipping lots of pages to figure out what he can still cast. Doesn't stop everything, notably not escape with Dimension Door. A caster without a pouch is most likely a sorcerer.
- Holy Symbol: stops some spellcasting, stops channel energy. Some priests have tattoos or birthmarks though.
- Arcane Bonded Items: many NPCs don't have familiars so if they're wizards tend to have this. Look for rings and amulets or fancy weapons in the hands of casters.

After that you can start sundering shoes, friendship bracelets, scarves and so forth, if Greater Sunder is your game.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

I'm gonna make some small revisions tomorrow, while running today I noticed a few errors.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

2 people marked this as a favorite.

I've uploaded compiled statblocks and handouts to the PFSPREP site.

I have to say, this is one of the worst scenarios for workload in compiling stats for. Many weird abilities that require looking up.

And Paizo, for the love of Urgathoa, PLEASE PUT ENCOUNTER STATBLOCKS TOGETHER ON ONE PAGE.

Nobody cares about page count or half-empty pages. Everyone cares about flipping back and forth forever.

Sovereign Court

Fear immunity isn't all over the place. It's usually a side effect of mind-affecting immunity (undead, constructs, vermin) which isn't unheard of.

That said, check if your GM allows Hurtful. It's usually good to ask for sign-off when taking something that was banned in PFS.

---

Also, how about asking the GM if you can learn Flyby Attack by the time you gain a Fly spell or dragon wings? With a polearm of choice, Longarm (and maybe Enlarge Person) spell, Power Attack, Furious Focus and (heresy! only if you have spare feats) Vital Strike that gives you a kiting alternative against things you can't outslug in melee. Or when you just need high mobility to dominate many enemies on a big battlefield.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

1 person marked this as a favorite.

These examples don't sound bad to me. Well, depending on how well the bard can sing. If it's awful terrible, don't. If it's funny terrible, go ahead.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

Yeah, let's keep going downwards. I wanna see what all the Leng is about.

Sovereign Court

You should be careful using those diagrams - while helpful, D20PFSRD is not actually an official source. In this case they don't seem to have completely implemented the most "recent" rules change as described here.

Sovereign Court

Most illusions do not have any physical substance. If you actually get "hit" by one, that would give you proof it's fake - automatic disbelief. So a wise illusionist tries to waste as much of people's time as he can before he actually gets the illusions into battle.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

Did I miss something, or should Tzur-Vaal have significant issues with armor and weapon proficiency?

Undead Type wrote:

  • Proficient with its natural weapons, all simple weapons, and any weapons mentioned in its entry.
  • Proficient with whatever type of armor (light, medium, or heavy) it is described as wearing, as well as all lighter types. Undead not indicated as wearing armor are not proficient with armor. Undead are proficient with shields if they are proficient with any form of armor.

So that technically takes care of his proficiencies while "wearing" Ilzinian. Let's assume that he's been in that skin for a couple of days so by now armor proficiency isn't an issue anymore (Ilzinian wears fullplate, so Tzur-Vaal also gets free medium and light proficiency).

He's also learnt to use a longsword, as indicated by his statblock. However, should he possess another PC with other weapons, they'd better be simple.

---

Another thing that hasn't gotten a lot of attention. Tzur doesn't speak common (he's ancient). So he can't really listen in on PC discussions. Important for the GM to keep in mind.

Sovereign Court

I've seen a regular summoner in action who just used the standard action summons, ignored the eidolon. It was still strong.

Sovereign Court

You might want to take a look at the Observer Robot in Lords of Rust p. 88 :)

Sovereign Court

I'd say don't use too many races; it's easier to present a clear concept of a world with say 1-6 races than with 20. So pick only races that you can really use a for a lot of NPCs, not a special snowflake race that you'd only be using once anyway.

Also, figure out which races are "too special" - those don't make good PC races. If any member of that race is so special/powerful/informed about cosmic secrets that it'd be disruptive if a player played one, that's a bad PC race. (By that logic, you probably shouldn't be playing elves in an orthodox Tolkien world..)

Make sure your races are all different enough from each other. Personally I think that between halflings, gnomes, and also dwarves, the "plucky small" niche is a bit crowded. Paizo improved a lot on it by really giving an angle to gnomes (first world, bleaching) and a bit to hafling (slavery etc.). Merely having different stat bonuses isn't enough to justify including a race.

Sovereign Court

The monster tactician is (IMO) over the top - it takes a good thing way too far. I suspect that's also the reason why it's not allowed in PFS.

Sovereign Court

Vital Strike isn't always bad, but you have to know what it's meant for. The design goal (I've been told) is to give you something when full attacking isn't an option. That can be due to surprise rounds, having to move before attacking, and other stuff like that. It was never meant to replace full attacks, but to give something back if you can't.

Sovereign Court

I'd say that making it through the first encounter is worth XP - you are experiencing the haunt, after all. Encountering it again, not so much. Final destruction could be awarded with story/quest XP.

Sovereign Court

I'm pretty sure it's supposed to only be usable once per level per day, just like Stunning Fist.

And I've recently seen it in action, and it's a really powerful ability, much more than Stunning Fist actually.


  • It triggers quite often, especially from L4 onwards when you can defend your allies. This gets you around a traditional tanking problem when enemies ignore the tank.
  • It can stop an entire attack routine, if you move an enemy far away enough. Particularly if the enemy had already moved, cuz then he can't even take a 5ft step to get back to continue a full attack.
  • You can move enemies into positions they don't want to be, during their turn, and then still take a 5ft step on your turn. That's a significant time/action gain when trying to set up flanks or get out of a recurring flanking pattern against you.
  • If enemies are trying to gang up on you, you may be able to move the first attacker so that the other attackers don't get enough room to cluster on you.
  • You can break off a flank before the other flanker also gets to use it.

Compared to Stunning Fist, which rarely goes off (because who can afford wisdom high enough to penetrate Fort saves while keeping physical abilities high enough to hit reliably?), it's an extremely good trade.

Sovereign Court

A big thing druids as healers lack is the ability to spontaneously convert other spells into healing spells. That's an underestimated ability that allows normal (good-ish) clerics to prepare "interesting" spells without losing out on healing power. A druid on the other hand has to make much more tradeoffs on how much slots to spend on preparing cure spells.

So even if you get access to important spells, you'll still be less flexible than a cleric because you need to make a harder split in resources.

Sovereign Court

Well, it says that it "radiates" darkness, and normally rays travel in straight lines. So I don't think darkness radiates around corners.

Yeah, your anti-shadow idea is interesting. A way for a rogue to have light to do his lockpicking without broadcasting his presence to all and sundry.

Sovereign Court

@Mauve: that's not really helpful since it's neither.

Darkness works like, well, darkness and light. It's simplest to think of Darkness as radiating anti-light like some sort of weird black lightbulb that makes everything darker. Anything that would block a ray of light blocks a ray of anti-light.

Could also be done with a bullseye lantern, I'd think.

Sovereign Court

Note that rust monsters can (and will) rust metals other than iron. It may be worth it for players to toss a few handfuls of coins at the monsters to distract them for a couple of rounds so they can avoid being swarmed themselves. Pick off the monsters one by one or hide behind the druids/monks.

I've also seen a magus protect his new shiny adamantine scimitar by distracting the beast by tossing it all his old backup weapons one by one until he could make it to hiding behind my zen archer.

Also, Make Whole can help recover some lost items.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

Terminalmancer wrote:
Michael Hallet wrote:
Terminalmancer wrote:
The idea's to get them to go where they need to without making it seem like the wizard has wasted his purchase, right? I personally would tend to say the balance is at letting the spell bypass one of the three challenges.
Yeah, which is why I'm a bit disappointed that it ends up being a bit of a trap option. By waiting out the storm, they will forgo the ability to secure the tarp which ends up making their initial investigation harder.
I'm not sure that's a flaw with the scenario so much as it's a flaw with the plan, though. Pathfinders should learn that speed is important sometime!

It's a bit of a genre savvy thing. If the natural world seems to be conspiring to hurry you along, then you should probably start fastening your shoelaces, rather than digging your heels in.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

dragonhunterq wrote:

First step is to define what you mean by "role-play"?

How are you going to define it in such a way that isn't going to come across as "how do we get people to play more like how I want them to play?".?

Could you explain this a bit more for me? It's not something I've experienced myself (that I noticed/can remember), but you're not the first to raise the subject. So it seems like this a concern that more people have.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

2 people marked this as a favorite.

You can't ensure RP as the GM, but you can certainly help a lot in making it happen. It's so much easier to get going if it's coming from both sides, so if the GM also talks back enthusiastically, that really helps.

Stuff you can do as a GM to make that easier is to take a moment while prepping a scenario to read up just a little bit more about the Golarion lore related to the places and people features. And make sure you understand what the NPCs want; that way you can really engage with the player if he's making an unexpected pitch, because you can figure out what the NPC might like/dislike about the offer.

You can take some initiative as a GM; instead of saying "the merchant asks what you're here for", you can sit up straight, look at the player and say "So, what business do you have with me?" Addressing people IC can help get them to respond in kind.

However, be careful how far you take this. The big complication we run into with RP-heavy scenarios is finishing on time. Getting to play the whole scenario, and not rushing the ending, are important. It's a shame if the ending contains some heartwarming part where the NPCs express what the PCs' successes mean to them, but nobody's paying attention anymore and the GM just rattles through it to get to the boons.

Also, try to be open to people who're not great IC talkers but who still engage with the story. If someone says "I'm going to try to convince the merchant to help us", he may not be comfortable playing it out. But you can still ask him "are you offering him any specific reasons to help convince him?". That shifts it a bit from the playing being eloquent, to the player paying attention to the story and having gotten an idea of what to offer the NPC based on what the players found out about him during the adventure so far. This kind of engagement is also very nice and should be embraced as well.

Sovereign Court

dragonhunterq wrote:

relevant FAQ is relevant free actions are normally only on your turn.

Also free actions that another legitimate action is dependent on should be usable off turn - such as drawing ammunition.

This is the important one. Most free actions can only be done on your own turn, except talking. However, free actions that have to happen at specific times (like a free grab after a bear takes an AoO) can happen out of turn if the occasion comes up.

Sovereign Court

Pizza Lord wrote:

A large-sized creature with a reach of 10 feet will typically double this with a reach weapon allowing them to attack out to 15 or 20 feet away, but not within 5 or 10 feet.

Ascalaphus wrote:
Imagine your fighter was enlarged but then his favourite lucerne hammer got disarmed. He picks it back up, but it's shrunk down to medium size. What area does the fighter threaten with it now?

In this case, your large-sized fighter would only threaten in his normal reach, within 5 or 10 feet. He would still be able to use its other traits; brace, +2 CMD to sunder medium and heavy armor, etc. This is covered in the rules for reach weapons. Wraithstrike mentioned it above but here's the PRD quote:

Reach Weapons wrote:
Glaives, guisarmes, lances, longspears, ranseurs, and whips are reach weapons. A reach weapon is a melee weapon that allows its wielder to strike at targets that aren't adjacent to him. Most reach weapons double the wielder's natural reach, meaning that a typical Small or Medium wielder of such a weapon can attack a creature 10 feet away, but not a creature in an adjacent square. A typical Large character wielding a reach weapon of the appropriate size can attack a creature 15 or 20 feet away, but not adjacent creatures or creatures up to 10 feet away.
Sorry, I have no underline format, so hopefully you saw the italicized 'of the appropriate size' in the bolded section. Since the reach weapon is not an appropriate size for the creature wielding it, it no longer grants the benefits. This may cause some players to cry foul, such asking why a large-sized longspear doesn't give them reach, the answer is probably that due to the size difference and weight balance issues, they can't hold it properly and use it as easily (like stairs made for giants and stairs made for halflings, they're both stairs, but tough to use for a human.) This also prevents a human from dual-wielding tiny longspears (for the reach) or something similarly awesome/weird.

That's an interesting detail. I guess that would mean that the reach of a creature using an inappropriately sized weapon is "undefined".

Sovereign Court

Imagine your fighter was enlarged but then his favourite lucerne hammer got disarmed. He picks it back up, but it's shrunk down to medium size. What area does the fighter threaten with it now?

Sovereign Court

I think some classes just need a huge warning sticker on them, NEVER RELY ONLY ON ONE ELEMENT. Just because it's allowed by the rules to make such a character, doesn't mean it's a good idea.

There's nothing wrong with being especially good at an element, but you should probably listen to the GM's recruitment pitch for the campaign before actually choosing a preferred element.

Sovereign Court ** Venture-Agent, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

claudekennilol wrote:
Jayder22 wrote:
It can only be fire damage, no options for changing to another element if the target resists or is immune to fire
Are you sure about that?

Interesting find.

Sovereign Court

The Steel Refrain wrote:
I'd probably go Dwarf over Aasimar in that case though, but that's just because I'm a traditionalist like that... ;)

Dwarves are a fine cleric race as well (Hardy and Stability are both good racial abilities) although you lose out a little on channeling, just when Herald Caller actually makes you good at channeling around corners to help your heralds. Though if you're willing to do without channeling you can also save on Charisma.

Sovereign Court

Apsu is a nice one, gives you access to Divine Barrier.

Sovereign Court

Let's take a look at an Aasimar Herald Caller of Torag. Our aim will be to stay out of melee so we'll employ spells at range and summon monsters to stand between us and the enemy (in case the other PCs fail in this). We'll also be providing mass buffing. The following is just a quick sketch.

Abilities post-racial, using stock Aasimar +2 Wis +2 Cha:
Str 7
Dex 10
Con 14
Int 12
Wis 20
Cha 16

Traits:
Magical Lineage (Burst of Radiance, or Chains of Light)
Wayang Spell Hunter (Burst of Radiance)

Feats
1 Selective Channel
3 Persistent Spell
4B Augment Summons
5 Sacred Summons
7 Dazing Spell
8B Superior Summons
9 Angelic Blood
11 Angelic Wings
13 Quickened Spell
15 Spell Perfection (Burst of Radiance, or Chains of Light)

As a Herald Caller of a deity with the Earth Domain we're allowed to summon Earth Elementals and communicate with them as if sharing a common language. They hit pretty hard. As a LG cleric we can also summon archons as a standard action with Sacred Summons, significantly increasing the chance our summon spells really go off. Lantern Archons can remain viable at many levels especially when you start summoning whole swarms of them. They can be buffed by bards, too, in which case they become quite absurd.

Burst of Radiance and Chains of Light are absurdly good attack spells. We might drop some of the metamagic though and instead get Spell Penetration and Summon Good Monsters to get more archon choices.

1 to 50 of 7,238 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

©2002–2016 Paizo Inc.®. Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours: Monday–Friday, 10 AM–5 PM Pacific Time. View our privacy policy. Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc., and Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Online, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.